Remote lockout use- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Remote lockout use

    So I just got my first XC race bike (SC blur). Also the first bike I've had with a remote lockout. I'm looking for some guidance on how people use their lockouts in races. Are you locking and unlocking frequently or only rarely? I would imagine using it on any fire roads or double track. But are people using it on smooth uphill single track? Since it's as easy as shifting, I imagine you could use it all the time if you want, but is this worthwhile?

  2. #2
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    On that particular model of bike I would say its not worth it to use the lockout, unless its road.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDLover View Post
    On that particular model of bike I would say its not worth it to use the lockout, unless its road.
    I've only got 3 rides on it so far but I would say it pedals extremely well. You may be right, maybe only on the smoothest of the smooth

  4. #4
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    Do the forks lock out at the same time? I mainly use mine to stop fork bob when out of the saddle on smooth climbs.

  5. #5
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    I've got the Anthem Pro 1 with the remote lock out, locks out front and rear, only use it for the road, bike pedals really well. still nice to have for getting to the trailhead.

  6. #6
    LMN
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    I probably through my lockout switch 50 times a ride.
    -I use it on steep climbs so rear suspension sits high in its travel.
    -Unless the trail is rough I use it every time I climb out of the saddle.
    -when ever I am riding on pavement

    The lockout also allows me to tune my suspension a bit differently. I put in a larger volume spacer and run a bit less air pressure to make it more supple at the top of the travel.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  7. #7
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    I never use mine. For front shock my opinion is that when climbing there's so little weight on the front end that it doesn't give you much help (unless your weight is oddly far forward), and if the climb is rough at all, smoothing the 'rattle' will help your climb.

    For fs, I think it depends on your bike. Mine doesn't seem to bob at all due to pedal stroke, and although I've got a 1 button fr/rr lockout, I never touch it. I suppose I should for smooth surface starts, or a smooth sprint finish, but I usually start seated (and often get the hole-shot) and with a smooth seated pedal stroke there seems to be insignificant shock movement, -but it couldn't hurt, so I guess I should start using it...
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  8. #8
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    My bike hasn't had a remote until recently. And honestly, for most of the racing, you don't need it. I am trying to eek out that last 10th of a percent of my riding right now, which is why I am using it (frequently).

    Right now, I use the lockout anytime I am on a smooth surface going hard, or when standing and hammering (which is often). In the past when I didn't have a remote I only used it on long, smooth climbs. Seated, I don't lock it too much.

    The difference is really small. I would recommend experimenting and seeing what works for you. I will say though that the gains of having locked are easily lost by making a mistake with it locked. Example, hitting a hard bump (even when climbing standing) and getting knocked off line. That second you saved on that climb having it locked was lost when it took you 3 seconds to recover getting knocked off line.

  9. #9
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    I agree with LMN and think it's a must have on a XC bike. I have a 18 Trek Top Fuel and use it probably 15-20x per ride. I use the lockout More than the dropper. A lot depends on your trails if you have smooth sections or uphill sections w/o baby head rocks it firms up the bike and you can ride it like a single speed. If your riding tech or trails full of baby heads not so much. I do a few mixed use dirt and gravel rides and the lock out is great for the gravel and road portions. Love the fox remote -too!!!



    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    I probably through my lockout switch 50 times a ride.
    -I use it on steep climbs so rear suspension sits high in its travel.
    -Unless the trail is rough I use it every time I climb out of the saddle.
    -when ever I am riding on pavement

    The lockout also allows me to tune my suspension a bit differently. I put in a larger volume spacer and run a bit less air pressure to make it more supple at the top of the travel.

  10. #10
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    My XC race bike is a specialized Epic. So No lock out for the rear as just let the brain do the work. In front I have Fox 32SC and leave it wide open 95% of the time. Seated climbing the front end is fine and does not move. Standing climbing it does sink into the travel, but I don't stand for long on that bike. It usally to clear feature or maybe 20 seconds max. For long road climbs I will lock out manually. On my SS HT I have the same Fox32 SC, but I have 3 position remote lock and I use that a ton. However there is a lot of standing climbing on that bike so it makes sense.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  11. #11
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    I have SC Blur also. I rarely use the lockout. Only time is when I'm climbing out of the saddle or smooth jeep road, which is rare. When I use lock out on our local race terrain, it feels like I'm losing traction.

    After riding the bike two seasons, still not a fan of their lockout setup. Better if it was "hard thumb" for lock, "easy finger" for unlock. It has never felt natural and I still get the two confused.
    Last edited by Poncharelli; 2 Days Ago at 07:47 AM.

  12. #12
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    I have no pedal bob and I have the cleanest bars around on my 2020 Specialized Epic Hardtail with SID Brain fork. Haha! Before you poo poo a hardtail know it's the same frameset that finished 1st and 2nd at the Leadville 100 this year under Howard Grotts and Quinn Simmons (who had 3 or 4 flats and is the 2019 Junior Road Race World Champion). #noclutter #simplicity #horsesforcourses

  13. #13
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    On many XC oriented FS bikes I think the lockout is the next step in making a bike more comfortable and capable. For really long rides, for really chunky or rough rides, or for rides that are a little over the capabilities of the bike the lockout can make the bike better.

    LMN has it right, you can tune for a more compliant ride, and tune for more bottom out resistance without riding a harsh bike when you have the option to lockout. I have my lockout cable adjustment setup to "fully" lockout the rear, and only firm up the front a lot. The inline cable adjusters are nice for this, if I decide to join a gravel ride with friends I can firm everything up on the lockouts can still take the light(er) carbon bike.

  14. #14
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    As an XC racer, I use the lockout a lot during races and rarely when not racing. When the placements between 1-5 or 1-10 are measured in seconds or fractions of a second, it makes a big difference. You are always trying to move forward as fast as possible, there is no rest or coasting, you want every last bit of energy transferred into forward motion. On even the most efficient XC bikes, you need a lockout because you are throwing the bike around, mashing pedals, explosive bursts of power, yanking it left and right, pushing down, pulling up, etc. All sorts of things that activate the suspension where you want it to remain rigid for maximum power transfer. If you look at the new Trek XC race bike and look at their reasoning behind it, you'll understand a bit about why this is so important for XC racing. I won't say that everyone needs to buy that bike, but the premises is valid and that's why lockouts are so common for XC race bikes.

    In general, the bike, the lockout, the suspension type, etc., only start to make significant differences when you are already a pretty high level performer, meaning that you consistently turn out fast times. Not trying to say other people are "slow", but at the higher levels you'll often reach a point where you can't really go any faster and need a lighter bike, a more efficient bike, etc. The extreme example is riding the 30lb AM bike in an XC race. Even a high expert rider will hit a wall and the riders with the same fitness on 23lb rigs will zoom right by on the climbs. When we get down to much smaller things like lockouts...they still make a difference..abet, smaller, but you have to remember when racing you are looking for any and every little advantage. Enough of these in your favor and you might just pull off something great.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stonerider View Post
    I have no pedal bob and I have the cleanest bars around on my 2020 Specialized Epic Hardtail with SID Brain fork. Haha! Before you poo poo a hardtail know it's the same frameset that finished 1st and 2nd at the Leadville 100 this year
    If you can take that kind of abuse and jarring, my hat is off to you. I can no longer do that. I watch the young pro-racers and I see that either they are on hardtails, or they run the lockout "on" for everything but the gnarliest chunky descents. I ride downhill HARD, but on a hardtail at that speed it feels like I'm constantly trying to snap my wrists off.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  16. #16
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    The lockout rarely gets used on my Blur. Out of saddle climb if it's not technical or fire road/gravel.

    Sent from my moto z3 using Tapatalk
    2018 Santa Cruz Blur
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  17. #17
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    I have demoed the blur, and I bought a sniper this spring. Both have remote lockout. During races I use the lockout anytime I stand and pedal and it's smoothish, and many times when I am seated and pedaling but it has to be smoother to use it when seated.

    On both bikes the lockout firms things up and gives you more to pedal against so I like that. Makes a huge difference for standing and pedaling but it's probably pretty minor when seated.

    I had a race (US Cup vail lake) where it was often pretty smooth because the course was covered in a real coarse sand which really smoothed things out. Super fun, twisty course but made it real easy to use the lock out a lot.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jtsoderman View Post
    So I just got my first XC race bike (SC blur). Also the first bike I've had with a remote lockout. I'm looking for some guidance on how people use their lockouts in races. Are you locking and unlocking frequently or only rarely? I would imagine using it on any fire roads or double track. But are people using it on smooth uphill single track? Since it's as easy as shifting, I imagine you could use it all the time if you want, but is this worthwhile?
    Doesn't matter to me if it is a race or not, I lock mine out countless times on a ride. I do not have a remote, but I reach down to turn the dial often.
    On the hard tail, obviously I can only adjust the fork. On my full suspension I too flip the lever throughout a ride. Less often do I fiddle with the shock though. I can deal with too hard or too soft shock. I do not like a fork too firm -albeit so often I find myself reaching to soften the fork at sketchy moments because I forget beforehand.

    Lock it out when you want, or if you don't want. There is no magic recipe. The worst thing that can happen is you forgot to soften it before attacking a rough piece of trail.

  19. #19
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    The way I ride my Blur locked out is essentially the default position, activating the suspension when I need more traction or comfort. It's a big plastic BMX bike that turns into a squishy mountain bike at the push of a button.

  20. #20
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    Mine gets used a 5-100 times, depending upon the trail. I do it without even realizing it (it is so engrained)

    I have a three position.
    Many XC race courses it will stay in the middle.
    The moment a trail points up and the trail is buff and smooth.
    When the Trail gets aggressive, or if the course is chunky, or poppy, and playful, it will stay unlocked. Poppy would be a trail that had tons of G outs and features and you are constantly loading and unweighting the bike over hill crests and obstacles.

    Some trails are more divided in their "sections where I would adjust it less throughout the ride.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    As an XC racer, I use the lockout a lot during races and rarely when not racing. When the placements between 1-5 or 1-10 are measured in seconds or fractions of a second, it makes a big difference. ...

    When we get down to much smaller things like lockouts...they still make a difference..abet, smaller, but you have to remember when racing you are looking for any and every little advantage. Enough of these in your favor and you might just pull off something great.
    Yep. A 5 second gain on 3 minute climb is nothing when just having fun with friends. Or even very little racing mid pack. But at the top end of grid that 5 seconds could mean a podium or not. It could mean being in contention to have sprint finish where again. Those lock outs come in handy. This is why XC race bike have them. Even though my XC race bike does not have remote lock out I did manually lock it out on the fork twice in my saturday race. Once for the 4 mile paved road mass start and then at the very end last 1 mile run to the finish. I caught a guy on the pavement and out sprinted him to the finish. While the guy I sprinted with was not in class he could have been (next age group up) and I end up 3rd in my age group. That could have been a sprint for 3rd.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    If you can take that kind of abuse and jarring, my hat is off to you. I can no longer do that. I watch the young pro-racers and I see that either they are on hardtails, or they run the lockout "on" for everything but the gnarliest chunky descents. I ride downhill HARD, but on a hardtail at that speed it feels like I'm constantly trying to snap my wrists off.
    I'm 40, and quite riding a FS XC bike that was on load to me an back to a HT. I will be on a HT for XC racing for the foreseeable future

    Also means I only have to lock the front

  23. #23
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    The Pivot Mach 4 SL with Fox Live is appealing, but not to my wallet. My buddy likes his 2019 Scott Spark RC World Cup three-position lever. He knew the Scott suspension wasn't as efficient as other options, but for pure racing he couldn't do without the 100/70/lockout.

  24. #24
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    I use the lockouts all the time on my Scalpel. I've ditched the troublesome twin lock hydraulic switch in favour of separate lock out switches for the Lefty 2.0 and Monarch XX.
    I'm going to get the lockout detuned slightly to a firm setting and then leave the open tune. I do like a little bit of movement

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