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  1. #1
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    XC Marathon on Hot Weather tips?

    Hi

    I'm usually do some 40-70km XC marathons, but I'm really bad when it's 30-35'C (85-95'F).

    Actually I'm done after 20km in such conditions. Need to slow down after.

    Hydration is good, cloths are ok. I'm just overheating.

    What's your experience racing in hot temperatures?

    One of thoughts is to change the helmet.

  2. #2
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    I don't really have an answer to help you out here. I am just the opposite. Give me those temps and I am super happy, but my wife is like you, she has a really hard time in those temp ranges.

    It may just be physiology of different people. She hardly ever sweats, so I think she has a hard time cooling off.

  3. #3
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    yes right!

    I'm also enjoy cold temps.

    The problem is if it's cold you can put an additional layer, but when it's too hot and speeds are low... riding in bikini could be solution

    Found another similar post, looks like electrolytes are very important.
    Which I didn't.

  4. #4
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    She can also ride without gloves or really thin liners in temps that I am literally wearing my alpine gloves and still having cold fingers.

    maybe ride with a misting fan on your handlebars. lol

  5. #5
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    big white bandana or booney neck protector covering the back of neck to shoulders
    big difference in the heat and sun
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  6. #6
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    As someone who deals with those and higher temps, I can tell you keeping the sun from you is key, i.e. make sure you have on plenty of sunscreen and if you're lacking any sort of hair, a bandana or better yet a BUFF with UV protection made of wicking material .

    Helmet wise, most definitely you want the most ventilated helmet, with good air flow you can afford, both $$ wise and trail condition wise (don't want an XC lid riding black diamond trails). The helmet change was the biggest thing for me when I started riding, moving from a piiece of crap to a nice Bell with lots of vents made a huge difference in keeping cooler.

    Another thing to do is keep a bottle of cold water specifically to squirt over you, your head, legs, wrists. Another place to help is proper socks and ventilated shoes - Wetting down the bandana can seriously help cool you down.

    As to electrolytes, yes, keeping those levels up is very important in heat, so use at minimum some tabs like NUNN to help replace lost units and supplement that with a energy drink with other stuff, plus some protein and sugars.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  7. #7
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    As a nordic-blooded guy that still does pretty well in the heat, here are a few tips I can share:

    1. Train in the heat, if you can (duh).

    2. Yes, a well-ventilated helmet is huge.

    3. Ditch the bib shorts. Every layer over every square centimeter of body surface is just insulation.

    4. Ditto any upper body base layer.

    5. Ditto anything on your head at all. It's an amazing heat radiator. Just leave a little hair up there for UV protection (I go #3 clipper attachment in hot weather).

    6. Even the size of your riding glasses affects cooling. Smaller is better.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  8. #8
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    I've found that doing Hot Vinyasa Yoga (95+ degrees) during the winter not only helps my strength and flexibility but also helps me keep the pedals spinning during the hotter months. It helps me adapt to pushing hard in extreme heat.
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  9. #9
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    in AZ we hit over 100 during out races.

    I wear my normal shop race kit. small ( short) ankle socks a halo under my helmet for sweat and gloves with a lot of ventilation, Main thing is to be ready for the race with fluids.

    I'll drink a lot more during a hot race. I also try to train/ride in the heat, which I prefer over cold weather.
    Too Many .

  10. #10
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    Im in Texas and do hours of training in the summer because its when I have the most time to ride. (long evenings)

    I pack my Camelback classic With ice and cold drink that fits the ride's needs. No the camelback does not trap heat. It is tiny compared to the size of my back and when filled with water, it doesnt lie flat on my back.

    Shave your head and your arms and exposed legs.

    Do some sort of heat acclimation training such as riding in doors with no fan. It doesnt take long to get used to it and it also doesnt take long to become de-acclimated.

    Clean pair of glasses with your stuff at the feed zone if allowed. Sweat stained glasses become worthless. Make sure you have a helmet that doesnt pour sweat into your glasses in Hot weather races. Been there, done that.

  11. #11
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    Definitely do as many "easy" aerobic rides as you can in the heat before your race. This is especially important if you work indoors. Heat acclimatization changes your blood volume, and your body's ability to handle the heat. It may even change your "sweat profile" or the amount of electrolyte that your body allows out during activity. It really doesn't take long to reap the benefits of training in the heat.

    In our local races it is very evident who trains or works outside and who does not. Last year we had one race where the heat index was well over 100 degrees. The office boys were dropping like flies.
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  12. #12
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    I'm also one of those who live in where there is a very warm climate for most of the year. Some races are done at 42 C degrees, which is brutal. My family has always been from here, so I guess I do have some genetics traits to deal with our climate.

    As others pointed out, the easiest thing you can do is to ride on the heat more so you get accustomed to it, it doesn't take long and you know what to expect on race day.

    Second most important thing is to keep hydrated (water and electrolytes) and cool off yourself when you feel you might overheat. First and foremost, cool off your head, most of the time the drop of performance you get is because you are overheating your head, which I think is less capable of tolerating heat than your other organs in the mid section. Throw some water over the top of your head. Second, wet your clothes and the air combined with the speed you have will amplify the cooling effect by a large margin.

    Sadly, sometimes you don't have water too cool off yourself and it is too hot, in those extreme cases it might be reasonable to slow down yourself before you overheat, conserve energy and attack when there is shadow/water/cooler climate.


    p.s.
    If you actually feed bad when overheating you should just stop and find help, heatstroke is some serious condition that you should be able to identify for your own sake.

  13. #13
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    Lot of good tips!

    Just to share mine.
    I talked this days with my doctor, as I did some tests before that race.
    But I missed some info he told me that time. Also I took his medication after the race.

    So the missing info was that my inflammations was high, that's why my intracranial tension was higher than normal.

    The combination of hot sunny whether, intense physical activity, blood vessels are expanding. Due to too much liquid in the body and the limited volume of our "brain pan" and expanding vessels I couldn't go above probably 50-60% if intensity.

    Now I understood why he told me to get rid of food that cause inflammations

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