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  1. #1
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    Peloton phenomenon

    Anyone do this? So pricey but I have so many friends sold on it! Must be something to it, especially the motivation side..

    New forum here: https://www.pelotonforum.com

    If you've tried it, share some insight. I've seent he ad.
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    I have one and did about 54 hours (out of a total of 450) on it last year. It works great, is quiet, clean, no maintenance, and the classes are pretty good. I can get a great ride in on it in an hour when it may be cold, raining, or hot as hades outside. You have to get used to the resistance knob and the fact that it's not free-wheel, but other than that no complaints whatsoever.
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    Depends on what you are after. If you are just looking for general all around fitness, and a way to stay motivated, it's a good option, albeit pricey. Another more affordable option using your own bike would be the Bkool setup, even higher quality production on the videos (same theme as Peloton, but also dedicated bike workouts), and significantly cheaper. If you are looking for more bike dedicated focus, then TrainerRoad, Zwift, Sufferfest, etc are a better option.

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    I saw an ad with a guy who had pretty horrible pedaling form. Bouncing around on the saddle like it was a pogo stick. I'm not sold on it. I'd be more interested in the wahoo bike
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    I'll let you know this fall when I pick a "hardly used" one off of Craigslist for under a grand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Train Wreck View Post
    I saw an ad with a guy who had pretty horrible pedaling form. Bouncing around on the saddle like it was a pogo stick. I'm not sold on it. I'd be more interested in the wahoo bike
    ha I have one spinerval video suffer-o-rama I think, and one girl in there bounces so much I can barely watch it while I kill myself on my lifecycle.

    dammit have good form if you are gonna be an instructor/actor
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  7. #7
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    I've always wondered if spin classes really did anything for actual power output? Bman? thoughts?
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    Do you love spin classes more than anything? Don't laugh, some do. If your goal is to be able to do a spin class workout any time, anywhere, then the Peloton bike is for you!

    If you're a cyclist though, i.e. someone for whom the goal is to get fitter so you can ride outdoors, there are better options. For the price of a Peloton bike, you can get a Wahoo Kickr Core and a decent gravel bike to mount on it. Use that for Trainer Road, Zwift etc., then take it out and actually ride it outside on the weekends.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scatterbrained View Post
    I've always wondered if spin classes really did anything for actual power output? Bman? thoughts?
    I got stronger last Spring using the Peloton than I have in the past couple years. I use my Favero Assiomo power pedals from my road bike so I get accurate power readings. The music and instructors actually really do help you when you're trying to finish off your intervals. You just have to know what YOU want from the ride and be able to massage the effort from what they might be doing. I got some of my highest output levels for 5 and 10 minutes on this thing. One of the instructors (Christine-she's a beast) just won a medal in the World Champs last Fall in the UK so it's not like they don't know what they're doing.

    Honestly, it's a nice change-up from regular road rides, especially in the cold, dark months. And I don't mind watching a couple of the female instructors for an hour or so.

    Here's a pretty hard ride I did last Summer. Granted, the numbers might not be huge, but keep in mind I'm 143 pounds and 60 years old.
    https://www.strava.com/activities/2492917544
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    People in marketing are finding that people will pay top dollar for convenience. Peleton is great because it's everything you need in one package. It's a monitor, it's a bike, and it's a work out plan all in one. Mail ordered and everything. One size fits all. Sure, you can build a better trainer for less but you would have to research trainers, find a monitor, and research bikes to use. It would go a long way for one of these companies like kickr to offer a complete package including a highly adjustable one size fits all cycling platform and monitor. When I see an ad for these trainers they always show people training on their 10k road rocket which just doesn't make sense since most people say their trainer build gets beaten up.

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    It seems like the Peloton bike is configured to intergrate with their app, and their app focuses on classes geared towards improving general fitness.

    I agree with earlier posts saying a smart trainer (wahoo, tacx, etc) paired with a good training app would be a better deal for cycling/racing fitness. Those things are ass kickers I can say for a fact and will definitely up your ftp. Not that a Peloton can't but they're more expensive and not exactly geared towards that.

    Indoor "smart" training has definitely come a long way in the last few years.
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  12. #12
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    I think I'll continue to use my actual bicycles on a trainer or rollers instead of buying that junk. Hard pass.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    I think I'll continue to use my actual bicycles on a trainer or rollers instead of buying that junk. Hard pass.
    LOL I knew I could count on a constructive, positive comment from you. Especially since you've probably never tried, or even seen, one.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    LOL I knew I could count on a constructive, positive comment from you. Especially since you've probably never tried, or even seen, one.
    You got me there. I don't have more money than sense, and as such, I choose to spend it wisely. I've seen them, and their price tags, and the classes. My SIL has one. She doesn't actually ride bikes outside aside from taking her kids to the park on the local rail trail.

    Like I said, I'll put my SRM-equipped mountain or road bike on my rollers, and continue to train in that way. If someone yelling at you is what gets you motivated to ride, great. It doesn't do anything for me, at all. I'm not going to try something that I know will do nothing for me. Sorry.
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    If someone yelling at you is what gets you motivated to ride, great. It doesn't do anything for me, at all.
    Ha ha this 100%. The few occasions I've done workouts of any kind with leaders commanding them I find myself thinking "Screw you, no, I don't WANT to do that and you can't make me." But I'll happily bury myself chasing stupid blue squares on Trainer Road. Probably says more about my issues with authority than about validity of the training platforms.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    You got me there. I don't have more money than sense, and as such, I choose to spend it wisely. I've seen them, and their price tags, and the classes. My SIL has one. She doesn't actually ride bikes outside aside from taking her kids to the park on the local rail trail.

    Like I said, I'll put my SRM-equipped mountain or road bike on my rollers, and continue to train in that way. If someone yelling at you is what gets you motivated to ride, great. It doesn't do anything for me, at all. I'm not going to try something that I know will do nothing for me. Sorry.
    Well I've got plenty of money AND sense. And you know what else I have? Choices. So if I don't want to go and ride MY SRM-equipped road bike, and don't want to bring it in from the garage and hook it up to some loud, clanky-ass trainer, I can get on my Peloton (that my wife bought me, lol) and have Emma Lovewell softly tell me to go harder, longer and escape from the misery of pedaling to nowhere.

    And calling something "junk" just cuz it's not your jam is not showing much sense, but that's alright, we all know it's just your style. I was just trying to help out with fc's question. Happy New Year!
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    Well I've got plenty of money AND sense. And you know what else I have? Choices. So if I don't want to go and ride MY SRM-equipped road bike, and don't want to bring it in from the garage and hook it up to some loud, clanky-ass trainer, I can get on my Peloton (that my wife bought me, lol) and have Emma Lovewell softly tell me to go harder, longer and escape from the misery of pedaling to nowhere.

    And calling something "junk" just cuz it's not your jam is not showing much sense, but that's alright, we all know it's just your style. I was just trying to help out with fc's question. Happy New Year!
    Likewise.


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  18. #18
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    I'd be bored out of my brain.....

  19. #19
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    I have one, and my experience/opinion is the same as BmanInTheD. Itís a nice, fun option to have. High quality build and monitor, and quiet and smooth as could be.

    I have a coach, and train quite seriously, and I use it for some of my assigned workouts, when I feel like a change up and it ďfitsĒ.. While there are tons of ďspinning class-typeĒ classes on there, there are also some that are rather serious and very suitable for what I need, with no screaming instructor or bouncing up and down. And as Bman said, you can massage a particular class/workout to get out of it exactly what you need.

    I also have a Wahoo Kickr, which I use with my hardtail MTB and Zwift, in front of a 65Ē flat screen, for structured workouts and Z1 active recovery pedaling. Again, another option for specific uses, and a change up.

    And I live in Arizona, where I can, and do, ride outside year-round. But as I said, choices and options, depending on what you want that particular day, or if the weather precludes riding outside.


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    Let's be honest, people will shit on peloton's price tag claiming they have more sense than money, but those are the same people that have no trouble buying a 6-8k real bike.

    In other words, peloton is not for people without money. Cheap people like myself settle for a 1k bike and maybe a used trainer or spinning bike. If you are looking for a complete indoor trainer, peloton may be a good choice, after all you will still have plenty of money for real bikes and cool pricy gadgets.

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    ^^^Glad somebody else gets the fact that it's not always an either/or choice. I like options.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    ^^^Glad somebody else gets the fact that it's not always an either/or choice. I like options.
    Don't let these guys knock you down. It obvious they don't have one or haven't used one. They are also some of the same names you see in many threads crapping on those subjects. I have learned to not trust their opinions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    You got me there. I don't have more money than sense, and as such, I choose to spend it wisely. I've seen them, and their price tags, and the classes. My SIL has one. She doesn't actually ride bikes outside aside from taking her kids to the park on the local rail trail.

    Like I said, I'll put my SRM-equipped mountain or road bike on my rollers, and continue to train in that way. If someone yelling at you is what gets you motivated to ride, great. It doesn't do anything for me, at all. I'm not going to try something that I know will do nothing for me. Sorry.
    I can send you some strongly worded emails you can read while on your rollers, if that might help.
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    Personally, I'm waiting to get the Kickr Bike this summer. Gotta get through this move first, but I already tend to sit in front of my TV spinning away on Zwift until my taint cries for mercy. If the Peleton bike worked with Zwift I'd already own one.
    . . . . . . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by scatterbrained View Post
    Personally, I'm waiting to get the Kickr Bike this summer. Gotta get through this move first, but I already tend to sit in front of my TV spinning away on Zwift until my taint cries for mercy. If the Peleton bike worked with Zwift I'd already own one.
    Casting no aspersions on your choice, but genuinely curious: why not get a Kickr Core, Kickr Climb, and $2000 bike to hook up to Ďem? I guess the Wahoo Bike makes it easy to change bike fit if you want. Is there other functionally that wouldnít be available with a real bike hooked up to a smart trainer/climb gizmo?

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    Casting no aspersions on your choice, but genuinely curious: why not get a Kickr Core, Kickr Climb, and $2000 bike to hook up to Ďem? I guess the Wahoo Bike makes it easy to change bike fit if you want. Is there other functionally that wouldnít be available with a real bike hooked up to a smart trainer/climb gizmo?
    I imagine the indoor bikes are more stable...not having to screw around with putting the bike on/taking it off the trainer has value too, along with not coating your bike with salt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by richde View Post
    I imagine the indoor bikes are more stable...not having to screw around with putting the bike on/taking it off the trainer has value too, along with not coating your bike with salt.
    I get the latter, but the former is why I ride rollers. I literally pick my bike up, set it on the rollers, and start riding like I would outside. Iíve had the same set since 2006(!). Multiple levels of resistance. Definitely prefer it over any form of trainer, although I also own one of those, too.

    You actually have to ride and stabilize the bike; if you donít, you fall off. I canít quantify this, but I feel stronger core-wise after riding the rollers exclusively for a winter than if I had been on the trainer alone. I left my rollers at my parents house one year, and felt ďoffĒ when the trails in upstate NY finally dried off.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    I get the latter, but the former is why I ride rollers. I literally pick my bike up, set it on the rollers, and start riding like I would outside. Iíve had the same set since 2006(!). Multiple levels of resistance. Definitely prefer it over any form of trainer, although I also own one of those, too.

    You actually have to ride and stabilize the bike; if you donít, you fall off. I canít quantify this, but I feel stronger core-wise after riding the rollers exclusively for a winter than if I had been on the trainer alone. I left my rollers at my parents house one year, and felt ďoffĒ when the trails in upstate NY finally dried off.


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    But at the same time, I'm willing to bet that you could dig deeper on a static trainer than on rollers.

    I can ride year round, so I don't have a dog in this fight, but there's value to both static trainers and rollers. An optimal setup would be to have both...and if cost is not a factor the Wahoo bike would be pretty damn nice.

  29. #29
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    Peloton phenomenon

    Quote Originally Posted by richde View Post
    But at the same time, I'm willing to bet that you could dig deeper on a static trainer than on rollers.

    I can ride year round, so I don't have a dog in this fight, but there's value to both static trainers and rollers. An optimal setup would be to have both...and if cost is not a factor the Wahoo bike would be pretty damn nice.
    The resistance provided by the magnetic unit on the rollers is actually enough. Iím riding my MTB at normal riding pressures, too. Did 4x6min at 360w tonight, alternating sitting/spinning and standing. Never got into my top gear (34x10), and my cadence was in the high 60s during the standing portions. 34x10 is going to be unpleasant very shortly unless you are doing some seriously low cadence work.

    Iíll also echo a common talking point from our velodrome-racing track brethren: doing high cadence work on rollers will help you smooth your pedal stroke out. Living in an area with a lot of decomposed granite, shale and sandstone, I notice that I spin the rear tire much less often than some people, and Iím running pretty fast, low knob rear tires. Coincidence? Maybe. Skill? Doubtful. Hardly scientific, but I can rev up to nearly 200rpm on the rollers without eating it. Thatís worth something. Certainly useful for applying very quick bursts.


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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    Casting no aspersions on your choice, but genuinely curious: why not get a Kickr Core, Kickr Climb, and $2000 bike to hook up to Ďem? I guess the Wahoo Bike makes it easy to change bike fit if you want. Is there other functionally that wouldnít be available with a real bike hooked up to a smart trainer/climb gizmo?
    I originally was going to go that route. Thought about picking up a kickr or an H3 and a cheap road bike. The issues for me are a bit more complex. Right now my wife also used our current exercise bike (Life Fitness LifeCycle 9500) to make sure she's on top of her fitness for her PRTs. Having a road bike that fits me would mean I'd still have to keep the exercise bike around. Also, I don't ride road anymore. Haven't in years and have no intention of doing it again. Meanwhile my wife is adamantly against road riding to the point where she objects vehemently against even bringing one in the house lest I get a wild hair up my backside and decide to head out on it. It's hard to argue with a woman who sees the bad side of car vs. bike accidents every day. That said; the Kickr bike can replace the LifeCycle in our home, it can quickly be adjusted to fit both of us, with no drive train there's minimal maintenance, the gearing can be customized, it can simulate climbs, and it'll be much more stable than a trainer. Right now I spend 2-4hrs a week on Zwift and I imagine after our move this summer that number will increase so having a dedicated rig just makes sense. Granted the cost for us isn't the factor that it might be for others.
    . . . . . . . .

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    I have one and love it. Lot of variety with the programs that allow you to target the type of workout you want. Itís a reasonably fun way to get cardio done and build/maintain leg strength when the weather isnít ideal. Iíve noticed improvements in my actual climbs as well, which was my goal. Bonus my wife digs it - which wouldnít be the case with a gravel bike and trainer. Are there cheaper options - certainly. But where peloton excels is the quality of the bike and the polish of the user experience.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scatterbrained View Post
    I originally was going to go that route. Thought about picking up a kickr or an H3 and a cheap road bike. The issues for me are a bit more complex. Right now my wife also used our current exercise bike (Life Fitness LifeCycle 9500) to make sure she's on top of her fitness for her PRTs. Having a road bike that fits me would mean I'd still have to keep the exercise bike around. Also, I don't ride road anymore. Haven't in years and have no intention of doing it again. Meanwhile my wife is adamantly against road riding to the point where she objects vehemently against even bringing one in the house lest I get a wild hair up my backside and decide to head out on it. It's hard to argue with a woman who sees the bad side of car vs. bike accidents every day. That said; the Kickr bike can replace the LifeCycle in our home, it can quickly be adjusted to fit both of us, with no drive train there's minimal maintenance, the gearing can be customized, it can simulate climbs, and it'll be much more stable than a trainer. Right now I spend 2-4hrs a week on Zwift and I imagine after our move this summer that number will increase so having a dedicated rig just makes sense. Granted the cost for us isn't the factor that it might be for others.
    Makes sense to me; right now Iím sharing a Kickr Core with my fiancťe, which is a PITA having to change bikes over a few times a week. Weíre Trainer Road users, so all the virtual reality stuff for Zwift users (climb angle, virtual shifting and coasting) are useless to us, but I see the attraction.

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    what you can do on a spinbike you cannot do on rollers or on a real bike are insane anaerobic watts where you just about pass out (you'd fall off rollers by then) and also insane high cadence (to me insane is 180-200...starts to become unstable)

    both of these types of sets translates to real world riding where you can blip up the cadence at any time very easily and also motor over huge grunts and pedal hard up and over with no gear changes...just more 'tools' in the quiver

    so in some ways you do get benefits you can't get on a normal bike, but you need to do those specific sets. it does pay off, but hurts and it's mental toughness to do that crap indoors
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    The way I look at it is you have to put in the effort and time, whether it's on a dumb trainer in a dank corner of the basement or something else. You decide what you wanna do and how much you wanna spend to make that less tedious. Smart trainers and apps can help, as can mixing it up with spin classes (incl Peloton) and so on.

    A few years ago one of the LBSs ran Computrainer sessions 4 nights a week. They had 8 set up and the sessions were always full. I invariably wound up in some type of informal competition with at least a couple of the other riders trying to get the best avg W/kg or something. One was a young(er) woman I often sat next to and I had to really bust a gasket trying to keep up with her. Those were a blast. At $20 per session it wasn't inexpensive.
    Do the math.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    what you can do on a spinbike you cannot do on rollers or on a real bike are insane anaerobic watts where you just about pass out (you'd fall off rollers by then) and also insane high cadence (to me insane is 180-200...starts to become unstable)

    both of these types of sets translates to real world riding where you can blip up the cadence at any time very easily and also motor over huge grunts and pedal hard up and over with no gear changes...just more 'tools' in the quiver

    so in some ways you do get benefits you can't get on a normal bike, but you need to do those specific sets. it does pay off, but hurts and it's mental toughness to do that crap indoors
    This is one of the things I was gonna mention earlier and left out. Some of the classes encourage you to do things that you might not think of (or may have forgotten if you've used a coach in the past, like me) like doing some super-high cadence efforts or super-hard surges, if left on your own. All these things help you either in just regular mountain biking or racing. Sure, you can do all this on rollers or a trainer, but unless you have a coach or are a REAL serious racer, some of these things you might not know about. And as said by someone else, having had a few really nice bikes myself, the Peloton is a really well-built/designed machine. VERY quiet, super smooth, and I haven't done one second of maintenance on it in over 200 hours of using it. The only nagging thing is the software has to be updated pretty often, but not much more than Garmin, iPhone, etc.
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  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    This is one of the things I was gonna mention earlier and left out. Some of the classes encourage you to do things that you might not think of (or may have forgotten if you've used a coach in the past, like me) like doing some super-high cadence efforts or super-hard surges, if left on your own. All these things help you either in just regular mountain biking or racing. Sure, you can do all this on rollers or a trainer, but unless you have a coach or are a REAL serious racer, some of these things you might not know about. And as said by someone else, having had a few really nice bikes myself, the Peloton is a really well-built/designed machine. VERY quiet, super smooth, and I haven't done one second of maintenance on it in over 200 hours of using it. The only nagging thing is the software has to be updated pretty often, but not much more than Garmin, iPhone, etc.
    Fair enough. I regret my choice of words, particularly the word "junk", and apologize.

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    I'm more interested in the entire indoor training phenomenon and how/if it's changed the landscape of amateur racing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fc View Post
    Anyone do this? So pricey but I have so many friends sold on it! Must be something to it, especially the motivation side..

    New forum here: https://www.pelotonforum.com

    If you've tried it, share some insight. I've seent he ad.
    Is a Smart Trainer setup cheaper? Barely, if you donít have a lap top or Apple TV And 2nd or 3rd bike already.

    Also having the adjustability of a spin bike is much easier to adjust fit (which could be impossible) on a purchased bike. They are quiet too, which is a big deal.

    Still, Iíd rather someone buy a first MTB and a Smart trainer for pure versatility. But for what it is, Iím excited to see so many people buying them and using them. Bottom line, People are doing more workouts per month than they ever did with a gym membership and itís changing lives. I have people all around me competing with each other and their clients around the nation.


    Someone asked if spin was beneficial? Itís basically a trainer without a freewheel, so absolutely. Remember peloton and several spin studio bikes have power meters.

    When I travel for work, I look for Cycle Bar studios and I just do my structured workouts while everyone does what the instructor dictates. I also do their sprint competition no matter where it falls in my sets which HUrTs. Two weeks ago, I did a drop in at a spin class and knocked out 2x15 at FTP. If I am lucky enough to get a hotel with a Pelatonbike, itís a plus! So far itís only happened a hand full of times.







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    Quote Originally Posted by richde View Post
    I'm more interested in the entire indoor training phenomenon and how/if it's changed the landscape of amateur racing.

    Power meters & smart trainers have brought structured training to a new level, now any amateur can use science and proven plans previously unavailable even to elite pro's. I have a feeling that amateurs (and pro's) are stronger on average than they used to be due to that.
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    Is a Smart Trainer setup cheaper? Barely, if you donít have a lap top or Apple TV And 2nd or 3rd bike already.

    You can run zwift on a phone and you don't need a second or third bike. You can get into a nice smart trainer setup for under $1,000 easy, and they are very quiet.

    Nothing against the Peloton but it doesn't seem to offer as much as a smart trainer for a competitive cyclist. It doesn't have a power meter and to my knowledge can't connect to any of the many good training apps. Does it have ERG mode?

    If I were to get a bike I'd get a wattbike or kickr bike instead.
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  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    You can run zwift on a phone and you don't need a second or third bike. You can get into a nice smart trainer setup for under $1,000 easy, and they are very quiet.

    Nothing against the Peloton but it doesn't seem to offer as much as a smart trainer for a competitive cyclist. It doesn't have a power meter and to my knowledge can't connect to any of the many good training apps. Does it have ERG mode?

    If I were to get a bike I'd get a wattbike or kickr bike instead.
    Some trainers are pretty quiet, but a Peloton Bike is virtually silent, which is why my wife bought one for me a few years ago. With little kids in the house, a bike on a trainer, no matter how quiet, makes a ton of noise vis-a-vis the PB. And they DO have a power meter, which is pretty accurate compared to my Favero power pedals, except for low and high power outputs. From about 130-250 watts, it's pretty good. Over/under that, it over/under records power. You can figure out how the discrepancies work in a ride or two or you can use your own power pedals like I do. But no, no ERG, you have to manually adjust your effort with the knob.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Power meters & smart trainers have brought structured training to a new level, now any amateur can use science and proven plans previously unavailable even to elite pro's. I have a feeling that amateurs (and pro's) are stronger on average than they used to be due to that.
    There is that, but more along the lines of what "typical riders" with different levels of natural ability have done.

    These tools allow people without as much natural ability but more motivation to compete with and even beat people who had been successful in the past just based on ability despite their relatively low motivation to train. Has the rise of the average but motivated discouraged the gifted (but ultimately lazy)?

    I'm one of the people with less ability but more motivation.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by BmanInTheD View Post
    And they DO have a power meter, which is pretty accurate compared to my Favero power pedals, except for low and high power outputs.

    Peloton says they calculate power with a combination of resistance and cadence, no strain gauges. So unless they've changed anything no power meter. Seems like they come up with a fairly accurate estimation though.
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  44. #44
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    Peloton is a doomed business model. If you look at their financials, the majority of their revenue comes from trainer sales and not recurring revenue from subscriptions. Other big players (Bowflex, etc) are entering the market at much lower price points and there is nothing unique or proprietary to protect them from competition.

    My guess is that we will see a more automated gen 2 bike from them that is more similar to a Wahoo trainer that is controlled by the app based on your fitness level. Honestly for $2500 how is this already not standard?

  45. #45
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    I'm old school, still using 2003 Krietler rollers while listening to NPR and watching races; also lifting weights. Downhill skiing on Sundays. But I still mostly ride outside, in Utah winters.

    At this point I don't want any more stuff in the house. I have three bikes (road, CX, and MTB), that's enough.

    I'm well known at my workplace for being a prolific cyclist and coworkers are telling about their pelotons they just got. I'm always positive. I tell them the best exercise is the exercise you'll actually do. If they enjoy it, great! I just don't have any trouble using what I have.

  46. #46
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    I was talking to my brother in law yesterday. He's had a Peloton for two years (he used to mountain bike but hasn't in years so interesting that he seems to be ahead of the curve on this). He said he likes it but that the resistance level seems to be really inconsistent across units. I've forgotten how he came to this conclusion.
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  47. #47
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    I had an email discussion about Peloton with one of my friend's a few months ago. From a cycling perspective the hard part is to view Peloton in the way a non cyclist would. I've never even been to a spin class so appreciating the difference between that approach for fitness versus indoor turbo training as cycling specific training is a challenge!

    Here are some of the youtube links from that discussion which are worth a watch I think.

    Peloton Bike Review 2019 | How good is it really? (From an Ironman triathlete.)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WSGq23RWOog

    What to Expect at a Spin Class | Keltie O'Connor
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=XHZdWVfOI7U

    I Did Peloton For Two Weeks Straight And Hereís What Happened
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=erqLKwwZCVE

    Comments on last Techinsider video:

    The knee pain would most likely have been from incorrect clipless pedal cleat and / or saddle position setup. The cycling shoes were Peloton branded too. This knee pain was mentioned a few times so I don't think he could have realistically kept doing that 45 minute bike workout each day without running into more serious knee injury issues later on.

    Notice how much he was sweating each time post workout. He most likely didn't have a fan or any cooling airflow in the room so would have been overheating, limiting performance.

    Notice how he had different results when going to the actual studio and using a different bike, that means the calibration for any power numbers was off between bikes (affecting the calories burnt figure). That's a big problem with exercise bikes.

    You can also see the difference in heart rate between the studio class and being at home, with the studio class being higher. This may be due to increased exertion but I suspect a lot of that was down to increased heat stress during the studio class, overheating even more in a crowded room with poor ventilation. Heat stress pushes the heart rate up even more.

    Notice how at the end his aerobic fitness had improved but no improvement in strength. You'd need to look into exactly which classes he was doing for the type of workouts involved.

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    Whatever path we take be it for financial, simple preference or a specific goal, any type of secondary riding indoor is better than nothing. I am fortunate to be able to have a Wahoo Kickr, and it allows me to get some cardio on days when it's either too cold for my wimpy 58 year old So-Cal spoiled bones, or raining, or simply after a long day at work and being time crunched.

    I use Zwift, and do not find it particularly boring at all. Two or three nights a week on the trainer and outdoors in the dirt on both days off is about all I can manage on a good week. It's about having options. I just had a fairly serious crash on NYD this week, and have substantial injuries. I'm hoping to at least lightly spin on the trainer in another day or two before I can get my MTB fixed back up and at least have some healing.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by WR304 View Post
    I had an email discussion about Peloton with one of my friend's a few months ago. From a cycling perspective the hard part is to view Peloton in the way a non cyclist would. .
    I'm entirely sure what your point is. I'll say that over the past years I've been in quite a few different spin studios and all were basically OK airflow and temp wise, if not at the level of airflow I use at home. That doesn't mean I not sweating bullets by the end of a session at home. Most all had the temp set in the mid to low 60s. One thing you can do is see how the airflow varies from point to point in the room and choose a spot that works the best for you.

    Also, almost all spin bikes have resistance controlled by the user with a knob, and it's totally uncalibrated. It's up to the individual how much resistance they want. A common method of qualifying the level of effort is RPE and/or heart rate. There are some spin bikes now that read out power and will link to a HRM to display HR. IDK how accurate or reliable these are.

    IMO. Spinning isn't the best think or the only thing for cyclists. It's just another thing you can throw into the mix. For non-cyclists, who are usually the majority in any spin class, it's a good way to get an aerobic workout they might not otherwise get.
    Do the math.

  50. #50
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    We have a Peloton and a Wahoo Kicker with Climb. The Peloton is fun and has different kinds of workouts. Some of the workouts with weights, etc. Peloton has lots of good instructors. I think the Peloton is great for some people, my wife uses ours and I use the Wahoo Kicker.

    For me the Wahoo Kicker is almost like riding my road bike outside. The set up is almost identical. I can do structured workouts through training peaks or ride or race within Zwift. With the Kicker setup I shift gears. The racing is very fun if you like racing.

    Both are great tools.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salespunk View Post
    Peloton is a doomed business model. If you look at their financials, the majority of their revenue comes from trainer sales and not recurring revenue from subscriptions. Other big players (Bowflex, etc) are entering the market at much lower price points and there is nothing unique or proprietary to protect them from competition.

    My guess is that we will see a more automated gen 2 bike from them that is more similar to a Wahoo trainer that is controlled by the app based on your fitness level. Honestly for $2500 how is this already not standard?
    I haven't looked at their financials, but with a hefty $49 CDN subscription charge every month, not sure why their subscription revenue stream is not more significant than what you are suggesting. That amounts to $600 a year, every year, subject to future increases.
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  52. #52
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    The business model is solid imho and those of many analysts and strategists. Near zero churn rate in their subscriptions if you read the S1. Hereís the thing: they are a highly scalable integrated technology company. They are no more an exercise/cycling company than Apple is a phone company.
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  53. #53
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    Before I was ever a bike rider, I was a gym rat, and right at the end I really enjoyed the spin classes. Something about women all around me and everyone else pushing very hard, combined with some good music, that really served to motivate me in a way that I could no longer do on my own any longer.
    The only thing that seems to motivate me to push myself now, is a steep natural climb on my mountain bike.
    If this device motivates some, then more power to them.
    Lastly on price, when are some of you fools going to figure out that one man's $5000 is another's $50?

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  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattMay View Post
    The business model is solid imho and those of many analysts and strategists. Near zero churn rate in their subscriptions if you read the S1. Hereís the thing: they are a highly scalable integrated technology company. They are no more an exercise/cycling company than Apple is a phone company.
    They've been losing money for years.

    https://finance.yahoo.com/quote/PTON/financials?p=PTON

    2019 Operating Income or Loss -197,400(,000)

    That's the main weakness with Peloton, if the company goes under, the bikes lose a ton of functionality and value.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    You can run zwift on a phone and you don't need a second or third bike. You can get into a nice smart trainer setup for under $1,000 easy, and they are very quiet.

    Nothing against the Peloton but it doesn't seem to offer as much as a smart trainer for a competitive cyclist. It doesn't have a power meter and to my knowledge can't connect to any of the many good training apps. Does it have ERG mode?

    If I were to get a bike I'd get a wattbike or kickr bike instead.
    You are right. Peloton is not the best for competitive cyclist. They should get a smart trainer, Second Bike and apple TV (or use their current device). Peloton has "power" and cadence but I think it still doesnt broadcast and cant be used for other apps. Of course it cannot freewheel, which can have its own undesired impact on knee joints. Zwift would likely cannibalize their membership as it is a 1/3rd the price monthly.

    The kicker bike is a Fancy piece of Kit. Its really a shame it doesnt have a
    Screen like the Peloton does, which is really great. (well accept when you old school non BT headphone wire taps a button on the screen.)
    https://www.wahoofitness.com/devices...ike/kickr-bike
    It's quite expensive.


    Why you want a viewing screen second bike:

    1. you cant see jack squat on a Phone. you can run TR, but you cant really Zwift. I've tried, it sucks, you cant read or see whats going on (Grades, Watts, breakaways, interval workouts) I was going to un zwift on ipad, but its not compatible with older ipads
    2. you really do need a second bike. Unless you enjoy the wasted time of installing and deinstalling your bike every time you want to switch between workouts AND re-clocking the Derraileur because they have never once been the same (Trainer cassette vs wheel casette.)
    3. I need more gear range on zwift than I have on The MTB, thereby wanting/needing another bike. (i giess this is really part of point 2.


    My setup is H2, Cheap $250 2x10 roadbike, apple TV, BT HR monitor, Tacx ipadmount.
    900+250+200+60+40. I also had to buy a cassette/chain.

    My in-Laws setup is the same, except they have a $350 used Scott Scale, So we had to add NX 11 speed and buy a Second seatpost and saddle for Swapping positions between husband and Wife.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Lastly on price, when are some of you fools going to figure out that one man's $5000 is another's $50?

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk
    THIS!

    Every now and then I meet someone with a peloton at our company that makes under 100K/year. When you get into the upper management ranks and our clients who are making 200K+ with household incomes over 300k, its over 50%

    The silence/kids/convenience factor is huge. Saving two gym memberships per year and being able to ride in silence in a room in the house is a big deal.

    If you are dedicated spin rat, its about the cost for a Single person for 1 year of Spin at big city prices.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    THIS!

    Every now and then I meet someone with a peloton at our company that makes under 100K/year. When you get into the upper management ranks and our clients who are making 200K+ with household incomes over 300k, its over 50%

    The silence/kids/convenience factor is huge. Saving two gym memberships per year and being able to ride in silence in a room in the house is a big deal.

    If you are dedicated spin rat, its about the cost for a Single person for 1 year of Spin at big city prices.


    I agree but since this is posted in xc/racing I think that demographic would be better served by a slightly more expensive kickr bike or something similar to that.

    Not sure about noise being a real problem though, yes a quiet machine is nice but most people who have cash for that also have a dedicated pain cave, plus they're probably blasting tunes, or in the Peloton's case listening to an instructor yelling at them.
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  58. #58
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    Peloton bikes are an exercise bike with a touch screen tablet computer built in. Apparently the screens face the same issue of obsolescence as something like an iPad or mobile phone in that an older Peloton bike's screen (sold between 2014 and 2016) is no longer supported for software updates and the older ones have problems with lag also. It's at least a $350USD plus tax and shipping to upgrade the screen:

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/7/30/2...n-stop-updates

    There's also this article on similar types of internet connected gym equipment:

    https://www.theverge.com/2019/7/18/2...aming-exercise

    .

  59. #59
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    Personal opinion:

    I think they are great for people who are on limited time that want a good quality workout at home. You can get in, bust your ass, and be done with it in a short period of time and nearly match the fitness level of most amatuer dedicated athletes (and can easily scale up to match their fitness if you want to).

    For competitive athletes, I think the "smart" trainer setup is better, combined with outdoor riding. You can get so damn strong now with a minimal amount of time by using amazing training plans. But you need to combine it with "experience", riding outdoors, to reach true potential as an athlete. Spin bikes and smart trainers don't teach you how to handle technical situations, and ONLY riding indoors will degrade those skills. Less important on a road bike, but critical on an MTB.

    I personally have little interest in either. I bought a wheel on smart trainer a while back and used it some. It was GREAT when I was injured as it gave me something safe to ride while recovering. I can see myself using it again if I really wanted to reach my fitness potential, but I would rather do that outdoors. Maybe I am giving up 5% of that potential by not having ERG mode forcing me to do the work, maybe more, I don't know. But I have time in my life to spare (okay, all my spare time is spent being physically active) so I choose to dedicate HOURS a day to being active vs targeted training.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I agree but since this is posted in xc/racing I think that demographic would be better served by a slightly more expensive kickr bike or something similar to that.

    Not sure about noise being a real problem though, yes a quiet machine is nice but most people who have cash for that also have a dedicated pain cave, plus they're probably blasting tunes, or in the Peloton's case listening to an instructor yelling at them.
    As someone who lives in San Diego and works out after the kids go to bed I can assure you noise levels matter. Also, There's no dedicated pain cave here, the kids got the spare upstairs bedroom for their toys and the spare room downstairs serves as a craft and storage room. Garage? Ha! Storage!
    . . . . . . . .

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    .....
    The kicker bike is a Fancy piece of Kit. Its really a shame it doesnt have a
    Screen like the Peloton does, which is really great. (well accept when you old school non BT headphone wire taps a button on the screen.)
    https://www.wahoofitness.com/devices...ike/kickr-bike
    It's quite expensive.


    .......

    ..........
    Personally I think it's better that the Kickr bike doesn't have a built in screen. I much prefer to use my TV.

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