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  1. #1
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    HR monitor Training

    Hi,

    Just after a little advice. My resting heart rate is 60bpm and seems to peak to 179 when pushing up hill. My local tracks have lots of hills so unless I ride really slowly, or just go out on the road it is impossible to keep the HR low all the time.

    I had read somewhere that on the easy days you should aim to keep the HR down below 140 to help with over training but also to teach the body to be more efficient, the aim being that you get the same output with less HR in the long run

    Is this fact or fiction and how many of you use your HR monitor as a training tool and if you do, what improvements have you seen

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    I have been using the HR monitor since mid-January. The differences between then and now are shocking and fun to see. In January, I would hit 150-160 during a moderate workout. Doing intervals I would hit 186-189 consistently.
    This month (after 5 consistent months of riding), I hit 130-140 during a moderate workout and 171-176 during my highest intensity interval (trust me, I am almost all out).

    I can't imagine myself hitting about 180 even if I went 100%

    Kinda fun to see. BTW, my resting HR is like 68-72 (which is high and always has been)

  3. #3
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    each and every workout has a purpose (recovery ride or interval), and the HR monitor helps me stay within the right zone depending on the workout.

  4. #4
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    I've been riding and/or training with HR monitor for about 10 years. I've added a PM on top of that last couple of years.

    What I've noticed is that the more I ride and train, the more steady my HR stays. Sunday I did a 2 hour ride at about 15-17 mph on flat road (Target of ~160W), with some sprints (riding through construction zones, some short hills, lights, etc.), and my HR never got over 141 for the 2 hours.

    This inability to get HR reactions typically happens to me mid-summer. Don't know if it's because I'm at near peak-fitness, summer heat, large training load (6 days a week), age, .........dont' know?

    I typically don't use a HR monitor off-road, but last time I did, I noticed that my HR stays lower than it use to, fairly similar to road riding; if I want it to. My main training partner and I can spin in the granny (for 3-5 hours) and have long off-road conversations . Some of it is that I'm lighter and in much better shape than I used to be, but some of it may be the training affect. If I want to hammer, then of course, I can raise my HR.


    BTW, my resting and peak HR is similar to yours. (Resting=50, Peak ~178)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poncharelli
    This inability to get HR reactions typically happens to me mid-summer. Don't know if it's because I'm at near peak-fitness, summer heat, large training load (6 days a week), age, .........dont' know?
    exactly my observation, however, for me it's plain and clear why: too much racing (mainly 4-6h events) and too little recovery because I enjoy riding far too much. Stupid but I can't help myself with it. Wish I was in my 20s again ;-)

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the great input guys.....this is just what I wanted to hear. Obviously an invaluable tool when training and tracking how well the training has worked when pushing hard.

    thanks again

  7. #7
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    there is a ton of terminology out there for HR training and it can get really confusing.

    In the most basic nutshell you should do 2 things: 1.endurance training (long distance at low HR) 2. interval training (short bursts of high HR).

    The goal is to train hard, but not so hard that you are too tired to train again tomorrow. Its quite common for someone to go out on a 3hr endurance ride and pedal too hard in the 1st or 3rd hour. They might not even feel so tired at the end, but the next day on the bike will be a different story. With the HR monitor you can find and set your zones, and stay within those so that you exert just the right amount of effort. Set your zones based on your max HR or more preferably your Lactate Threshold HR.

    A websearch will provide plenty of info for setting zones and doing interval sets, then with practice and experience you will learn to fine tune these things.

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