Experimenting numbness in my left foot after long climbs...any ideas WHY?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Hope Experimenting numbness in my left foot after long climbs...any ideas WHY?

    Hi

    I had a race this past weekend, and after 15km of hard climbing ( 32 * 26 ). I notice that my left foot was almost dead, I mean I could feel it, but I know that it WAS NOT normal.
    I was checking that my shoes were not tight, in fact they were a little loose. I think that it may be, because I pushed my feet very hard on the pedals...any other ideas or suggestions?
    It only happens in long climbs where I push hard on the pedals (usually in races).

    Thanks a lot!

    Bye.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by fran
    Hi

    I had a race this past weekend, and after 15km of hard climbing ( 32 * 26 ). I notice that my left foot was almost dead, I mean I could feel it, but I know that it WAS NOT normal.
    I was checking that my shoes were not tight, in fact they were a little loose. I think that it may be, because I pushed my feet very hard on the pedals...any other ideas or suggestions?
    It only happens in long climbs where I push hard on the pedals (usually in races).

    Thanks a lot!

    Bye.
    Think of your seating position. First do not go making big changes in your positioning as your body will notice the changes. Think of how you rear makes contact with the seat. Are you hugging the left side of your saddle more? How are you positioned on the saddle? Are you closer to the rear or the front. When you climb you want to be closer to the front end of the saddle , this is where it is more narrow. Think of what creates the problem. When you push hard on the pedals. Try working on a good climbing position :
    closer to the front of the saddle. bending closer to your handlebars. spinning NOT mashing on the pedals.
    If you think about it you are working out on the biggest muscles in your body. As a result blood flow is high from you high heart rate. You should not be experenicing any dead sensations on the bike. Try climbing with a friend and ask him how you look. You should be relaxed on the bike especially on the climbs. Have him or her follow you from behind and look to see if you are mashing harder on one side vs. the other. Remember you have to be smooth on the climbs and spin more.
    If you have not been fitted on your bike by an experienced/qualified person look into it . This helps with alot of the problems you have and may not realize you have.
    Good luck and enjoy the climbs.

  3. #3
    Throbbing Member
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    As said, spinning not mashing is the answer. All that pedal pressure restricts the blood flowing in your feet. It’s real easy to “thrash” up hills by just mashing esp. when racing. “Use The Force Luke” relax, and concentrate on spinning circles when climbing.
    Phil Hernandez RIP

  4. #4

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    As Seatstay said, how do you sit? when you lay the power down on the pedals do you tense up so your thigh sucks up tight to the seat? Doing this can pinch shut the main artery runing down the inside of your thigh there for retricting blood flow imensly. try to relax your legs a little or make sure your knees are straight a head.

  5. #5
    bleeding eventually stops
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    It's not your seat...it's your foot.

    If your seat was causing nerve compression it would cause numbness going down your entire leg. The thing about compressing your femoral artery doesn't make anatomic sense, and simularly it would cause problems all the way down your leg.
    You are describing a peripheral nerve compression, or possibly vascular compression. Something is happening around your foot or calf to cause the problem.
    My best guess would be that when you climb you are pulling up more on your pedals. This is causing the artery that courses along the top of your foot....your dorsalis pedis to be compressed between the top of your foot and the shoe. (Something loosening your shoes won't solve, although a smart first instinct) This restricted blood flow is causing the numbness.
    The solution may just be a good pair of cycling socks with a lot of padding on the top of the foot.
    Good luck.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by fran
    Hi

    I had a race this past weekend, and after 15km of hard climbing ( 32 * 26 ). I notice that my left foot was almost dead, I mean I could feel it, but I know that it WAS NOT normal.
    I was checking that my shoes were not tight, in fact they were a little loose. I think that it may be, because I pushed my feet very hard on the pedals...any other ideas or suggestions?
    It only happens in long climbs where I push hard on the pedals (usually in races).

    Thanks a lot!

    Bye.
    Climbing places a lot of pressure on the bottom of the foot. This can restrict blood flow to the toes and parts of the foot resulting in hot foot and foot numbness.

    I've suffered from hot foot for a decade. Some of the things I've tried that you might want to consider are
    -moving your cleats backward to help move pressure off the front of the foot
    -trying an after market insert - Super feel, Sole, DownUnders. These will be infinitely better than the standard sock liners that come with shoes
    -look at Specialized body geometry shoes. They have some features designed to help foot problems.

    -I finally decided to try custom orthotics. This is an expensive solution. They just got here yesterday so it will be a 3-6 week break in period before I can make a definitive review.

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