MTB-Road shoe, pedal, and cleat position- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    MTB-Road shoe, pedal, and cleat position

    Does anyone who trains on the road have to run the same shoe and pedal that they run on their MTB? I gave up trying to match the cleat and pedal position from my mtb to my road bike, so I put egg beaters on my road bike. MTB shoes are hot on the road though? Curious if anyone else has encountered this and what a work around may be.

  2. #2
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    MTB-Road shoe, pedal, and cleat position

    Whenever you get a comfortable pair of cycling shoes with a cleat position that works you should hang onto them and treasure them. They're worth their weight in gold.

    You should be able to get the cleat alignment on your road and MTB shoes close though.

    A starting point is to use the Steve Hogg method for cleat alignment. Find your 1st metatarsal (the bony protrusion behind your big toe) and draw a mark on the shoe at that point. Find your 5th metatarsal (the bony protrusion behind your little toe) and draw a mark on the shoe at that point. Put a ruler between those marks and align the shoe cleat so that it's on that line.

    WHY BIKEFITTERS SHOULDN?T CHEW THEIR NAILS » Bike Fit » Feet » Steve Hogg's Bike Fitting Website

    <iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/9589645" width="500" height="400" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe> <p><a href="http://vimeo.com/9589645">Steve Hogg fits cleats</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user1235292">Ron Heptinstall</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

    That should get the cleats in around the same place on both shoes, allowing you to then work on the cleat angle.

    "Explanatory note: The rest of the procedure for placing your cleats (once you’ve determined where you want them) is as follows.

    1. Place your bike on an indoor trainer and pedal for 10 minutes, warming up until you are riding with reasonable load. The load needs to be heavy enough for you to be working hard but without sacrificing technique. Observe the angle of your feet on the pedals. It may be toe in, toe out or straight ahead. It may vary between feet. Make a mental note of that angle.

    2. Remove your shoes and place one of them in the pedal. Make sure that crank arm is forward and horizontal. Viewing from the opposite side of the bike (so that you can see the pen mark on the shoe and its’ relationship to the pedal axle), make sure that the shoe is leveled between where the sole joins the upper at mid heel, and where the sole joins the upper underneath the ball of the foot. With many shoes this will give the appearance of being heel down but what we are trying to achieve is leveling the foot inside the shoe. Most shoes have a ‘heel lift’ in the shoe last shape and a sole that is thickens underneath the cleat mounting area, so the heel will appear to be down when the foot is level.

    3. Again viewing from the opposite side of the bike, use a T square or rule held vertically, to determine where the pen mark indicating the centre of the ball of the foot is in relation to the centre of the pedal axle. Make sure that the shoe is being held in the pedal at the approximate rotational angle that you observed from above when pedaling under load. Measure the axle centre to pen mark distance and adjust forwards or backwards as necessary until you achieve the desired placement.

    4. Repeats steps 2 and 3with the other shoe.

    5. Now go for a ride and find a clear stretch of road without traffic or obstacles, accelerate to at least 30 – 35 km/h and stop pedaling with the right foot forward. Take care to keep your foot from swiveling as you stop pedaling. With the foot forward, attempt to turn the heel inwards. Is there available free play?

    If not, stop and adjust the angle of the cleat. Remember: if you want your heel to move in, the nose of the cleat needs to point in towards the centre line of the bike.

    If there was inward movement, continue again, accelerate to 30 – 35 km/h, stop pedaling again and attempt to move your heel outwards. Is there available freeplay?

    If not, stop and adjust the angle of the cleat. Remember: if you want to move your heel outward, the nose of the cleat needs to point more outwards from the centre line of the bike.

    Keep repeating this until under load, you foot position angle on the cleat allows you free movement either side of where your foot naturally wants to sit under load.

    6. Repeat step 5 on the left side."
    Steve Hogg


    POWER TO THE PEDAL ? CLEAT POSITION » Bike Fit » Feet » Steve Hogg's Bike Fitting Website


    Different shoes and pedals will have different stack heights so you may need to adjust the saddle height depending upon which shoes you're wearing.

    In terms of temperature and your feet getting hot are you wearing thin summer cycling socks or a thicker sock? The thin summer cycling socks tend to be cooler.

  3. #3
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    I tried running the same shoes on my mtb and road bike for quite some time. Never could get a position that felt good on both. Picked up some dedicated road shoes and aligned them to where they felt comfortable. No issues switching between bikes.

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    Man, thanks for the detailed reply! I have seen Steve Hogg's site, and it is a wealth of info. I think something changed when I started riding almost exclusively SS. I think my crank bros. cleat is a few mm behind the ball of my foot--I seem to get a lot of power and torque climbing that way.

    I will go through this and see if my Look cleat gets as far back. It is so much larger, I am thinking that may be the problem.

  5. #5
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    MTB-Road shoe, pedal, and cleat position

    Something I meant to add is that there can be variations between shoes from different manufacturers. Are both your road and mountain bike shoes from the same manufacturer?

    Along with general fit and cleat hole drillings the soles themselves can be angled differently and feel different. Specialized shoes for example have a 1.5 degree cant built into the sole of the shoe, affecting the foot position when pedalling so they'll feel different to a shoe from another brand when riding.

    If you're switching between a few sets of shoes it's a good idea to use exactly the same type of insoles/ footbeds in each pair also. If you have say a pair of Giro cycling shoes and a pair of Northwave cycling shoes the insoles that come with the shoes are completely different in terms of design and support. The Giro insoles have built in arch support whilst the Northwave insoles are totally flat. I think it gives more continuity and keeps your feet happier to have matching insoles / footbeds across all your cycling shoes to make the shift between riding in different shoes less.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by slohr View Post
    Does anyone who trains on the road have to run the same shoe and pedal that they run on their MTB?
    Yes. Last 2-3 seasons Bontrager RL MTB and XT pedals. Always used mtb shoes and pedals with no issues . (4 years or so)

    Eggbeater cleats did not last to long for me. I kept them on after CX season and was amazed how quick cleats wore out on trainer over winter

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the great info! I had Specialized MTB shoes, and they were the best cycling shoes I ever had. Replaced them with another brand, and have not been happy since. I wear orthotics for horribly pronating feet, but never needed them when wearing the Specialized. I didn't realize (I guess I should have figured that out on my own) they had a canti angle built in--must be why they almost felt "magical" in getting power to the pedals. And no--I have Garneaus for road. I think I'll just get another pair of Specialized and be good to go! I'll reply when I get them. Thanks to all for the feedback!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by slohr View Post
    Does anyone who trains on the road have to run the same shoe and pedal that they run on their MTB?..
    I use the same shoes for Mtn bike and road bike. The mtn shoes are a little heavy for the road bike, but work fine.

    SPD M-536 pedals on the mtn bike and A-520 ont eh road bike. I am more sensitive to cleat position on the road bike as compared to the mtn bike.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", 19' Vassago Optimus Ti SS 29", '19 Ibis Ripmo, XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

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