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  1. #1
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    Yeti SB5c vs SB6c?

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    Last edited by dglove; 08-11-2014 at 10:27 AM.

  2. #2
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    Re: Yeti SB5c vs SB6c?

    Quote Originally Posted by dglove View Post
    It's fun to monster-truck sections, but I prefer fun/flickability. This led me to consider 650b, and I headed out to a demo day.
    Dude. If you like fun and flickability you should definitely check out the Endurad 559 wheels size. Stiffer, lighter, stronger, and cheaper (when do you ever get all four of those properties!?) than 650b, and more flickablily than you can shake a flikability stick at.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iscariot View Post
    Dude. If you like fun and flickability you should definitely check out the Endurad 559 wheels size. Stiffer, lighter, stronger, and cheaper (when do you ever get all four of those properties!?) than 650b, and more flickablily than you can shake a flikability stick at.
    Hardy har....

    If anyone has comments on travel/geo I'd would appreciate it, otherwise I'll delete this thread.

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    I've had a similar experience on a longer travel 29 (not an SB95). Gobbled everything moab could throw at me but in the end just felt like I was riding a tank and missing some of the handling characteristics of a smaller wheel. I'm 5'8" and do think there is something to be said of rider height as it relates to appropriate travel, wheel size, geo, etc TAKEN TOGETHER! Folks who want a Yeti (now), myself included, are in a very interesting situation especially with some 66s still floating around at a killer deal. My take is the new 6c will be what some 66 owners did to the stock builds to build them bigger (fox 36, etc.) while the sb5 is going to (going on a limb here) replace what others did to the 66 to keep them light and trail-oriented. I'd be interested to hear more about the demo on the 5...

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    Quote Originally Posted by ugly View Post
    I've had a similar experience on a longer travel 29 (not an SB95). Gobbled everything moab could throw at me but in the end just felt like I was riding a tank and missing some of the handling characteristics of a smaller wheel. I'm 5'8" and do think there is something to be said of rider height as it relates to appropriate travel, wheel size, geo, etc TAKEN TOGETHER! Folks who want a Yeti (now), myself included, are in a very interesting situation especially with some 66s still floating around at a killer deal. My take is the new 6c will be what some 66 owners did to the stock builds to build them bigger (fox 36, etc.) while the sb5 is going to (going on a limb here) replace what others did to the 66 to keep them light and trail-oriented. I'd be interested to hear more about the demo on the 5...
    Really interesting insight regarding the two different SB66 builds.

    Any specific questions about the demo? I rode the SB5c for about an hour and didn't want to give it back...

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    Ya I can't take credit for the insight as it was pointed out to me like that from someone else but I agree with it. How would you compare the sb5 to the 66 (assuming you've rode one). My predicament is I can get a carbon 66 now at $4k.

  7. #7
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    There's a really good discussion of exactly this topic in this thread:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/yeti/yeti-sb5...ty-922454.html

    Start around post #200, and read down from there.

    (TL;DR Summary: for most people, the SB5 will be the best all-around bike. If you're looking for a purebred enduro racer with super low/slack geo, the SB6 would be the weapon of choice)

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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    There's a really good discussion of exactly this topic in this thread:
    http://forums.mtbr.com/yeti/yeti-sb5...ty-922454.html

    Start around post #200, and read down from there.

    (TL;DR Summary: for most people, the SB5 will be the best all-around bike. If you're looking for a purebred enduro racer with super low/slack geo, the SB6 would be the weapon of choice)

    JP
    Thanks, JP.

    I will be looking into the SB5C. After watching a lot of Enduro videos and Reading JP comments, it seems the SB6C is more a mini downhill bike. Where I live, Climbing is more important. A lot of punchy climbs, even the singletracks fast flowing requires a lot of pedaling input because of rocks and roots. Our Downhills are fast but short.

    It would nice if they can stock the SB5C with a 150mm fork instead of 140mm.

    Thanks.

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    I'd wait to see the leverage curve of the SB6C. My guess is that the SB6C will be more progressive than the SB5C and be designed to plow through rougher tracks while staying more composed - as opposed to skip over the terrain, but feel nervous/skittish when really pushed.

    If so, then it really should depend on which feel you'd prefer for your local trails.

  10. #10
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    Tough to draw any conclusions on a bike that hardly anyone has had a chance to ride yet.

    That said, I used to own an SB-66c set up as more of a burly all-mountain bike: Fox 36, carbon haven wheels, 1x transmission, dropper post, and wide bar. That bike was insanely fun, both uphill and down. However, I jumped on the 650B bandwagon, and got a Santa Cruz Bronson.

    Just looking at the numbers, the bike should be a slightly more modern version of the SB-66: a bit slacker HT, steeper ST, and longer reach. But its pretty close. I'm seriously considering the SB6c or a new Nomad as my next bike, mainly because I'm on a L Bronson now that seems way too compact. I'd like something a bit longer and more stable.

    I've ridden a few similar 6" travel bikes lately, and these bikes seem to have come into their own right now. If the SB6c isn't a damn good bike, it will face some stiff competition from bikes like the Nomad, Enduro, Kona Process, and Norco Range. There are just a ton of good bikes in that genre that pedal well but rip on descents.

  11. #11
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    I agree,

    i really want the 6 but with all the rocks and accents I'm think I may go wit a 5
    Hmmm
    Maybe a 6 if I was still n my 20's or 30's

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    Like a lot of people, I'm sitting between two chairs!!! SB5C or SB6C?
    I now own a SB66a, which I love but, want to go for 27.5 and carbon.

    For home trails for sure the 5c is better but I often go to the Alps(Morzine,les Gets...)for enduro riding and in La Bresse for some courses of enduro riding with Rémy Absalon.
    Where the 6c will be more approprieted.
    A lot of you goes for the 5c with a 150mm 36, but want about a 6c with a 150mm 36 for home trails that I push to 160-170mm when going to the Alps??? (what's easy to do whit the new 36).
    JP, is the 6c rideable a 150mm 36? (lower bb height) Will it help to climb better?

    Ho,and sorry for that, can't buy both... ;-((

    Thanks

  13. #13
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    I've never tried it, but I assume a 6c with a 150 would feel pretty damn similar to a 6c with a 160 (I think the HA would change by 0.5 degrees and the BB would lower by a few mm).

    I can say that I rode the 5c pretty thoroughly through the Alps last summer, and it was an incredibly capable machine for the job. It's climbing capabilities are already well-documented here, and it was everything I needed on 99% of the descending I did.

    I think you'd probably be happier in the long run with a 5c, but I understand that the 6c is pretty damn tempting from a pure passion point of view...
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    Hi JP,
    Thanks for this fast answer.
    Did you run the 5c with a 150mm 36 in the Alps?

    regards,

    Frédéric

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    I got the 6c and it honestly climbs better than my Santa Cruz Blur LT does. I don't think you're giving up all that much efficiency between the 6c and 5c. If you aren't doing big, rough stuff all that often, the 5c is probably more appropriate and you'll work a little less, but I don't think you'll regret either. I'm in So Cal and most of my trails are probably better served on a 5c, but I don't regret my decision one bit.

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    I ended up going with the SB5c X01 build. I test rode both, sadly just around the JensonUSA parking lot and street only, but the SB5c fit me better than the SB6c, I'm 6'1. Now in all fairness I'm coming off of a Stumpy hard tail and wanted to make my next bike the only bike I would need for a long while. I fully planned on taking the SB6c home, but on the day the SB5c cried out my name, and I fell in love instantly. So far I haven't found any limitations with the 5" travel and I hope that doesn't change anytime soon. I highly recommend installing a stealth dropper post. Obviously this is my first long travel bike, so I'm not a good judge of what a bike should ride like compared to others in similar travel. But I must say, this bike is amazing. I think it climbs as well, if not better than my old hard tail. I have such confidence on the trail, both up hill and down hill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by benfocused View Post
    I ended up going with the SB5c X01 build. I test rode both, sadly just around the JensonUSA parking lot and street only, but the SB5c fit me better than the SB6c, I'm 6'1. Now in all fairness I'm coming off of a Stumpy hard tail and wanted to make my next bike the only bike I would need for a long while. I fully planned on taking the SB6c home, but on the day the SB5c cried out my name, and I fell in love instantly. So far I haven't found any limitations with the 5" travel and I hope that doesn't change anytime soon. I highly recommend installing a stealth dropper post. Obviously this is my first long travel bike, so I'm not a good judge of what a bike should ride like compared to others in similar travel. But I must say, this bike is amazing. I think it climbs as well, if not better than my old hard tail. I have such confidence on the trail, both up hill and down hill.
    Ben,

    This is Josh, the guy that pulled up to ask you about the a Yeti when you were about to hit the Backbone at Will Rodgers. How did the ride go? That is a pretty steep climb there for a while. Are you on a Large?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullit21 View Post
    Ben,

    This is Josh, the guy that pulled up to ask you about the a Yeti when you were about to hit the Backbone at Will Rodgers. How did the ride go? That is a pretty steep climb there for a while. Are you on a Large?
    Josh,

    Ride went great! This thing climbs like a freaking champ! It was a great ride, nice little 21 miles round trip. Yes, I'm on a large.

  19. #19
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    Just my 2cents, but if the 6c climbs so well, why not take the slight weight and climbing disadvantage of the 6c vs the 5c, to get the better descender? I ride a SB95c with 150 Pike and absolutely love my bike, but I would like a little more travel in the rear. A 29" wheel is going to "make up" for less travel, but the 27" (cuz its not really 27.5") doesn't have that same effect really. Sure most 5" bikes can be ridden by a good rider on pretty much any trail, but generally speaking, its faster and more controlled in the rough with a bike that has more travel. I guess I just dont get the bike shops and bike makers who push smaller bikes and say "you don't really need 150mm of travel on these trails." Sure, take it a step further, you don't really need anything but a SS full rigid to ride most trails, but what is the most fast (fast=fun to me) way to ride down that gnar? In a perfect world, if I had tons of money, I'd have a 120mm bike and a 160mm bike, but with only one bike, I want the bike that is least limited on the DH. If I was to have my SB95c stolen, I'd be going for the SB6c all day long.

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    Different strokes... I would give up an inch to gain a bit more in uphill pedaling. Most of my rides are between 3k-4k of climbing so giving up just a little means a lot.

    I havent ridden the SB6 but Im weary of what some people consider a great climber. I myself am not a great climber. I rode the Pivot Mach 6, which is supposed to be a great climber, and was just zapped on my regular rides.

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    Marc.t,

    Dickbrown is right, it's different strokes for different folks.

    As I previously mentioned above, I wanted the 6c, but the 5c just felt better under me. Some days I wonder if I'll miss the extra travel and slightly slacker build down the road, but as of now, I don't miss it at all. I think both are great bikes and you can't go wrong with either, you just have to find which one fits you best and fits your riding best. Now on the topic of running out of suspension travel, I can tell you that hasn't been a problem yet. I've bottomed my 5c, and the only reason I ever knew it was because of the rubber ring on the shock. You never feel a bottoming out with the Switch Infinity system. I've never ridden a 95 or 66 so I don't know how well the original Switch system worked when you maxed out your suspension, but the SI makes it feel like you just keep going. So basically I think it's less of a suspension travel question and more of a angles question. If the slacker angles work for you, then great grab up the 6c instead. Also down the road you can always slack out a 5c some more with a 150mm on the front. Doubt I ever will, but the option is there.

    Where I ride on a daily bases you climb as much as you descend and I really do enjoy how well the 5c climbs. I will say I think it's ability to climb so well is in large part because of the SI, not just the angles, which is why I'm sure the 6c is a great climber, if not the best climber, in it's travel class.

    Yeti markets the 5c as BOTH a Trail Bike and a Enduro Bike, and I think that's a very fair assessment of just how well-rounded it can be.

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    Gotcha, for me, I look at it like this: 3-4k feet a day of climbing is typical #enduro races, and typical for most avid riders (or at least the ones I know). Personally, I wish my SB95c had 140mm in the rear. Hoping to get a little more out of the rear end with a DB Inline. I just don't see a 5" 650b bike being "enduro." Its a solid trail bike through and through, akin to the Camber Evo or the Santa Cruz 5010. Anywho, the more bikes the better! That 6c is just so bonerifically gorgeous though...

    EDIT: running out of suspension travel is primarily a function of air PSI in the rear shock. If you had 150mm in the rear, you could theoretically have a more plush ride both on small and large bumps/hits. IE, the less travel you have on the more gnarly terrain, the more air you need to not bottom out and the more harsh the ride. Also, on chunky turns where you want to drop your outside foot, you often cant on the smaller bike without pedal strikes, which means you probably can't take the turn as fast as a larger bike because you aren't able to properly weight the bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by marc.t View Post
    That 6c is just so bonerifically gorgeous though...
    1000% TRUE FACT! One main reason I really wanted the 6c to fit a little better on me, those damn simple, sexy lines. I love my 5c lines, but still those 6c lines on a scale of 1 to 10 are an outstanding 11.

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    I am now trying to figure this out for myself. I don't know if now that a few more months have passed more people have been able to ride both. I currently have a sb66c with a 150 pike up front. If I do go for the SB5c I will most likely use a 150 pike as well. I live in the Bay Area and also have a hard tail that I do most of my XC rides on. I am leaning towards the 6c, but would like a little input if anyone has any. Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by twschiess View Post
    I am now trying to figure this out for myself. I don't know if now that a few more months have passed more people have been able to ride both. I currently have a sb66c with a 150 pike up front. If I do go for the SB5c I will most likely use a 150 pike as well. I live in the Bay Area and also have a hard tail that I do most of my XC rides on. I am leaning towards the 6c, but would like a little input if anyone has any. Thanks.
    I have an SB5c with a 150 Pike. My hardtail is so lonely I took it apart to rebuild.

    I havent ridden the SB6 but I have read everything. If your looking for as close to a do it all bike as you can get go SB5. If you want a downhill spaceship go SB6.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dickbrown View Post
    I have an SB5c with a 150 Pike. My hardtail is so lonely I took it apart to rebuild.

    I havent ridden the SB6 but I have read everything. If your looking for as close to a do it all bike as you can get go SB5. If you want a downhill spaceship go SB6.
    What Dick said certainly aint false, but I think it varies a bit based on perspective. I have the SB6, never tried the SB5. The SB6 is the best "do it all" bike I've ever owned. I typically have a trail bike and a big bike. After riding the SB6 for a while, I won't be selling my big bike..

    I don't doubt the SB5 might be quicker point A to point B sometimes, but I am not feeling that the SB6 is slow. I notice the Yeti enduro guys, Graves and Rude anyway ,seem to be riding the SB5 a lot, so obviously it handles well. I certainly can't ride like them....

    But, that perspective I mentioned, well I prefer to buy a bike biased to fun, not efficiency. 120mm just does'nt make me all hot and bothered. 150mm is where I like to be.

    I personally disagree that the SB6 is a downhill spaceship, it pedals excellent, no worse and probably slightly better than my HD did. Few more pedal strikes, and its longer so you do need to use some more body english in the tights, but man it rides 100% better than my HD did for me. Obviously others will have the opposite opinion, and thats fine, just keep in mind that some of us think the SB6 be perfect for all day rides.

    I routinely get out for 30 and 40 mile trail rides on my flat pedal, 800mm bar having 30 lb sled. (now with the SB6 its 27lbs!!) No complaints. I definitely make it to the top after some of my friends that take the climbs seriously, my perspective just differs. I like to let it all hang out on the descent, and that SB6 sure does that well!!

    Like I said, Dick aint wrong, and for a lot of folks he is absolutely correct. For a lot of riders the SB6 is a downhill spaceship. So, just be honest with yourself about what you want out of a bike.

    Sorry that was so long!!

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    I really appreciate the insight. Thanks. I am definitely leaning towards the SB6. I am usually in no hurry to get to the top, but always in a hurry to get down.

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    Quote Originally Posted by twschiess View Post
    ...but always in a hurry to get down.
    Definitely get the SB6c then. It is an incredibly efficient climber.

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    I see your point Subydoo. You really can't compare bikes by what you read. I rode a Mach 6 during my search and found it to pedal quite poorly, for me. Everything you read says that is a pedal friendly bike. But not for me.

    The SB6 wasn't out (or at least was a Yeti in the woods) when I was buying so thats why I never rode it. But after the Mach 6 test ride I decided that the 130mm range was the sweet spot for me. Maybe I would have felt different after riding the SB6.

    I can say that the SI on the 5 is brilliant. So brilliant that it feels way better climbing with the shock wide open. You can actual feel the rear tire push into the ground. No bobbing unless standing and even then its minimal. If the SI on the 6 is the same then I should have ridden one. I just couldnt wait.

    Everyone has an opinion. You will get hot and cold opinions about everything on this site from bikes to components to drink mixes. In the end you have to see for yourself.
    You have to ride it first. I had to go to Colorado (from Socal) to ride the Yeti. And I walked away with a deposit on one. Told myself I wouldn't buy a bike without riding it first.

    Everyone here is right. I love my 5. Subydoo loves his 6. Dudes love their ASR's.

    Its a Yeti. You're gonna love it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dickbrown View Post

    Everyone here is right. I love my 5. Subydoo loves his 6. Dudes love their ASR's.
    Amen Brother!! Like you mentioned earlier, different strokes...

    And the SI on the 6 is also brilliant. Put in some good miles already, St George, Moab, Fruita, SLC, Hood River, Castle Rock, have not even taken it out of descend mode yet!!

    Heading back to the PNW this week to ride some more dirt, can't wait!!

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    All great opinions on the two bikes. For those of you that have a 6c/ridden one, did it ever feel like too much bike, to the point where maybe the 5C might have been a better option. I am moving to the PNW and am afraid if I went with the 6C it may be too much bike at times. Thanks

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    When I demoed the 5 and 6 (I had to demo the 5 twice to make sure), I had each for a 2-3 days so I could hit a few different trails. I made sure to take both of them on some "boring" trails, and always had fun on both. The 6c on the angry downhill was what made the difference. I felt confident knowing how beefy that thing was. The 5 was fantastic downhill, but the 6 made me feel like I REALLY knew what I was doing. ON RAILS.
    '16 Yeti SB6c - spruced up a bit
    (on the way: Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead)

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    No - I was worried about this when I bought my 6c too. I was coming from a Mojo HD, which works great for my trails here in NorCal, but thought that the 6c might be "too big".

    Don't get me wrong, it IS a little bigger, and requires slightly more finesse/muscling on tight switchbacks - but besides that, it is better both up and DEFINITELY down than my HD is!

    I kept my HD cause in case the SB6c was too big for my local trails, figuring I would use the 6c for trips to Downieville or Santa Cruz, but this has just not been the case. My HD is collecting dust in my garage, and I take my 6c everywhere!

    ***
    EDIT: I also used my Mojo HD last year at BC Bike Race, and it was great for those trails. I would LOVE to take my 6c out there and give it a rip! I suspect it would be absolutely, positive awesome.

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    Ok, so it looks like I am going the sb6. Now the question is if I go with a pike 160 or the Fox 36? Also the Turquoise or Raw? How is the paint holding up on the turquoise?

    I am also thinking of the Ibis carbon wheels. Are wide rims all they are cracked up to be?

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    I really like the color of my turquoise, but not gonna lie - the paint scuffs and scratches very easily. I am sure it is a thin layer of paint in order to keep the weight down. Definitely put clear vinyl stickers over any of the places where the cables rub or it'll scuff in literally 2 rides.

    You can't go wrong with either fork. I had a Pike on my Mojo and loved it, and a Fox 36 on my Yeti and love it. I think the Pike is a smoother fork on small bumps and stutter stuff, but feels like it looses touch on faster and chunkier and bigger hits. The Fox does not feel quite as "magic carpet" on the small bumps/stutters, but feels definitely more composed and stiffer when it gets rowdy and fast.

    I have not used the Ibis carbon wheels, but I'm running a set of Derbies on both my Mojo and my Yeti and I love love LOVE these wheels. They are light (wheelset is 1660g with I9 hubs and sapim spokes), and the performance is pretty incredible. Takes a little while to nail down the pressures - I am currently running about 4-6psi lower than I would for "normal rims" . . . but once you get it dialed, hold on tight! Crazy amounts of grip, and no burping or squirm.

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    Would throwing a Dual-Air Pike on a SB6c seem sacrilegious? I was thinking the 130mm travel setting might be nicer for sustained climbs.

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    I can't imagine lowering the bb on an sb6c while climbing over rocks....it's already low enough. I think it climbs fine at 160mm up front.

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    You cannot go wrong with both bikes, just go with the one that suits your style, or type of riding. I demo'd an SB5 and loved it, amazing bike, fast fun trail bike, that would take you down the steep stuff if you wanted, very good efficient climber, but knew that the 6 was going to be more suited to my riding, there was no demo available for the 6 so I bought a sb6 frame off the back of the sb5 feel, crazy i know, it went against every gut feeling not to demo before I buy but I thought the 5c is so good the 6c can't be a dogs dinner. I have absolutely no regrets, just built it up and hand a couple of rides out, and it has blown me away, super efficient climber particularly as I am coming from an active horst link bike, and just a fast turning monster on the downs. I would be happy to ride it all day on big xc days out, blast EWS style trails, uplift, some/most downhill, the lot. no more dreaming / feeling the need for other bikes.

    This is my first post so hello, and there is something very special about Yeti's

  39. #39
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    BC Bike Race

    Quote Originally Posted by dacarbon View Post
    No - I was worried about this when I bought my 6c too. I was coming from a Mojo HD, which works great for my trails here in NorCal, but thought that the 6c might be "too big".

    Don't get me wrong, it IS a little bigger, and requires slightly more finesse/muscling on tight switchbacks - but besides that, it is better both up and DEFINITELY down than my HD is!

    I kept my HD cause in case the SB6c was too big for my local trails, figuring I would use the 6c for trips to Downieville or Santa Cruz, but this has just not been the case. My HD is collecting dust in my garage, and I take my 6c everywhere!

    ***
    EDIT: I also used my Mojo HD last year at BC Bike Race, and it was great for those trails. I would LOVE to take my 6c out there and give it a rip! I suspect it would be absolutely, positive awesome.

    So dacarbon if you have experience with the BC Bike Race how do you think the SB6c would go? I did it last year on a Nomad with an older 36 and the 36 really sucked the life out of me! Plan to do it again next year and am looking for a new steed!

    Is the 6c the way forward... or a 5c?

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    Anyone using a MRP Stage fork on their SB's? I'm hearing really great things about this fork...

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    I think my answer of 6c vs 5c for BCBR depends whether or not you are doing the race for funsies, or if you actually seriously care about your time/place. If I was doing it for fun . . . 6c, hell yea! I would love to try my 6 down Rupert's, Hoods in the Woods, Bucket of Blood, Half-nelson etc etc! I think it would be totally fine in the transitions and the technical climbing is certainly good enough to justify the fun from downhilling.

    If was racing for time/place tho . . . I'd use a 5c. Lighter, probably a bit more efficient, and stick a Fox 34 on the front for a climb mode that would not suck energy out of you - it would be a much better trail race bike, esp on those gravel transitions on some of the middle stages.


    Quote Originally Posted by diranne View Post
    So dacarbon if you have experience with the BC Bike Race how do you think the SB6c would go? I did it last year on a Nomad with an older 36 and the 36 really sucked the life out of me! Plan to do it again next year and am looking for a new steed!

    Is the 6c the way forward... or a 5c?

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by dacarbon View Post
    I think my answer of 6c vs 5c for BCBR depends whether or not you are doing the race for funsies, or if you actually seriously care about your time/place. If I was doing it for fun . . . 6c, hell yea! I would love to try my 6 down Rupert's, Hoods in the Woods, Bucket of Blood, Half-nelson etc etc! I think it would be totally fine in the transitions and the technical climbing is certainly good enough to justify the fun from downhilling.

    If was racing for time/place tho . . . I'd use a 5c. Lighter, probably a bit more efficient, and stick a Fox 34 on the front for a climb mode that would not suck energy out of you - it would be a much better trail race bike, esp on those gravel transitions on some of the middle stages.
    That's kind of what I was thinking....

    The Nomad sucked the life out of me last year but I have a feeling my couple of generation old 36 is just not that good at climbing...

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    If it makes you feel any better, my mojo HD sucked the life out of me too! Maybe it was just the race. Still the hardest athletic event I've ever participated in. Although Pisgah Stage Race was pretty damn close...

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    Quote Originally Posted by dacarbon View Post
    If it makes you feel any better, my mojo HD sucked the life out of me too! Maybe it was just the race. Still the hardest athletic event I've ever participated in. Although Pisgah Stage Race was pretty damn close...
    Good to hear! That said I am signing up for next year!!

  45. #45
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    The numbers

    Yeti SB5c vs SB6c?-numbers.jpg

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    Fox X on a SB5c

    Fox X on a SB5c - from Enduro World Series - Richie Rude's Yeti SB5c. Also running a FOx 36.

    Yeti SB5c vs SB6c?-s1600_pit_bits_1.jpg

    Richie Rude's Yeti SB5c - PIT BITS - 2014 Enduro World Series Colorado Freeride Festival - Mountain Biking Pictures - Vital MTB

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    Is rude's 36 (above) 150 or 160? I was thinking of getting a 36/160 in case I want a 6c frame down the road.

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    You can't tell.... the 36's all look the same.

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  51. #51
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    I really wish Yeti would offer the setup that Rude and Graves use. Float X/36/Saints would be so much fun on the 5c. Yes, I know some people would think it overkill, but for others it would be a wonderbike.

    BTW Joe Lawill won the Enduro National Championship (Masters 40-49) on a 5c yesterday. Don't remember his setup, but we were running 95% of the DH track during 1 stage. With as rough as the courses were, it just goes to show that some people have super human bike handling skills. He would have placed 11th in Pro which had a stacked field including Ropelato, Lopes, Warner, etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    I really wish Yeti would offer the setup that Rude and Graves use. Float X/36/Saints would be so much fun on the 5c. Yes, I know some people would think it overkill, but for others it would be a wonderbike.

    BTW Joe Lawill won the Enduro National Championship (Masters 40-49) on a 5c yesterday. Don't remember his setup, but we were running 95% of the DH track during 1 stage. With as rough as the courses were, it just goes to show that some people have super human bike handling skills. He would have placed 11th in Pro which had a stacked field including Ropelato, Lopes, Warner, etc.
    I agree with this, I think the 5c is more appropriate but I would want to build it with the 6c specs for suspension. I think many would go for this option.

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    I really wish Yeti would offer the setup that Rude and Graves use. Float X/36/Saints would be so much fun on the 5c. Yes, I know some people would think it overkill, but for others it would be a wonderbike.
    Quote Originally Posted by chambers.308 View Post
    I agree with this, I think the 5c is more appropriate but I would want to build it with the 6c specs for suspension. I think many would go for this option.
    It's hard to hit every bullseye, especially for a small company like us. We feel like we offer some pretty great kits for the 5, but we also offer a frame-only option for guys who want to get more creative. Regrettably, we can't fill all potential niches.

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  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    It's hard to hit every bullseye, especially for a small company like us. We feel like we offer some pretty great kits for the 5, but we also offer a frame-only option for guys who want to get more creative. Regrettably, we can't fill all potential niches.

    JP
    Totally understandable but a guy can wish!

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    Quote Originally Posted by chambers.308 View Post
    I agree with this, I think the 5c is more appropriate but I would want to build it with the 6c specs for suspension. I think many would go for this option.
    if you run the 5c thru a frame geometry calculator using a Fox 160mm 36 fork (as apposed to the 140mm fox 34 numbers on the website), its remarkable how closely the geometry approaches that of a 6c in one size smaller (i.e XL 5c to a L 6c). the bottom bracket goes up and the head angle slackens.

    one of the bikes i am building right now is a 5c with a Fox 36 TALAS with the travel limits set at 140mm to 160mm. I know a lot of people are averse to the TALAS, but should be interesting to see how much of a chameleon the bike is.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    It's hard to hit every bullseye, especially for a small company like us. We feel like we offer some pretty great kits for the 5, but we also offer a frame-only option for guys who want to get more creative. Regrettably, we can't fill all potential niches.

    JP
    Yea I 100% agree. I just think that its a tempting build in a perfect world with unicorns that exist would be sweet.

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    To keep this comparison going:

    I demo'd the SB6c this past Saturday. I have also demo'd the SB5c, but it was a year ago, and in a pretty mellow area.

    I was lucky enough to demo the 6c on my backyard trail that I've ridden a hundred times. Stiff, rocky climb (1200 feet in just shy of 4 miles) and a great test-bed for a demo. Technical climb, technical descent.

    The 6c was way too much bike for me - I went into this demo really thinking I wanted to go to something like it for next year; a bigger-travel 27.5 (I have a moto background and am gravity-biased, but climb a boat-load).

    I think the 5C is way more versatile and would definitely be the one I would choose between the two. I think most people will say all day long that the 5 is of of the "everyman" bike. The dude running the demo program had one in the truck that was his personal machine...I didn't look too close but I noticed it has a MonarchPlus in back.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdc_worm View Post
    if you run the 5c thru a frame geometry calculator using a Fox 160mm 36 fork (as apposed to the 140mm fox 34 numbers on the website), its remarkable how closely the geometry approaches that of a 6c in one size smaller (i.e XL 5c to a L 6c). the bottom bracket goes up and the head angle slackens.

    one of the bikes i am building right now is a 5c with a Fox 36 TALAS with the travel limits set at 140mm to 160mm. I know a lot of people are averse to the TALAS, but should be interesting to see how much of a chameleon the bike is.
    -It seems the 2015 models (according to the website) come with a FOX 34 FLOAT CTD FIT 150. Did it used to be 140mm?

    -Also FAQ tells us: The SB5C is designed to run a 150mm or 160mm travel fork. Running a 160mm travel fork gives the bike a slacker head angle and a higher bottom bracket.

    This makes choosing between sb6 and sb5 a bit more easy for me, as i can safely upgrade shocks knowing it would work with the bikes geometry.

    -Do you guys agree?

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by KGAmoto View Post
    I think the 5C is way more versatile and would definitely be the one I would choose between the two. I think most people will say all day long that the 5 is of of the "everyman" bike.
    I think you hit the nail on the head. Admittedly, the 5c would be the more appropriate sol'n for me, but I have a tendency to live by the mantra of "if its worth doing, then its worth overdoing." sure, I may be penalized on some techy climbs (although I didnt feel this during my demos) and I may fight the bike a bit more in the twisties, but a big bike can go anywhere a smaller bike goes where as the opposite may not be true. Its the same reason I run super big brakes on all my bikes. DH brakes only penalty is extra weight in XC stuff, whereas XC brakes penalize you a lot more in sustained descents. Its a tradeoff, I suppose.

    Quote Originally Posted by bioni View Post
    -It seems the 2015 models (according to the website) come with a FOX 34 FLOAT CTD FIT 150. Did it used to be 140mm?

    -Also FAQ tells us: The SB5C is designed to run a 150mm or 160mm travel fork. Running a 160mm travel fork gives the bike a slacker head angle and a higher bottom bracket.

    This makes choosing between sb6 and sb5 a bit more easy for me, as i can safely upgrade shocks knowing it would work with the bikes geometry.

    -Do you guys agree?
    Yup. The previous website had the SB5c geometries listed with both a 140mm and 150mm fork if I remember correct. An adjustable travel fork should allow you to dance between trail type geo and enduro type geo without penaly...assuming the fork's performance is up to par....

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    Anyone on sb5c upgraded their shock to the specific tuned float X - if it's available for purchase?

  61. #61
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    100%, in my case. I ride a large SB5c with the new 36 TALAS FiT4. I have it set up with a 25mm travel change (using spacers - already comes with 2 5 mm spacers in there, so there is actually a total of 40 mm drop possible from 160mm) and with tolerances is spot on 140mm from seal to crown in the lowered position. This put my SB5c at Yeti's published geo and it rides like a trail bike. I pop it into 160 on the downs and when I need a higher bb for rocky sections, or a slacker feel (and some bigger cahones ).

    Does the trick. The new TALAS V is excellent, with feel on par to the previous FLOAT generation. I have not experienced the new FLOAT for comparison.

    And, FYI, while firm, the SI really does feel like it gives the bike more travel. Now, if the CTD shock was not so inconsistent...

    Anyway, DB inline waiting in the wings until I get the mounting hardware sorted out.

    Quote Originally Posted by bioni View Post
    -It seems the 2015 models (according to the website) come with a FOX 34 FLOAT CTD FIT 150. Did it used to be 140mm?

    -Also FAQ tells us: The SB5C is designed to run a 150mm or 160mm travel fork. Running a 160mm travel fork gives the bike a slacker head angle and a higher bottom bracket.

    This makes choosing between sb6 and sb5 a bit more easy for me, as i can safely upgrade shocks knowing it would work with the bikes geometry.

    -Do you guys agree?
    Get a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live. ~Mark Twain, "Taming the Bicycle"

  62. #62
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    I've been following this thread for a while now since I've been thinking about the sb5/sb6 for quite awhile. I know the sb5 would be the ideal bike for 90%+ of my riding but there is that 5 - 10% where its just awesome to have a big bike. Chunky descents, classic NE drops to flat and good ole fun jump lines would make the sb6 super ideal.

    Has anyone taken the sb6 and put an angleset on it to steepen the HA a little bit? It seems like that might solve some the hesitations people are having about it being more of a mini DH bike and make it more of a long legged trail bike. I'm a sucker for the 140 - 160 trail bikes, and this seems like the perfect medium to bring the HA up to the 66 - 66.5 range while still having all the perks of the sb6.

    I don't know, maybe I'll just try it out and let everyone know how it goes

  63. #63
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    My head tube angle measures just under 65* and it's perfectly fine here on the front range, even on switch backs. Sure it's longer than the 5 but it's just "different" climbing, not worse. The added wheelbase is more than welcome on descents.

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    Haven't ridden a SB6, but here's my take on the SB5C:

    I have a few hundred miles on it, it's an enduro build with a fox 36 fork upgrade and offset shock bushings which slackened the head angle by about a degree. I can't believe how capable the bike is descending! The harder you push it the better it feels, especially in fast root / gnar sections. I felt much more comfortable on steep descents after installing the bushings.

    A buddy that I ride with has a spartan (160mm) and while his is slightly more capable it also weighs more.

    That said, I'm considering an upgrade to an SB6 because I don't think the 5 is going to be capable at Whistler on the big jump lines. But hey, that's what a downhill bike is for right?

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    I think this is a really interesting discussion, in affect is it better to steroid up a sb5c or buy an sb6c in standard trim? its a difficult one, for some it will be really clear cut, others not so, but what a great predicament to have. Don't take away anything from the 6c's climbing ability, I think there is very little between them in that department, yes the 5c has the edge but not by that much. Yes the 5c has a shorter wheelbase and so is more nimble in the tight stuff, but again not by massive amounts, the 6c is still really capable. Rough downhill the 6c takes it, as it does with high speed cornering, but a 5c with float x and 36 would be knocking at its door. I demo'd a 5c and bought a 6c frame and built up. The 5c would have worked for 90% of the time, but for that 10% the 6c was the better bike, and for the other 90% it was still a great bike. I don't race so the final clincher for me was fit, at 6ft 5, I went for the bigger bike, which made the decision easier. It's a hard one to call.
    Last edited by Bikefarmer; 07-22-2015 at 02:22 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Magsrgod View Post
    Has anyone taken the sb6 and put an angleset on it to steepen the HA a little bit? It seems like that might solve some the hesitations people are having about it being more of a mini DH bike and make it more of a long legged trail bike. I'm a sucker for the 140 - 160 trail bikes, and this seems like the perfect medium to bring the HA up to the 66 - 66.5 range while still having all the perks of the sb6.
    I would say to set your expectations low if you try going with an AngleSet. While the specs on the AngleSets suggest degrees of change to the head angle, the change is actually relative to the head tube length. For the SB6c, the larger the frame, the longer the HT length, and the less impact that the AngleSet will have. You have to also factor in that the AngleSet adds external length to the HT, which slackens the bike before steepening it. Running the numbers through Cane Creek's and others geo calculators, even the most aggressive setting resulted in less than 1/2* angle. I thought about going this route if I felt that the 6c was too slack, but from research, it actually seems like an exercise in futility.

    Quote Originally Posted by backshift View Post
    That said, I'm considering an upgrade to an SB6 because I don't think the 5 is going to be capable at Whistler on the big jump lines. But hey, that's what a downhill bike is for right?
    If you are doing it solely for Whistler, I would say that a 6c would slay the jump lines from Freight Train to Dirt Merch to ALine. You do see a few of the more aggressive "mini DH" bikes on those lines and even in some of Whistler's promo vids they show a Giant Reign killing Dirt Merch. Having demo'd a Nomad and a Range at Whistler this year, its clear why there are still so few "mini DH" bikes in park: the extra two inches of travel and 63* HA is irreplaceable in the steep Double Black tech lines like Schleyer, O' Sin, No Joke, Joy Ride, Whistler DH, etc. Your best bet would be to beat up somebody else's DH rental if you plan to get outside of the jump lines.

    That said, at Trestle and Angel Fire, a 6c would probably be more than adequate just about everywhere. That's just my opinion...my goal was to build a 6c and have it as my sole ride at Whistler. After running an enduro type bike and a DH bike there, I am somewhat glad that plan didnt come to fruition haha.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    It's hard to hit every bullseye, especially for a small company like us. We feel like we offer some pretty great kits for the 5, but we also offer a frame-only option for guys who want to get more creative. Regrettably, we can't fill all potential niches.

    JP
    Honestly, I'm a little surprised with this response, given Yeti's investment in its Enduro team and how frequently the 5C seems to be appearing underneath them. Would it really be that tough to offer up a 5C with parts from the 6C's cockpit and fork swapped over? Even if you didn't offer an upgraded shock, it seems like you'd have a winner on your hands that would require virtually no additional effort on your part.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdc_worm View Post
    I would say to set your expectations low if you try going with an AngleSet. While the specs on the AngleSets suggest degrees of change to the head angle, the change is actually relative to the head tube length. For the SB6c, the larger the frame, the longer the HT length, and the less impact that the AngleSet will have. You have to also factor in that the AngleSet adds external length to the HT, which slackens the bike before steepening it. Running the numbers through Cane Creek's and others geo calculators, even the most aggressive setting resulted in less than 1/2* angle. I thought about going this route if I felt that the 6c was too slack, but from research, it actually seems like an exercise in futility.
    Awesome thanks for the info man. I never really payed attention to the angleset enough to realize this but it makes perfect sense. I'm going to go demo one in a few weeks so I will see how it fits but all signs are pointing to a medium. We'll see if I'm impressed enough to pull me off my Knolly... or maybe I'll just get another bike. Yeah that sounds good, another bike

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magsrgod View Post
    Awesome thanks for the info man. I never really payed attention to the angleset enough to realize this but it makes perfect sense. I'm going to go demo one in a few weeks so I will see how it fits but all signs are pointing to a medium. We'll see if I'm impressed enough to pull me off my Knolly... or maybe I'll just get another bike. Yeah that sounds good, another bike
    Cane creek angleset have creaking issues.
    Get a works components instead.
    You need to specify the HT length when picking one, so it really is close to the angle change you need.

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fsXdMaFzT0U

    This is a video from one the mountain trails we ride over here. The terrain is pretty similar to this where ever we ride localy.

    I ride a process 111 to day. It's a 29'r with only 120 in the front and 111mm in the rear.
    It's a fun ride that soak up much more then you expect from the short travel.

    But it's not enough for me. So for the terrain you see in the video, would you think a SB5c would do? It wouldnt be to harsh and tiring?

    I would love to demo both the 5 and 6 on my local trails, but the only shop that sell them in my country is on the other side og the country, and the terrain over there is completly different.

    Cheers

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    It must be Norway as its too big for Scotland. If that's your standard trail I'd go 6c, as you are going to sometimes ride rougher stuff, plus you Norwegian dudes are big chaps, and with a 6c you can road trip to Hajfell for a bit of DH action. If that's the roughest trail then a 5c would do. Awesome trail, what part of Norway? Maybe the 2016 holiday needs to be Norway if that's what the riding is like.

  72. #72
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    No question for me with that chunk, I'd go 6c....but I'm also old I have a new 5c and a 2014 Pivot Mach 6 and if that was my local trail, I'd ride the Pivot most of the time.

    I've only rode the 6c once and that was a demo in Fruita that was NOT set up in any way that I like. Consequently, I wasn't impressed. I later rode the 5c and loved it. It also helps that it's different and compliments my Mach 6. I rode the 5c on it's first big ride yesterday and I love how twitchy it was in the tight trees. I think it might get tossed a bit more than *I* would like in that terrain on the video.

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    Yes, it's in western Norway. Just a 15-20 min car trip from down town Bergen.

    It take about an hour and a half of pedaling, walking and carrying from the bottom to the top. The top peaks about 750m above sea level or 2500ft.

    I am not the biggest guy. I am at 5'10 and 170ish lbs (I have been told i have scottish blood though).

    I read that sb6 pedals very nice for a big bike, I am just curious how it will be around more tight wooden tracks where i believe sb5 would have more of an advantage?

    I am looking for a one quiver bike, but i guess one will have to give up something to gain something

  74. #74
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    Well with the new variables of riding other areas and CARRYING your bike plus wanting a one quiver bike, maybe the SB5c is the way to go. Build it up with a 150mm (some will even opt for the 160mm) front fork and have at it. My SB5 is just under 25 lbs with pedals so carrying or pushing it shouldn't be too big of a deal.

    Quote Originally Posted by bioni View Post
    Yes, it's in western Norway. Just a 15-20 min car trip from down town Bergen.

    It take about an hour and a half of pedaling, walking and carrying from the bottom to the top. The top peaks about 750m above sea level or 2500ft.

    I am not the biggest guy. I am at 5'10 and 170ish lbs (I have been told i have scottish blood though).

    I read that sb6 pedals very nice for a big bike, I am just curious how it will be around more tight wooden tracks where i believe sb5 would have more of an advantage?

    I am looking for a one quiver bike, but i guess one will have to give up something to gain something

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by bioni View Post
    Yes, it's in western Norway. Just a 15-20 min car trip from down town Bergen.

    It take about an hour and a half of pedaling, walking and carrying from the bottom to the top. The top peaks about 750m above sea level or 2500ft.

    I am not the biggest guy. I am at 5'10 and 170ish lbs (I have been told i have scottish blood though).

    I read that sb6 pedals very nice for a big bike, I am just curious how it will be around more tight wooden tracks where i believe sb5 would have more of an advantage?

    I am looking for a one quiver bike, but i guess one will have to give up something to gain something
    I just demo'd an SB6 last week.

    If you're climbing 1.5 hours, I would without-a-doubt go with the 5. For "ME", I felt the 6 was a lift-served bike. During my demo I rode a trail that had a fairly stiff, rocky 4 mile climb. My time up wasn't much slower than my best, but I felt as if I really struggled. And again this is just my opinion but I wasn't blown away coming back down. The fork has SO MUCH travel, there was just a lot of movement when standing and power-pedaling down.

    The 5 seems like a better option for a more all-purpose machine. Graves and Rude and proving that too in the EWS.
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    I'd still stick with a 6c, if I was riding that day in, day out, The 6c is not that heavy, mine is still lighter than my 140mm alloy bike and I'm happy to carry it up 3000ft+ of Lake District fells and Scottish mountains, on a day. I think it rides up well, almost as well as the 5c, it was never hard to pedal, in fact the total opposite, for a 160mm bike it's pretty amazing. I've done lift access, DH, and 40+ mile xc rides, it will cover them all. I demo'd the 5c before I went 6c, the 5c is definitely more flickable in an out of trees, but the 6c just seems to find and hold the line, I don't think the 6c has ever felt too big, in fact on some tight alpine switch backs I was amazed at how smooth it was round them. I'd agree with people that the 6c can dampen some trails down if run soft. I don't have the super light skills of Richie Rude and Graves, so went for the burlier of the 2 frames for the riding I do. Lot of love on here for both bikes and either one would manage most, but just depends on the finer details on how you ride.

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    We support a tour company in the Alps, Trail Addiction, and those guys ride big alpine stuff all day, every day. Having ridden with them and tons of other places in the world, I can comfortably say that they're riding more vertical on tougher trails than 99% of us.

    At the start of the season, they all wanted 6's, but we were sold out. They all reluctantly took 5's and loved them. A little later in the season, we finally got some 6's in stock and filled their old orders. Most of the guys who have a choice still ride their 5's. They like the 6 for bike-park-y stuff and big DH chunder, but you simply cannot beat the 5 for versatility.

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  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    We support a tour company in the Alps, Trail Addiction,

    At the start of the season, they all wanted 6's, but we were sold out. They all reluctantly took 5's and loved them. A little later in the season, we finally got some 6's in stock and filled their old orders. Most of the guys who have a choice still ride their 5's. They like the 6 for bike-park-y stuff and big DH chunder, but you simply cannot beat the 5 for versatility.
    Ridden with those guys a few times. They're awesome riders and they run great trips. I've seen them shred on steel hardtails and various shades of all-mountain bikes. My guide on one week had a brake that had suffered a few too many tumbles and, in the strictest sense, DID NOT WORK (tm) - not that it prevented him from leading us down any number of sketchy, steep, switch-back-ridden alpine plummets under perfect control.

    If the bikes are standing up to the abuse that those guys dish out as alpine guides that's a fantastic endorsement for the product.

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    Great inputs here guys!

    John P, you seem to really love the 5c reading this post and many others about the bike

    If i get the 5c and find it to be a bit to harsh on the rocks, would upgrading the rear to a Float X be a good choice, or is the stock so dialed with the bike that it would not give me much of an improvement?

    And maybe even upgrade the front to new fox 36 160mm. According the website the 5c is designed to run a 150mm or 160mm travel fork.

    Sorry for all these questions, it's a big investment and it would be nice to know if i can upgrade the bike to be more plush without loosing the good handling of the bike

    Best regards

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    Quote Originally Posted by bioni View Post
    Great inputs here guys!

    John P, you seem to really love the 5c reading this post and many others about the bike

    If i get the 5c and find it to be a bit to harsh on the rocks, would upgrading the rear to a Float X be a good choice, or is the stock so dialed with the bike that it would not give me much of an improvement?

    And maybe even upgrade the front to new fox 36 160mm. According the website the 5c is designed to run a 150mm or 160mm travel fork.

    Sorry for all these questions, it's a big investment and it would be nice to know if i can upgrade the bike to be more plush without loosing the good handling of the bike

    Best regards
    I talked to the guy that runs Yeti's demo program last week - his personal bike in the van was a 5C with a Rockshox MonarchPlus (piggyback shock like the FloatX).

    He said that the 5C was his go-to choice for nearly anything and rarely rides a 6. I think people on here *want* to love the 6c, and so did I, before my experience during the demo. I had slight intentions of building one for next year as my only bike, but will not now.

    It IS a big investment - therefore I think the 5C will give you more for your money given your criteria. Go 160 if you want, then a piggyback shock in back like the FloatX and I would assume it would do really well for you.

  81. #81
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    Yes, you can make those upgrades.

    Regarding my love of the 5, yes, it's a great bike. More than that though, I'm just trying to give people reasonable expectations and steer them towards the best bike for their needs. I understand the mentality of "well, I've ridden 6" bikes for the past 3-5 years, so I need the SB6." The reality is that the SB6 is not like previous generations of 6" bikes; it is a purpose-built Enduro World Series race weapon that can be a real handful as a daily bike. On the other hand, the SB5 is much more capable than any other 5" bike I've ever ridden; in fact, it's more capable than most 6" bikes I've tried, including the SB66.

    Anyway, buy the bike you want, but all of my personal experience and feedback that I've received from people who've ridden both bikes A LOT is that the 6 is an incredible weapon for enduro racing, but the 5 is the bike you'll want to ride every day.

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  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    Yes, you can make those upgrades.

    Regarding my love of the 5, yes, it's a great bike. More than that though, I'm just trying to give people reasonable expectations and steer them towards the best bike for their needs. I understand the mentality of "well, I've ridden 6" bikes for the past 3-5 years, so I need the SB6." The reality is that the SB6 is not like previous generations of 6" bikes; it is a purpose-built Enduro World Series race weapon that can be a real handful as a daily bike. On the other hand, the SB5 is much more capable than any other 5" bike I've ever ridden; in fact, it's more capable than most 6" bikes I've tried, including the SB66.

    Anyway, buy the bike you want, but all of my personal experience and feedback that I've received from people who've ridden both bikes A LOT is that the 6 is an incredible weapon for enduro racing, but the 5 is the bike you'll want to ride every day.

    JP
    Thank you for your input throughout this thread. I'm heading out to CO at the end of August with a buddy and were renting a Sb5 and a Sb6, so I will get to compare them side by side on the trails for a few days. After reading everything I'm leaning more towards the Sb5, I think it will just be the better weapon for the day to day in New England. I'm excited to throw a leg over them!

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magsrgod View Post
    I'm leaning more towards the Sb5, I think it will just be the better weapon for the day to day in New England.
    My home base is in Maine when I'm not in the office in Golden or traveling to someplace overseas, and the 5 is superb for the riding I do around here. A 6 would definitely be overkill (as it is for most places).

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    Add evol can or corset to rear shock! Easy fix.

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    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    My home base is in Maine when I'm not in the office in Golden or traveling to someplace overseas, and the 5 is superb for the riding I do around here. A 6 would definitely be overkill (as it is for most places).

    JP
    So where isn't the bike overkill in your mind? Just curious. It seems that even on many stops in EWS the 5c still is preferred.

    Thanks,

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by chambers.308 View Post
    So where isn't the bike overkill in your mind? Just curious. It seems that even on many stops in EWS the 5c still is preferred.

    Thanks,
    JP's covered all that I think above as:
    "bike-park-y stuff, big DH chunder" or " Enduro World Series race weapon".



    IMO, the three examples he mentioned above are over the head (usually) for most of today's "do-it-all" 125mm trail bikes like the Sb5.
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    Hi it's my first post here after being a long time lurker. I've been on my Sb6 for around 3 months and have no regrets. I use it for everything from straight up DH to XC rides with guys in full Lycra. It may be overkill for most of my riding but for how I like to ride and going to bike parks, it is perfect. I tried a lot of different bikes when I was waiting to find a 5 and 6 i could ride back to back. Everything I rode was good, but didn't have that special Yeti feeling. When I finally got to ride both, I went with the 6 because it just fit me better and I haven't looked back. My dad has a Sb66c that I rode when looking for mine. I feel like the 6 climbs nearly as well but destroys it as soon as the trail turns down.

  88. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by chambers.308 View Post
    So where isn't the bike overkill in your mind? Just curious. It seems that even on many stops in EWS the 5c still is preferred.

    Thanks,
    Rude or Graves on board a 5c is significantly different than 99.9% of the rest of us on one. Also note that they are mount FloatX rear shocks and 160 travel 36 forks on the front. Should get the front end to around a 66 degree HA with a slight increase in the BB height as well along with a much more controlled rear wheel in the chunder. I would guess that we will see both of them on 5c's this weekend in Colorado since those trails look pretty smooth and tame compared to what other rounds have.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Rude or Graves on board a 5c is significantly different than 99.9% of the rest of us on one. Also note that they are mount FloatX rear shocks and 160 travel 36 forks on the front. Should get the front end to around a 66 degree HA with a slight increase in the BB height as well along with a much more controlled rear wheel in the chunder. I would guess that we will see both of them on 5c's this weekend in Colorado since those trails look pretty smooth and tame compared to what other rounds have.
    Along this same line but in the othe direction, what are people's thoughts on running 150 fork on the 6c which would bring the HA to around 66 degrees for a mor playful bike?

    Also, is there any noticeable difference between the 5c's 1.2 degree slacker seat angle compared to the 6c?

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    The 6c is way underrated as an all arounder. I never saw being overbiked a problem. It's not too long, it still takes switchbacks just fine, and it climbs REALLY well, not just for a 6 inch bike. People keep being steered away from them.

    Even Yeti is underselling this thing. If you guys at Yeti don't want them, I can keep a couple more of them warm for a while. I can make room.

    I love my 6, and the only reason I'd get a 5 at the moment is to have another SB to ride when the 6 needs a wrench.
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    I'm surprised to see that Yeti is specing the 5c with a 150 mm fork now. Why the change from a 140 mm fork?

  92. #92
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    I've owned a 5c "built big (i.e. 160mm travel Fox 36, stouter wheels, wide DH bars) since early April. I've thrown everything at it: Moab for a week, local Golden rides, high country Colorado rides, etc. I love this bike, coming of 2 seasons on an SB66c. Love. But with my fork off for service this week, I jumped on the opportunity to throw a leg over a 6c to see what the difference is. I had been on the fence when I bought the 5c initially, but it really came down to availability and I could get a 5c but not a 6c at the time. I did not regret the decision I made, and still don't.

    But holy crap is that 6c a rad bike.

    I took it on a pretty big day: rode Kenosha Pass to Breckenridge on the Colorado Trail, which is a 20+ mile affair of high alpine, rocky/rooty singletrack that tops out at 11,800'. Followed that up with a lap down a 9-mile trail called Gold Dust, which was new to me but had high-speed chunky stuff, tight woodsy rooty stuff, and quite a bit of technical climbing. Finished the day at dusk with a quick shuttle on Baker's Tank and Aspen Alley in Breckenridge: BT is a bit old-school rocks and roots and AA is a bermed, smooth, buffed-out flow trail. Keep in mind I only have this one day on the 6c, but I'd say 30-ish miles with a wide variety of trail that I am both familiar and unfamiliar with is grounds enough to make a descent comparision. I got the 6c set up pretty close to the 5c suspension-wise and bar height/reach wise, and also put my wheels/tires (Spank Oozy Trail 295 with 2.4 Maxxis High Roller II front/rear) to try and eliminate variables that could affect the comparison. Both bikes had the same 1x11 drivetrain with a 32T chainring. Here are some thoughts about the two bikes, along with some notes about how they compare to the 66c, for your consideration:

    1. The first thing I noticed as I started to climb the 6c, is how much "more" bike it feels like. My 5c is a Large, as is the 6c I am demoing. The wheelbase/reach is noticeable, right away. Not just fit, but it just feels "bigger" like you're riding a size bigger. Considering the L 6c has the wheelbase of the XL 5c this is not surprising. I was really worried this would bother me, but it wasn't bad and I got used to it pretty quickly. Particularly when the trail turned downhill...
    2. I've always felt the 5c felt a little twitchy at speed, when compared to the 66c. Not a lot, but just a bit less stable when really letting it run fall-line through rough and/or loose stuff. Alternatively, the 5c seems to require less ride input to change line, overall it has a more agile feel to the 66c. The 6c has the more stable, planted feel of the 66c, without feeling like it's too difficult to switch up line choice if you need to.
    3. The rear suspension on the 6c has a more active, softer feel to it. The 5c feels firmer. Neither is prefereable, just different. I have both bikes set up with approximately the same amount of sag, and flipped the CTD levers around quite a bit during my test ride. Note: I tend to prefer a bit less air in the can and then set the CTD in something like Trail 2 or 3 all the time... the Yeti demo guys say to run these things wide open (descend mode) all the time but I just prefer the feel of less spring/more compression damping.
    4. The 5c corners really well, better than the 66c did IMO. The 6c corners effortlessly. Particularly at speed. Even though the bike is longer, by the end of the day I really felt like I could snap it through the tight berms on Aspen Alley, and a bunch of rocky downhill switchbacks on Baker's Tank were no trouble.
    5. Climbing the 6c in general was not nearly as much "more" effort as I anticipated, compared to the 5c. I really thought it would feel slower on the climb, like it would be more effort. And it is, but not as much as I expected. Very tolerable, compared to my 5c. In fact, the front end seems to wander a tiny bit less on steeper/techy stuff, even with a 50mm stem. I have a 70mm stem on my 5c.
    6. I have not climbed the 6c up any really tight switch-backy stuff, yet. The 5c is about the same in this regard to the 66c, and I feel the noticeably "larger" feel of the 6c might come in to play in this situation. But what tight-ish climby stuff we did encounter was no issue on the 6c.
    7. Where I felt the 6c was not a lot more effort to climb i.e. pretty comparable really, that feeling of "about the same" really went out the window once the bike started going down zee hill. Oh man, I cannot tell you. Stable, planted, smooth, and fast. The bike is hungry: and it hungers for earth and rocks. It gobbles them like a 2-year-old eating cake at a birthday party. While the 6c is a little bit of effort to get off the ground at a slow speed it's easy to pop, drift, and wheelie at will if you pick up the pace a bit. The bike wants to go fast, it practically begs you to let it run. And where both my 66c and 5c have a little feeling that if you get in the backseat and don't really "drive" the bike forward bad things will happen, the 6c is just utterly confidence inspiring. Note: the 5c feels less like this than the 66c did. The 66c really felt like you had to be over the front, elbows out, charging at all times. The 5c will reward you if you do, but won't punish you if you don't. The 6c is like the 5c, but more so.


    Quote Originally Posted by SiO2 View Post
    Along this same line but in the othe direction, what are people's thoughts on running 150 fork on the 6c which would bring the HA to around 66 degrees for a mor playful bike?

    Also, is there any noticeable difference between the 5c's 1.2 degree slacker seat angle compared to the 6c?
    Actually, yes RE: seat tube angle question. I noticed there were really steep pitches on the climb yesterday that I didn't have to scoot as far forward on my saddle to clean. I didn't think of it at the time, but this might have to do with the steeper ST angle, no? RE: shorter fork to steepen the 6c I cannot say, but Never felt like I wanted/needed the 6c to be more 'playful' as it was easy enough to manual, wheelie, bump jump, and generally tear ass through whatever I wanted to.

    Quote Originally Posted by John P. View Post
    Yes, you can make those upgrades.

    Regarding my love of the 5, yes, it's a great bike. More than that though, I'm just trying to give people reasonable expectations and steer them towards the best bike for their needs. I understand the mentality of "well, I've ridden 6" bikes for the past 3-5 years, so I need the SB6." The reality is that the SB6 is not like previous generations of 6" bikes; it is a purpose-built Enduro World Series race weapon that can be a real handful as a daily bike. On the other hand, the SB5 is much more capable than any other 5" bike I've ever ridden; in fact, it's more capable than most 6" bikes I've tried, including the SB66.

    Anyway, buy the bike you want, but all of my personal experience and feedback that I've received from people who've ridden both bikes A LOT is that the 6 is an incredible weapon for enduro racing, but the 5 is the bike you'll want to ride every day.

    JP
    Agreed the SB5c is more capable than the 66c, climbing and descending. Especially with the 160mm travel 36 up front. Not sure the 6c isn't the bike I want to ride everyday, though...





    Notes about the tester: about 6'2" and 195# or so. Clipped in to old school Shimano 636s, all the time. Prefers more "natural" backcountry and high alpine style trails but enjoys all kinds of trail from smooth bermed flow to rowdy chunder. Not the fastest up or down, but a pretty good bike handler. Rides mostly in Colorado but has also ridden in OR, WA, UT, AZ, WI, IN, and MI. Been to every Tribe Gathering except the one in Vail two (three?) years ago.
    Last edited by Full Trucker; 08-02-2015 at 09:53 PM.
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  93. #93
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    Wow thanks for the detailed review!

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    Quote Originally Posted by wrinklefree View Post
    Wow thanks for the detailed review!
    Of course, hopefully I helped.




    Something that should be noted is I have the luxury of enjoying 2,000+ foot descents on the regular. My "go to" ride is Chimney Gulch, which as an out-n-back nets me 1,800' vertical up and down in about 10 miles R/T. This very very very much influences my preferences when it comes to bike geometry and suspension. If I lived somewhere with less elevation change and/or tighter trees I'm sure I'd pine for a snappier bike with narrower bars. YMMV.


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    Incredible review, thanks for your input. My question to you is, when you built your 5c up on the heavy side, did it cross your mind that with how you were building your 5c, you could just get a stock 6c and be fine?

    I too am contemplating building up a heavier duty 5c. fox 36 and float x. But then in the back of my mind I ask myself, Am I just building a 5c to do what a 6c can do stock?

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    Quote Originally Posted by chambers.308 View Post
    Incredible review, thanks for your input. My question to you is, when you built your 5c up on the heavy side, did it cross your mind that with how you were building your 5c, you could just get a stock 6c and be fine?

    I too am contemplating building up a heavier duty 5c. fox 36 and float x. But then in the back of my mind I ask myself, Am I just building a 5c to do what a 6c can do stock?
    That thought most certainly crossed my mind. I definitely have an affinity for "bigger" bikes coming from a DH race background... Really it came down to availability for me at the time. When I purchased my bike a 6c just wasn't an option, but the 5c was. I took a ride on a friend's that was also "built big" and really liked it. As I said before, I didn't and still don't regret the decision and I'm now looking forward to getting back on my 5c (when the fork is done being serviced) and making the comparison the other direction as well. Am I just blown away by the 6c because it's new and shiny and not mine? Or are the subtle (and not as subtle) differences going to cause me to consider making a switch? I am in full agreement with John P. that it's about getting the right bike for your needs, your terrain, your style. Even for me, in Colorado, not racing #enduro I wonder if I would grow to feel like having the 6c is just too much bike? Granted, I also have a steel hardtail if I really want or need "less bike" for a ride or two.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Full Trucker View Post

    Agreed the SB5c is more capable than the 66c, climbing and descending. Especially with the 160mm travel 36 up front.
    That would be impressive.

    Some good feedback, thanks.

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    Awesome Reviews !! Thumbs Upz Full Trucker !!

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    Nice review Full trucker

    I am very interested to hear if anyone in here have tried it with the .16 fox suspensions.

    Seems Tested: Yeti SB5c – Flow Mountain Bike liked it a lot.

    "Rear shock of the century award goes to, this one. The FOX Float DPS with EVOL air can"

    Would love to hear what the differences are in feel etc are.

  100. #100
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    it is too bad that the yeti forum is buried at the very bottom of this very long forum. I dont ride a yeti but love looking at the 5C and 6C so this thread is awesome.

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    So just a some what of a quick 2 cents kind of thing.
    I was also on the fence at one point. By reading the review of the 5c it almost seemed that I should go that route and just build it a bit burly. My riding skills really lean more towards rougher, faster dh type of trails. Ridden multiple type of 160+ bikes in the past as my pedal bike.
    Anyways finally pulled the trigger and went with the 6c in a normal burly build for it. Pike 160mm, flow wheels, XO1 11spd.
    I'm coming off a solid year of being on a 66c, and before that 2yrs on a '12 Nomad, and before that a Canfield The One from '09-'11 first two generation models.
    The 66c was an amazing bike and was literally the perfect AM bike, easy enough to do epics and still plenty enough for the rough stuff.
    Jumping on my 6c, of which I've only had 2 rides on it. That thing just blew my mind. Didn't feel like I lost any climbing ability or agility vs the 66c and actually feel like it pedal a whole lot better than the 66c. It's so much more planted and traction for days. Also the extra momentum the 27.5 gives you when starting off on a climb just helps too.

    I'm on mediums for both the 66 and the 6c. And yes the 6c is definitely on the bigger feeling side of things. The cock pit is roomier and the WB was noticeable off the bat.
    But the roomier cockpit helped with the climbs really well and the WB was noticeable but not in a bad way.

    Now the descending of the bike is just wow. I felt like I was on my canfield The One in 8inch mode. This thing really corners well like all reviews have mentioned and is very stable and just so perfectly supple to where you don't feel like you are getting beat up in the back end. I did notice how much more efficient the 6c was on consecutive square edge hits it was compared to the 66c. I've always felt that hang up on the 66c not frequently but when I did notice it usually was in a pretty much clutch situation, and would scare me just enough.

    So the improvements with the 6c, I'm so glad I decided to go with it. It's definitely more the kind of bike I like to ride and yes it's about 75% overkill of most of the trails I ride on a daily basis. But I'm ok with that since this thing rolls and climbs so well. And so much more than any other 6"+ bikes I've been on.

    Granted I never tested out the 5c but I could see myself probably wanting a bit more out of the bike when It came down to the DH aspect of riding. I do ride a lot more aggressive and love the dh more than the climbs. So I really feel this was the better of the two for me.

    Good luck to those still deciding but if I really had to say which is better the 6c would really be the better bike if you really prefer the DH and plan on taking this bike to bike parks and want to up your DH game in your riding. Otherwise I would agree with others that the 5c would probably the more suiteable bike for the majority. I just never considered myself in that category.
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    Quote Originally Posted by doodooboi View Post
    ...I did notice how much more efficient the 6c was on consecutive square edge hits it was compared to the 66c....
    I noticed this as well when I first got my 5c when compared to the 66c... the suspension just felt "smoother" through rough multiplying square edged hits. Is it a product of the refined suspension, the slightly bigger wheels, or a mix of both? Who cares... it's good.

    Note: the 5c and 6c are comparable in this aspect, they both feel very efficient through this type of terrain. Most of the DH prowess the 6c holds over the 5c (IMO) is attributed to a more "stable" feel at high speed... a trait I would suspect has quite a bit to do with the geo differences between the two bikes, not necessarily the extra inch of suspension travel.
    The older I get, the faster I was.





    Punch it, Chewie.

  103. #103
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    "Like a two-year-old eating birthday cake..." Funny stuff. Well done Trucker.

    Been riding S-20s (poor man's homegrowns since '97). So I'm old. And I have a total left metal shoulder from playing baseball as a kid.

    The Schwinns spoiled me. Folks threw 29ers at me and were aghast when I told 'em it was like riding a 6' 4x4. Splinters and all. I never test rode a 29er that I would even consider taking on a day's outing.

    I love to climb and here in Ocala at Santos in the limestone quarries I could climb pretty much anything with the S-20 26er. And the funky forward pivot worked great downward as well.

    Can you say twitchy? Oh man it was all over the place - and you just had to trust it - and stay off the front brake.

    So they say that Yeti had something to do with the old homegrowns. Maybe - cause I talked my wonderful girlfriend into a SB5c. She had a 29er (Trek Lush - told her she was not allowed to say "I ride a Lush" out loud.) Not for the reason you assume - but because I wasn't the one that talked her into buying that living room sofa.

    The 5c is so similar to the 17" S-20, but so much more refined. SO MUCH MORE! It has all the fun and none of the scare.

    So I got envious chasing her on my 19" S-20. She's so smooth and controlled on the 5c, and still flickable? Wow. Is flickable a word?

    I got a SB6c. Medium to her small.

    It is incredible. Just like everyone says - faster is better - and it never runs out of capability. You have to ride it hard to get the 17" S-20 out of it - but it's there. You can dive into an apex - balls out - and just reverse direction (High Roller 2.4 3cs) and the acceleration! Crank and it goes. So quick. And climb? You can accelerate UPWARD!

    Really. And remember - I'm freakin' OLD.

    I thought - "1x11 are they nuts?" Nope they ain't. I doubt I'll ever have two (or more) sprockets betwixt my ankles again. Unless I need to match my metal shoulder.

    I really thought I'd never ride anything that I'd like as well as the homegrown stuff.

    Glad to say I was wrong.

    Kudos Yeti. You did it again (maybe again?).

  104. #104
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    I have a '15 SB6c now, and am thinking about a SB5c as a daily sort of trail rig. I've been on an ASR5 alloy (26") a few years and love it's lightness and ability to toss it around and pop off lips. But it gets really busy as speeds and chop pick up, about when the 6c takes the baton and tears off. Am thinking the SB5c will be the perfect middle.
    Wanted:

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    The 5c is actually a good compliment to the 6. I thought I might have been a little dumb getting both, but they both still feel different. The biggest difference descending is that the 6 feels like it's on rails, but the 5 is easier to change lines or pivot tight corners (light and "tossable")
    '16 Yeti SB6c - spruced up a bit
    (on the way: Guerrilla Gravity Pedalhead)

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    I had both all season and put about 1000 miles on each. I think there is too much overlap to have both - really the 5c extends 10% to the trail end of things and the 6c extends 10 or 15% to the DH ripper side. So they overlap 80% IMO. I sold the 5c and picked up a shorter travel 29er for trail duties.

    Quote Originally Posted by scooderdude View Post
    I have a '15 SB6c now, and am thinking about a SB5c as a daily sort of trail rig. I've been on an ASR5 alloy (26") a few years and love it's lightness and ability to toss it around and pop off lips. But it gets really busy as speeds and chop pick up, about when the 6c takes the baton and tears off. Am thinking the SB5c will be the perfect middle.

  107. #107
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    I demo'd a Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt BC Edition a couple of weeks back which was very good. Am thinking of a SC 5010 over the SB5c at this stage...

  108. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by diranne
    Am thinking of a SC 5010 over the SB5c at this stage...
    Are there reasons why?

  109. #109
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    I did have a quick car park ride of a SB5c and it felt good. Sadly I can't find a demo in my area so am loathed to take the plunge...

    Am also concerned about the longevity of the Switch Infinity system....

    There is a good review here of a strip down and they note some cosmic damage after 1,000km: ENDURO Long Term Test 2015 | Yeti SB6c 1000km Check Up | ENDURO Mountainbike Magazine

  110. #110
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    But I am yet to decide!

  111. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by diranne View Post
    There is a good review here of a strip down and they note some cosmic damage after 1,000km
    LOL Your "cosmic" damage comment had me worried.

    After reading the review I suspect you mean some "cosmetic" wear on the Kashima coating?

  112. #112
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    Comical damage!

  113. #113
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    LBS says the 5010 has some issues with loosening of the rear suspension, but after a real ride on a 6c, no comparison - not even close, so I didn't discuss at length.

  114. #114
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    does anybody feel like the sb6 is to long? how is it on technical climbs? she has a serious wheelbase it looks like. probably really stable

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    I'll give my input in a few weeks. Currently I ride a C'dale 29er HT and it's not great in the rough stuff but on climbs it's good. I'm really curious to see how well the 6C is going to perform on this part of the trail.

    https://www.strava.com/segments/752260

  116. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    does anybody feel like the sb6 is to long? how is it on technical climbs? she has a serious wheelbase it looks like. probably really stable
    I rode a 17" S-20 for almost 18 years from Memorial in Houston to Markham in Ft. Lauderdale. The front and rear tires almost touch (ha.).
    Yeti SB5c vs SB6c?-1998s-20.jpg
    I found a 19" S-20 on Ebay and like it much better - much more stable than the 17 and still all the fun of a quick bike.

    They are incredible climbing machines but o so twitchy. I have a medium SB6C now and honestly, none of my technical climbs are more difficult on the 6c. You have to get used to the comfort and stability. It throws ya. You get the impression that it can't and what you learn is that the harder you push the more it responds and soaks up the tight switchbacks and climbs.

    I've found the HRIIs to work great on the limestone AND wet/muddy root-filled trails. Never found a tire that can cover a spread like that so they get some of the credit.

    My only complaint on the 6 - the bb is too low. I strike ALOT. I do weigh 225 - and the strikes never throw me, so is it just my chosen trails - lotsa rock and roots? My 19" S-20 sports 140mm Bombers in front and a 5" RockShox rear that's about an inch longer than stock - which makes it more lifted than my kids CJ 7! I ride with low pressure in the Bombers for comfort. Haven't struck the pedals more than five times in years.

    But my gps says that even with the strikes - I've picked up a couple mph on my favorite trails. And the weight of the two bikes is not much different.

    If my 6 was stole tomorrow - I'd order another immediately.

  117. #117
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    The Call of Kazbegi

    Whereas the SB5c and SB4.5c makes sense, it was interesting to see the SB6c in 'The Call of Kazbegi.' Interesting because it's coined as an Enduro racer.

    I continue to battle the ping pong match in my head of "which to get" between the 5 and 6. Currently rockin' the SB95 and after 2 years... it's time to move on. It has treated me well, really well, but feel I need the DH capabilities to be more inline with my needs. Without demoing, just yet (CO Front Range has been moist), I'm 'assuming' the 5c will ONLY be slightly better than my current 95; which will not make the investment feel valuable. Thus, the reason to look at the next tier up at the 6c.

    To all those that had the 95: Is my assumption inline about the 5c with it only being slightly better on the DH than the 95? Or should I just look at the 6c?

    Simply trying to position my thinking a little more before beginning to demo the bikes in limited terrain.

    T.I.A.

    ---

    My riding includes a mix bag of epics rides (Monarch Crest type stuff), quick afterwork rides (Apex, LOTB, C-Gulch), bike parks (Trestle), high alpine stuff (Georgia Pass) and discovering new trails (C-Butte, T-Ride, etc.). I'm fairly fast up and down. Prefer to plow and stay low while moving at a good clip on the DH no matter the trail's surface. 6' 210 dude that can muscle his way around trying to take bike up a hill if he had to.

  118. #118
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    6c.

  119. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by the need View Post
    Whereas the SB5c and SB4.5c makes sense, it was interesting to see the SB6c in 'The Call of Kazbegi.' Interesting because it's coined as an Enduro racer.

    I continue to battle the ping pong match in my head of "which to get" between the 5 and 6. Currently rockin' the SB95 and after 2 years... it's time to move on. It has treated me well, really well, but feel I need the DH capabilities to be more inline with my needs. Without demoing, just yet (CO Front Range has been moist), I'm 'assuming' the 5c will ONLY be slightly better than my current 95; which will not make the investment feel valuable. Thus, the reason to look at the next tier up at the 6c.

    To all those that had the 95: Is my assumption inline about the 5c with it only being slightly better on the DH than the 95? Or should I just look at the 6c?

    Simply trying to position my thinking a little more before beginning to demo the bikes in limited terrain.

    T.I.A.

    ---

    My riding includes a mix bag of epics rides (Monarch Crest type stuff), quick afterwork rides (Apex, LOTB, C-Gulch), bike parks (Trestle), high alpine stuff (Georgia Pass) and discovering new trails (C-Butte, T-Ride, etc.). I'm fairly fast up and down. Prefer to plow and stay low while moving at a good clip on the DH no matter the trail's surface. 6' 210 dude that can muscle his way around trying to take bike up a hill if he had to.
    Based on your description, 6c would be my choice.

  120. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    does anybody feel like the sb6 is to long? how is it on technical climbs? she has a serious wheelbase it looks like. probably really stable
    One thing to keep in mind about the SB bike's wheelbase is their slightly longer chainstay when compared to the trend of other bikes. because of the longer chainstay, some of that wheel base is behind you, and the rear of any vehicle always turns tighter than the front. if you can point the thing where you want it to go, it will go there. That said, my opinion is that the SB6c requires you to be active in the tight technical uphill stuff. it rewards you for being out of the saddle and leaning the bike rather than staying seated and turning the bike. additionally, the longer chainstay allows you to stay more easily centered in the bike which can overcome body position errors that result in a loss of traction (weight too far forward) or an inadvertent manual (weight too far rearward).

    Quote Originally Posted by the need View Post
    I continue to battle the ping pong match in my head of "which to get" between the 5 and 6. Currently rockin' the SB95 and after 2 years... it's time to move on. It has treated me well, really well, but feel I need the DH capabilities to be more inline with my needs. Without demoing, just yet (CO Front Range has been moist), I'm 'assuming' the 5c will ONLY be slightly better than my current 95; which will not make the investment feel valuable. Thus, the reason to look at the next tier up at the 6c.
    having demo'd both in the front range, my conclusion was that SB5c was probably 5% better going up (150mm fork) than the SB6c. at the same time, the SB5c was probably 15% more adept at going gown than the SB5c. they really are that close. we ended up with 5c for my GF (160mm fork) and a 6c for me. The "you have entirely too much time on your hands" full review i wrote up can be found here:

    http://forums.mtbr.com/yeti/sb5c-sb6...ck-967094.html

  121. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by the need View Post
    My riding includes a mix bag of epics rides (Monarch Crest type stuff), quick afterwork rides (Apex, LOTB, C-Gulch), bike parks (Trestle), high alpine stuff (Georgia Pass) and discovering new trails (C-Butte, T-Ride, etc.). I'm fairly fast up and down. Prefer to plow and stay low while moving at a good clip on the DH no matter the trail's surface. 6' 210 dude that can muscle his way around trying to take bike up a hill if he had to.
    I ride all of the same trails. I rode the 5c for a few months last season and then swapped to the 6c at the start of the year.

    The 5c was an amazing bike, light, handled amazing and felt real nimble. Also climbed great.

    The 6c gained me about a pound (just under 28lbs complete). It climbs nearly as good as the 5. The switchbacks up pick n sledge took a bit getting used to with the wheelbase but it didn't really make anything more difficult, just felt different. It handles the down amazingly, more stable and feels like a rocket ship. I got PR's all the way down enchanted/apex on my first ride there.

    I have zero regrets going to the 6c. Works great on everything on the front range and it's a dream on 30+ mile rides in the high country.

  122. #122
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    yeah i'm on a 2016 mach 6 and that thing is actually a beast of a descender especially for how short of a wheelbase it has. i'm just also really interested in trying a sb6 as well. i like the steeper seat tube angle. i have heard the yeti isn't as plush as the mach

  123. #123
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    By design the yeti tightens up while climbing so I just leave it in full open all the time. I'd say it's plenty plush downhill.

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    how is she on seated climbs?

  125. #125
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    I pretty much only climb seated on the 6c. I think it climbs great. Doesn't wander and I can make pretty much any switchback.

  126. #126
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    tdc and ilike, thanks. Gives greater confidence that the 6 is still capable for the everyday and then some.

  127. #127
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilikemtb999 View Post
    I pretty much only climb seated on the 6c. I think it climbs great. Doesn't wander and I can make pretty much any switchback.
    Yup...wasn't implying that it was a one size fits all technique. The front end is undoubtedly lighter than my previous Niner...especially getting it to stick during switchbacks with step ups right in the middle. I will say that I have a very short torso and long arms/legs, so it probably takes more body english for me than some to get my weight forward. Another thing that helped get the front to stick was going with a very aggressive front tire: Magic Mary SG Vert Star has made the bike feel much more nimble on the ups...with the same amount of input, it feels like the front tire wants to grab everything rather than push off of line.

    Quote Originally Posted by the need View Post
    tdc and ilike, thanks. Gives greater confidence that the 6 is still capable for the everyday and then some.
    it absolutely is. the 5c is probably a better every day tool, but if you are doing bike park and big descents, the 6c will allow you find a bit more trouble and then save you from your mistakes as you get to close to crossing the line, haha...

  128. #128
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    I really don't get the same feeling that the front end is light on climbs at all. I run high roller 2's front and rear.

  129. #129
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilikemtb999 View Post
    I really don't get the same feeling that the front end is light on climbs at all. I run high roller 2's front and rear.
    i am not implying that you, or anyone else, will get that same feeling. i tried to detail in my previous response some variables that may contribute to the feeling that i get. assuming you have normal proportions (I do not), my short torso may not allow me the same body English as you while in the saddle, which is why i am rewarded when i get out of the saddle. my frame of reference from my previous bike is also likely different than yours. my terrain, i suspect, is different from yours. if anything, my comments were attempting to highlight how incredibly versatile the bike is for an enduro class bike, which is subsequently why there is one sitting in my garage.

  130. #130
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    Paid Spam---Looking to upsize from a Green L to an XL...

    Yeti SB6c, L, DVO Diamond Fork - Buy and Sell and Review Mountain Bikes and Accessories

  131. #131
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdc_worm View Post
    i am not implying that you, or anyone else, will get that same feeling. i tried to detail in my previous response some variables that may contribute to the feeling that i get. assuming you have normal proportions (I do not), my short torso may not allow me the same body English as you while in the saddle, which is why i am rewarded when i get out of the saddle. my frame of reference from my previous bike is also likely different than yours. my terrain, i suspect, is different from yours. if anything, my comments were attempting to highlight how incredibly versatile the bike is for an enduro class bike, which is subsequently why there is one sitting in my garage.
    I'm with you on this - front end of the 6 feels lighter than my previous bikes. I, too, have a short torso and proportionally long legs for my height. I think you're right - body type/size, trails, and previous bike experiences all weigh in when it comes to discussing how one bike feels compared to others.

  132. #132
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    well it feels light because the front wheel is way out in front of you because of the slack head angle. combine that with a long top tube and more then likely a short stem and there you have it. light front end

  133. #133
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    well it feels light because the front wheel is way out in front of you because of the slack head angle. combine that with a long top tube and more then likely a short stem and there you have it. light front end
    My findings are a little bit different.
    Slacker HT can cause the front to be lighter, here I agree with you.
    But the longer TT will make the front more planted.
    I have ridden several different bikes in medium and large sizes. I have tried to make the cockpit to feel the same with different stem sizes.
    For example a Nomad 3 L with a 35mm stem vs medium N3 with a 55mm stem. The large with the shorter stem had the front planted more and it was harder to lift the wheel... I blame more of the bike weight to be in the front end here.
    The longer bike was also less sensitive to the weight distribution and had a wider margin for error in this regard.

  134. #134
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    Just got back from a 30 mile ride and I am extremely impressed with the climbing prowess of the 6C. I was riding a Cdale 29er before my 6C and IMO the 6C is equal to or even better than the Cdale 29er. I really put the Cdale through the wringer (about 700 miles in less than 6 months. Needless to say, I won't be riding the Cdale on the trails anymore. I enjoy climbs and one concern I had about the 6C was if it could do well in this area. I may need to adjust my fork a tad, as I feel it was a bit too firm for my weight. The entire ride I was in 'trail' mode and I'm pretty confident that in 'open' mode, it will climb just as well.

  135. #135
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    well it feels light because the front wheel is way out in front of you because of the slack head angle. combine that with a long top tube and more then likely a short stem and there you have it. light front end
    At the risk of digressing from the topic of this thread, you can't simply reduce bike performance as it relates to front wheel feel to just those 3 variables. if you fix those three, and either a) lengthen the chainstay, b) make the seat tube angle more vertical, c) drop the bottom bracket, c) get out of the saddle, d) grow your torso by 6", e) point the bike downhill, f) etc etc etc then the front wheel of the bike will feel more planted.

    At the end of the day, the 5c and 6c exhibited the exact same traction, power, and efficiency characteristics when climbing in the demos that I did. The accuracy of the front wheel when going up was fairly close between the two, but the advantage would go to the 5c. I have been able to tune my personal 6c to track the front wheel very well, even with a 35mm stem. As a side note, from a bike fit perspective, I was on an XL 5c and a L6c...which are strikingly close in geometry.

  136. #136
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    it's not even a matter of that it's weight on the front wheel. same goes with running a shorter stem

  137. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    it's not even a matter of that it's weight on the front wheel. same goes with running a shorter stem
    outside of the bottom bracket drop, please educated us on how any of the variables that i listed fail to move weight bias away from the rear wheel and in the direction of the front wheel?

    bottom bracket drop lowers a rider's center of gravity, decreasing his leverage on a given wheel, making hit harder to lift said wheel, either front or rear. coincidentally, when following the longer/slacker/lower trend in mountainbiking, lower has more to do with BB drop than bar height as it inherently makes a bike more stable.

    hypothetically, if you ran a -30mm stem on a bike with a 30" reach and top tube, it would force the rider to be out of the saddle with increased weight on his hands, resulting in increased weight on the front wheel. by the logic you are exercising, as the stem goes negative in length, the front wheel would never be on the ground.

  138. #138
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    Some people are crazy?

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    well that's going a bit overboard and i don't disagree with your points. but the fact of the matter is any bike with a really slack head angle and short stem has less weight on the front wheel. it's just inherent of that kind of bike. that's also a big part of why you can run a really aggressive slower rolling tire in the front and it doesn't matter nearly as much

  140. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    well that's going a bit overboard and i don't disagree with your points. but the fact of the matter is any bike with a really slack head angle and short stem has less weight on the front wheel. it's just inherent of that kind of bike. that's also a big part of why you can run a really aggressive slower rolling tire in the front and it doesn't matter nearly as much
    agreed. and to keep the comparison "apples to apples" so to speak (and to stay on the OP's topic), in my demo'ing, I was swapping between an XL SB5c and a L SB6c. Geometrically, here is how they stacked up:
    <u><b>SB5c - SB6c (in mm)</b></u>
    452 - 447 Reach
    635 - 621 Stack
    653 - 632 Top Tube (Effective)
    769 - 773 Front Center
    1211 - 1215 Wheelbase
    both used 50mm stems.

    the frames are very similar sized, within 5mm of each other, but the top tube of the 5c is 21mm longer and somehow still felt like it planted the front wheel more than the much slacker 6c. my guess is that the the longer top tube allowed my weight to be pulled more forward over the bars when in the saddle.

    Anywho, the similarities in geometries above should give us an idea of how closely the bikes are capable of performing to one another, which I think were reflected in my demo'ing.

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    i actually wonder why they decided to give the 5 such a slack seat tube angle. it's literally my only gripe with my pivot

  142. #142
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    A little late tho the party but whatever...
    Quote Originally Posted by the need View Post
    To all those that had the 95: Is my assumption inline about the 5c with it only being slightly better on the DH than the 95? Or should I just look at the 6c?
    You can probably read this post for my more "in-depth" comparison of the 5c to the 6c to my 66c, but I feel as though I can also address this particular question as well: I have some appreciable time on a 95c as well as the other three and feel the 95 is the least 'descendy' of the bunch, by more than what I would consider a slight amount. And 'built big' 5 is pretty rad, and it's what I currently ride. That said...

    Quote Originally Posted by Ilikemtb999 View Post
    I ride all of the same trails. I rode the 5c for a few months last season and then swapped to the 6c at the start of the year.

    The 5c was an amazing bike, light, handled amazing and felt real nimble. Also climbed great.

    The 6c gained me about a pound (just under 28lbs complete). It climbs nearly as good as the 5. The switchbacks up pick n sledge took a bit getting used to with the wheelbase but it didn't really make anything more difficult, just felt different. It handles the down amazingly, more stable and feels like a rocket ship. I got PR's all the way down enchanted/apex on my first ride there.

    I have zero regrets going to the 6c. Works great on everything on the front range and it's a dream on 30+ mile rides in the high country.
    ^^^I'll be doing this for 2016.

    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    i actually wonder why they decided to give the 5 such a slack seat tube angle. it's literally my only gripe with my pivot
    It's my only real gripe with the 5c as well.
    The older I get, the faster I was.





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  143. #143
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    i actually wonder why they decided to give the 5 such a slack seat tube angle.
    Because Yeti designed it for use with a 140mm fork?

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    Long time since I've posted, so why not.

    Glad to see this forum conversation has continued to grow over the last year. I'm still loving my 5c. I think everyone has to find what works best for them. I still love my 5c to death. I've been riding it a year now. It's currently undergoing some upgrades. New rear shock (been playing with a Fox Float X EVOL, but going to go with an X2 most likely, once it comes in), also putting a new 2016 Fox 36 160mm RC2 on it. Part of me thinks I'm adding too much muscle to the bike, but I just love how it rides, love how it climbs, love how it corners, and really only felt it needed some suspension updates from the 2015 offerings of 34 140mm and CTD.

    For those who don't have a 5c or 6c yet and still want to know which one to get, I strongly urge a demo day. I know that with Yeti those can be far and few between, but they are really great to find what fits you best.

    I parking lot demo'd both when I was shopping a year ago and who knows what I might have decided on today, but that day a year ago the 5c just worked for me, my size, my riding style, etc. I still think it does to this day. Obviously I'd love to have one of each if pocket books were unlimited, lol.

  145. #145
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    Yeti SB5c vs SB6c?-image3.jpgI love both my 5c and 6c but if i'd have to choose and could only have one I'd say......5c for my everyday riding terrain !!! That being said I believe that the 6c can climb at about 85% of the efficiency of the 5c and that bike is about 4 1/2 pounds heavier. The 5c is more flickable and nimble. Pointed down the mountain and high speed turns and berms it's the 6c all day.
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    nice collection you have there. i'll have an sb6 to add to my quiver next week.

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    Quote Originally Posted by skinnybex View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image3.jpg 
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ID:	1041431I love both my 5c and 6c but if i'd have to choose and could only have one I'd say......5c for my everyday riding terrain !!! That being said I believe that the 6c can climb at about 85% of the efficiency of the 5c and that bike is about 4 1/2 pounds heavier. The 5c is more flickable and nimble. Pointed down the mountain and high speed turns and berms it's the 6c all day.
    rad garage! i would say that my experience reflects the same result as yours in terms of trade off, but i would lean in the direction of the 6c as i tend to favor being over equipped rather than under equipped. i would you outside of the half pound frame penalty, the weight difference can almost be accounted for between the wheel builds and the shocks...

  148. #148
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    Quote Originally Posted by tdc_worm View Post
    rad garage! i would say that my experience reflects the same result as yours in terms of trade off, but i would lean in the direction of the 6c as i tend to favor being over equipped rather than under equipped. i would you outside of the half pound frame penalty, the weight difference can almost be accounted for between the wheel builds and the shocks...
    Thanks Worm, I have two passions, Liverpool Football Club for 23 years and Yeti Cycles since May 2015. My big weight penalty between the 2 bikes would be Lyrik, Float X, Flow wheels, Atlas Cranks and Frame.....Pedals as well. I've ridden the SB6 my last 3 rides totaling about 70 miles and 10k Elevation gain and I'm really happy with how it pedals. I don't even need to mention it's strengths because you own the bike and it's dialed !!!
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  149. #149
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    Invol2ver I'm really excited for you to get your bike. Maybe we can get some trail time together up in St. George / Hurricane in the future. I spent 2 days riding Hurricane at the beginning of December and it was amazing.
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    Definitely man

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    How do you like that lyrik

  152. #152
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    The Lyrik is absolutely amazing. It's the Fork that should be compared to the new Fox 36 instead of the pike when you talk about 160mm travel and it addresses any of the shortcomings of the pike where people say the fork isn't as composed during high speed chunk and gets deflected and uneasy on bigger hits during aggressive riding. It's stiff and supple yet still forgiving when your just riding more mellow terrain just like the Pike. It's low speed and small bump compliance is awesome. The charger damper is so reliable and you can buy one fork and change between 160mm, 170mm and 180mm to suit your travel needs with new air shafts.
    Last edited by skinnybex; 01-10-2016 at 12:00 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinnybex View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	1041431I love both my 5c and 6c but if i'd have to choose and could only have one I'd say......5c for my everyday riding terrain !!! That being said I believe that the 6c can climb at about 85% of the efficiency of the 5c and that bike is about 4 1/2 pounds heavier. The 5c is more flickable and nimble. Pointed down the mountain and high speed turns and berms it's the 6c all day.
    Skinnybex, if it came down to having ONE bike only which would you choose?
    I like them both but just not in the budget.

  154. #154
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    I've ridden the Pike 160mm on my N3 and I was very happy and I also rode a couple hundred miles on a Boss Deville and I wasn't impressed at all. I know the 2016 Fox 36 is a great choice but do yourself a favor and put the RS Lyrik on your shopping list and I know which one you'll choose is you were doing a blind test and had know idea between the 2 brands. I also have a 2016 Fox 34 and I'm very happy with it but I still prefer the pike and that was when I rode a SC 5010 with a 130mm Pike.
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  155. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahtune69 View Post
    Skinnybex, if it came down to having ONE bike only which would you choose?
    I like them both but just not in the budget.
    What is your normal Daily terrain ? 50/50 Flat and climbing or Descending and rough ? I'd say if you normally Ride Flowing single track with lot's of elevation gain mixed in followed by a quick decent back down get the SB5c as you can build the bike plenty robust to about 25 pounds and still it will handle plenty of rough chunk and drops but it'll feel more on Edge.

    If on the other hand you intend to ride Bike parks and some DH specific shuttled stuff then no doubt go with the SB6c. The bike is truly amazing but it's not the Jack of all trades that the 5c is when it comes to long days in the saddle. Don't get me wrong that if your super fit and you don't mind grinding out 30 - 40 miles on a 28-30 pound 6" travel bike then no doubt you should get the SB6c. The SB6c can put a smile on your face each day and everyday if you push the boundaries.

    The SB6c in the complete Sram XO build is all you need if you want a complete build as the wheel set is outstanding and will not disappoint you. I have 3 friends that ride that same DT wheel set. Frame up build is also fun just take your time choosing your parts for what you really want.....Super buff Mini DH or nimble Sub 28 pound All mountain Billy Goat !

    I also believe that in July or August the SB5c will get the internal Cable routing upgrade as well as Boosted rear end so then all new Yeti SB frames will be the same. Some people like the idea of Boost and embrace the change and some people don't like the fact that their existing parts might not be compatible without some changes and money spent. Also I think the SB5c would perform even better with a piggyback Shock like the Float X or RS monarch plus so it's a true chameleon. The 2016 SB5c's come with the new Evol can on the shock. I have the non Evol Fox CTD but it has an Avy'd Tune and performs very well.

    It's all about whether you feel like the SB5c will not be enough bike or the SB6c will be to much bike for what you ride or enjoy riding. Both are great and they both are Raced at the highest levels.... World champion products that you can purchase right now and know that your getting the best performance, design, style, craftsmanship and service in the industry !!!
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  156. #156
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    ahthune I guess I should give you the answer to your question on which ONE bike to buy and I'd say go with the SB6c because I think at some point you'll wish you went BIG so you might as well not doubt your choice. Go with the Sram Xo build that they list on their site unless you want to build from the frame up. The GX build is lacking with the wheels as well as Brakes and no Carbon bar and those are all upgrades you'll eventually make in the future. I'm also a big fan of the RF cinch cranks as their pretty light and robust as well as stiff and look good. Hope this helps my friend !!!
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    yeah i have a 16 36 now and i'm not impressed. i'm looking at the new lyrik and the stage

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    Quote Originally Posted by skinnybex View Post
    ahthune I guess I should give you the answer to your question on which ONE bike to buy and I'd say go with the SB6c because I think at some point you'll wish you went BIG so you might as well not doubt your choice. Go with the Sram Xo build that they list on their site unless you want to build from the frame up. The GX build is lacking with the wheels as well as Brakes and no Carbon bar and those are all upgrades you'll eventually make in the future. I'm also a big fan of the RF cinch cranks as their pretty light and robust as well as stiff and look good. Hope this helps my friend !!!
    Thanks skinnybex, I think you help me decide on which bike to get. Stay tuned!

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    I ended up choosing the sb6c for that reason as well. I think the bike is a good compromise for many different terrains and riding styles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by albuht813 View Post
    I ended up choosing the sb6c for that reason as well. I think the bike is a good compromise for many different terrains and riding styles.
    Your going to be stoked the first time you spin the cranks on your maiden voyage and just wait until you get to drop down that valley you've always ridden cautiously and you realize that this bike will give you so much confidence to take your riding to the next level....enjoy my friend and post some pictures when you get the bike !!!!!
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  161. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    yeah i have a 16 36 now and i'm not impressed. i'm looking at the new lyrik and the stage
    The different forums I've read and followed about the Stage fork have been glowing reviews so maybe that will turn out to be a great match for your build. Keep me informed on your choice if you go with the Colorado build....Yeti and MRP
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    Before I bought my 6c, I demo'd a 6c and 5c. As already well posted the 5c rewards a more precise rider and line choice. I'm less experienced and knew I wanted something that would save my ass when I just pointed and plowed. Today's ride reminded me why I chose the 6c and glad I did just for that reason. I rode a technical rutty rocking slick trail and several times new I picked the wrong line going down and was ready for "oh crap"!
    Never happened and the bike never flinched lucky for me! I felt like Graves or Rude at the end I was so happy and proud I made it with out a fall!

    No regrets! This thing is amazing!

  163. #163
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    I just rode an identical loop out at some of my local trails. Saturday I rode 22 miles on my SB6c and that was after 8 days without riding so I was just getting my legs back.

    Sunday I rode a 16.4 mile out and back on the 6c without any stops and my Garmin read 1:47.23 with 1,827 feet elevation gain.

    Today Monday I rode the exact same 16.4 mile out and back on my 5c without stops and my Garmin read 1:40.49 with 1,839 feet elevation gain.

    The Trail was 50/35/15. 50% flat and flow, 35% climb and quick step ups , 15% Downhill and elevation drop. Obviously the terrain was suited much better for the lighter and more efficient 5c and I was surely more tired today or the gap might of been a few more minutes but I'd have to say the 6c is really good even when your trails might not be as rowdy and DH specific.

    Just thought I'd give you my results since it gives you an idea of how well the 6c can move on the flats and climbs. bike weight difference is around 4 pounds and the tires are not the same. 5c was Butcher FR / Slaughter R on Enve's and the 6c was Maxxis DHF FR / DHR R on Stan's Flow.
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  164. #164
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    Quote Originally Posted by skinnybex View Post
    I just rode an identical loop out at some of my local trails. Saturday I rode 22 miles on my SB6c and that was after 8 days without riding so I was just getting my legs back.

    Sunday I rode a 16.4 mile out and back on the 6c without any stops and my Garmin read 1:47.23 with 1,827 feet elevation gain.

    Today Monday I rode the exact same 16.4 mile out and back on my 5c without stops and my Garmin read 1:40.49 with 1,839 feet elevation gain.

    The Trail was 50/35/15. 50% flat and flow, 35% climb and quick step ups , 15% Downhill and elevation drop. Obviously the terrain was suited much better for the lighter and more efficient 5c and I was surely more tired today or the gap might of been a few more minutes but I'd have to say the 6c is really good even when your trails might not be as rowdy and DH specific.

    Just thought I'd give you my results since it gives you an idea of how well the 6c can move on the flats and climbs. bike weight difference is around 4 pounds and the tires are not the same. 5c was Butcher FR / Slaughter R on Enve's and the 6c was Maxxis DHF FR / DHR R on Stan's Flow.
    Skinnybex.

    7 minutes is a pretty big difference in time on the same exact trail. I think the 4 pounds on the sb6 plays a roll in this, if the sb6 was 4 pounds lighter it might be a bit closer in time.
    Im still leaning on the sb6 but the sb5 is pretty impressive.
    Thanks for the comparison.

  165. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by dglove View Post
    Compare
    I'm curious to know why the 6 has internal cable routing but the 5 does not. Anybody know if they'll adopt internal for the 5 any time soon?

    I'm on a Mojo SL now, and am debating between the HD3, and the Yeti 5 or 6. The 5 looks awesome (the new Mojo doesn't look as sweet as the Yeti, imo), and maybe closer in geometry to the SL than the 6.
    Happy Trails...

  166. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by lycra View Post
    I had both all season and put about 1000 miles on each. I think there is too much overlap to have both - really the 5c extends 10% to the trail end of things and the 6c extends 10 or 15% to the DH ripper side. So they overlap 80% IMO. I sold the 5c and picked up a shorter travel 29er for trail duties.
    Which 29er did u get to complement your 6c?

    I am kind of in your zone of thinking here. I have a 2014 Scott Spark 900SL with 120 Reba and carbon wheels. 23lb all xc'ed out and 25.7 with a heavy Moab build (minion 2.3s, dropper, sram x1 cranks, ibis carbon bar, etc). Basically its identical in geometry to a ARSc with a 120mm fork and has better tire clearance. Its a great bike with a lot of range (I did Tour Divide on fast tires and aerobars and even raced an enduro with the Moab setup). For reference I hit the shuttles here in Moab on it and it hit all the big moves save one or two. I was hurting bad the next day usually though. It packs up a bit in really tall chunder but is fast and smooth for most terrain. I just got a new front triangle, the bike is all rebuilt and dialed but I cant really seem to sell it for what I think it is worth.

    I am buying a Yeti. Can get a deal on the XO1 build with Enve upgrade. Sb4.5c, Sb5c and Sb6c all the same price. My thinking is keep the Spark and put a faster, lighter tire on the rear than the Minion DHF and get a tasty green SB6C with the Enve wheels.

    I can only test out the SB5C here in Moab. I havent ridden a 6" travel bike in a long time. I loved them back in the day when they weighed 38 lbs and were 26ers.

    Thoughts on 5 vs. 6 to complete my quiver? I may hit a resort or park this summer but really just want a bike that doesnt overlap my Spark and such.
    Divide Bike Bags

  167. #167
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    I had a 5 and a Turner Burner but they were too similar. So I sold the Turner and got a Ripley with a 140 pike and some Nox wheels. Sold the 5 and for a 6 with some derbies. Have to say it was a great switch. The 6 combs surprisingly well. I'd say almost as good as the 5. Maybe as good. I love the fact that I have too very different bikes now.

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    Lurked here for a while, previous '14 575 owner, LBS made me a deal on a '15 5c I couldn't refuse.

    I previously rode the 6 and found it super easy to do everything at the cost of being numb and boring at everyday not balls out speeds; it was only fun if your hair was on fire. Never rode the 5c but all the feedback here convinced me it was the everyday droid I was looking for so I bought it, so far very satisfied.

    I agree with a lot that's been said, notably skinnybex, it feels more flickable around tighter corners, more able to pick a line around rocks where the 6 wanted to just go over them. That said from almost the first ride I never felt the '15 Fox 34/150 fork was as good as the rest of the bike. Same fork was on the 575 and a great match but on the 5c it felt inadequate so I've gone to a '16 36/160, I'll have my first ride on it tomorrow.

    Thanks for all the info everybody!

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    Same, I read a lot here and thaks for the advice.

    I think I'll do the opposite build of previous posts : going on a 'ligh' SB6c.
    I should not feel lot difference with a 150 pike on front while pedalling, but enjoy the 150mm on the back !

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    Quote Originally Posted by skinnybex View Post
    I just rode an identical loop out at some of my local trails. Saturday I rode 22 miles on my SB6c and that was after 8 days without riding so I was just getting my legs back.

    Sunday I rode a 16.4 mile out and back on the 6c without any stops and my Garmin read 1:47.23 with 1,827 feet elevation gain.

    Today Monday I rode the exact same 16.4 mile out and back on my 5c without stops and my Garmin read 1:40.49 with 1,839 feet elevation gain.

    The Trail was 50/35/15. 50% flat and flow, 35% climb and quick step ups , 15% Downhill and elevation drop. Obviously the terrain was suited much better for the lighter and more efficient 5c and I was surely more tired today or the gap might of been a few more minutes but I'd have to say the 6c is really good even when your trails might not be as rowdy and DH specific.

    Just thought I'd give you my results since it gives you an idea of how well the 6c can move on the flats and climbs. bike weight difference is around 4 pounds and the tires are not the same. 5c was Butcher FR / Slaughter R on Enve's and the 6c was Maxxis DHF FR / DHR R on Stan's Flow.
    Skinnybex, I have been following your thoughts closely on the forums. Great insights!
    I have been on a custom small 25lbs SB5 for 2 years now (PIKE, Debonair Plus, NextSL, Carbon rims), and I am thinking about a light sb6 build. Basically transferring my SB5 spec over to a SB6 should give me a 26lbs SB6. So, fork choice?
    1. 2017 Fox 34 in 150mm for the SB6. Would the sb6 be compromised with a 150 fork?
    2. I am well familiar with the Pike, but like the idea of a lighter Fox 34 (1780g vs Pike 1860g) on SB6. Would the 2017 Fox 34 be adequate for the SB6? Thoughts?
    I am 165lbs, so dont need a Lyrik!

  171. #171
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    Hello Jakster. You'll be stoked with the 6c and considering your plans on a trimmed down build the bike should be very capable of those epic rides where you want to grind out long climbs and many many miles.

    I wouldn't even consider ditching the pike for the 34 on a bike like the 6c. For the small amount of weight savings......80 grams the 34 can't stand up to the same abuse without being deflected and bullied through the rough stuff. The fox 34 is a wonderful trail fork but it gets overwhelmed when pushed extremely hard which is what you'll be able to do with your 6c. The pike is such a fantastic fork and it's already light weight and 35mm stanchion is perfect for your 6c.
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    Thanks for the quick response! I hear you, the pike has been outstanding with no problems. But then, the elephant in the room, what about a 160 Lyrik for about 120gr more!? Not so much for the stifness, but for that bigger negative chamber and extra small bump sensitivity? #confused

  173. #173
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    Quote Originally Posted by jakster View Post
    Thanks for the quick response! I hear you, the pike has been outstanding with no problems. But then, the elephant in the room, what about a 160 Lyrik for about 120gr more!? Not so much for the stifness, but for that bigger negative chamber and extra small bump sensitivity? #confused
    TBH, If your willing to spend 1k I'd contact Avalanche Suspension and order the Rock Shox Yari with the Avy Cartridge installed and tuned for your desires. You can get a new Yari fork for $500 if you shop around and the Avy kit will be $450.

    I'm very happy with my Lyrik on both my 6c and 5.5c but if I could do it all over again I'd go the route I mentioned above.

    New Lyriks can be had for $650-$700 on PB.
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    would love to see a repeat with same tires on both bikes.. preferably the 5c tires...I think bike weight is much less a factor than people think..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leethal View Post
    would love to see a repeat with same tires on both bikes.. preferably the 5c tires...I think bike weight is much less a factor than people think..
    Agreed. I suspect the Butcher/Slaughter combo would roll a lot faster than the Minions. Could be the majority of the time difference really.
    The older I get, the faster I was.





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