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  1. #1
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    Confused. I dont know if im in shape or not lol

    So first race is coming up this sunday, Wether has been so on and off it has really messed up any type of training. I did get some good fatbike time in this winter and got a lot of miles in on a trip to Brevard a month ago.

    Question is HR vs effort. My HR has been awesome, very controlled and my speed/hr is great. Im pretty much under 150 (max is kinda unknown right now but ive seen 190 at rare time). My effort seems a little "heavy" but im able to keep that pace up with out issues and HR stays solid I haven had many chances for high intensity. I sometimes work a bit harder just to see if it will get into the higher ranges, it feels laggy. I dont think im tired as my training volume is pretty low (under 6 hr) and my sleep patterns havent changed.

    Would being tired cause slow response or would it be higher then usual

    My riding partner is always in way better shape then me and I am able to keep pace with out struggling for the first time ever, but again not race pace stuff(he would smoke me).

    Cliff note, Im loving that fact my HR is nice and controlled/low for given speeds that normally have me 10-15 beats higher. Im worried this time at lower HR has messed up my high intensity stuff.

    With a race coming up on Sunday, should I bother trying to get some higher HR stuff in before then?

  2. #2
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    Sounds like a good time to break out the stopwatch, or Strava.

    I have a couple of local efforts that I do that do a good job of telling me whether I'm in shape or not. I'll do two things, either a max effort to the top, or two hard laps. The former tells me the power is up and the weight is down, AND that I'm "fast". The latter tells me staying power/endurance is good.





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    I'm no trainer, but I'd suggest this:

    Try running for a change of pace, to get used to breathing patterns at high HR. Then try spinning at high RPM for very short intervals. Keep the longer distance high HR (race pace) stuff off for now, if you care for your results in this one race.

    When it comes to the race, your lack of fundamentals and base training will be brought up and your weaknesses exposed. Others will be in a similar predicament as yours, so don't expect a terrible result. Don't literally throw it away by doing silly stuff like not warming up properly. I know that when it comes to riding with others, I oft don't get a proper warm-up and pay for it, starting too hot from the get-go, and struggling as a result. Just got to get your head in the game and the race might be what does that. If it's not too close, maybe a practice run at 150 bpm average effort, to get strategy down as to where increase of effort can help your average speed.

    I think I'm in decent shape after doing 93 hours (1100 miles) so far this year. I'm limited by being on a single speed and also because my course limits my speed, and find that my HR has dropped to the 120 going at about the same pace as I used to do it at about 150 bpm. If I didn't have a HRM, I wouldn't know how easy I've been taking it due to improved fitness--the body merely gets efficient at stuff it repeats. If the race was just like what I was doing during my 6 hours a week, I'd be confident. I'm ramping up to 8 hours a week since it's getting warmer. Maybe once the chest-high weeds die out, I'll be up to 10+ hours a week (pros do what, 20-40 hours a week?). I'm only going to expect results based on what I've put in...

  4. #4
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    Do a high intensity workout before race, 1 day before. That should help prepare your body and you for what its to come. If you only train below race intensity you are going to suffer, unless you plan to ride a mediocre race.

    The whole point of training for racing is to be able to race well. Your training should be harder than race intensity if you want to improve, that's the key element for improving race pace.

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDLover View Post
    Do a high intensity workout before race, 1 day before. That should help prepare your body and you for what its to come. If you only train below race intensity you are going to suffer, unless you plan to ride a mediocre race.

    The whole point of training for racing is to be able to race well. Your training should be harder than race intensity if you want to improve, that's the key element for improving race pace.

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    Not sure if he's making fun of us or what, but this only reminds me that we should be really asking the sports scientists, not fellow forum people. Who to trust?

    All I know is TDLover is stating something wrong, which should be obvious if you've ever had a professional coach or a race before, and trying to make it sound good with cross-fit sense.

  6. #6
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    Ive gone from one extrem to the other, Last year I was training abit to hard intensity wise. The lack of this season has just been weather related and nothing more. Trails should be good enough to give it a solid lap to see how it feels. Mentally I need to see where im at.

    On that note all my regular spring riding locations, I have PR them and even grabbed a few KOMs, but again these are just rail trail double track ect. I dont think I can recover quick enough the day before. Im going to see how I feel tomorrow with some efforts and go from there.

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    Just keep trying to fit some training in, all the way up to the race, but no crazy stuff a day or 2 before the race.

    Actually wise to do the opposite of what TDLover said, on the day before, and force yourself to ride extremely easy/slow, to the point that you're bursting with the urge of wanting to go fast (which you unleash on race day).

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by zooey View Post


    Not sure if he's making fun of us or what, but this only reminds me that we should be really asking the sports scientists, not fellow forum people. Who to trust?

    All I know is TDLover is stating something wrong, which should be obvious if you've ever had a professional coach or a race before, and trying to make it sound good with cross-fit sense.
    There are plenty of people who ride hard the day before a race.

    Do they blow themselves up? No. But some short intervals? Yeah.

    I think people who take the day off or ride easy and steady would be very much in the minority. I wouldn't hesitate to do a 90% effort for a single lap of a multi lap XCO course.



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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by zooey View Post


    Not sure if he's making fun of us or what, but this only reminds me that we should be really asking the sports scientists, not fellow forum people. Who to trust?

    All I know is TDLover is stating something wrong, which should be obvious if you've ever had a professional coach or a race before, and trying to make it sound good with cross-fit sense.
    No disrespect to your previous coaches or yourself, but I think they are a bit behind in sports science. If you believe in science machine4321, a high intensity effort before race can make a significant improvement in your race pace, hard to believe, but it is what science has shown us.

    The high intensity effort won't fatigue you for race day because it is short. Just a few minutes, you will probably burn all your glycogen stores that day, but with proper nutrition and rest you should be full by next day.

    The workout can be as simple as 5x 1 min all-out efforts with rest in between. Depending of what you can handle I suggest 1-2 mins recovery.

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    Ah, the context in the following line was giving me the impression that you were telling him to actually mimic the race a day before, possibly doing more laps than what's required on raceday. Was assuming you were joking and acting like some Spartan no-pain no-gain hardcore HTFU type. Bad to be a vegetable days leading up to a race, under the premise of being well-rested, but intense workout is fine if it's short. I was suggesting something similar in my post, and suggesting that pre-riding the course should be for strategy.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDLover View Post
    No disrespect to your previous coaches or yourself, but I think they are a bit behind in sports science. If you believe in science machine4321, a high intensity effort before race can make a significant improvement in your race pace, hard to believe, but it is what science has shown us.

    The high intensity effort won't fatigue you for race day because it is short. Just a few minutes, you will probably burn all your glycogen stores that day, but with proper nutrition and rest you should be full by next day.

    The workout can be as simple as 5x 1 min all-out efforts with rest in between. Depending of what you can handle I suggest 1-2 mins recovery.
    That makes more sense. I assumed a race type effort as well. Im debating a pre ride or rest the day before but in all honesty Ive had far to much rest this spring lol.

    I am going to try a few burst up the puchy climbs we have or a flying lap to see how it compares to last season tomorrow just to get a feel. I dont like pre riding the day before as I almost always go to hard.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TDLover View Post
    The workout can be as simple as 5x 1 min all-out efforts with rest in between. Depending of what you can handle I suggest 1-2 mins recovery.
    I am a big advocate for intensity the day before a race but 5 x 1 all-out is a serious workout that will negatively performance for several days.

    I generally recommend the day before 1.5hrs with 15 minutes @90% of race pace.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    I am a big advocate for intensity the day before a race but 5 x 1 all-out is a serious workout that will negatively performance for several days.

    I generally recommend the day before 1.5hrs with 15 minutes @90% of race pace.
    I don't disagree with what you said and I would add that this is a case where details matter.

    Every athlete will respond different, without knowing everyone's background we can't standardized workouts. However I have the following personal comments on this matter:

    • This is a case where a good coach pays off. He will know what you can endure to have the best performance on race day.
    • All out efforts will be very subjective for people without access to a power meter, although not strictly needed.
    • Very high intensity workouts on consecutive days are possible for some people, without much detriment in performance.
    • Some people race better with some fatigue, rather than being full rested.

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    I'm not always able to get out and ride the day before a race, if I've been riding regularly earlier in the week I find I'm ok, even 2 days off doesn't seem to bother my body on race day (but my head is really wanting to ride that day before).
    I try to at least warm up and do a few sprints to get a sweat going, I limit it to less than an hour, but it's often just 15 minutes. My pre-race warm-up is similar, 10 or 15 minutes, a few harder efforts until I start to get a sweat going (warm).
    Day before race is a good opportunity to clear small branches and sticks from my trails, and maybe cut some blackberry vines or do other trail maint.

    Last season my main competitor had won a 30 mile race the day before a Sunday race, I had checked results that night, and I knew he'd have a not quite full tank. He's very fit and fast (imo), I led out and kept an eye on him 'back there', knowing that he was going to crack, and sure enough after about an hour he started dropping back, but he had a good fast hour in him. - It's good to know if your competitors overdid it the day before. If you're not really fit, your day 2 would be much worse than his after a 30 miler.

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    My advice as a Novice:

    Ride without the heart rate monitor for a bit, or at least hide your data while you are riding. Look at your data afterward and compare that with the effort you felt you gave in the race. Having heart rate data available in the race is and can be very distracting. Ask yourself what you are going to do if it is suddenly 20 BPM higher than what your "hard effort" workouts are. Do you let off? do you freak out because its "unsustainable"?

    Of course there is a delay, You wont hit those red zone figures until the last seconds of a high output anaerobic climb most likely.

    About preriding and high efforts:

    Get Strava
    Look at previous race lap splits on Strava
    Look at average MPH for the course
    Put in a race pace Lap and evaluate how you feel. How many more can you do like that? Was that all you had? How fresh do you feel? Maybe it wasn't Race pace at all?



    I personally have bad races if I preride the full distance course the day before even at 85%. To add more color, I am great off the start and feel bad/ until about mile 8-10. My ideal day before is a relaxed zone 2 effort with 4-6 Hard 1 minute efforts sprinkled in. Too much climbing the day before does me in. Distance doesn't matter all that much if I am taking it easy.

    Tuesday and Wednesday before the sunday race are high intensity /temp rides for 1-1:40 ish.

  16. #16
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    I think this is a pretty good pre-race day workout. Look at Day 3, the pre-race day Spin.
    https://whatsonzwift.com/workouts/8w...ay-prep#week-8

    I wouldn't necessarily ride the whole course, depends on lap length. I'd be trying to accomplish something like the workout above, and maybe arrange the ride so I scope out the start and finish of the course if there's a way to do that.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by zooey View Post


    Not sure if he's making fun of us or what, but this only reminds me that we should be really asking the sports scientists, not fellow forum people. Who to trust?

    All I know is TDLover is stating something wrong, which should be obvious if you've ever had a professional coach or a race before, and trying to make it sound good with cross-fit sense.
    When I did a 30min hard hit out the day before a race, I'd race much better than if I didn't.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by zooey View Post
    Just keep trying to fit some training in, all the way up to the race, but no crazy stuff a day or 2 before the race.

    Actually wise to do the opposite of what TDLover said, on the day before, and force yourself to ride extremely easy/slow, to the point that you're bursting with the urge of wanting to go fast (which you unleash on race day).
    That's pretty much the complete opposite of what people who are paid to race actually do.

    Lots of WC XCO racers busting out a race pace, or slightly slower, lap of the race course the day before.

    Put another way, if you can't do a single lap hard, and do 6-8 again the next day, your training has been insufficient and you aren't prepared to race anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    That's pretty much the complete opposite of what people who are paid to race actually do.

    Lots of WC XCO racers busting out a race pace, or slightly slower, lap of the race course the day before.

    Put another way, if you can't do a single lap hard, and do 6-8 again the next day, your training has been insufficient and you aren't prepared to race anyway.

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    This doesn't necessarily work if you are not racing on an XCO short track. Some of our courses are one big loop. 20-28

    I dont care what the WC Pros do, clearly doing one lap is NOT going to effect someone who gets to ride 20 hours per week.

    One lap as a percentage of their weekly workload is about 3%

    One lap on a slightly longer course for someone who fights to get 8 hours of weekly moving time is going to have a bigger impact. I'm pretty sure you were implying this, but being more of a dick about it.

    I'm not sure why you are referencing WC racers at all as they should not be used for much of a comparison. In fact I find it quite hilarious how often they are referenced.

    Do average adult swimmers look to Michael Phelps and company's prerace routines when determining the best way for them to prepare?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    That's pretty much the complete opposite of what people who are paid to race actually do.

    Lots of WC XCO racers busting out a race pace, or slightly slower, lap of the race course the day before.

    Put another way, if you can't do a single lap hard, and do 6-8 again the next day, your training has been insufficient and you aren't prepared to race anyway.

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    That's only 1 lap. That's very low volume intensity and as I've mentioned before, is not a problem. They had days before this day to walk the track and figure out how they're linking lines together from section to section. This is advice to someone who's asking whether or not they're fit, who's probably racing on a day off without the luxury of days of practice and setup, and spending race day doing all the paperwork and last minute equipment checks themselves, playing it safe in regards to rest. There's other disciplines like DH and Enduro who ride the track, just to get an idea of what the track's state is, after weather and a bunch of other practicing riders beat it up. Then there's local races which only have the courses taped the day before. Other sports don't go playing some quarter/period of a scrimmage game before game day, or running through the course as some mud runner. This is unique to WC XCO MTB. Who's to say this guy's race isn't some super endurance marathon or short track or beginner class that runs half as many laps. You notice more going slow on the course, than you do going fast. Going slower is often more difficult over tech, and you should be prepared to handle it in case of traffic or a mistake. It's a track walk + practice lap in one, and if you're doing it while others are practicing, you can watch others' lines as they pass. Not sure if you're trying to promote a certain kind of training intensity the day before based on weak logic like correlation or just pointing out that racers have had to adapt...

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by zooey View Post
    That's only 1 lap. That's very low volume and as I've mentioned before, is no problem. They had days before this day to walk the track and figure out how they're linking lines together from section to section. This is advice to someone who's asking whether or not they're fit, who's probably racing on a day off without the luxury of days of practice and setup, and spending race day doing all the paperwork and last minute equipment checks themselves. There's other disciplines like DH and Enduro who ride the track, just to get an idea of what the track's state is, after weather and a bunch of other riders beat it up. Then there's local races which only have the courses taped the day before. Other sports don't go playing some quarter/period of a scrimmage game before game day, or running through the course as some mud runner. This is unique to WC XCO MTB. Who's to say this guy's race isn't some super endurance marathon or short track or beginner class that runs half as many laps. You notice more going slow on the course, than you do going fast. Going slower is often more difficult over tech, and you should be prepared to handle it in case of traffic or a mistake. It's a track walk + practice lap in one, and if you're doing it while others are practicing, you can watch others' lines as they pass. Not sure if you're trying to promote a certain kind of training intensity the day before based on weak logic like correlation or just pointing out that racers have had to adapt...
    Quote Originally Posted by FJSnoozer View Post
    This doesn't necessarily work if you are not racing on an XCO short track. Some of our courses are one big loop. 20-28

    I dont care what the WC Pros do, clearly doing one lap is NOT going to effect someone who gets to ride 20 hours per week.

    One lap as a percentage of their weekly workload is about 3%

    One lap on a slightly longer course for someone who fights to get 8 hours of weekly moving time is going to have a bigger impact. I'm pretty sure you were implying this, but being more of a dick about it.

    I'm not sure why you are referencing WC racers at all as they should not be used for much of a comparison. In fact I find it quite hilarious how often they are referenced.

    Do average adult swimmers look to Michael Phelps and company's prerace routines when determining the best way for them to prepare?
    Ok. Both of you need to think about this from a physiological work perspective. I was using a WC XCO lap as an example of TIME. TIME. <15min.

    Any person toeing the line should be able to do 15min of on/off work, at 80-90%, the day before a race. Really, that's like 8-9min at 80-90% effort. There shouldn't be any residual fatigue from that.

    Whether it's on the road, your local rail trail, your local trail system, or the race circuit you're hitting the next day. It will prepare your legs for the stress of a race.
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  22. #22
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    There is actually no correct answer to this debate.
    Some people race their best with some fatigue in their legs, others race their best totally fresh. The research that I have read indicates that having "some" fatigue is best.

    I think it is something that everybody should experiment with. You need to find out what works for you.

    For myself I definitely am better with some fatigue. I find that I run a little lower heart rate, I recover better from efforts above threshold and most importantly I don't hurt nearly as much.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by zooey View Post
    That's only 1 lap. That's very low volume intensity and as I've mentioned before, is not a problem. They had days before this day to walk the track and figure out how they're linking lines together from section to section. This is advice to someone who's asking whether or not they're fit, who's probably racing on a day off without the luxury of days of practice and setup, and spending race day doing all the paperwork and last minute equipment checks themselves, playing it safe in regards to rest. There's other disciplines like DH and Enduro who ride the track, just to get an idea of what the track's state is, after weather and a bunch of other practicing riders beat it up. Then there's local races which only have the courses taped the day before. Other sports don't go playing some quarter/period of a scrimmage game before game day, or running through the course as some mud runner. This is unique to WC XCO MTB. Who's to say this guy's race isn't some super endurance marathon or short track or beginner class that runs half as many laps. You notice more going slow on the course, than you do going fast. Going slower is often more difficult over tech, and you should be prepared to handle it in case of traffic or a mistake. It's a track walk + practice lap in one, and if you're doing it while others are practicing, you can watch others' lines as they pass. Not sure if you're trying to promote a certain kind of training intensity the day before based on weak logic like correlation or just pointing out that racers have had to adapt...
    Actually in nearly all sports they do a workout or practice pretty close to their event.

    The only exception to this is people who complete is sports with very short and high intensity efforts (Sprinters). It is hard to wrap our heads around but a 20s sprint actually takes longer to recover from then 20 minutes flat out. But even sprinters do a little workout before their race.

    I work with a lot of amateur athlete who do stage races. Even on their relatively low training volume (10-12hrs a week) I do not see a big drop in their power values as the week progresses.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    Ok. Both of you need to think about this from a physiological work perspective. I was using a WC XCO lap as an example of TIME. TIME. <15min.

    Any person toeing the line should be able to do 15min of on/off work, at 80-90%, the day before a race. Really, that's like 8-9min at 80-90% effort. There shouldn't be any residual fatigue from that.

    Whether it's on the road, your local rail trail, your local trail system, or the race circuit you're hitting the next day. It will prepare your legs for the stress of a race.
    Sounds like you need it. You're too stuck in the expert's frame of mind to see it from someone who isn't at that level. It's the fundamentals from the training period before that prepare you, not some last minute cramming.

    I haven't shown that I don't understand any benefit of high intensity right before a race. I just am promoting a different way of getting it, as opposed to riding the course fast, such as doing hide cadence spins. It could be very well that some of these XCO racers just are so single-track minded that riding fast is all they can think of doing, as if it's as natural to them as eating and sleeping.

    Again, the guy's not aware of it he's fit or not. He should be coached as such, not as a pro. He needs to make smart & efficient use of his time he has left. Without any costly training aid tools or personal coaching, he should be careful on risky days like the day before the race. It's likely too late to pick-up a program, that eases in and out stressful training and peaks fitness on a certain day. Some people aren't disciplined to follow plans, nor disciplined enough to not blow themselves up, and he's noted that he did just this last year. Learning from past experience is wisdom, hence why I suggested a change to different high intensity like running then doing short high cadence spins that aren't likely to be taken too far leading up to the race day, forcing a ride to be extra slow to also minimize risk and put him solidly on a different path rather than having a repeat of past mistakes. Will provide a good contrast to last year's results and open his mind to new training methods that might actually stick and make his life more interesting.

    I suggest incorporating mobility and light strength training to the repertoire, like yoga/pilates, gymnastics, and bodyweight exercises like pull-ups and push-ups, to compliment cycling training. Also other cardio sports should be added, as they get far more results in a short amount of time than trying to cram more cycling training in. Running (pref trail running) and swimming should undoubtedly help. Also street BMX and DH can hone skill faster than trying to get everything trained at once with trail riding. I wanted to also suggest skiing, but not sure if that's still possible in your area. Cram whatever you can in your schedule, doing something whenever you have idle time. Go at them as if it were a training exercise, and the progress shown should be fun and satisfying enough.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by machine4321 View Post
    Question is HR vs effort. My HR has been awesome, very controlled and my speed/hr is great. Im pretty much under 150 (max is kinda unknown right now but ive seen 190 at rare time). My effort seems a little "heavy" but im able to keep that pace up with out issues and HR stays solid I haven had many chances for high intensity. I sometimes work a bit harder just to see if it will get into the higher ranges, it feels laggy. I dont think im tired as my training volume is pretty low (under 6 hr) and my sleep patterns havent changed.

    Would being tired cause slow response or would it be higher then usual
    For me a lower exercise heart rate is a sign that I'm starting to build up some fatigue from riding. A lower heart rate without much response is when I'm a bit tired and a higher heart rate with fast response is only when I'm fresh.



    This is a weekly summary from a few years ago. I started off completely fresh at the beginning of the month. You can see how although my average power output stayed constant over the four weeks my average heart rate dropped every week. Although my heart rate response was dropping I was still riding consistently, as shown by the power outputs.



    When I'm tired my heart response is low. It takes some time for the heart rate response to recover. The graph above shows my exercise heart rate for the first 30 minutes of 3 seperate turbo training sessions a few days apart overlaid. This is a 10 minute warmup and then 20 minutes trying hard at close to time trial pace effort, using the same gear and resistance setting each ride. It's showing the difference in heart rate response from doing the same session as I recovered.

    I started off very tired and after just one day recovery my heart rate response wasn't really there. I did quite a hard 20 minutes at an average heart rate of just 115bpm on the Tuesday.

    The same session three days later shows a clear difference. I still wasn't feeling great but for the 20 minutes effort I had an average heart rate of 131bpm, 16bpm higher than for the same session on Tuesday after five days recovery.

    After 8 days recovery I did the 20 minutes at an average heart rate of 139bpm, 24bpm higher as I was feeling fresher by then.

    Monday - day off
    Tuesday - 35 minutes on turbo trainer
    Wednesday - day off
    Thursday - day off
    Friday - day off
    Saturday - 1 hour 5 minutes on turbo trainer
    Sunday - 1 hour on turbo trainer
    Monday - day off
    Tuesday - 1 hour 15 minutes on turbo trainer

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    Back to the OP, I would say "run what ya brung". In other words, do the best with whatever fitness you have. I would suggest wearing the HR but cover the readout, ride by feelings, and just work on pushing yourself vs the other racers. Have fun, go hard, try to beat people but don't stare at your HR. Look at the HR after the event, and use this first race a abasline for the season, it's just the first race, your fitness should be growing through the season so worrying about early season results can be frustrating, so don't do it.

  27. #27
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    Race is tomorrow. I have me doubts but I will explain. I must have been tired. I was forced into 3 days off the bike due to nasty weather and no trainer.

    Went out today to do a couple efforts and HR was much more responsive in both directions. I did a couple hard efforts and they didn't feel to great lol. I will update tomorrow

  28. #28
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    Looking forward to your update. Hope you crushed it!

    My cliff notes (late to the party):

    1. It's OK to go pretty darn hard the day before a race.

    2. Equally, it's not OK to go pretty darn hard AND very long the day before a race.

    Everybody's "long" is different, but for me, I limit it to no more than 10 or 15 minutes.
    Whining is not a strategy.

  29. #29
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    Sooo, body responded much better the I thought....the first lap. Lungs felt great all racexand Hr was working great. I had cramping issues though. 2nd lap my lower back started to go followed by quads, apperantly I wasn't allowed to stand up. I backed off a bit and they faded. 3rd lap felt great for half the lap then calfs pretty much stopped working then quads and back went again. I don't think these were hydration or food issues but just straight shock to my body. My own fault for not preparing it for what was to come. Ive never wanted to give up that bad before but fought through the 4th lap to 3/4 pack finish.

    The order of the course was changed this year so no comparison. For some reason they thought it would be a good idea to mass start the 30-39, 40-45 and 45-49 and throw us into the worst start loop I have ever seen.

    All in all it was the first race and it let me know what to work on.

    Thanks for the discussion, I learned a lot.

  30. #30
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    Awesome that you got out there and did it, now take all of that data that you have and use it to improve.
    A couple general comments from being somewhat in the same position recently:
    - Cramps I've had in races have almost always been related to breathing (I can understand your quads/calf/back muscle cramps could be different), but once I learned the mental focus of seriously paying attention to breathing I was able to work through that during races.
    - Not sure how long your laps were, but sounds like it's time to work in some endurance rides and reduce that fade

    Congrats though, sounds like you took away a few personal wins from this race and that's so important

  31. #31
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    Congratulations on fighting through it.
    I can sympathize all to well with the start and cramping.

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