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  1. #1
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    Trail bike recommendation for my wife please!

    I hope that I'm not imposing here ladies but I need your help. I myself am intermediate at best & my wife, just now getting back into MTB is a beginner.
    I want to upgrade her from her old & outdated 2000 Santa Cruz Juliana super lite with 26" wheels & rim brakes to something more modern.

    The terrain where we ride in Central Texas has a lot of rock gardens and is a mixture of steep climbs and fast decents. I want her on a 1x drivetrain because having 2 or 3 chainrings confused her & causes her to always be in the incorrect gear.
    REI is having a 20% off Cannondale this whole Labor Day weekend so I ordered online a 2019 Cannondale Habit 2 AL. She is only about 5' 2" so I went with the XS. The XS model comes with 27.5 wheels. I didn't learn until after the fact that the Head Tube Angle might be a bit too slack for her at 66 degrees. This is my only concern? Should it even be a concern. The benifit would be that she would be less prone to going over the handle bars & going down hills makes her nervous. I want her on something that will make her more confident. Cannondale claimed that the steep seat tube angle helps the rider position their weight forward for climbing.
    I originally wanted to get her a Liv Pique or Juliana but I got an amazing deal on this & it has the 1x11 drivetrain, dropper post, & decent components. The retail price is $2,625 and I got it for $2,099. I'm not crazy about the color scheme but it's at the top of my budget. I ride a 2015 Specialized Stumpjumber Comp Evo & want her to have something capable.

    Here's a link to the bike here. https://www.rei.com/product/145810/c...mens-bike-2019
    Thank you all in advance!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trail bike recommendation for my wife please!-juliana-.jpg  

    Trail bike recommendation for my wife please!-cbe488b3-89cd-41d2-893e-bb1d2443d013.jpg  


  2. #2
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    I wouldn't be too concerned about the HTA as long as the bike fits and is comfortable for her. 66 degrees is going to be fine, especially if you're tackling steep or rocky terrain. The only thing to watch out for is the front wheel wandering on steep climbs. If she finds this happening then scooting forward on the saddle is a good technique to learn. Overall I think a slacker HTA is more of an advantage than a disadvantage (to a point) and 66 degrees is pretty normal these days.
    Ride like a girl! :cornut:

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    Thank you so much for the reply. Update: I might be cancelling the Cannondale & hold off for the 2020 Liv Embolden that's supposed to be released around early November. Some of the components are a step down but some are better & I like how the frame is designed for women & not just an XS size of a men's frame like other brands. It's a pretty nice bike that's within my price range & to be honest, she'll probably never outgrow it.

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    I suggest finding a clinic to go with the new bike. With the changes in geometry to more slack, plus wider bars, lower top tube etc, the way we ride bikes has really changed. A clinic can show her how to make the most of the new rig. A good example is that in most cases, you don't have to shove your butt way back counter the tendency to endo. A clinic will set her up for confidence on the new rig.

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    The bike you're looking at is great for her.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    I suggest finding a clinic to go with the new bike. With the changes in geometry to more slack, plus wider bars, lower top tube etc, the way we ride bikes has really changed. A clinic can show her how to make the most of the new rig. A good example is that in most cases, you don't have to shove your butt way back counter the tendency to endo. A clinic will set her up for confidence on the new rig.
    Thank you. That's a great suggestion and it's one that I have been considering as well.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    The bike you're looking at is great for her.


    I'm glad you think so. It should be a very nice bike. Now she's telling me to just cancel the whole thing so that she can get good on her old bike but the forks seem to be blown out and I don't think that she understands how much better newer bicycles are now.
    The attached image is the 2020 Liv Embolden that I was considering for her but not available until the end of November and it's $1800.00. I like the top tube and how it has that nice little bend to it, making the stand-over height nice and low.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trail bike recommendation for my wife please!-my20embolden1_colora.jpg  


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    Quote Originally Posted by Primalspy View Post


    I'm glad you think so. It should be a very nice bike. Now she's telling me to just cancel the whole thing so that she can get good on her old bike but the forks seem to be blown out and I don't think that she understands how much better newer bicycles are now.
    The attached image is the 2020 Liv Embolden that I was considering for her but not available until the end of November and it's $1800.00. I like the top tube and how it has that nice little bend to it, making the stand-over height nice and low.
    Wow, the spec on both of these bikes are something I should have looked at earlier. The Liv you propose doesn't have boost spacing in the rear. Both have cheap forks. The Liv has quite dated geometry. I like the 2.6" tires on the Liv. Both have press fit bottom brackets.

    In hindsight, both of these bikes suggest that you have hardtail budget and are trying to shoehorn a full squish bike into that budget. I would look for a used bike for her. Honestly, both of these bikes are spec'ed below what I would ever suggest for anyone.

    It's nice to see a full list of features at this price point (hydro brakes, dropper, 1x, tubeless, your choice of tire widths), but the component levels of a lot of these parts are garbage and not going to provide the kind of long and reliable service she's used to if she is currently enjoying what is unquestionably a high end 19 year old bike. And with the dated geometry, anything other than maintenance is a waste.

    My ladyfriend is riding a Juliana Furtado. Her budget was a bit higher. That said, she has been confident on it from day one. I think you should probably look for a used FS bike with a higher spec or suggest she ride a hardtail. I would rather ride a $12-1500 hardtail than the suggested bikes and save the money for a decent one if she's going to ride it enough. You will hardly ever see a serious rider on the level of bike we're discussing here.

  9. #9
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    2K will get you a whole lotta used bike

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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post

    Honestly, both of these bikes are spec'ed below what I would ever suggest for anyone.

    It's nice to see a full list of features at this price point (hydro brakes, dropper, 1x, tubeless, your choice of tire widths), but the component levels of a lot of these parts are garbage and not going to provide the kind of long and reliable service she's used to if she is currently enjoying what is unquestionably a high end 19 year old bike.
    I would have to disagree. The specs on the Embolden is very decent for an entry level bike and an entry level rider. While the components on her Furtado may have been top of the line 19 years ago, I can guarantee that today's low end components are still better due to new technologies and also to the trickle down effect. SRAM SX Eagle has gotten lots of good reviews from the industry and uses most of the same technologies as the more expensive Eagle groupsets. The fork and the shock are the same models (albeit newer and with more travel) that are on my 2015 Liv Lust. I have put over 2500 km on that bike in the last 2 years and have never had a problem with either of them. They work flawlessly and feel great except for the fact that mine were only 100 mm. The brakes I can't comment on because I am not a big Shimano fan. Considering how great the Giant/Liv bang for your buck is, I'm sure that they are more than adequate as well. I'm not sure if you felt that the press fit bottom bracket was a detriment or an asset, but I much prefer my press fit BBs. I've gone through more than one BB rebuild on my threaded BB fat bike and my husband gone through too many to count on his 3 bikes with threaded BBs as well. PRessfit may be harder to service, but they seem to need way less servicing anyway. As for geometry, while it may not seem to be the most modern of geometry, it is still going to be far more modern than what she has. The Emboldens have only been around for 3 years so the geo isn't really that dated.

    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    I think you should probably look for a used FS bike with a higher spec or suggest she ride a hardtail. I would rather ride a $12-1500 hardtail than the suggested bikes and save the money for a decent one if she's going to ride it enough. You will hardly ever see a serious rider on the level of bike we're discussing here.
    I agree that a used bike could be a great option, but as OP stated, they are having a hard time finding one in her size. Also, in their price range, a decent used bike is likely to be more than a couple of years old meaning that the geo is likely to be far more outdated than that of the Embolden.

    I'm not sure the age of the OP or his wife, but I can guarantee that as an adult whose body tends to get sore and stiff much quicker than a person younger than their mid-twenties, I would have absolutely hated biking if I had been forced to learn on a hardtail. I definitely would not have enjoyed biking as much as I did nor would I have become the serious biker that I now am. As it is, I never, ever lock out my suspension as I prefer the cushiness to the efficiency.

    You are 100% correct that you will hardly ever see a SERIOUS rider on the level of bike that we are discussing here, but she is not yet a serious rider. This is the perfect spec of bike for either a person who is never going to get serious or for a person to learn to love riding on and to get serious enough that they know exactly what they are looking for when they decide to upgrade to a better bike.

  11. #11
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    Honestly, there's nothing wrong with unisex bikes for women. Liv bikes are nice, but not the be all and end all, even for us shorties (I'm 5'2.5" and ride a unisex Ibis in size small). I actually found that the XS Liv bikes I have demoed in the past felt too cramped in the cockpit and the small was a better fit. Your best bang for the buck would be a current season blowout like the Cannondale you ordered, or a used bike. Since your already bought the Cannondale and it's from REI, why not just see if your wife likes it when it arrives? It's REI... if she hates it she can return it, even after a test ride or two.
    Ride like a girl! :cornut:

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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    2K will get you a whole lotta used bike
    Ya....that was the first place that I looked....Craigslist, Ebay, Bike Exchange. I looked to the point of frustration. Nearly impossible to find a bike in her size. As it is, I can't even find used bikes in my size. Originally, I only wanted to spend around $1,000 so bumping it up to $2,000 is stretching it. Keep in my that my wife is really slow and I'm just trying to get her on something that would encourage her to ride more. Neither one of us is competing for going to PR's.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mahgnillig View Post
    Honestly, there's nothing wrong with unisex bikes for women. Liv bikes are nice, but not the be all and end all, even for us shorties (I'm 5'2.5" and ride a unisex Ibis in size small). I actually found that the XS Liv bikes I have demoed in the past felt too cramped in the cockpit and the small was a better fit. Your best bang for the buck would be a current season blowout like the Cannondale you ordered, or a used bike. Since your already bought the Cannondale and it's from REI, why not just see if your wife likes it when it arrives? It's REI... if she hates it she can return it, even after a test ride or two.
    You're absolutely right. It couldn't hurt to have her at least do a test ride in the parking lost. I did get a good deal on it. It's not like I am paying full-price for the 2019 Habit. She would never outgrow even an entry level bike.
    Thank you for the reply.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mLeier View Post
    The Emboldens have only been around for 3 years so the geo isn't really that dated.
    Nonsense. Compare the geometry chart and you'll see otherwise.

    I agree that a used bike could be a great option, but as OP stated, they are having a hard time finding one in her size. Also, in their price range, a decent used bike is likely to be more than a couple of years old meaning that the geo is likely to be far more outdated than that of the Embolden.
    I'm a small rider as well, so I can empathize with that. Since this is a forum, where I get to give my opinion, my opinion is that more budget is needed or a used bike is the best use of budget, or a hardtail.

    I'm not sure the age of the OP or his wife, but I can guarantee that as an adult whose body tends to get sore and stiff much quicker than a person younger than their mid-twenties, I would have absolutely hated biking if I had been forced to learn on a hardtail. I definitely would not have enjoyed biking as much as I did nor would I have become the serious biker that I now am. As it is, I never, ever lock out my suspension as I prefer the cushiness to the efficiency.
    It sounds like this opinion is based on zero experience. I have certainly many more lifetime miles on a hardtail than a full squish and my experience with a progressive geometry hardtail suggests otherwise.

    I do agree that locking out one's suspension is generally not something that is of any benefit to anyone. There might be some XC race somewhere where there is some minor benefit, but the idea that locking out a properly designed suspension creates any significant "efficiency" gain is a myth as well.

    You are 100% correct that you will hardly ever see a SERIOUS rider on the level of bike that we are discussing here, but she is not yet a serious rider. This is the perfect spec of bike for either a person who is never going to get serious or for a person to learn to love riding on and to get serious enough that they know exactly what they are looking for when they decide to upgrade to a better bike.
    You could show up at a large trailhead in Colorado where there are dozens or hundreds of riders on the trails at any given time (what I would think would be a representative sample) and not see anyone on this level of bike. If I had the choice between the Santa Cruz in the original post and this bike, I'd save my money and ride the former.

    As with most things, the bottom rung is trash, the middle rung offers good bang for the buck, and the top of the line is a luxury. I'd rather be on a middle of the road hardtail than a budget full squish. It doesn't mean I'm not impressed that one can purchase a full squish bike for $1800, but it's only after digging deeper into the specs and realizing the compromises that have to be made to get there that I can say I won't be buying those bikes. I'm also a person to keep durable goods like this for a very long time, though, and so perhaps I'm a different kind of purchaser.

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    The thing about an entry level FS is that it is heavy and lower end components don't work that smooth. For a small rider, weight is evrything.

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    FWIW, for used bikes, you just have to be patient. My friends are always asking me to help them find bikes, so I Iook within our active local community. I recently just scored a Norco Sight C 7.1, 2017, retail $6500 USD, for $2200, size small. Blue Book on it was $2900. My friend's budget was $2500.

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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    It sounds like this opinion is based on zero experience. I have certainly many more lifetime miles on a hardtail than a full squish and my experience with a progressive geometry hardtail suggests otherwise.
    Sounds like you have been riding for a long time! That's exactly my point though. Starting on a hardtail when you are younger is a great idea. Or even if you want to get really good, really fast and want to make sure that your technique is spot on. Jumping on a hardtail once you already know how to ride well can also an enjoyable experience. For an adult getting into riding and wanting to enjoy it to the fullest rather than chase PR's, a full suspension is going to be much more enjoyable though.

    Maybe for someone with as much experience on bikes and with tastes as discernible as yours, the geo and the components on something like the Embolden wouldn't be up to snuff. However, for someone just getting into riding or upgrading a 20 year old bike, it is a fantastic option. I've ridden the Embolden the geo felt just fine. It climbed well, it descended well. It did everything I asked of it. It's a great bike for the price. Would I buy one for myself now? Absolutely not, but I am a much more aggressive rider now and know exactly what I am looking for. If I hadn't found myself the new used Lust on Kijiji for even less money, I'm sure I would have been more than happy with the Embolden. I would also absolutely buy one for my kids if I could find a used one at a good price. And for the record, my 12 year old daughter is 5'2" and is actually quite a good rider, so I'm not talking about it just being good for little kids. I think it's a fantastic short term bike for someone who is going to outgrow it either physically or skill wise, or a fantastic long term bike for someone who is just going to take it easy and ride occasionally for fun for the foreseeable future.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mLeier View Post
    Sounds like you have been riding for a long time! That's exactly my point though. Starting on a hardtail when you are younger is a great idea. Or even if you want to get really good, really fast and want to make sure that your technique is spot on. Jumping on a hardtail once you already know how to ride well can also an enjoyable experience. For an adult getting into riding and wanting to enjoy it to the fullest rather than chase PR's, a full suspension is going to be much more enjoyable though.

    Maybe for someone with as much experience on bikes and with tastes as discernible as yours, the geo and the components on something like the Embolden wouldn't be up to snuff. However, for someone just getting into riding or upgrading a 20 year old bike, it is a fantastic option. I've ridden the Embolden the geo felt just fine. It climbed well, it descended well. It did everything I asked of it. It's a great bike for the price. Would I buy one for myself now? Absolutely not, but I am a much more aggressive rider now and know exactly what I am looking for. If I hadn't found myself the new used Lust on Kijiji for even less money, I'm sure I would have been more than happy with the Embolden. I would also absolutely buy one for my kids if I could find a used one at a good price. And for the record, my 12 year old daughter is 5'2" and is actually quite a good rider, so I'm not talking about it just being good for little kids. I think it's a fantastic short term bike for someone who is going to outgrow it either physically or skill wise, or a fantastic long term bike for someone who is just going to take it easy and ride occasionally for fun for the foreseeable future.
    In that case, what's wrong with her current bike? There's still a good mix of tires available in 26". It'd be nice if it had disc brakes, but other than that, she should ride what she has.

    A friend of mine recently bought a 2006 Trek Fuel EX 8 WSD for $400. It had tubeless ready wheels, decent suspension, 3x9, and hydraulic disc brakes. With a 1x conversion and a dropper (she installed a $139 Amazon one that worked great), it would have been a hell of a bike for the money. Geo was comparable to the Liv discussed above.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    FWIW, for used bikes, you just have to be patient. My friends are always asking me to help them find bikes, so I Iook within our active local community. I recently just scored a Norco Sight C 7.1, 2017, retail $6500 USD, for $2200, size small. Blue Book on it was $2900. My friend's budget was $2500.
    Hello, I keep looking but no luck and I really want us to get in some good riding because the weather is cooling down. I think the fork on her current bike is not working properly. It doesn't operate very smoothly.
    Any suggestions for looking for used bikes online? I only know of Facebook, Craigslist, Ebay, and Bike Exchange.
    Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    In that case, what's wrong with her current bike? There's still a good mix of tires available in 26". It'd be nice if it had disc brakes, but other than that, she should ride what she has.

    A friend of mine recently bought a 2006 Trek Fuel EX 8 WSD for $400. It had tubeless ready wheels, decent suspension, 3x9, and hydraulic disc brakes. With a 1x conversion and a dropper (she installed a $139 Amazon one that worked great), it would have been a hell of a bike for the money. Geo was comparable to the Liv discussed above.
    I really appreciate your input and it's valued because you took your time to reply.
    I would be OK with her continuing to ride her current 26er but I think that fork is bad. It doesn't operate very smoothly. My wife also gets very very confused with changing gears and a 3x or 2x isn't the best option. You may be wondering why she would even be on a bike but we do it mainly for the exercise and so that we have a hobby that we can enjoy together. She's expressing an interest in getting back into it after not having ridden that bike for years and I'm just trying to get her on something that is more user-friendly. I don't believe that it would make sense to upgrade her current bike. I already spent $85.00 to get it tuned and I had to have old cables replaced because they were so old that the cables were moving freely. My local LBS said that it would be around $300 to get new wheels with mechanical disk brakes but then it looks like the fork might need to be rebuilt as well.
    Where we live, it's not all smooth singletrack. We have a lot of rock gardens and roots so I believe that the 27.5 wheels would help her get over them with more ease. I'll continue to look for used but not having any luck.
    Thanks

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    Have you looked on Pink bike? that's the #1 mtb buy/sell. MTBR buy/sell is unfortunately full of spammers. Pinkbike has lots of bikes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Primalspy View Post
    I really appreciate your input and it's valued because you took your time to reply.
    I would be OK with her continuing to ride her current 26er but I think that fork is bad. It doesn't operate very smoothly. My wife also gets very very confused with changing gears and a 3x or 2x isn't the best option. You may be wondering why she would even be on a bike but we do it mainly for the exercise and so that we have a hobby that we can enjoy together. She's expressing an interest in getting back into it after not having ridden that bike for years and I'm just trying to get her on something that is more user-friendly. I don't believe that it would make sense to upgrade her current bike. I already spent $85.00 to get it tuned and I had to have old cables replaced because they were so old that the cables were moving freely. My local LBS said that it would be around $300 to get new wheels with mechanical disk brakes but then it looks like the fork might need to be rebuilt as well.
    Where we live, it's not all smooth singletrack. We have a lot of rock gardens and roots so I believe that the 27.5 wheels would help her get over them with more ease. I'll continue to look for used but not having any luck.
    Thanks
    I bet there's a $1200 hardtail out there brand new, tubeless ready, 1x, dropper, that would work perfectly for her. With plus tires at the right pressure, I highly doubt she'd miss the rear suspension.

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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    I bet there's a $1200 hardtail out there brand new, tubeless ready, 1x, dropper, that would work perfectly for her. With plus tires at the right pressure, I highly doubt she'd miss the rear suspension.
    I appreciate the suggestion but as we're not teens anymore, I'm willing to sacrifice quality for comfort. Seriously, we cruise on the trails when it's just me and her. It's very difficult to go fast on the trails where we live. They're more technical. I can travel about an hour from home and be on nice flowy trails. That's a different story. In that case, a hard trail would work.
    We're in Central Texas near Austin but when we lived in California, we started off on $400 Kona hard trails. I'm talking super entry level & I beat the crap out of that bike because I didn't know that my bike sucked so I enjoyed the hell out of it. Again, the trails out there were doable on a hard trail. I have a Specialized Stumojumper Comp Evo with 150mm travel so I'm just looking for something nice and cushy for her.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mahgnillig View Post
    I wouldn't be too concerned about the HTA as long as the bike fits and is comfortable for her. 66 degrees is going to be fine, especially if you're tackling steep or rocky terrain. The only thing to watch out for is the front wheel wandering on steep climbs. If she finds this happening then scooting forward on the saddle is a good technique to learn. Overall I think a slacker HTA is more of an advantage than a disadvantage (to a point) and 66 degrees is pretty normal these days.
    Thank you for the reply. I think that you're right. The more I study geometry, it seems that the XC geometry isn't recommended as a "Do it all" bike. The trail geometry is. And yes, we have a ton of big rocks, rock gardens, large roots, and being the fact that we're not going for speed and PR's, I don't believe. that it would make sense to have a XC bike that's designed for speed. I spoke with a pro XC rider the other day and he told me that he has to slow down for the techincal downhill parts because his bike is limited and they make up for it in other parts of the courses.
    Last edited by Primalspy; 09-07-2019 at 04:32 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    Have you looked on Pink bike? that's the #1 mtb buy/sell. MTBR buy/sell is unfortunately full of spammers. Pinkbike has lots of bikes.
    I checked and I only found a 2016 Liv Lust and a carbon model Juliana that was well over $3,000 dollars.
    Liv is discounting their 2020 Intrigue Advanced 2 by 20% off, bringing the cost down to $3108. I believe that it might even be a better bike than what I have but it seems like a good deal and I wouldn't have to change a thing for as long as we own it. She would never outgrow this bike. It's available in a size small not far away and if we end up needing an XS they have have it brought in from one of their other locations.
    https://www.liv-cycling.com/us/intrigue-advanced-2



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    Quote Originally Posted by Primalspy View Post
    I checked and I only found a 2016 Liv Lust and a carbon model Juliana that was well over $3,000 dollars.
    Liv is discounting their 2020 Intrigue Advanced 2 by 20% off, bringing the cost down to $3108. I believe that it might even be a better bike than what I have but it seems like a good deal and I wouldn't have to change a thing for as long as we own it. She would never outgrow this bike. It's available in a size small not far away and if we end up needing an XS they have have it brought in from one of their other locations.
    https://www.liv-cycling.com/us/intrigue-advanced-2


    I had a 2015 Liv Lust and just bought the 2020 Liv Intrigue Advanced 1. It is an AMAZING bike! I can’t even explain how much better it is than my Lust. You are right, it is a bike that she will likely never outgrow. I have a size small. I never had a chance to try the XS, but the small feels great. The bars do feel a little too wide for me, but I solved that issue by moving my levers inwards and cheating the bar a bit until I decide for sure what I want. The bike may fee big for her at first coming from 26” wheels, but have her try to give the small a chance.

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    5'2" should be on an XS on the Intrigue. I'm 5'5 and ride the small.

  28. #28
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    Keep in mind that the XS only comes with a 75mm dropper. Pretty much useless. 5’2” (my height with shoes) falls in the middle of the XS range, but the small starts at 5’2”. I find the 100mm dropper to be just perfect for me on that bike.

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    The bike you're considering now is much nicer and more modern in its spec and geo then the one you were looking at before. If it fits well and a test ride goes well, go for it.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by mLeier View Post
    Keep in mind that the XS only comes with a 75mm dropper. Pretty much useless. 5’2” (my height with shoes) falls in the middle of the XS range, but the small starts at 5’2”. I find the 100mm dropper to be just perfect for me on that bike.
    We just got back from Austin trying out the Intrigue Advanced in a size SM & it's way to too big. I couldn't even stand over it and I'm 5'5". I didn't like how the flat part of the top tube that is supposed to allow for more stand over clearance is directly under the front of the seat. It did no good. My wife was standing on her tippy toes & it was way too snug. I couldn't imagine the XS being much better being that the difference in stand over height is at best maybe a 1/2 inch. Wet left the store disappointed.
    We then went to my favorite shop that I purchase all of my bikes from and she stood over a size SM Juliana Furtado & she was able to stand flat footed but it was still a little too snug. I really believe that their XS would be perfect. They have a size XS Furtado in their rental department but it was loaned out. My plan is to try the Cannondale when it comes in this coming Wednesday & then compare to the Furtado.

  31. #31
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    Update

    I found a very nice, gently used 2016 Specialized Rhyme FSR Comp Fattie in a size XS. The oringinal owner claims that the bike has only been ridden a total of 6 times and they never really got into it so it was stored. It has a Fox 34 front shock and it appears to have very decent components.
    They are asking $1650 or best offer. It was purchased new for $2500
    My only thing are the fat tires. The rims are 29mm inner width with 3.0" tires. My Stumpjumper also has 29" inner width wheels but only has 2.3" tires. I assume that I could put a regular size tire on it but then it might lower the BB height and could change the way the bike handles along with more pedal strikes, is what I read right?
    The 2019 Cannondale Habit that I ordered came in and I just received the call today that they built it up and it's ready to be picked up.
    I'm not sure if I'm into the idea of my wife having a fattie bike but this is honestly the closest thing that I have found. that would fit her. Last weekend, I had her ride my bike and I used my dropper seat post to lower the seat for her and she said that now she knows why I am trying to get her into something newer. She likes the way it felt more stable and she liked the way the suspension soaked up every bump. She's on board with the whole new bike thing now. Thoughts?

    https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/valu...oduct/3062511/


  32. #32
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    Search is over! I got a good deal on the 2016 Specialized Rhyme Comp 6Fattie. I paid a little less than the suggested Bicycle Blue Book value. It had only been ridden about 6 times and it looks absolutely brand new like I had just walked out of the store with it. It has a Fox 34 fork & a Fox Float shock with a 1x11 drivetrain. We just got back from a nice long ride and she did the best I've ever seen! She was able to conquer more obstacles than ever before. She said that she feels a lot more confident and she is super happy because her bike looks like the girlfriend of my bike. (ps. we tried the Cannondale & it was bad. The suspension sucked & it was sooo heavy!) Thank you to for their help!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Trail bike recommendation for my wife please!-img_0020.jpg  


  33. #33
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    It’s beautiful!!! ❤️ So happy to hear that she found something she loves and that feels great! Happy trails!!!

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by mLeier View Post
    It’s beautiful!!! ❤️ So happy to hear that she found something she loves and that feels great! Happy trails!!!
    Haha!
    She can't stop talking about how the day was in her words, "Perfect." Happy trails indeed.

    Cheers!

  35. #35
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    Nice looking bike!
    Congrats.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSU Alum View Post
    Nice looking bike!
    Congrats.
    Thanks! We're really really liking it! Remind me to never ever special order a bike that we've never test ridden before.

  37. #37
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    I am so glad you found something that she will love!

    I know you already plunked down the money, but I just wanted to share that I bought a 2020 Juliana Furtado in the plus build because I loved the confidence that the fatter tires gave me descending and riding over lumpy stuff. I live in Maine and my local trails are rocky and rooty too, so I understand your concern. I think the full squish and bigger tires will help her grow her riding and enjoy it more.

    Have much fun!

  38. #38
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    That looks to be a very nice bike! A solid used bike like that is a huge step up from the other ones you were looking at. I hope she enjoys it.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    That looks to be a very nice bike! A solid used bike like that is a huge step up from the other ones you were looking at. I hope she enjoys it.
    I agree. We went to go look at the Cannondale and it was junk! Heavy as a brick. Crappy welds. Ugly paint job. Crappy everything. I will not or at least hope that I never ever special order a bike that I have not test ridden first. She loves her bike. She can't stop asking me how proud I am of her for being able to tackle bigger and scarier obstacles. Now, she's totally looking forward to our next rides.
    Used Specialized bike beats new crappy bike all day long. Thanks for chiming in and talking some sense into me!

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by StinaBikes View Post
    I am so glad you found something that she will love!

    I know you already plunked down the money, but I just wanted to share that I bought a 2020 Juliana Furtado in the plus build because I loved the confidence that the fatter tires gave me descending and riding over lumpy stuff. I live in Maine and my local trails are rocky and rooty too, so I understand your concern. I think the full squish and bigger tires will help her grow her riding and enjoy it more.

    Have much fun!
    That's awesome! We looked at Julianas as well but to get one with good components, I would have needed to pay over $3k
    This Specialized that I got her will last a long time.

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