Women's Specific or Not?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Women's Specific or Not?

    In my opinion, it depends. I will take that $12K bike off their hands though...
    https://www.outsideonline.com/240195...-specific-29er

  2. #2
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    Love my Liv bikes, all three of them. Well two are mine. The other is my wife's.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    Will swerve for leaves.

  3. #3
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    Still not sure what makes a bike "women specific" besides the title. The part about suspension tune for lighter riders makes sense. The rest seems like marketing. A bike does not know what gender is on the bike. There are short people and tall people in both genders...its just that people on the shorter side are going to be mostly women. In my shop days...I've sold womens bikes to short guys. My GF is 5'6" and both her bikes are mediums (Stumpjumper 6F and a Ibis Ripley) in standard sizes. Then her fit was dialed in via the stem, handlebar, and saddle. Bike geometry/fit is #1...not the label put on the frame. Once the fit is found...then the rest can be dialed in with the contact points. I'm 5'8" and also ride medium frames...but our bikes are set up very differently. We have the same inseam...I just have a longer torso and ride a lower position. We can ride each others bikes by switching a few things around.

    Giant has the budget to push gender specific bikes...and they cater to the people that want a gender specific bike.

  4. #4
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    The frame is designed differently to accommodate the difference in leg-body proportions and arm/shoulder differences. I know a couple guys that prefer the geometry of the "ladies bikes" and I know gals that ride 'men's bikes". Only you know which is a better fit for your body proportions after trying them. More choices area good thing and it is good that Liv and others are offering bikes with different geometric designs to fit more people.

  5. #5
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    In my opinion no it's not necessary other than light tunes on shocks and forks. You will always get people with different body proportions within genders as well as across genders. One example is size 10 jeans which come in 29", 30" and 32" length, if we were all so 'uniform' this wouldn't be necessary. Every bike will need tweaking and adjusting according to your body whether your a man or a woman. The only reason I've gone female model this time is because I preferred the colours on the woman models and seeing as I've gone frame only there is literally not a single other difference. In fact if anything I generally avoid womens models because they're often under spec'd and are hard to sell on again because blokes don't want to buy them.

  6. #6
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    More on women's specific, thoughts from a number of companies https://cyclingtips.com/2019/10/wher...anging-market/

  7. #7
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    Didnít specialized recently drop their womenís specific bikes? I know Santa Cruz and Yeti seemed to double down on it. Weird.

    Brands like Ibis wonít ever have a womenís specific. They do have a roxy tune for the shock for the lighter riders.

  8. #8
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    I donít think we need womenís specific bikes today. All the bikes are made well enough to show itís strictly a marketing thing than anything else these days.

    What we really need is more recognition from the industry as a whole as what we can doómore DH, enduro, freeride, etc type recognition than anything else.

  9. #9
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    I've only owned one woman's specific bike: Transition Syren (which is now obsolete). All other bikes were size small bikes which were adjusted to my stats. I currently have a Canfield Balance (27.5" fs) and a Chromag Stylus (26" ht). Both are fine. If I plan to replace either, I'll just chose according to best fit. BTW I am 5'4" 125lbs.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  10. #10
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    I've never have had a women's specific bike. I don't think I've even test ridden one. My height and weight put me on a men's medium frame (or a small in some models) which gives me a much broader range of options than if I was looking for a XS frame or trying to set up suspension for a ~100 lb rider. Which makes me lucky I guess.

    Minor complaint- I've had black, silver and brown bikes in the past. It's nice that the advent of carbon frames has broadened the palette of ALL bikes so a gal can get a "serious" bike in a prettier color without having to buy a Juliana
    I drank the 29er koolaid- turns out it was POWERade :)

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