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  1. #1
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    Strength Training

    Hey ladies- New to here and I was wondering what everyone does for strength training? I'm doing mainly all mountain riding. I am looking for exercises to get stronger for technical downhills and jumps. Thanks!

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    I started working out with a personal trainer at my gym once every other week back in July. It keeps my motivation up. Otherwise, I've looked to http://www.bikejames.com/, Girls Gone Strong: Free Workouts, Nutrition and Lifestyle Information for Women., and https://www.fitnessblender.com/ for inspiration on they days when I'm working out on my own.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    What I do that seems to help with my biking the most: squats, squats, and more squats. It keeps your hips strong and keeps my body from getting out of whack.
    The winter I spent doing squats + lunges religiously made a noticeable difference in my biking strength the following spring - hills that used to be grunts, and technical features that were "ehhh maybe I'll make it today" were suddenly easy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    One other thing: YOGA. While it's not strength training in the sense where you go and pick up heavy things and put them down repeatedly, there are a lot of strength and flexibility components to yoga that not only help me ride better, but let me ride without pain.
    +1. Yoga is also amazing for balance.

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  4. #4
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    I'm lucky enough to be genetically disposed to carrying muscle and being strong, so, for me, I mainly do yoga- everything from the easiest/most relaxing to the harder, advanced power stuff, depending on how I feel. Any time I see a chiropractor or massage therapist, they assume I lift weights on a regular basis.

    Like the other ladies said- awesome for strength and balance, AND in addition to that, proprioception... which is the ability to know where your body/body parts are in space without actually looking at them.
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    This is great info! I used to be an ultrarunner and was just as bad about strength training as I am now. However I realize now I really need it. I'll take a look at some of the links provided. I have done a little yoga in the past and really like pilates so it looks like that is a must for sure! Thanks everyone for taking the time to provide info. I am going to check it all out!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mudgirl View Post
    I started working out with a personal trainer at my gym once every other week back in July. It keeps my motivation up. Otherwise, I've looked to http://www.bikejames.com/, Girls Gone Strong: Free Workouts, Nutrition and Lifestyle Information for Women., and https://www.fitnessblender.com/ for inspiration on they days when I'm working out on my own.
    Have you done the fitnessblender videos? Are they any good?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    Sure, if you want, send me a PM and I'll be happy to give you some pointers when you get started.

    Also, don't forget about bodyweight exercises. It's really a good way to get started, and it doesn't require the gym.

    Resting is important too. Yer body, no matter what yer mind says, always needs time to heal. I always allow a day in between strength training sessions.
    Definitely thank you!

  8. #8
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    I started doing crossfit training 2 years ago. The training, typically is short, high intensity workouts (combines weight lifting, gymnastics and cardio) made a significant and noticeable difference in my overall fitness in terms of strength and endurance riding. I built muscle and burned body fat through increased metabolism.

    I had a terrible DH crash in August last year and suffered serious polytrauma. My fitness level prior to my crash was pivotal to ensuring a steady healthy recovery. I eased back into training and got back to riding when I was medically cleared. It's been 5 months post crash/injury, and I'm now surpassing my previous PRs prior to injury.

    In addition you cannot out train a bad diet. If you are eating the wrong foods, it will be very difficult to see optimum results for either health, fitness or body composition.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    I started doing crossfit training 2 years ago. The training, typically is short, high intensity workouts (combines weight lifting, gymnastics and cardio) made a significant and noticeable difference in my overall fitness in terms of strength and endurance riding. I built muscle and burned body fat through increased metabolism.

    I had a terrible DH crash in August last year and suffered serious polytrauma. My fitness level prior to my crash was pivotal to ensuring a steady healthy recovery. I eased back into training and got back to riding when I was medically cleared. It's been 5 months post crash/injury, and I'm now surpassing my previous PRs prior to injury.

    In addition you cannot out train a bad diet. If you are eating the wrong foods, it will be very difficult to see optimum results for either health, fitness or body composition.
    Good job on the PRs! Diet is all good. My BF is a stage 4 cancer survivor and I have Celiac's Disease so we eat very clean. I ride or run almost everyday but really need that strength piece of it. I am determined after reading these posts to incorporate it asap!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeni-mtb View Post
    Have you done the fitnessblender videos? Are they any good?
    Yeah, I started doing them a few months ago, and I have a couple that I incorporate into my workouts fairly regularly: Kelli's Upper Body Workout for People Who Get Bored Easily, and Kelli's Brutal Butt & Thigh workout. I've done a handful of others as well, but those two I go back to often when I don't feel like searching through all of the videos.

    It's a couple who just started making workout videos about 6 years ago, and IMO, their more recent videos are better. The ones from the beginning of their endeavor are more dry, the narrations kind of boring. But I think they are all good workouts. I don't always follow the workouts to a T, as there are some moves I just don't have the flexibility/mobility to do, but I just substitute with something else until they move on to the next exercise.

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    +2 for yoga. I do Shaun T's Insanity videos, because I'd rather jump around like an idiot in the basement where no one can see me than at the gym! It's essentially intervals of body weight exercises (squats, jumps, push-ups, planks etc) and routinely reduces me to lying on the floor feeling sorry for myself... Which, I grant you, is not exactly hard to do before 6:00 in the morning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ryetoast View Post
    +2 for yoga. I do Shaun T's Insanity videos, because I'd rather jump around like an idiot in the basement where no one can see me than at the gym! It's essentially intervals of body weight exercises (squats, jumps, push-ups, planks etc) and routinely reduces me to lying on the floor feeling sorry for myself... Which, I grant you, is not exactly hard to do before 6:00 in the morning.
    I will wake up before sunrise any day of the week to go riding but not to do anything else. I tried Insanity once. I would rather run a 50k haha. I am super uncoordinated too so the privacy of my own home is always good. I did do some cross fit type classes once at a gym and the poor instructor spent the entire time running over to correct me cause despite how many times I would do the specific exercise I would forget and do it wrong.

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    I liked the first phase of New Rules of Weight Lifting for Women, it got complicated after that. The text of the book has some great info too even if you don't do the routine.

    I also did Stronglifts 5x5 for a while but I found that squats 3 days a week just didn't mix with biking.

    The routine described here is also good:
    Two day full body strength training routine - MyFitnessPal.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rae6503 View Post
    I liked the first phase of New Rules of Weight Lifting for Women, it got complicated after that. The text of the book has some great info too even if you don't do the routine.

    I also did Stronglifts 5x5 for a while but I found that squats 3 days a week just didn't mix with biking.

    The routine described here is also good:
    Two day full body strength training routine - MyFitnessPal.com
    I like the concept of the two day routine. I did something similar yesterday but for 30 mins. I did a combo of pushups, weights concentrating on arms and back, abs and ended with plank. Needless to say it hurts to lift my arms today.

  15. #15
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    Deadlifts for riding

    11 Ways Dead Lifts Will Make You a Better Rider


    I recently PR'd my deadlift at 195lb. I should be blasting past 200lb soon
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rae6503 View Post
    I liked the first phase of New Rules of Weight Lifting for Women, it got complicated after that. The text of the book has some great info too even if you don't do the routine.

    I also did Stronglifts 5x5 for a while but I found that squats 3 days a week just didn't mix with biking.

    The routine described here is also good:
    Two day full body strength training routine - MyFitnessPal.com

    The 5x5 is a great program, but a bit much during the riding season. Also, it emphasizes squats way over the deadlift, and I think they should be equal. Use it in off season. In the on season, expect to reduce the weight a bit and back off to four sets per lift. And, lift roughly only twice per week.

    If you want to get real benefit from lifting weights, you have to use the basic, heavy lifts, and expect to suffer at least a bit. The mental conditioning that comes from hard lifting carries over well to pushing yourself on a bike.

    If you are messing around with light weights you'd be better off doing trail work.

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    I am way better at deads than squats anyway.

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    Where/how did y'all learn to lift? It sounds like a great thing to do but I'm always worried that if I try I'll throw my back out because I have no idea what I'm doing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ryetoast View Post
    Where/how did y'all learn to lift? It sounds like a great thing to do but I'm always worried that if I try I'll throw my back out because I have no idea what I'm doing.
    I took classes in both highschool and college. The book Starting Strength has a LOT of really good information, and if you google you can find videos and such. Or maybe you could find a trainer that you like, but make sure it's one that knows/does the basic big lifts like squats and deadlifts, not one that does weird "balance on a ball while pretending to drive a car with a weight plate" things (I've seriously seen this).

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rae6503 View Post
    I took classes in both highschool and college. The book Starting Strength has a LOT of really good information, and if you google you can find videos and such. Or maybe you could find a trainer that you like, but make sure it's one that knows/does the basic big lifts like squats and deadlifts, not one that does weird "balance on a ball while pretending to drive a car with a weight plate" things (I've seriously seen this).
    Absolutely!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rae6503 View Post
    I took classes in both highschool and college. The book Starting Strength has a LOT of really good information, and if you google you can find videos and such. Or maybe you could find a trainer that you like, but make sure it's one that knows/does the basic big lifts like squats and deadlifts, not one that does weird "balance on a ball while pretending to drive a car with a weight plate" things (I've seriously seen this).
    Like Nino's???

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xW-nWnl5hYk

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    Following this thread because I really ought to lift more... But I really don't want to pay for a gym membership.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy Juice View Post
    Thats what I thougth too! But...

    Genentically gifted pro atheletes who have all day to work out have the time and stamina to dabble in whacky fringe exercises.

    For the everyday, working man or woman, it is not time effective. I'd soon work on better bike balance by balancing on my bike while riding a techy trail. Hard core explosive power and injury resistance comes from heavy weights - and can be attained in a very time effective manner if you know how strength train correctly.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Thats what I thougth too! But...

    Genentically gifted pro atheletes who have all day to work out have the time and stamina to dabble in whacky fringe exercises.

    For the everyday, working man or woman, it is not time effective. I'd soon work on better bike balance by balancing on my bike while riding a techy trail. Hard core explosive power and injury resistance comes from heavy weights - and can be attained in a very time effective manner if you know how strength train correctly.
    Yep, no doubt. Plus he (and all the other pros doing this stuff) have trainers with years and years of experience working with elites... They're not some dudebro who saw something cool on Instagram.


    I'm kind of coming around to thinking that without a personal trainer and access to gym equipment, sticking with yoga and a couple simple circuits of properly-performed bodyweight exercises (squats, lunges, core) are better than nothing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy Juice View Post
    Yep, no doubt. Plus he (and all the other pros doing this stuff) have trainers with years and years of experience working with elites... They're not some dudebro who saw something cool on Instagram.


    I'm kind of coming around to thinking that without a personal trainer and access to gym equipment, sticking with yoga and a couple simple circuits of properly-performed bodyweight exercises (squats, lunges, core) are better than nothing.
    Right on. Anything is better than nothing, well, except maybe a walk to the donut shop.


    Actually, if you know how to separate the good from the bad, learning how to do core exercises with good form by watching youtube shouldn't be too hard. You still need gym access though. I'm lucky enough to have an old olympic weight set and rack in my basement. Cost was way less than a year's gym membership and I have 24 hour access to every exercise I need. And, I can play my own classic rock!

  26. #26
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    Sure Stripes, it's worth a sticky for all the links and resources! Always looking for new stuff to try. I have some basic home equipment, (yoga ball, some weights, even a dead lift bar) that I use, along with yoga mat.

    I've been taught a few workout routines, and the commonalities are all summarized nicely here, and you can use lighter weights or no weights than depicted here. It's more about getting the form down in the beginning:
    Heavy Lifting For the Endurance Athlete Part 1: Learning the 7 Key Exercises | TrainingPeaks

    Also if you have lower back issues, or if you drive a lot or sit at a computer a lot, or ride a bike a lot, or all 3 then these foundation training exercises pretty much act to reverse all of those poor posture/core weakness related spinal issues. It helped me more than any chiropractic session with my own lower back issues:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BOT...ature=youtu.be

    A core strength routine that I like because it hits all of the basics is this one:
    Core exercises for cyclists | Bicycling

    Yoga is fantastic - +1 that it helps with body awareness, breathing, relaxation and proprioception! Great for the DH gnar. I do some restorative poses, and have gone to Hot Yoga (bikram) a lot in the past, but it takes a lot of time out of my schedule. I do love it though. Does anyone have any good youtube links to any yoga routines to share? The ones I've been finding are all poor quality, or a little well, hokey.
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    Quote Originally Posted by shredchic View Post
    Also if you have lower back issues, or if you drive a lot or sit at a computer a lot, or ride a bike a lot, or all 3 then these foundation training exercises pretty much act to reverse all of those poor posture/core weakness related spinal issues. It helped me more than any chiropractic session with my own lower back issues:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BOT...ature=youtu.be
    I've seen this video shared in several places, but it says not to do if you've never done their exercises before... Is there a good beginner video you can recommend?

    Also, what kind of yoga videos are you looking for? I can keep an eye out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy Juice View Post
    I've seen this video shared in several places, but it says not to do if you've never done their exercises before... Is there a good beginner video you can recommend?

    Also, what kind of yoga videos are you looking for? I can keep an eye out.
    I did it without any formal introduction. It took a couple of tries to get it right, but I certainly didn't hurt myself! It moves at workout pace, so it might take a little sitting out and just watching at first. On the foundation training website, there is a page with some intro videos. Here is one explaining what the "founder position" is all about: Our back pain solution: The Founder - Foundation Training » Foundation Training

    Mainly looking for a good restorative routine. I guess ones that address specific areas like Neck and shoulders, or something cycling specific, like hammies, glutes, IT band, etc. But anything people find helpful would be of interest.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    There are plenty of core exercises you can do without a gym. Planks and mountain climbers come to mind. Plenty of martial arts exercises (kicking and knee raises above the waist) automatically work the abs without you trying.
    Sorry I wasn't clear, but by core exercises I meant core/fundamental lifts. Like the deadlift, squat, bench, military press, and chin up (or bent over row).

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    I've heard that Convict Conditioning and You are Your Own Gym are good bodyweight routines but I haven't used either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shredchic View Post
    I did it without any formal introduction. It took a couple of tries to get it right, but I certainly didn't hurt myself! It moves at workout pace, so it might take a little sitting out and just watching at first. On the foundation training website, there is a page with some intro videos. Here is one explaining what the "founder position" is all about: Our back pain solution: The Founder - Foundation Training » Foundation Training

    Mainly looking for a good restorative routine. I guess ones that address specific areas like Neck and shoulders, or something cycling specific, like hammies, glutes, IT band, etc. But anything people find helpful would be of interest.
    I teach yoga, so I usually just do my own thing based on what I feel my body needs, but Lynda Wallenfels often recommends this sequence, which I've done and found very helpful: https://www.doyogawithme.com/content...and-lower-back

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    I do not agree that heavy weights are the only way you are going to make gains. I did body building way back in the day, and now I do what's called "functional fitness" type regime. It incorporates a little bit of everything - TRX, body weights, plyometrics, balance, med balls blah blah what lots of people are doing. ( Think Core Performance ala Verstegen type training)

    For reference, I'm 5-4,125 ish, age 55. One of my shoulders is 50/50 up for reconstruction with a torn labrum. I never work with anything heavier than a 15 lb dumbbell other than the occasional sled pull.Mostly I work with 8.10, 12. The rest is all body weight work. No barbells, no heavy lifts, but lots of pyramids, core, functional movements, mixed up failure and endurance type sets,metabolic/circuit type muscle confusion..

    And you know what? I am stronger than I have ever been in my life, including when I was body building. I'm biking and skiing the best I have ever. I can help with any household project my husband dreams up that involves lifting, carrying, holding heavy things over my head while he attaches them...

    So define heavy weight. Even in my body building days, I'm small and lean and could never bench more than 125.

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    "San-greeea"... funny stuff from Dom

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    lol, that's hilarious.

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    10 Things That Strong Women Do


    1) Strong Women Hold Their Heads High

    Whether you’ve got a bodyweight deadlift (or 2x BW or more!) or you’re just working on learning how to use the barbell, strong women know that earning your strength is nothing to be ashamed of. You work hard for any muscle gain, so be proud of it!

    2.) Strong Women Work on Pull-ups

    If there’s one thing I’ve learned about this training life, it’s this: pull-ups come and go. At some points in your life, you might have a bunch of pull-ups. And at some points, you might be back on the band or the machine, recovering from an injury or some over indulgences of the nutritional kind. And some folks are still working on getting their first pull-ups! Pull ups are tough... I'm now able to hold the bar at my chin and slowly lower.

    It’s all good. The point is that strong women do the work. Pull-ups are hard fun! Strong women work on their pull-ups!

    3.) Strong Women Eat What/When They Need To Eat

    You can’t expect to perform if you don’t eat to perform. But, seriously, fuel the tank. Be smart and eat what your body needs in order to do good things. Besides, starving yourself is so 1992.


    4.) Strong Women Make Noise In The Gym (or on the trail!)

    They might grunt when lifting, they might swear when they miss a lift, they might yell in joy when they get a PR. But rarely does a strong woman glide into the gym and out without someone noticing her energy, even if she didn’t say a word. There’s just something about a strong woman that turns heads.

    5.) Strong Women Spend Time On Protein

    We ask our friends, we ask our coaches, we look online. And we talk about powders and shakes. Whey protein?Egg protein? Pea protein? What kind is best? Least expensive? Won’t make my skin break out? For all we talk about protein shakes, you would think there should be a name for this obsession and knowledge accumulation, like wine lovers get to be called wine connoisseurs. Maybe we’re protein specialists?

    I'm vegan so I'm a bit of an enigma to my coaches at the gym. But I'm definitely building muscle and I'm getting stronger

    6.) Strong Women Wash Their Workout Gear In Some Unique Solutions

    You know how this is: after a certain time, your workout clothes get this “fragrance” that won’t quit. (I’m being nice with the word “fragrance”—it’s actually a weird musty stink.) Some women use vinegar in their wash to get the smell out. I use Tide and hang dry my stuff and it works great too. (Are there other good solutions? Let me know!)

    Mtb apparel/gear has a way to go re the anti-bactirial/antistink technology. Most of my workout/running gear is all antistink.


    7.) Strong Women Don’t Ask The Question “Does this make my ass look big?”

    Mostly, we don’t give a damn if it does. For some of us, no matter what we wear, we can’t hide our tuckus/booty/butt. (And we don’t want to, anyhow. We earned those big, beautiful glutes! We’re happy that our work paid off!) And for others, we’re working on growing that posterior chain. But, for strong women of any shape, usually the last of our concerns are opinions about our buttocks.

    8.) Strong Women Don’t Waste Time Worrying Whether They Have “Too Much” Muscle

    We don’t look in the mirror and think “my arms are too big” or “my quads are way too strong.” We see our bodies for what they are: marvelous human machines that are the result of a lot of hard work in the gym and in life. Let the rest of society waste time debating what a “real woman” looks like. We are real women and we’ve got stuff to do.

    9.) Strong Women Enjoy Training; They Don’t Just Suffer Through It

    This mindset helps so much. Not every day is going to be lovely (and strong women accept that fact), but strong women don’t look at each training session as some form of punishment or a way to earn their food. On some level, strong women come to really enjoy training: the basic measure of oneself, the push, the pull, the lift, the practice, the testing of limits, the agony, the sweat, the joy—all of it. In many ways, training is just like life: it’s got the good parts and the bad parts and a whole lot of in-betweens.

    Sure, some of training might be enjoyed more in hindsight than in the moment, but there is a joy found in the process that keeps us going day after day. Many people start with distractions or rewards in order to get into a routine, but once they’re in that routine, strong women settle down and learn to enjoy the process. And that’s the real secret of longevity. If you hate something, you won’t usually keep doing that thing for the rest of your life. So, learn to love training—it’s a fabulous gift to give to yourself!

    10.) Strong Women Pull Other People Up. They Don’t Push Them Down

    I’m not a big fan of the word “empower” (read “Do Not Empower Me”) because I like to earn my strength (and not be given it), but I do think it’s very important to think about how you’re using your power. Are you helping to elevate other people around you? Or are you making other people smaller so you can feel bigger?

    Strong women know that true strength is not selfish. In the movie “Mad Max: Fury Road” there’s a scene at the end where the platform is rising and strong women are on it, leaning down and offering a hand and boosting people up onto the platform so they can rise together. That’s how I think about strong women: we help each other to rise.

    10 Things That Strong Women Do by Lisbeth Darsh - Eat to Perform
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    Thanks cyclelicious! Some of the best advice I've ever had .

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    #2. I would love to work on pull up. I have a torn labrum in my right shoulder, and hanging body weight from bars is a non-starter. So I focus on pushups instead.
    #6. soak in a combo of Biz and oxyclean. Do a search for "stinky bike gear recipe".

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    #2. I would love to work on pull up. I have a torn labrum in my right shoulder, and hanging body weight from bars is a non-starter. So I focus on pushups instead.
    #6. soak in a combo of Biz and oxyclean. Do a search for "stinky bike gear recipe".
    My husband had surgery last week to for labral tear. His initial injury about a year ago, limited him to what he could do (on the bike and at the gym) and the pain and ROM got progressively worse. MRI confirmed the diagnosis but the extent of damage wasn't known until actual surgery. He's already started his physio and we are hopeful that he will make a full recovery.
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    Getting Started in Strength Training later in Life - summary of article here


    Strength Training-hires.jpg

    Being older could be a benefit in strength sports. Age brings strength, muscle density, and the calm focus of a successful athlete.

    What do women who first take up strength sports in their 40s, 50s, and beyond need to consider?

    Benefits Of Strength Training For Older Women

    1) It’s time efficient. Unlike running, you don’t need to train for a long time to get the benefits. And you can add intensity (rather than duration or distance) to keep the progress coming.

    2) You set your own schedule. Weight training fits around work and family, so you can set your own schedule and stick to it.

    3) It gives you a competitive outlet. And if you want to compete, there are tons of avenues open to you. The main strength and physique based sports are bodybuilding, strongman, powerlifting, and Cross Fit. All welcome older women. Most actually have dedicated age categories or Masters divisions to champion older athletes

    4) There’s a strong community feel. Women who lift share a distinct bond. It doesn’t matter what weight you have on the bar. If you step up to the squat rack, or load up a bar for a deadlift, other women in the gym will know you’re part of the clan.

    5) It promotes bone density. Skeletal strength becomes even more dramatic after menopause. Older women are at significant risk from osteoporosis and fractures. Strength training is an amazing tool for tackling loss of bone density.

    6) You’ll maintain your metabolic rate. Muscle mass starts to drop from our 30s onwards. This loss contributes to creeping weight gain (typically 10lbs a decade), and so-called problem areas. Boost your muscle mass (even by a little) and you’ll keep your metabolic rate higher. This means you can control your weight without having to take calories so low. Strength training is a far more effective weight management tool than dieting.

    7) Keep up with the kids. Or the grandkids! Strength training won’t make you heavy, slow, or muscle bound. It’ll make you stronger, more agile, and less prone to aches and pains.

    8) You’ll add or retain your muscle mass. More muscle means more calories burned (even at rest), and helps you shape your physique. The common areas older women worry about – arms, stomach, hips, thighs, butt – are lifted and filled out by strength training.

    9) Your posture and skin tone will be better. Strength training will help maintain your postural muscles, meaning you’ll look taller and slimmer. And older women who strength train report that it seems to keep their skin tone looking better, too. Perhaps it’s down to the muscle filling out the skin.

    10) You might experience fewer aches and pains. Getting older tends to mean back pain, joint pain, and general feelings of wear and tear. A smart strength training program can reduce aches and pains from everyday life.

    Did You Know?

    As women grow older, our physical activity levels tend to drop. The 35-44 age group is still the most active, but only around 1/3 of this age group meets activity guidelines.

    In the 55-64 age group, less than 1/5 women take part in moderate activity on a regular basis.

    Older women taking part in sport report two main benefits (aside from health improvements): a boost in self-confidence about body image, and access to a new network of social support.
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    Tips for Women New To Lifting

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    1. Don’t do too much too soon.
    Having big goals and numbers to hit, is fantastic, but it’s important to remember that won’t happen overnight. Practice technique, progressively increase weights to avoid injury. “It’s a marathon not a sprint!”

    2. Eventually, your huge PR jumps will slow down.

    Your first year, or two, you will make huge jumps in your lifts and it will feel great. That will eventually slow down after those initial years. I deadlifted 175 lbs. after my first 4 months of crossfit training. Then I worked my butt off, for over a year, to get over 215 lbs. This is normal; Don’t let it discourage you, or make you feel weak. After your body gets accustom to the heavy work load and adapts, you will have to put in more effort to see those gains.

    3. Stop comparing yourself to anyone else.

    This is not just advice for new lifters. You will be much happier not worrying about someone else’s numbers, or what they were going to lift. You should definitely be competitive, and a little friendly competition can be good; but, if you are constantly comparing your journey and situation to others you’re going to be disappointed. You will never feel good enough doing this—its negative self-talk, and not productive. It’s necessary to have a goal, and others you look up to, but don’t downplay your hard work and achievements in the process.

    4. There isn’t a “one-size-fits-all” approach.

    One program isn’t going to work for everyone; we all have different weaknesses. There is no absolute correct form for everyone. It’s like with many things, there are multiple ways of doing something and finding what works best for you and your body type will give you the best success. Yes, there are dangerous/ blatantly wrong forms of performing a lift, but there are things that will never be the same for everyone.

    5. Have fun with training and competing!

    If you don’t, what’s the point? There is enough negativity in life, and you will encounter plenty in a strength sport. Lots of people will tell you what you’re doing is dumb and they will not understand it. You will get asked some of the dumbest questions possible; learn to laugh at them. People will talk negative about others, but don’t let that influence you. If you are bored, injured, or not having fun with training or competition (if you choose to) change what you are doing, and dismiss the negative input from others—it’s no one’s happiness but your own!

    Strength Training-deadlift-day.jpg
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    Are female bodies really that different to male when it comes to the mechanics of lifting weights?

    Females tend to respond better to higher training frequencies than men. This is probably because we aren’t as physically strong, so are less likely to place max demands on our nervous system and muscle tissue as a result of workouts. Higher training frequency is not just possible for us, but can often be the best course of action. Plenty of women thrive on a training frequency that would cripple a lot of guys. Full body workouts, or upper/lower and push/pull splits can be a great way for women to strength train (rather than traditional body part splits).

    And, of course, female athletes have much lower levels of testosterone than men (even men who don’t train), and our levels of estrogen, progesterone, follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone rise and fall.

    If you look at a male and female skeleton side-by-side, there are very few differences. The main one (and certainly the main one which would affect lifting) is the structure and width of the pelvis and hips.

    So what about the structural and mechanical differences between women and men? What are they and how do they affect how we train and compete?

    1. Wider Q-Angles
    Women tend to have a wider angle between points on the quadriceps and patella tendon. This won’t necessarily lead to any problems when lifting, but can be a factor in knee injuries, valgus collapse (medial knee displacement), and hip internal rotation. It’s certainly worth being aware of this mechanical difference if you like to squat!

    2. Lower Body Strength
    Women tend to have greater lower body strength compared to upper body strength, and less of a hamstring/quad strength ratio. This is just one good reason to pay particular attention to strengthening and stabilizing the entire posterior chain.

    3. Greater Flexibility
    Women tend to be naturally more flexible than men, which means they can stand to do more stability work in their routines. Don’t neglect flexibility and mobility work altogether, but tip the balance in favor of more stability and activation work. Working through full range strength exercises will train your strength and stability, whilst encouraging your natural flexibility. And be aware that at certain points in your life, you may experience unusual levels of joint laxity, so be sure to program your workouts accordingly.

    4. Hyper-Extension Of The Lower Back
    Pay attention to your low back when you lift. Some women tend towards over-extension of the lumbar spine during compound lifts, and body weight movements like push ups and plank holds. Spend time learning how to control your core to prevent hyper-extension.

    Sauce: How Your Female Body Mechanics Affect Your Lifting - Lift Big Eat Big
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    Why Squats and Deadlifts Are Good For Your Health


    I love to squat and deadlift. In fact, I am a firm believer that every person needs to do some type of squatting and deadlifting multiple days per week. This does not mean that we need to throw a bar on our back or load up a bar with maximum weights.

    People fall on different spectrums in terms of their capabilities in the gym. I have a specific assessment that helps me identify where upon this spectrum they fall. If a client is not capable of putting a bar on their back or pulling weight from the floor, the plan is to get them there.

    Many will argue there are other ways to get strong and healthy in the gym. I agree that you can do other training programs in the gym, but they will not be as beneficial as one that makes you squat and deadlift. There are a few reasons for this.

    We live in a time period where we sit throughout the majority of the day, and even when we are up and moving, our heads tend to be buried in our phones. We have all heard the dangers of too much sitting. In fact, the media even titled stories stating that sitting was more negative for your health than smoking.

    I would strongly discourage you from smoking, but I think we all know that sitting is bad. Often times we chalk up too much sitting as a major cause to the obesity epidemic. I do not disagree with this, but there is much more that comes along with too much sitting.

    Gravity is one of the forces that is always enacting upon our bodies. Our ability to withstand gravity is critical to our health. When we sit down in a chair all day long, we do not need to fight against gravity, the chair does it for us. Due to the way that we sit all day long, our posture rolls forward.

    Our head comes forward, shoulders internally rotate, and our spine and hips flex. We tend to get very tight in the front of our bodies and our muscles lengthen in the back. On top of being in this position for prolonged periods of time, we do not need to stabilize ourselves against gravity. Again, the chair is doing this for us.

    Our posture collapsing in is a safe position. This is why you see many nervous system disorders present with this postural adaptation. We are built to have muscles stabilize and organize our joints, while the large muscles on the backside of our bodies propel us into movement. The problem is these muscles are nonexistent and weak.

    We then tend to go to the gym and ride the bike and do some crunches, which continues to strengthen the poor posture we are in all day long. We don’t want to squat or deadlift because we don’t want to hurt our knees and our back.

    The problem is sitting down all day long is far worse for your knees and lower back. The muscles responsible for stabilizing your spine are asleep and from having our knees bent all day long sitting, we lose terminal knee extension, placing increasing shear forces on the joint. You need to squat and deadlift to make your back and knees healthy. Of course with proper form, this should be able to go without saying.

    Squats and deadlifts teach us how to fight gravity. I know the research shows inconsistent results when looking at bad posture and pain, but we cannot ignore all of the anecdotal evidence out there. When people get stronger at resisting gravity they tend to feel a hell of a lot better. Chronic joint pain dissipates, mood elevates, people get less sick, and even digestion can improve.

    When we compress against gravity a few things happen. For one, our breathing is compromised. Our ribs cannot expand allowing us to take a deep belly breath. This for one, weakens spinal stabilizers, because our breathing muscles play a major role in that. It also negatively effects our mood and can even cause pain.

    The research is pretty clear in showing that taking deep breaths can allow us to relax by turning on our parasympathetic nervous system. If our ribs are compressed, we never get these deep breaths. This actually can negatively affect our immune system as well, leading us to be more prone to illness.

    Our spine is a highway for nerves to run up and down. When we develop poor posture these nerves cannot relay messages quite as efficiently. This alters the mechanics of our movements. Moving with poor mechanics over time can lead to a lot of wear and tear and chronic pain. Roughly 1 out of 3 Americans over the age of 50 suffers from chronic back pain. That is an incredibly high number and only looking at pain in one part of the body.

    Our nerves play a critical role in our immunity to illness as well. This is known as the neuroimmune system. Our nerves help to maintain barriers such as the blood-brain barrier, control inflammation, and mobilize our immune defenses. Our poor posture, limiting the efficiency of our nerves, can be a major reason why we tend to get more colds then others during the winter.

    One of our largest nerves, the vagus nerve, goes from our brain to our guts. When this nerve gets compressed it can negatively affect our digestion as well as our mood. Not only does the vagus nerve send signals controlling our digestion, but it also passes signals to the brain.

    90% of our serotonin is found in the gut. When serotonin levels fall we can get depression, anxiety, and anger issues. Serotonin is not the only neurotransmitter found in our guts. Our opioids also have receptors in our gastrointestinal tracts. All of these neurotransmitters can negatively affect our moods. They may not be able to adequately pass through the vagus nerve and/or cross over the blood-brain barrier, because remember, the blood-brain barrier is maintained by our nerves.

    Partaking in exercise is always a good option. However, a couple of days per week we should dedicate some time to helping us get out of our poor posture and teaching us to fight back against gravity. This not only can make us strong, but can help improve nearly every function of the human body.

    There are no better exercises to teach you how to fight gravity than the squat and deadlift. The squat requires you to place a bar on your back. The weight being placed here is constantly trying to push you forward. You need to stand up tall, breathe deep into your belly and brace hard, and then move through a full range of motion. This helps with everything that we discussed earlier, even teaching you how to breathe right.

    The deadlift does the same thing as the squat. As you break the floor with the weight you have to continue to fight gravity to maintain position and lock the weight out. The stronger we get at fighting gravity, the less prolonged poor postures are going to negatively affect us.

    This doesn’t mean we squat and deadlift a couple of times per week that we can just sit down all day long and be fine. We still want to be up and moving around as much as possible. However, life requires us to sit down for periods of time. This is something that is a lot of times out of our control. Getting stronger in the squat and deadlift will help us get through these periods of time that are out of our control.

    Other exercises can make us stronger, I will not argue against that. However, squats and deadlifts allow us to load the movements more than other exercises. Of course weight is a measure of gravity. The more we load it up, the better we are at resisting gravity with no weight.

    If you suffer from chronic pain, poor mood, gastrointestinal distress, or frequent colds, I highly recommend you find a good coach and start adding in some strength training that includes squats and deadlifts. Of course, still get adequate sleep and eat well. That is a powerful combination.

    Why Squats and Deadlifts Are Good For Your Health
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    Not so much about strength training per se... but more about mental strength and pursuing your goals.


    Strength Training-13557800_1035136336577072_7388683546335469637_n.jpg

    ''I think midlife is when the universe gently places her hands upon your shoulders, pulls you close, and whispers in your ear:
    I’m not screwing around. It’s time. All of this pretending and performing – these coping mechanisms that you’ve developed to protect yourself from feeling inadequate and getting hurt – has to go.

    Your armor is preventing you from growing into your gifts. I understand that you needed these protections when you were small. I understand that you believed your armor could help you secure all of the things you needed to feel worthy of love and belonging, but you’re still searching and you’re more lost than ever.

    Time is growing short. There are unexplored adventures ahead of you. You can’t live the rest of your life worried about what other people think. You were born worthy of love and belonging. Courage and daring are coursing through you. You were made to live and love with your whole heart. It’s time to show up and be seen.''

    ~ Brené Brown

    Photo: Helen Mirren, age 70 (will turn 71 on July 26) . 70 is the "new" middle age.
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    Thank you for the motivational and technical advice everyone ❗

    My .02 :
    No decent gyms in my area.
    MTB time serves my aerobic workout throughout the week.
    For strength training I use SPRI resistance bands (red or blue) .
    Also bodyweight exercises such as: walking lunges, wall sits, squats, calf raises, push-ups, Iplanks, and 1 leg balance squats etc...

    Having specific goals is very motivational for me so I
    love me some 30 Day Challenges !
    Right now my sister and I are doing a plank challenge and we are up to 95 seconds !
    The goal is to be at a full 2 minutes on July 31. The purpose to build stronger core muscles.

    On august second we will start a new 30 day Planking Challenge, where we will begin with the month with only a 30 second hold, but add an additional twist, such as raising 1 arm and 1 leg off the floor for half the time, then switching to the other diagonal arm/leg. We will gradually increase time by 5 seconds everyday until the end of 30 days.
    Also I just started doing a 30 day pushup challenge. I do regular military style pushups. Could only do 3 everyday until I could do 4 .
    4 everyday until I can do 5 etcetera.

    And yes rest of days are crucial. Rest days for your body to recover for the challenges ahead, and the help prevent burn out.

    All for now.
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    Good article about metabolism

    Your metabolism has nothing to do with why you gain weight as you age

    You've probably heard that once you hit 40, it's all downhill when it comes to your weight.

    That inexplicable force we call our "metabolisms" does begin to grind a bit slower every year from age 30 onwards.

    Here's the good news: The rate at which your metabolism slows down is actually rather minimal. In reality, most weight gain that happens in mid-life isn't the result of a slower metabolism at all.

    Instead, it comes down to a simple, but changeable truth: As we get older, we get less and less active.

    While this might sound depressing, it's actually great news. There's plenty we can do to counteract the slow, seemingly inevitable onset of poundage.
    Some highlights:

    Most of the things people say will boost your metabolism won't
    When we're eating, we burn a small amount of calories (roughly 10% of our total calories burned for the day). This is called the "thermic effect of food," and it's the first of those three phases I mentioned earlier. We can turn up the heat on this process a tiny bit (but remember, not by a whole lot) by doing things like drinking stimulant beverages like coffee and eating large amounts of protein.

    "Eating foods like green tea, caffeine, or hot chili peppers will not help you shed excess pounds," notes an entry in the A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia, hosted by the National Institutes of Health. "Some may provide a small boost in your metabolism, but not enough to make a difference in your weight."
    And

    Instead, get active
    Not surprisingly, the most important calorie-burning activity we engage in is just that — activity.

    Whether we're taking the stairs, stepping away from our desks for a coffee, or sweating it out in a hot yoga class, we're expending energy. Researchers call this second phase "physical-activity expenditure." After a strenuous workout, we continue to burn more calories than we would while at rest — and that's the third phase, or what's called "excess post-exercise oxygen consumption."

    When it comes to counteracting weight gain, these two phases — the ones related to physical activity — are the most important. Your best bet for burning more calories throughout the day is to increase your levels of any kind of activity, be it running or walking.
    ....

    Your best bet for burning more calories throughout the day is to increase your levels of any kind of activity, be it by adding miles to your runs or simply by taking the stairs at work. Better yet, do both.

    Read more:

    How to not gain weight as you age - INSIDER
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    10 Things The Best Athletes Do

    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0037-640x428.jpg

    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0007-640x428.jpg


    1. They don’t look for a quick fix.

    The best athletes with the best physiques – the people you admire – have been working on their bodies for a long, long time. They’ve been dedicated to their craft for years or in some cases decades. It’s simply unreasonable to give up on a dream because you couldn’t make it happen in a matter of weeks. Likewise, if you’re dissatisfied with your results, you won’t improve by throwing in the towel. You need to be in it for the long haul.

    2. They know where they are, where they want to go, and how to get there.
    The best athletes move from goal to goal, constantly setting their sites on new horizons to maintain a sense of interest along the way. Even if they aren’t competing, they are training for something.

    If you find yourself in a state of listlessness with no clear direction of where you’re going, do not despair. Set a goal like putting 50 lbs. on your squat or PRing your Fran time, give yourself a realistic deadline (3-6 months), and commit to it. Picking out a sport to compete in and entering a competition is a great way to motivate yourself and remain accountable too. If competition doesn’t seem worthwhile because you don’t want to embarrass yourself, remember that your first and foremost competition is you.

    3. They don’t try to reach their physique goals by cutting Calories.

    The best athletes are rarely looking to be in a calorie deficit – they view food as a way to enhance work capacity and they focus on maintaining and building the muscle they are earning in the gym.

    4. They don’t obsess over their abs.

    Ultra endurance athlete, elite powerlifter, and beer enthusiast Alex Viada once said (I’m paraphrasing) “The best athletes I know don’t spend a whole lot of time thinking about how to get abs; the work they do ultimately just lands them in that spot.” Judging by Alex’s success with his consultation company, Complete Human Performance, his impressive physique, and the fact that he can deadlift 700 lbs. then run a 5 minute mile, I think he knows what he’s talking about.

    5. They don’t worry about putting on body fat due to overeating.

    Fat is easy to lose but muscle is hard to gain. Most athletes spend a good part of their life chasing the latter and so they don’t have to worry so much about the former. For that reason, the best athletes in the world actively seek out weight gain. They do this by lowering their activity level and building their bodies for a specific result. In that process, they are often intentionally put on a bit of fat.

    The best way to say it is “ass moves mass”. Want to squat more? You need to put a lot of quality work into developing your quads and glutes, perfecting your form, and increasing your work capacity. That cannot be accomplished in a Calorie deficit, and it’s a lot harder to do if you’re worried about your scale weight.

    6. They train smart and focus on incremental performance increases.

    Most people think that to perform at the highest level possible, you need to train 24/7 and push yourself to the point of exhaustion every single workout – more of everything, harder workouts, longer workouts, etc. News flash: the best athletes don’t work out this way. Their approach doesn’t even resemble the casual athletes approach.

    The fittest people on the planet vary their training with a combination of intensities, activities, and modes of training. You might for instance see someone doing high intensity interval training in the morning to build anaerobic capacity, then weightlifting in the evening to develop maximal strength. They didn’t start out like that (and they typically do either or).

    7. They don’t feel guilty when they miss workouts.

    The fittest people take time off or reduce their work volume as part of the plan to get better. When you’re pushing the limit of human performance, rest isn’t just beneficial – it’s necessary.

    Yeah, if you’re chronically missing workouts and you haven’t been to the gym in months, you might want to do something about it and work on your time management…but don’t feel guilty if you have to push a workout a day late or you miss one session after months of consistency. Consider it extra recovery and get back at it hungrier than you were before.

    8. They surround themselves with people who’re better than they are.

    The “Big fish-little pond” effect is what happens when you’re the strongest/fastest/best athlete in your gym and you no longer have anyone to compete with; you’ve caught the biggest fish in your little pond and it’s time to expand your horizons. This concept can be applied to pretty much any situation where you’re no longer challenged by your environment.

    When a lack of competition stifles your growth, what do you do? The fittest people on earth change perspective. They put themselves out there and seek out new challengers. They don’t shy away from a reality check that perhaps their squat could be stronger; perhaps they could stand to work on their conditioning.

    9. They constantly seek out new information and develop a broad knowledge base.

    Elite athletes don’t have access to any training, nutrition, or motivational materials that your average person doesn’t, but they are constantly studying and applying new methods.

    10. They do EVERYTHING they need to do to be the best they can be.

    Many of the best athletes we work with are moms and dads. They serve our communities as firefighters or police officers, nurses and some are serving/have served in the military. They have very demanding lives, but they make no excuses when it comes to training, eating, and recovering.

    Being the best version of yourself is largely mental; it’s about starting on the path that is the opposite of the one you were on and just never looking back. When you spend enough time living your life, striving for constant improvement, nourishing your body, and being in control of yourself, you realize how much it sucks to live any other way.


    sauce: 10 Things The Best Athletes Do (That You Don't) - Eat to Perform
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    This guy...cracked me up.

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    Horror show... but I do them anyway

    Strength Training-14708368_10153955377391027_7989427302125250096_n.jpg
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    We’re very different from each other, so no one should ever assume that one speaks for all. So here is the thoroughly unofficial and totally incomplete list of 10 Things Strong Women Won’t (Usually) Tell You.


    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0037-640x428.jpg

    1.) We hurt

    Strong women won’t tell you right away when they’re injured, either physically or emotionally. We’ve spent our lives brushing things off.

    • Insult? Brush it off.
    • Bruise? Scrape? Brush it off.
    • Torn ACL? Bleeding head wound? Broken heart? Brush it off.



    Seriously though, many strong women have a hard time admitting weakness (just like many strong men). We’re working at it but keep in mind that we don’t always show what’s going on under the hood, and sometimes we need help.

    2.) We’re not fans of that phrase “for a girl”

    “You’re strong for a girl“
    “You’re pretty good at this for a girl“
    “You’re pretty tough for a girl“

    Those sentences never sound right or feel right. Can we please just stop using them?

    3.) We prefer the women’s barbell for certain lifts

    We use the bigger/heavier barbell at times (for movements like deadlifting and press and back squats) but many of us like the smaller circumference/lighter weight barbell (the “women’s barbell”) for movements like cleans and snatches. We can manipulate this barbell more easily and it just feels better for pulling movements. It’s not lesser, just different. Please stock it in your gyms so we have options. (It’s not a luxury as much as a necessity for some of us with smaller hands.) Thanks!

    4.) Our accomplishments don’t need to be compared to men’s in order to be accomplishments

    Ever watch a powerful woman pull 300 or 350 pounds (or more) on a deadlift? Ever hear men comment and say things like “Wow! That’s close to what I deadlift!” Ever really think about that compliment?

    We get that you’re trying to be nice, and we appreciate it. Really, we do! You’re sweet. But our accomplishments are important on their own, not just in comparison to men’s. Let us have our moments totally on their own. Thanks for understanding.

    5.) We do like our gym outfits

    I know, I know. We say things like “What we lift is important, not what we wear” and we mean that. But many of us also enjoy putting together our gym outfits and we do not mind receiving compliments from women and men. As long as nobody is leering or over-salivating, a “You look great!” or “Nice pants!” is appreciated whether it comes from women or men. We like to do good and look good.

    6.) We’ve never been big fans of only one “RX weight” in a workout description
    We get it. You’re putting a workout on the board and the tradition at CrossFit.com is to just list one weight, and everyone scales from there. But not all traditions are meant to be kept. (Think fruitcake at the holidays, smoking, and men-only golf clubs: traditions best left to die.)

    Many gyms take the RX weight and adjust it down 30% for women, so women have a weight approximation for which to scale. That’s cool. Also, some coaches write the workout and then put a percentage (like 70% of 1 RM, or bodyweight) so everyone calculates their own numbers. That’s cool, as well. There are probably other options, too: something to think about.

    7.) We won’t object if you want to help put away our weights

    Seriously. Who objects when someone helps? It’s a pain to put away all that gear when you’re finished with a workout.

    If everybody helps put away all the gear (not just their own), everything gets done quicker. Never hesitate to help a fellow gym member. We’re cool with helping and being helped. (Or we should be.) Everybody pitch in!



    8.) We (usually) love encouragement, but we (usually) don’t love being yelled at

    We’re strong and we can take it, but we usually only like yelling when it’s during a nasty met-con or one of our lifts, and it’s something like “GO! GO! GO!” or “STAND UP! STAND UP! STAND UP!”

    The rest of the time? We’d rather you spoke in a regular voice and talked to us. It’s easier to hear what you’re saying when we’re not having to also deal with how you’re saying it.

    9.) When we fail (which we do often) sometimes the best thing to say is nothing. Just be with us

    We know we failed, and often we know the errors that caused our failure. We don’t always need solutions, and sometimes we just need company—someone to share our pain but not fix it. We can (probably) fix it ourselves, but we would enjoy a little company along the way.

    Besides, we’re not experts on everything in the gym, and we don’t expect you to be, either. Just being our friend is enough. (Well, unless you’re the coach, then we do expect you to be an expert.)

    10) We can tell when someone is looking at our assets instead of our eyes

    It doesn’t matter if we’re turned in the other direction and pulling 250 lbs from the floor. We know. Don’t be a creep, and don’t be a criticizer: that goes for men and women. We’re all in this space together, trying to be healthy and do something good for our bodies. Let’s enjoy this time and each other.

    Remember, most people aren’t even getting off their couches and breaking a sweat, so the fact that we’re all working towards strength and fitness means we have something in common. Let’s celebrate that and each other! Strong women help this world become stronger, and so we all benefit. Raise a barbell to strong women and to strong men! (Or we’ll just raise it ourselves because we’re good with that, too.)







    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0007-640x428.jpg


    Sauce: 10 Things Strong Women Won't Tell You by Lisbeth Darsh - Eat to Perform
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  52. #52
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    Morning Workouts

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    What's the Least Amount of Exercise I Need to Do to Look Good?

    The short answer: ninety minutes per week. But those minutes have to count.

    "Shorter workouts need to create a serious amount of metabolic demand," Trink says. "That means you're using a lot of energy and accelerating your heart rate, while also developing strength and muscle mass. These workouts need to hit both ends of the spectrum: You're using weight training to develop some lean muscle tissue while elevating your heart rate and using up a lot of energy to keep your body fat low."

    That means using short rest periods and almost exclusively compound exercises, meaning movements that use multiple joints and larger muscle groups. There are two different kinds of workouts you can do:


    Option 1: The 3-Day Approach
    If you're really short on time, this one's the best: three full-body gym sessions per week, each about 25 to 35 minutes long. Here, you're going to be doing three sets of supersets, which is a pair of exercises that are performed back-to-back and typically use different muscle groups, so that (in this case), your back is resting while you're hitting your legs, so your heart rate stays high and your fat loss continues. Here's a sample. (For all the workouts in this article, start with a three to five minute warm-up; jogging is fine.)

    4 supersets of front squats and pull-ups, 8 to 10 reps per exercise, 45-60 seconds rest after each superset. If pull-ups are tough, there's no shame in jumping while you pull yourself upward, or you can try starting at the top of the movement and lowering yourself down as slowly as you can. The lat pull-down machine can also work if things get too tough.

    Rest 2 minutes.

    3 supersets of step-ups and single-arm dumbbell overhead presses, 10 to 12 reps each per side, 45-60 seconds rest after each superset.

    Rest 2 minutes.

    3 supersets of push-ups (if that's tough, do them on your knees or with your hands on a wall) and jump squats, 25 reps each, 45-60 seconds rest after each superset.

    You'll feel like you've run ten 100-meter sprints while being kicked in the lungs by a steel-capped boot, but the entire session shouldn't last more than 35 minutes. It's important to note the structure, so you can come up with your own workouts: Start with two big compound exercises, and as you fatigue, move to slightly less-demanding unilateral exercises (that's movements that use one arm or leg at a time), and finish with high-volume bodyweight exercises. This way, you're a lot less likely to hurt yourself as your energy drops and in case your form starts to slip.

    Option 2: The Six-Day Approach
    Three workouts will get the job done, but Trink's favorite approach is six workouts of 10 to 15 minutes apiece. This actually results in less time spent in the gym, but if yours is hard to get to, it may wind up more time-consuming. He thinks it's still worth it.

    "In my experience, high-frequency exercise is optimal when it comes to body composition, strength improvements, and movement quality improvements," he says. "You're getting into that fatigued state more often and even if, at the end of the week, your net training time is the same, I almost always see better results with more frequent workouts."

    Here's Dan Trink's perfect week. For selecting the weight, err on the lighter side and increase the weight next time you work out.

    Day 1: Alternate 10 trap bar deadlifts and 10 push-ups for 10 minutes.

    Day 2: 10 minutes of rowing on an ergonomic rower for max distance.

    Day 3: Put 50 percent of your bodyweight on a barbell and squat as much as you can for 8 minutes. (Form is important here. If you sense that you're losing integrity, don't be a hero; decrease the weight.)

    Day 4: Alternate 50 burpees and 50 calories on an assault bike for 10 minutes.

    Day 5: Do 10 pull-ups and 1 dip, then 9 pull-ups and 2 dips, continue until your pull-ups hit zero. (Or try the pull-up substitutions above.)

    Day 6: 50-calorie row, 50-calorie bike, 50 calories on the ski machine or elliptical, 500-meter run. Do that for 12 minutes.

    Cakewalks they ain't. But if you're a little tired of hearing that an hour per day is the only road to a healthy, strong, and lean body, this plan combines the benefits of the traditional weights-and-cardio plan in a fraction of the time. Why not do more with less?


    Sauce: https://tonic.vice.com/en_us/article...ource=vicefbca
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    I think that yoga is the biggest waste of an hour that anyone can do for exercise.

    I wish that weight lifting classes were as proliferate as yoga classes, because I think people are intimidated by weights and don't know how to get started or to progress, so they don't do it. But yoga classes are a dime a dozen and they are marketed to the max, so that's where people go, and then they wonder why they aren't strong.

    A hard weight workout is just that, hard, and can be really uncomfortable for the first month for beginners. But nothing gives as much bang for the buck. It's too bad that bad personal trainers are an absolute plague. Probably the best method is to find an experienced friend and ask to work out with them in the weight room for a few weeks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geargals View Post
    I think that yoga is the biggest waste of an hour that anyone can do for exercise.

    I wish that weight lifting classes were as proliferate as yoga classes, because I think people are intimidated by weights and don't know how to get started or to progress, so they don't do it. But yoga classes are a dime a dozen and they are marketed to the max, so that's where people go, and then they wonder why they aren't strong.

    A hard weight workout is just that, hard, and can be really uncomfortable for the first month for beginners. But nothing gives as much bang for the buck. It's too bad that bad personal trainers are an absolute plague. Probably the best method is to find an experienced friend and ask to work out with them in the weight room for a few weeks.
    I'm pretty sure a lot of prominent MTB and trials athletes will disagree with you. A well rounded athlete tends to use many different forms of training and yoga is often one of them and not just for strength.

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  57. #57
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    Good story and I can relate. In my case I started crossfit in 2014 ( I was 55) Never lifted weights , never ran, or did gymnastics... i just rode my bike. Now I'm hitting some pretty decent PRs lately (all post injury) : . But I am also accelerating (burning fat and getting stronger) when I doing slightly lighter weights and lots of reps during high intensity intervals. And yup it all helps my riding. I am also pleased to I have lost weight, gained muscle and gone done in a size as well (size 6 and getting closer to a size 4)


    My workout: 'I worried I'd get big if I did powerlifting, but I've dropped a dress size’


    I started weightlifting three years ago at the age of 46. I’d done competitive athletics in my 20s and wanted to find a physical activity that would challenge me. I loved the film Rocky, and the classic training sequence from it, so I decided to join a boxing club. Non-competitive boxing became my second love for 10 years. But eventually it started to take a toll on my body, and I quit just after my 40th birthday.

    If you’re not a runner (and I never enjoyed running), the options for fitness in the middle years really narrow down to a handful of activities. Many play tennis (which yields a high chronic injury rate in the over-40s), take up yoga (which is fine, but doesn’t really get the heart rate up), or try golf (which isn’t my thing).

    I tried British Military Fitness for a year, but you need the stamina of a younger athlete. I considered CrossFit, but there was no way I was going to manage the dynamic moves. I was intrigued by the strength-based exercises and set out to find a qualified strength and conditioning trainer. Will Davis at Performance Pro started me off with body weight exercises, and at first, when he asked me to pick up a bar bell, I told him I didn’t want to lift heavy weights; I worried that I would get big. He guaranteed I would not. I thought about the women I’ve seen lifting weights who look lean, and changed my mind.

    Powerlifting consists of three lifts: the squat, the bench press and the deadlift. Lifting weights is technical, but that’s what I love about it. You make improvements every week. It has a huge health impact for women as they age. I had a bone density scan last year and the technician told me mine was “off the charts”. I have also dropped a dress size as fat has gradually become muscle.

    Lifting provides a challenge for me, and I love the training environment. My gym is full of athletes of all ages, each with their own goals. No one is there to show off. It really is empowering.

    My weekend workout
    Sessions per week? Three.
    Best pre-workout meal? Peanut butter on toast.
    Most exhausting move? My maximum deadlift of 92.5kg; one and a half times my body weight.




    Sauce:

    My workout: 'I worried I'd get big if I did powerlifting, but I've dropped a dress size’
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    Can I Get A Hallelujah? Can I Get An Amen?


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    Strength Training-wsszkkb.jpg


    Ladies, I’m going to give it to you straight. Once you commit to lifting and working out, certain things are going to happen and they’re unavoidable for most women, just like being fabulous. But we all know that if being fabulous had a meter, we would break that sucker every single day.

    As we get stronger and more fit, we learn that we have to deal with some things. So here are 5 Things That Lifting Women Learn:

    As your glutes get firmer, the girls up front might get smaller.

    Weird, right? But it’s our form of shrinkage. I know this is not the news you’re hoping for, but it’s the truth. Breasts are made up of glands, ducts, and fat — and some of us simply carry more fat here. But when you’re losing fat (and building muscle), you don’t get to select where that fat comes off. Your body chooses, and it might choose to take some fat from your breasts. That’s the (often) unhappy news. The good news? You still look better than ever! (And those stronger pectoral muscles might hold your girls high as gravity tries to do its thing.)

    Your hands will change.

    We call them calluses, and know they’re a sign of doing work. Your mom might call them “those rough things on your palm, honey” and ask if they’re normal. Oh Mom, we passed that point long ago. Fabulous women are not normal, because it’s impossible to remain normal when you keep getting better and better.

    No matter how feminine you are, if you gain ANY muscle, at some point a jack-wagon is going to say something about how you “look like a man.”

    You don’t look anything like a man, but some fool will write that because you have some muscular definition. So this is where you get to practice the most useful skill of all time: pushing the ignore button. Press on with whatever you’re doing. Which matters more: how fantastic you feel OR what some jack-wagon thinks? Strong will carry you in your later years, and weak will not, nor will the opinions of idiots on the internet. Morons are like milk past the expiration date — don’t drink that garbage unless you want to be up at 3am and miserable.

    Your bathroom scale becomes like Allison from the 3rd grade: she used to be your best friend but you just don’t see her value anymore.


    Sure, the scale gives you a number, but that number only tells you how much you weigh, not who you are or how wonderful you might be. What you really want to know is how strong you are and how fantastic your clothes feel — and you already know that! So why do you keep looking at the scale? Toss her and stick with your new best friend: the barbell.

    You want to eat more and — get this — it’s OKAY!

    You’re not just stuffing your face with pizza and cake anymore — you’re priming your body with fuel like steak and veggies. Nobody accomplishes much on a starvation diet, so you stop starving yourself. Instead, you learn what to eat when to accomplish your goals of building muscle and reducing body fat. You learn to make peace with your body and work with it, instead of fight it. And now you feel FREE.

    Bonus: You’re improving your longevity.


    Now, that may not sound as exciting as “you look way hot” but it’s an important point. Strong people live more productively longer. It’s not enough to be skinny, and it’s not enough to have a healthy heart; you need to actively build muscle to combat its natural loss. Consequently, being strong is what we all need to age with grace. High-five yourself, women! Getting strong and staying strong increases your quality of life for years to come! Go celebrate with a deadlift!

    Strength Training-14925569_1834805426763900_8766877958412552424_n.jpg


    Sauce: "The Girls Might Shrink (And 4 Other Lessons Lifting Women Learn)" by Lisbeth Darsh - Eat to Perform
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    Five Signs You Should Be Eating More Protein

    The Paleo Diet. Protein powder. Gourmet burgers. In case you haven't noticed, our culture has become obsessed with consuming protein—which means few of us are skimping on the stuff. "These days, most of the hot fad diets are very pro-protein." says DR Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D., author of The Flexitarian Diet.

    But despite our preoccupation with protein, some of us are still slipping through the cracks—namely vegetarians or people who tend to under-eat, says Blatner. Problem is, it can be tricky to identify what's considered "not enough" since the recommended intake of protein is a broad range, rather than one hard number.

    Afraid you're short-changing your system? Forget crunching numbers—just look for these signs that your body is begging for protein:

    You Crave Sweets
    One of the first signs you're low on protein: You start craving sweets and feel like you're never quite full, says Blatner. You'd think a protein shortage would trigger an urge for steak and eggs, right? But one of protein's most critical functions is keeping your blood sugar steady—which means if you're lacking, your glucose levels will be all over the place, encouraging you to reach for a quick fix like lollies. "If all you ate in the morning was a handful of cereal, you're going to get energy right away, then your energy is going to wane," she says. "That up-and-down is where cravings come in."


    Your Brain Feels Foggy
    Balanced blood sugar is essential for staying focused. So when you're protein-deprived and your glucose levels are fluctuating constantly, Blatner says you may feel a little foggy—like you can't quite get with the program at work, for example. Why? Because you don't have a steady stream of carbs to fuel your brain. Protein at meals helps time-release the carbs for steady energy rather than up and down spikes. If you're relying only on "fleeting foods," such as crackers or bread, you'll only experience short bursts of mental energy, followed by the fog.

    Your Hair is Falling Out
    Protein is the building block of all of your cells—your hair follicles included. "If your hair follicles are strong, they keep your hair on your head, despite the tugging we do all day and the wind going through your hair," says Blatner. But if you're chronically skimping on the scalp-stabilising nutrient, you may notice that your strands start thinning (although, keep in mind, this can also be a sign of other conditions, like thyroid trouble).


    You Feel Weak
    We all know that protein is essential for building muscle. And if you don't get enough of it, your muscles may start to shrink over time, says Blatner. As a result, you may feel weak and unable to do the exercises you once excelled at.

    You Get Sick Constantly
    Your biceps aren't the only thing that protein reinforces. "Protein is needed to build all the compounds in our immune systems," says Blatner. So if you seem to catch colds or infections more often than everyone else—and you're otherwise in good health—a protein deficiency may be to blame. Another sign: You constantly get hangnails. "Our skin is a huge immune organ because it protects us from the environment," says Blatner. If your skin isn't strong due to a shortage of protein, you may start to notice cracks and tears (like hang nails), potentially exposing you to pathogens and leading to infections.


    sauce: Five Signs You Should Be Eating More Protein - Fitness, Sex, Health, Wellbeing & Weight Loss | Women's Health Magazine Australia
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    “Are Low Carb Diets Good for Leaning Out?”



    Should you be on a low carb diet if you’re trying to lose fat? The answer can be tricky, depending upon your goals. Let’s be honest – we’ve all seen people gut it out and achieve some level of success on this style of diet. Typically, the number on the scale goes down, and certain parts of them look a little tighter because they’re no longer as inflamed as they were before. This has a lot to do with what kind of diet they were on prior to going low carb. In other words, it’s not all fat loss.

    Now, you have to realize that I am having a discussion about populations that exercise intensely. This isn’t a knock on low carb – it can be an effective diet for sedentary people, and some athletes say it works for them. However, most athletes don’t do well on these types of diets. Glucose is the primary source of fuel during high intensity activtity, and performance practically always takes a backseat on a low carb diet. That’s not acceptable.

    Some of the negative effects of low carb dieting can be attributed to reduction in Calories. This can be made up for by increasing fat intake, but most folks eat about the same amount of fat as they were before, and end up in a huge Calorie deficit created by the reduction of carbs. It basically becomes a less effective version of Weight Watchers – call it “Carb Watchers” if you will. The single-minded focus on reducing carbs leaves out one of the most basic components of fat loss.

    Here are a few common pitfalls you’re bound to run into on a low carb diet:

    1. Insomnia becomes “normal” and sleep quality is reduced

    2. Cardio workouts might be slightly better, but during weight training you’ll never really feel strong

    3. Stress levels will elevate

    4. Your hormone function can get seriously thrown out of whack and your metabolism can be effected negatively

    Keeping all of this in mind, there are ways to employ periods of lower carbohydrate/calorie intake and achieve all the positives without the negatives. In short, it’s overwhelmingly unnecessary to restrict carbohydrates in such an extreme fashion if you’re maintaining a high level of activity. The end result tends to be a lethargic, broken, confused athlete.

    There is a better way.


    Sauce: "Are Low Carb Diets Good for Leaning Out?" - Eat to Perform

    January 2017
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    Don't Tell Me What Strong Looks Like

    As motivating and inspiring as the health and fitness industry can be, too often we perpetuate one particular image of a strong body: climbers are chiseled like statues, yogis are lean and flexible, runners are slender and toned.

    Today, I have a personal record (PR) marathon time of 3 hours and 41 minutes, and I don’t look anything like your stereotypical runner. I have cellulite, love handles, beefy thighs, and a slightly defined stomach. I’m a far cry from the slim bodies I see on running magazine covers or Instagram posts from my favorite brands.

    For years, I struggled to call myself a runner, or even an athlete, because I didn’t think I looked like one. I started running regularly in December 2013 because it helped me get out of bed in the morning. For the first time in my life, I wasn’t motivated to get active with the sole intention of losing weight. I was slow, but I loved the way running made me feel about myself. I felt strong and empowered by what my body could do—a radical change from the two-decade pursuit of a “perfect body” that I assumed would make me happy.

    With time, my goals evolved from simply getting to the finish line in one piece to hitting a particular time. I set goals to run a sub-two-hour half marathon and a sub-four marathon. In the back of my mind, I assumed that the faster I ran, the stronger I’d look—stronger, in my mind, meaning more slender. So I kept pushing myself, and though I did notice my body changing, I never really lost any weight. How could I be strong if I still didn’t look it?

    Then, in April 2016, I started working toward a goal to take my marathon PR from 3:59 to 3:35 in an attempt to qualify for the Boston Marathon.

    As weeks of training went by, I developed a nasty habit of assessing my weight while I got dressed to run. I’d stand in front of my mirror wearing shorts and a sports bra, look at my reflection, and feel defeated because I wasn’t developing what I thought of as a runner’s body. I was working harder than I’d ever worked in my life, but I didn’t think I looked the part.

    As the summer heat intensified, so did my training. Running in a heavy, sweat-drenched shirt was becoming increasingly uncomfortable, but I was too insecure to ditch it and run only in my sports bra. Women my size—a U.S. 8/10—don’t run in their sports bras, I thought. I would look at the thin women rocking their sports bras in my running group and feel frustrated that I didn’t look like them. I could keep up with them, but I didn’t think that I was as athletic because I didn’t have a body like theirs.

    But the problem wasn’t that I wasn’t fit or toned enough. It was that I had failed to embrace my own strength beyond my appearance. So what if I didn’t see any women my size running in their sports bras? I figured if I was this insecure about my shape, then I probably wasn’t alone. I also realized that the only person stopping me from feeling confident in a sports bra was me. So, one disgustingly hot and humid summer day, I shed my shirt and shared a video on Instagram, encouraging other women to do the same.

    That first run in my sports bra was terrifying. I spent the entire run on edge, ready to defend myself to anyone who dared to put me down. But to my total surprise, nobody paid attention to me. Not a single person looked my way or validated my fear that my body wasn’t good enough to be seen in a sports bra.

    The #SportsBraSquad was born, and suddenly women of all different sizes were ditching their shirts with me. Whenever I felt too insecure to run in my sports bra at a race, I’d scroll through the #SportsBraSquad hashtag and read stories of women, both slender and curvier, who struggled just like I did to feel proud of their strong bodies.

    All my life, the fitness industry has shown me how strength is supposed to look, and it never looked like me. Today, I call ********. Because at 160 pounds, I ran a marathon in 3:41. And this year, I plan to do it in 3:30. Strength doesn’t look a certain way—it feels a certain way. My marathon PR isn’t a step toward “the perfect body.” It represents me at the happiest, strongest, and best version of myself yet.


    Sauce: https://www.outsideonline.com/215624...n=facebookpost
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Yes!!!

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    Why working out on an empty stomach is a bad idea


    The going belief in the fitness world has long been that working out on an empty stomach results in increased fat loss. In fact, a 2013 study published in the British Journal of Nutrition concluded that working out on an empty stomach, or fasted, burned nearly 20 per cent more fat than doing so after breakfast.

    But nutritionists warn that this might not be the best course of action. The logic behind increased fat burn is that when hungry, the body has depleted glycogen stores — stored up carbohydrates that give us energy — and so it needs to use fat as fuel. It sounds like a great way to get fit faster, but it could actually be counterproductive.

    “If someone hasn’t eaten in an extended period of time — and we talk about fasted exercise as taking place first thing in the morning, so your last meal would have been dinner the night before — your glycogen is depleted and your body will use fat as fuel, but it could also use muscle,” says Kirstin Schell, a registered holistic nutritionist. “And since muscle fuels our metabolism, it’s actually not very helpful.”

    Studies have shown that doing a regular exercise routine at your normal intensity would not cause you to tap into muscle mass for added energy, but if your goal is to increase your intensity (and if you want to achieve results, you’ll need to do this), then you will use valuable muscle to fuel your workout.

    Schell says another downside to exercising fasted is that you’ll simply have less energy to push yourself harder. And while a study published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport showed that the effects of fasted exercise are different on men than on women — they’re more beneficial for men — both groups showed decreased performance when they worked out on an empty stomach.

    Plus, you run the risk of experiencing the natural effects of physical exertion without sufficient nutritional fuel: lightheadedness.

    Experts also point out that since the body doesn’t like to be starved, your metabolism will respond to the increase in fat burn by slowing down. And the next time you eat, it will inherently store more fat to compensate for the loss.

    Instead of hitting the treadmill or the running trail hungry, go for a breakfast that amounts to 200 to 300 calories, and includes a balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat.

    “You want something that’s easily digestible but provides you with enough energy,” Schell says. “Try a banana with nut butter or a small smoothie with Greek yogurt, a piece of fruit and some protein powder. Overall, it’s pretty small in terms of volume but energy dense so you won’t crash.”

    If you’re working out later in the day, Schell says there’s less risk of being in a fasted state, even if you ate at noon and are hitting the gym at 6 p.m., but you could supplement with a snack-sized meal about an hour before to top out your energy stores.

    Sauce: Why working out on an empty stomach is a bad idea | 102.1 the Edge

    Doing the Crossfit Open 17.3 today. Snatches and Pull Ups

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  66. #66
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    Jumping back into this thread...

    I got into Orangetheory Fitness a few months ago, and I LOVE what it did for my fitness and strength, but man, it is NOT sustainable for my wallet. The local rec center, however, is $5 for a day pass. So... I'm looking to somewhat recreate the OTF workouts at the gym. Does anyone incorporate HIIT with weights into their fitness routine?

    Related--just got a bigger (read: heavier...) bike, so I'm really hoping to build some strength so I can ride the thing properly!

  67. #67
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    Yes. I work out at a gym that is part of a PT/athlete training facilty. A NCAA Sweet-16 team trains some of its members here.
    It's called functional fitness boot camp which really doesn't say what we do. We incorporate everything from high intensity intervals to plyometrics to weights to supersets to agility to metabolic to...... it's mixed up always and I never know what to expect. I do all around weights but I'm not doing barbells at the level of cycleicious.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    Yes. I work out at a gym that is part of a PT/athlete training facilty. A NCAA Sweet-16 team trains some of its members here.
    It's called functional fitness boot camp which really doesn't say what we do. We incorporate everything from high intensity intervals to plyometrics to weights to supersets to agility to metabolic to...... it's mixed up always and I never know what to expect. I do all around weights but I'm not doing barbells at the level of cycleicious.
    That sounds a lot like what I'm interested in! So it's a class with an instructor?

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    Yes, the workouts are laid out by the trainers but we do them at our own pace. The trainer supervises, helps with modifications and form if needed.

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    Throwback Thursday...Old school training


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    And here is the amazing story behind that pic! https://rouleur.cc/editorial/eileen-...eid=df90402e36
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  71. #71
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    Use Your Own Strength to Get Strong

    Save your cash, you have all the tools you need to build strength. Your own body!

    Do the words ‘free weights’, ‘gym’ and ‘strength training’ have to be in the same sentence? C’mon, you’ve got a 50/50 chance at this one. Well, not in my world they don’t. Whether you’re home, at the park, the beach or on vacation, anytime is a good time to do these 10 easy bodyweight exercises. Some tackle the core, some the legs, some the upper body, and some incorporate a feel-good stretch.

    Lunge – Great for leg strength. With your feet shoulder width apart, step your left foot forward and lower your right knee until it’s almost on the ground. Then, return to a standing position. Do this several times on each leg. Focus on good form.

    Pistol squat - Start by holding your arms out straight out in front of you. Raise your right leg out in front of you, too. Balancing on your left leg, bend your knee until you’re close to the ground. (Your right leg should still be extended!) After holding this position for several seconds, unbend your left leg to rise back to an upright position.

    Step-up – You’ll need a step, bench, or high curb. Any surface located slightly above ground level will do. Place your right foot flat on this surface and simply straighten your leg. Basically, you’re stepping up and then stepping back down again. Do this between 10 and 15 times on each leg.

    Standing calf raises - You’ll need a vertical wall. To start, stand about a foot away from the wall. Put your hands on that surface at about shoulder height and rise up on your toes. Make sure to keep your knees straight. Lower yourself back to the floor and repeat.

    Worm-walk - Start in a standing position, but double over and let your hands touch the floor. If you can’t reach the floor, get them as close as possible. Walk your hands forward until you’re in push-up position, then take tiny steps until your feet meet your hands again.

    Mountain climbers – Like horizontal climbing on the floor. Start by getting onto your hands and knees. Put your right foot on the floor under your chest and extend your left leg behind you. Bend over your right foot so that your palms are flat on the floor. Then, jump. Switch the position of your legs while they’re in mid-air.

    Push-up - To do a push-up, place your hands flat on the floor about shoulder width apart and extend your legs behind you. Your feet should be together and your elbows should be straight but not locked. Keeping your back flat, lower yourself toward the floor until your elbows are at 90 degree angles. Then, push yourself back up

    Burpee – A Cross fit favourite. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart, then crouch down to the floor, putting your palms flat on the ground. From that position, kick your legs out behind you as though you were going to do a push-up. Instead, jump and pull your legs back underneath you. As soon as they’re planted, leap straight up into the air.

    Planks – Lie on your front, holding yourself off the floor with your elbows. Extend your legs behind you as though you were going to do some push-ups. Then, just hold that position. Make sure your back is straight.

    Arm circles – Stand relaxed and then extend your arms out to the sides, parallel to the ground. Keeping them extended, rotate them in clockwise circles fisting crunches for about thirty seconds. Switch direction and repeat.

    Twisting Crunches- While lying on your back, lace your fingers behind your head. Rotate your right elbow inward as you raise your left knee. Your elbow and knee should meet over your midsection. Return to your starting position and repeat with your opposite side.

    Oh, that’s 11 exercises! Throw in that last one for good measure and thank me later.

    So don’t feel obligated to use the gym or a set of dumbbells for strength training. Sure, they’re both beneficial, but so is pumping out a few sets of the above exercises next time you’re out walking or at the park with the kids and/or dog. Experiment with incorporating some of them into a run as a means of getting the blood moving all through your body.

    Free and easy, they’ll have your body burning bright in no time!
    Burpees schurpees Ugh!

    Strength Training-16939682_1887672014810574_2132933696793648704_n.jpg

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  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Throwback Thursday...Old school training


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    And here is the amazing story behind that pic! https://rouleur.cc/editorial/eileen-...eid=df90402e36
    Love that! Thanks for sharing.

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  74. #74
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    Ok so question for you ladies now that I'm working on downhilling and jumping mainly these days.

    Just did two days of DH runs and OW. These things hurt:
    Forearms
    Glutes
    Shoulders
    Abs
    Triceps
    Hamstrings

    And on the second day it was KILLING me to be off the saddle.

    So I've decided it's time to go back to gym ratting in addition to the yoga/calestinestics.

    So here's what I'm thinking I need:
    - assisted pull-ups
    - deadlifts
    - tricep pull downs

    And then I get stuck. I do bridges, body weight squats, planks, and single leg RDLs without weights.

    Any suggestions on other exercises and if I should do high rep/low weight or heavier weight/low rep?



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  75. #75
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    ^You might want to start talking with a fitness coach or personal trainer about your goals and what are you able to commit and want to achieve. They can design a training program to get you started and that the works for you. Building strength, gaining muscle, is as hard as losing fat...
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    I second that. A good trainer will do an assessment to identify strength, weakness and any imbalance. They will listen to your goals and design a plan for you. One problem with self assessment is that you may miss key components of balanced training which can excaberate any weakness, set you up for injury, or create more imbalance.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    ^You might want to start talking with a fitness coach or personal trainer about your goals and what are you able to commit and want to achieve. They can design a training program to get you started and that the works for you. Building strength, gaining muscle, is as hard as losing fat...
    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    I second that. A good trainer will do an assessment to identify strength, weakness and any imbalance. They will listen to your goals and design a plan for you. One problem with self assessment is that you may miss key components of balanced training which can excaberate any weakness, set you up for injury, or create more imbalance.
    Yep, already on that. Meeting on June 10.

  78. #78
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    Here's one I really like, T-spine pushups.Great for core and shoulder stablization

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SgeUqvNzag


  79. #79
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    ^T-spine pushups are excellent!

    Another functional exercise I like for core and shoulder stabilization is the turkish get up. Seems a little complicated at first but once you get the hang of it ... starting with really light weight. It's a full workout that walks your body through all its possible motions.


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  80. #80
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    Wow, never seen it broken down like that before!!

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    Ok, so I finally have a trainer. After moving to CO 9 months ago and finally getting my health straightened out, a friend of mine who lives up in Ft. Collins is now doing my weight training program.

    It's definitely has a mix of calisthenics and picking up heavy things and putting them down repeatedly, but it's a good strong program.

    My riding has changed too. I don't do much XC these days and mainly DH and playing in the local parks, but I'm hoping that in the next month or two it'll make a big difference.

    The first time I really thinned down it was from weight training. Apparently just living at altitude helps you build muscles after living at sea level most of my life (lungs haven't caught up yet), but between MTB, weight training, yoga, and during the off-season Aikido; I'm hoping I can get really strong.

    Because strong is the new sexy

  82. #82
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    Strong is definitely sexy and healthy. Weight lifting will increase bone density... an older study but still relevant https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9927006


    Doing full body weight lifting, like Olympic style lifts, will stimulate body producing hormones that will trigger growth. If you examine the skeletons of weightlifters and football players, you will see that their bones are more dense and often even larger diameter.

    But no, ladies, you aren't "big boned" because you lift. I weigh a lot less than when I started lifting /strength training 3 years ago. Cardio workouts and diet has also contributed to my body getting leaner.
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  83. #83
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    I've done two weeks of my weight training program. Now that I finally have a trainer week 3 is this week. I can't believe what a difference even two weeks makes.


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  84. #84
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    I see a couple personal trainers (one at my work gym and one by my house) and I also travel for work periodically. One of my trainers recommended the SLAAP workout for travel:

    SLAAP workout is best anywhere you are.

    (S)quats
    (L)unges
    (A)ny
    (A)bdominal exercise (crunches, Russian twist, etc.)
    (P)ush ups

    Doing just 3 set of 15 of these fundamental exercises will help keep your base intact and give you a good burn.

    -laine

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by laine View Post
    I see a couple personal trainers (one at my work gym and one by my house) and I also travel for work periodically. One of my trainers recommended the SLAAP workout for travel:

    SLAAP workout is best anywhere you are.

    (S)quats
    (L)unges
    (A)ny
    (A)bdominal exercise (crunches, Russian twist, etc.)
    (P)ush ups

    Doing just 3 set of 15 of these fundamental exercises will help keep your base intact and give you a good burn.

    -laine
    Not a bad one at all! Right now I'm doing 3 sets of 15-20 (I'm building up from 10 reps) to develop a base). But there is nothing wrong with body weight.

    For push-ups I have to do wall push-ups though. Otherwise they kill my shoulders.
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  86. #86
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    [QUOTE=stripes;13219284

    It's definitely has a mix of calisthenics and picking up heavy things and putting them down repeatedly[/QUOTE]

    Training has change! It is more "multidimensional" than ever, and better for it. My trainer calls it functional movement. We do different things all the time. I love it. A good whole body med ball workout is my favorite. Balance, core, plyometrics, weights, pyramids. Super sets, cardio, bosu, functional movement..... It's all good stuff especially when you put it all together.

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    I was a dedicated mountain biker who moved to the beach and had 2 kids so took up surfing. I started doing Cris Millls surfing training workout, look it up surfstrengthcoach.com.
    Do it and you will get ripped and strong and have great balance and flexibility, all things good for mountain biking too!
    I am able to go from surfing all the time to mountain biking again easily

  88. #88
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    “I played everything. I played lacrosse, baseball, hockey, soccer, track and field. I was a big believer that you played hockey in the winter and when the season was over you hung up your skates and you played something else.”
    ―Wayne Gretzky


    Wayne Gretzky participated in a variety of sports. Variety makes better athletes who are less likely to get hurt and more likely to stay interested in all sports.

    Good article that supports this idea:

    Sauce: https://olympiafitnessri.com/blog/on...vm8MY.facebook
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  89. #89
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    Anyone here do 5x5s? I'm thinking that's not a bad winter strength training to do.


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  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by harperbikebeer View Post
    I was a dedicated mountain biker who moved to the beach and had 2 kids so took up surfing. I started doing Cris Millls surfing training workout, look it up surfstrengthcoach.com.
    Do it and you will get ripped and strong and have great balance and flexibility, all things good for mountain biking too!
    I am able to go from surfing all the time to mountain biking again easily
    In the winter here, I'm thinking of getting a pair of roller skates so I can cross train in the winter. Roller skating is popular here, and there's a rink nearby. Not many beaches here in Colorado

    I'm a big fan of cross training. I might have to look at getting a pair of snowshoes for the winter.
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    On other notes, I blew up my knee July 1. I have a partial MCL tear and full ACL, and I have surgery sometime in the future. The timeline has not been set, yet.

    Needless to day, the enforced lack of activity is driving me nuts. My body hurts from lack of activity and movement restriction. For now, I'm on crutches and non-weight bearing.

    I sat down this weekend and came up with a list that I can do at home.
    1-legged body weight squats
    SL dead lifts

    (above holding on for balance. If I fall I'm screwed)
    1-legged planks (braced leg not touching)
    3 different kinds of crunches
    Seated Dumbbells- shoulder matrix, curls, triceps, rowing.
    Using the ball is out.

    Bike season is over for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    On other notes, I blew up my knee July 1. I have a partial MCL tear and full ACL, and I have surgery sometime in the future. The timeline has not been set, yet.

    Needless to day, the enforced lack of activity is driving me nuts. My body hurts from lack of activity and movement restriction. For now, I'm on crutches and non-weight bearing.

    I sat down this weekend and came up with a list that I can do at home.
    1-legged body weight squats
    SL dead lifts

    (above holding on for balance. If I fall I'm screwed)
    1-legged planks (braced leg not touching)
    3 different kinds of crunches
    Seated Dumbbells- shoulder matrix, curls, triceps, rowing.
    Using the ball is out.

    Bike season is over for me.
    Seems a little weird every time (except in the early nineties) they get me to physic right away....and the rehab starts even if i am on crutches and a brace...

    Usually just knee extensions against the wall, to improve rang of motion....

    I am surprised they haven't got you moving a little yet....I had no ACL for thirty years....tore the MCL within the last ten.

  93. #93
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    This is for outside of the knee rehab so I don't lose ALL my muscle. I still have to meet with the surgeon for the injured knee.

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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    This is for outside of the knee rehab so I don't lose ALL my muscle. I still have to meet with the surgeon for the injured knee.
    So are you looking to work other body parts in the meantime that don't require any weight on your leg?

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    On other notes, I blew up my knee July 1. I have a partial MCL tear and full ACL, and I have surgery sometime in the future. The timeline has not been set, yet.

    Needless to day, the enforced lack of activity is driving me nuts. My body hurts from lack of activity and movement restriction. For now, I'm on crutches and non-weight bearing.

    I sat down this weekend and came up with a list that I can do at home.
    1-legged body weight squats
    SL dead lifts

    (above holding on for balance. If I fall I'm screwed)
    1-legged planks (braced leg not touching)
    3 different kinds of crunches
    Seated Dumbbells- shoulder matrix, curls, triceps, rowing.
    Using the ball is out.

    Bike season is over for me.
    Man, I'm so sorry. I've been there I had to rehab my ACL/meniscus a few years ago. Then my upper body a year later with the breast reduction.

    As soon as you can, start pedaling. I was able to pedal 9 days post op. It hurt, but it helped.

    If you have access to a gym with a handbike, use that. While it's not pedaling with your feet, it'll help you get exercising. And stronger shoulders. And anything at all to get the heart rate up and the blood pumping will help you heal.

    Walking on crutches was quite the workout for me, especially when I was strong enough to put the weight on the crutches and use them to go. I could cruise at one point

    If you have some dumbbells at home, you can do all the upper body fun (lat pulldowns, shoulder raises both lateral and front, tricep exercises, shrugs, and bicep curls).

    Yoga helps:
    8 Seated Yoga Poses You Can Do from a Chair | SparkPeople

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    Friday funnies ... keep workin it



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    Damn, that's a lot of muesli

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    Ride like a girl! :cornut:

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
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    LOL yep
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  100. #100
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    I did my first 15' rope climb. This was a big achievement for me... feeling stoked

    https://www.facebook.com/badkat.ljub...1057601674570/

    Grip and upper body strength helps but the main power is legs... never skip leg day
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    Strength training and cardio is a good balance. I did a 10k race (not my my sport) yesterday. I was pleased with my results 56:39 (I took 4:30 minutes off my time from last year's race... same course). I did well in my age category

    Hubby and I did a celebratory ride in the afternoon

    Strength Training-22853091_2006222439622197_3837491028817204760_n.jpg

    Strength Training-23032785_2006222336288874_1418793061414376342_n.jpg

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    Throwback Thursday and a little TGIF

    Strength Training-23472464_10159650820980192_2145931785357732459_n.jpg



    Set up
    Strength Training-23844765_2019951744915933_8104731434664195085_n.jpg


    Lift-off

    Strength Training-24129797_2019951711582603_7785520691888982298_n.jpg



    success


    Strength Training-23795539_2019951794915928_4928460355213837689_n.jpg

    I love my coach.... she cracks me up
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  103. #103
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    I like how the weight is floating in my hands as I'm dipping quickly under bar during the clean.

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    I've been doing crossfit training for 4 years. The benefits outweigh the cons.


    The Female Lifting Revolution
    Has anything advanced the case of female super-fitness more than CrossFit? That's a rhetorical question. The answer is obviously "no."

    Today, more women are lifting weights, getting strong, and looking better than ever because of the popularity of CrossFit training. Bodybuilding couldn't pull it off, and even the popularity of "bodybuilding light" – Figure, bikini, etc. – hasn't drawn in modern women as much as CrossFit has. Love or hate CrossFit, these are the facts.

    In the past I've referred to CrossFit as "the Scientology of fitness" among other unflattering references, but it's hard not to notice the legions of super-jacked, crazy-strong women that seem to be popping up all over the place.

    Back in the late 80's when I was just starting my coaching career, a woman who could clean & jerk 135 was about as rare as seeing someone doing deadlifts at Planet Fitness. Today, however, women who can do "the king of lifts" using 200 pounds are a dime a dozen.

    Strength Training-26114011_2038446063066501_8668195485911326223_n.jpg

    Three decades ago, the only place you could see a six-pack on a woman was at a bodybuilding competition. Today, it's commonplace, and this is mostly due to CrossFit.


    Looking Past CrossFit's Shortcomings
    I can already hear the objections beginning to percolate in that brain of yours. You're thinking CrossFit is dangerous, they all use drugs, yada yada yada. But guess what? Just like the greatest athletes, pretty much all popular training systems get some things wrong, but end up succeeding anyway because they do so many other things right. There's no perfect program.

    Let's look past the shortcomings of CrossFit in an effort to discover why it's producing so many goddamned insanely strong women who could out-lift the average guy during her warm-ups.


    After watching the CrossFit phenomenon with interest for a number of years, I've isolated four primary reasons why you'd probably place dead last if you entered the women's division at the next CrossFit Regionals. (Oh, and you'd also have the worst abs too.)

    Note: CrossFit men are no slouches either, and many of them could (and often do) fare quite well in Olympic lifting, powerlifting, and physique competitions. So don't get sidetracked by the focus on females – there's lots to learn here for all of us.



    Strength Training-25659512_2034871643423943_8575582885215755799_n.jpg

    Reason 1 – Work Capacity
    How many hours a week do you work out? For me, it's between 8-10 hours. That seems like a lot, but in my conversations with a number of CrossFit coaches and competitors, high-level CrossFit competitors train between 6-8 hours a day, at least when the CrossFit Games are coming up. That means they train about 4-5 times more than you do, and manage to recover from it as well.

    What's that? You're concerned about overtraining? Hey, I totally get it, but as the years roll on, I find myself less and less concerned about this much-feared malady.

    Remember that the key driver of muscle growth is training volume, which just means workloads. As long as your intensity is at or above about 60% of 1RM, the more work you do (and as long as you can recover from it, of course), the more adaptations you can make.

    Look, I'm as amazed by the workloads of top CrossFit competitors as you are, but I chalk it up to the gradual evaporation of scientific ignorance. Some of you are too young to know this, but the IOC didn't allow women to compete in the marathon until the 1980's because it was widely assumed that "the weaker sex" wouldn't be able to tolerate the stresses of such long distances.

    Today, less than three decades later, the women's world record is only 15 minutes slower than the men's. Oops, guess we were wrong, and maybe we're also wrong about how much work a resistance-trained athlete can do.

    In related news, I know of trainers who think that if your workout goes past 60 minutes, your efforts will be nullified by a sudden shitstorm of catabolic hormones. This was "common knowledge" in gyms only a few decades ago, despite the fact that some pretty decent bodybuilders (like Arnold, for example) had apparently never caught wind of the idea.

    Take Home Lesson: Maybe the problem isn't that you're doing too much work, maybe it's that you're not doing enough work.

    Strength Training-23621323_2016605998583841_729018897322477031_n.jpg

    Reason 2 – Enforcement Of Progression
    We all know that progressive overload is important, and listen, it's great that you're doing your best to add 5 pounds to the bar every week. In CrossFit, it's a little different.

    Each WOD (workout of the day) is a group competition. WODs typically involve beating your best time for a specific workout, or trying to do more total work within a fixed timeframe. Either way, WOD's are total hell, and likely a lot more intense than YOUR typical workout.

    I'm not suggesting that you should be puking your guts out after every (or any) workout, but many typical gym lifters lose track of the importance of progression and intensity somewhere along the way. Sure, we all try to beat our PR's when we can, but in CrossFit, there's usually a heightened sense of urgency about this subject.

    In CrossFit, it's not like you go in to the gym and "see how I feel today." If you're in, you're ALL in. It's much more of a do or die scenario. Sure, there are some cons to go along with that pro, but it cannot be denied that the typical CrossFitter works hard and is always trying to work harder.

    Take Home Lesson: Maybe you're not working as hard as you think.

    Strength Training-dscn1241.jpg

    Reason 3 – Novel, Unexpected Training Threats
    If you've ever watched a legit CrossFit workout, you might have noticed that it's a bit different from what you're used to doing. You probably never do more than 5 reps on deadlifts, or 2-3 reps per set if you're doing Olympic lifts. And as everyone knows, "low reps are for bulk and high reps are for tone."

    Okay, couldn't help myself with that one (sorry), but you probably do buy into the idea that the "sweet spot" for gains is roughly between 8-12 reps per set. Or, if you're trying to improve strength, you probably do between 1-5 reps per set. In addition, you probably lift during some workouts and do cardio on others. And you know what? Science more or less agrees with you on all this.

    Thing is, CrossFit hasn't really gotten wind of these ideas as of yet, so they do things a little different. So if you wander into a CrossFit box just as they're about to start a WOD, you might see people doing one of the following:

    The Filthy 50
    50 box jumps to a 24-inch box
    50 jumping pull-ups
    50 kettlebell swings
    50 walking lunge steps
    50 knees to elbows
    50 push presses with 45 pounds
    50 back extensions
    50 wallballs with a 20-pound ball
    50 burpees
    50 jump rope double-unders

    Murph
    One-mile run
    100 pull-ups
    200 push-ups
    300 bodyweight squats
    One-mile run

    King Kong
    Three rounds of:

    455-pound deadlift
    2 muscle-ups
    3 squat cleans with 250 pounds
    4 handstand push-ups

    I'm going to go out on a limb and predict that you haven't done anything that even remotely resembles workouts like this. After all, at least at a quick glance, they seem to violate every known training principle ever conceived.

    But as whacked as these workouts seem (and maybe are), they do offer a unique advantage: They impose threatening demands on the body that trigger homeostatic disruption.

    In other words, your body is literally threatened by the extreme novelty of these workouts and begins to increase both muscle size and strength levels to protect itself against similar threats in the future.

    At the core of this premise is the idea that novelty is a key feature of effective training, particularly for muscular hypertrophy. Think about it: If you needed to be sore tomorrow, what would you do today to create that soreness? Would you do something familiar, or something very unfamiliar?

    Further, the more experienced you become, the more it is that novel training sessions grow in importance. After all, as a beginner, everything you do in the gym is novel, right? And of course you grow like a weed no matter what you do. Later on however, it becomes harder and harder to "shock" your system, even if you work hard, because the exercises you do are familiar, and you've already adapted to them.

    Take Home Lesson: Consider (carefully) scaring the shit out of your body with novel, unexpected training challenges.

    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0432.jpg




    Reason 4 – Social Support

    My final observation about why CrossFit seems to be effective for many people involves social pressure, er, I mean social support. We all know the value of having a motivated training partner. When you have a workout buddy, you can push and support each other to bigger and better performances, and a bit of friendly competition definitely helps you push hard when you otherwise might not.

    Now multiply this effect by 15 or 20, which is what happens in a typical CrossFit environment. As you're about to start your WOD, as the large electronic timer mounted on the wall approaches 00:00:01, you and a bunch of other classmates are now involved in a highly charged athletic competition, not just a workout. It's competitive, it's intense, and you can't help but want to do as well as you can to save face.

    Note also that at high levels of sport training, even in individual sports like weightlifting and wrestling, athletes train in team environments. Take a look at the famed Westside Barbell Club in Columbus, Ohio. Over the years, several noted strength experts have told me in confidence that they believe 90% of Westside's success stems from their highly intense team environment, and not the unusual training methodology they espouse.

    Take Home Lesson: You'll train harder in a group environment. Consider finding one.

    Strength Training-22789129_135444687210295_2762219057142618918_n.jpg

    A Little Perspective
    Sure, a lot of what CrossFit does seems (and probably is) flat-out stupid and dangerous, but don't throw the baby out with the bathwater. If you take the time to look a little deeper, there are hidden gems to be discovered.

    And as a final thought, I'll remind you the very activity that we all know to be so valuable to health, performance, and sports preparation – resistance training – was almost universally considered to be a bad idea several decades ago.

    Scientists, doctors, and sport coaches warned that lifting weights would stunt your growth, slow you down, and make you "muscle bound." We laugh at these notions today, but have you ever wondered what they'll be laughing at 50 years from now


    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0372.jpg

    https://www.t-nation.com/training/wh...gn=article5989
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  105. #105
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    People have good intentions to get fit and just because you took longer than others, doesn't mean you failed. Remember that.


    How to Stay Motivated

    Motivation has a way of disappearing. A new year rolls around, we get pumped up and excited, and then suddenly a week goes by and our motivation has gone out the window.

    And it’s no surprise why—making a change is hard. Saying you want to exercise more is simple, but actually making it happen can be terribly difficult, draining your motivation fast.

    So, we thought we’d put together some quick tips to help you stay motivated to move.

    1. STICK TO THE BASICS.
    There is so much information out there on motivation and strategies for making change that it’s easy to get overwhelmed.

    Instead of drowning in info, stick to the basics. Eat well, get 7.5 to 8 hours of good quality sleep each night, and drink plenty of water during the day. Keeping it simple helps you stay focused on the things that matter. When you’re hydrated, well rested, and full of nutritious food, you’ll be more likely to feel motivated to move.

    2. FOCUS ON CONSISTENCY OVER INTENSITY.
    It’s easy to go too hard and too fast out of the gate. We think big changes require big actions. But the truth is that consistency matters far more than intensity. Start small and focus on doing something each day. Change happens slowly and steadily, not overnight. Once you get the hang of consistent action, then you can start upping the intensity.

    3. DON’T TAKE AN ALL-OR-NOTHING APPROACH.
    We’re often quick to judge our goals on a pass/fail basis. Either we did it or we didn’t. Combine this with a lofty New Year’s resolution and you have a recipe for failure.

    Instead, make progress your measuring stick. Are you getting better? Are you taking actions toward your goals? Are you headed in the right direction?

    Don’t get down on yourself if you’ve missed a day or already faced a challenge. Just keep moving forward. The year is long, you’ll go far if you remember something is better than nothing.

    4. REMIND YOURSELF WHAT’S AT STAKE.

    Sometimes we are motivated to take action not by what we’ll get if we do, but by what will happen if we don’t. We drag ourselves out of bed and to work each morning because if we don’t, there will be consequences.

    The same is true of moving more. It may sound a tad morbid, but it’s important to remind yourself what will happen if you don’t make movement a regular part of your day. What will happen to your health and to your happiness?

    Your primary motivation should never be fear, of course, but keeping the consequences of inaction in mind can certainly help push you forward.

    5. DON’T COMPARE YOURSELF TO OTHERS.
    Social media has made it easier than ever before to compare. It’s extremely tempting and hard to resist comparing where we’re at with others. But it can also be super deflating.

    Instead, try to focus on yourself, on your goals and your priorities. Remember that we’re all on different paths and trying to compare them isn’t fair to you, helpful for making progress, or a good way to stay motivated.

    6. START WITH THE SMALLEST POSSIBLE THING.
    You don’t need motivation to brush your teeth or tie your shoes. You just do it. Tiny tasks are effortless.

    When you’re not feeling motivated, focus on a task so tiny that there’s no motivation required. It may seem silly at first, but it also may just lead to forming a new habit.

    7. HAVE FUN!

    The more fun you’re having, the more motivated you’ll feel. Don’t force yourself to do things that feel like bores or chores. They sap your motivation.

    Instead, do something you’ll enjoy. Even if it’s a short walk. Even if it’s dancing to your favourite jam in your living room. Even if it’s just a few stretches to help you relax.

    LIVING THE DREAM
    The dream is for your motivation to grow over time, rather than fading away. And that might not happen at first. That’s okay.

    But if you stick to the basics, consistently take small steps, and have fun with the process, you just might end up living the dream.
    Sauce: https://www.participaction.com/en-ca...otivation-last
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  106. #106
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    Good tips for improving bone density. If you are concerned about your bone health, it doesn’t mean you need to turn your program upside down. Simply include one or two exercises that stress your legs, hips and lumbar spine in a random manner with some impact and force. You might also add vitamin D as a supplement


    3 Ways To Keep Bones Strong For Life

    Strong bones are the pillars of a body that's healthy, athletic, and prepared for the long haul. Learn how to eat and train to help keep your bones strong as you age!

    While you may think you're years away from having to think about bone health, I'm here to tell you that taking care of your bones isn't solely about preparing for the future; it matters now. By age 18, nearly 90 percent of your adult bone structure is solidified. By age 30, the chance of making any further enhancements to your bone density is slim.[1]

    Fortunately, your nutrition and exercise habits can have a profound impact on helping to maintain the bone strength you have and maximizing every opportunity for adding strength.

    Solidify the foundation of your frame today by incorporating the right nutrition and training strategies!


    Calcium: The Backbone Of Bone Health


    Your bones are alive and constantly remodeling. This occurs via the removal and addition of bone tissue, a process referred to as bone turnover. Assuming you're getting adequate nutrition and exercise, your body consistently adds more bone material throughout childhood, and even up until age 30.

    It's around this age, however, that bone turnover begins to net a negative outcome. But lifestyle and nutrition choices may help support the health, density and strength of your bones.

    Strength Training-3-ways-keep-bones-strong-life-v2-1-700xh.jpg


    As you can imagine, if you never actually hit your peak bone density, you're at further risk. In fact, research published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise found that 22-50 percent of female athletes have osteopenia (sub-peak bone density).

    Given that 99.5 percent of your bodily calcium stores are within your bones, it makes sense that calcium plays an integral role in optimizing bone strength and formation. To help support bone health, Martha Pyron, MD, a sports medicine specialist with Medicine in Motion in Austin, Texas, recommends women aim for a minimum of 1,200 milligrams of calcium per day.

    Calcium-rich foods include all dairy products (think milk, cheese, yogurt), as well as cruciferous green veggies (broccoli, bok choy), soy products (tofu, seitan, edamame), and kidney beans. If you don't eat enough of these foods daily, consider supplementing with calcium to help meet your daily goal.

    When selecting a calcium supplement, choose calcium carbonate or citrate. These two options are better absorbed by the body than other options.

    Vitamin D: Calcium's Helping Hands

    Vitamin D may help promote bone strength by facilitating increased calcium absorption. Unfortunately, few foods contain enough vitamin D to give you all you need.

    The good news is that sunshine is the best source of vitamin D. When the UVB rays from the sun contact your skin, they initiate a cascade of reactions that convert the vitamin D precursor molecule in your skin, 7-dehydrocholesterol, into a useable form of vitamin D known as calcitriol. It's calcitriol that works in a hormone-like fashion to increase production of calcium-binding proteins, and ultimately, calcium absorption.

    If only getting out in the sun were enough to make this happen! Lifestyle, geographical location, skin pigmentation, and sunscreen use all impair the absorption of necessary UVB rays to drive this formation. As a result, most of us are vitamin D-deficient. Hence Dr. Pyron's recommendation to supplement with 800-1,000 IU of vitamin D per day.

    To optimize absorption, select a vitamin D-3 supplement, also known as cholecalciferol. This form beats the pants off of vitamin D-2 when it comes to absorption.

    Resistance Training: The Finishing Touch

    Working out with weights can further enhance your bone strength and preservation. That's because resistance training provides a direct stressor to your bones. To adapt to such a stress, your body increases the production of cells responsible for laying down new bone material. As a result, bone density can be maintained or even enhanced.

    Try incorporating weight-bearing exercises at least 2-3 times a week. Push-ups and bodyweight squats work great as well, along with any other move that loads up your frame and makes it work. Jumping rope, walking, and jogging are also great for maintaining bone-mineral density.

    Bottom line: Stay active, stay healthy, stay strong—and your bones will thank you!


    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
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  107. #107
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    Hey everyone! Poking my head back into the forums to ask... Has anyone found or come up with a good strength program for enduro racing? I keep saying I'm not going to race this year but I know that's a bad joke, sooooo... Might as well do it right!

    Whatcha got? Right now I only do body weight stuff. I'm a total gym newb.

  108. #108
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    Nothing beats more time riding. Look to be riding 3-4x a week, probably something in the 2-3x riding of short sprinty stuff on the XC bike/ Enduro and a good long ride day somewhere in the realm of 15-20mi (24-32km) with some good elevation gain. Additionally 2x a week strength should be great and 1 rest day.

    Some weight and strength training that might help:

    Grip strength- Farmer's carry is a good exercise. Walk 100m carrying heavy kettlebells or dumbells in each hand. 5-8 rds couple times per week

    Core- Front squats are excellent for core. Increase the weight gradually. (figure out what the heaviest you can lift then start with 50% of that weight and do 3-5 reps) Increase weight to 60% 70% 75% 80% 85% 90%.
    Or Figure out 80% of your max and do 5 sets for 6 rounds

    Planks - on your elbows hold for 1 minute. Switch to side plank each side 1 minute and then rest 30sec. Repeat x5
    I recently won our gym plank hold this year... I held the plank for 10:01 minutes.

    Sit-ups or V-ups or hollow holds all good for core

    Push ups- 10 reps (strict) x 5 sets
    Pull ups- excellent for your lats. Even if you can't do them strict , you can start with jumping pull ups or use a band (engage your lats) Some people find chin ups (hand grip facing you is easier)

    I like handstand holds. Try and hold a handstand against the wall for a minute. Try to increase (good for core and shoulders)

    I like high intensity intervals... there's alot of combos to choose from (running sprints, burpees, wall balls, kettlebell swings, trusters, skipping, box jumps etc)

    There are other powerlifting exercises like deadlifts. Works the hamstrings core, grip.

    Lots of options and areas to target. Let me know if this sounds ok. I have more ideas
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  109. #109
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    Strength Training

    What’s your thoughts on stronglifts 5x5, especially for off season training?
    Guerrilla Gravity BAMF, Colorado Front Range
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  110. #110
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    For those not familiar with SL5x5

    https://stronglifts.com/5x5/

    It is a progressive program that is easy to follow. The routine and the app are simple enough to get people into the gym, work out and understand how to follow a routine without having to spend ages figuring out what to do before hand. I understand that the weights start light and the loads are gradually increased. I read that most people see some results (increased strength and some body changes after 5-6 months) which is a good incentive because when you see results you're less likely to give up.

    Some people find that it's not the best for stamina and aesthetics; and not enough upper body work. But it is a good baseline for building habit

    In my experience, I found that it's important to lift correctly, lift safely and lift regularly especially if you want to see results and maintain fitness.
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  111. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Nothing beats more time riding. Look to be riding 3-4x a week, probably something in the 2-3x riding of short sprinty stuff on the XC bike/ Enduro and a good long ride day somewhere in the realm of 15-20mi (24-32km) with some good elevation gain. Additionally 2x a week strength should be great and 1 rest day.

    Some weight and strength training that might help:

    Grip strength- Farmer's carry is a good exercise. Walk 100m carrying heavy kettlebells or dumbells in each hand. 5-8 rds couple times per week

    Core- Front squats are excellent for core. Increase the weight gradually. (figure out what the heaviest you can lift then start with 50% of that weight and do 3-5 reps) Increase weight to 60% 70% 75% 80% 85% 90%.
    Or Figure out 80% of your max and do 5 sets for 6 rounds

    Planks - on your elbows hold for 1 minute. Switch to side plank each side 1 minute and then rest 30sec. Repeat x5
    I recently won our gym plank hold this year... I held the plank for 10:01 minutes.

    Sit-ups or V-ups or hollow holds all good for core

    Push ups- 10 reps (strict) x 5 sets
    Pull ups- excellent for your lats. Even if you can't do them strict , you can start with jumping pull ups or use a band (engage your lats) Some people find chin ups (hand grip facing you is easier)

    I like handstand holds. Try and hold a handstand against the wall for a minute. Try to increase (good for core and shoulders)

    I like high intensity intervals... there's alot of combos to choose from (running sprints, burpees, wall balls, kettlebell swings, trusters, skipping, box jumps etc)

    There are other powerlifting exercises like deadlifts. Works the hamstrings core, grip.

    Lots of options and areas to target. Let me know if this sounds ok. I have more ideas
    Thanks!

    I definitely have the time on the bike bit down, as I've trained for endurance XC for several years. But I'm ready to be more well-rounded!

    A lot of these things I do with my gymnastics (handstand? hard to explain ) trainer (we're also working on fall mechanics, which will definitely help me on the bike!), so maybe it's just an issue of filling in the gaps...

  112. #112
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    Calories Burned With Exercise

    Ever wonder how many calories you burn taking the stairs or walking the dog? Find out how you can smoke more calories every day doing fun, easy activities.

    HOW CALORIE BURN WORKS
    There are endless ways to get the exercise you need to stay healthy. Sick of the gym? Try going dancing or cleaning up the yard. Small, fun activities can help you stay fit and lose fat.

    How many calories burned by an exercise depends on how big you are. It takes more energy to move a bigger body. When he was starting out at 600 pounds, Bodybuilding.com model "Possible Pat" Brocco experienced serious weight loss simply by walking to the grocery store every day.

    Keep in mind that the calorie numbers here are just estimates. How hard you work makes a difference in how many calories you burn, so don't just phone it in.

    And of course, hundreds of calories burned won't add up to much weight loss if you're eating hundreds of calories too many. Use our calorie calculator to make sure you're eating the right amount.
    EXERCISES THAT BURN 100 CALORIES

    ACTIVITY DURATION
    Power Walking 15 minutes
    Dancing 20 minutes
    Stretching and Calisthenics 30 minutes
    Shorter Rest Periods 1 workout
    Taking the Stairs 6 times
    Parking Farther Away Every time
    Raking 18 minutes
    Cooking 34 minutes
    Window Shopping 25 minutes
    Forearm Flexing 5-6 sets

    EXERCISES THAT BURN 200 CALORIES

    ACTIVITY DURATION
    Easy Bike Riding 35 minutes
    Supersets 30 minutes
    Scrubbing Floors 40 minutes
    Mowing the Lawn 35 minutes
    Tennis 26 minutes
    Dog Walking 40 minutes
    Walking at Lunch 30 minutes
    Bowling 60 minutes
    Beach Volleyball 23 minutes
    Jumping Rope 17 minutes

    EXERCISES THAT BURN 300 CALORIES

    ACTIVITY DURATION
    Cross Country Skiing 18 minutes
    Rollerblading 26 minutes
    Rock Climbing 36 minutes
    Ultimate Frisbee 48 minutes
    Standing at Work 8 hours
    Shoveling Snow 38 minutes
    Kayaking 52 minutes
    Baseball 90 minutes
    Walking on the Beach 55 minutes
    Washing Your Car 63 minutes
    Running 20 minutes


    Strength Training-27332401_2053472204897220_2654033280928571383_n.jpg

    Strength Training-27539984_2056707471240360_5526823094265119028_n.jpg

    215lb deadlift
    Strength Training-27067329_2054180178159756_1351858276347844283_n.jpg

    85lb Power clean - triple extension
    Strength Training-27544646_2054180424826398_4686104125878557011_n.jpg

    85 lb Power clean finish- elbows up
    Strength Training-27066972_2054180311493076_5789410850649066379_n.jpg



    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bur...SM_FB_Training
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  113. #113
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    Body image.
    The struggle is real. Perfectionism. OCD. Type A. Expectations. Goals. Number on the scale. Clothing size. Beachwear.

    When you look in the mirror, what do you see? Strength? Beauty? Smarts?

    We are our worst critics. It’s ok to want to be a better you.

    Let’s start with the voice in our heads. Listen to how you talk to yourself.

    Here are a couple tips to get you started:

    1. Be positive and kind. Treat yourself as you would someone else. When you look at yourself, instead of zoning in on your so-called trouble area, find something you like about your body and give yourself a compliment.

    2. When it comes to exercise, set performance-based goals. Don't think of exercising as simply burning calories and improving how certain body parts look in the mirror. Instead, take a look at what your body can do. Make it a goal to perform X quality push-ups, more box jumps than you did the last time, or run 1 to 5 km at a certain pace. Choose to focus on becoming the strongest version of yourself.

    3. Focus on your natural talents. Everyone has unique physical talents and abilities, such as jumping high, running fast, or upper body strength. Everyone has non-physical talents as well, like singing, playing an instrument, math, being hilarious or conscientious. Remember what YOUR gifts are.

    4. Don't compare yourself to others. Understand that every body is unique and there is no need to constantly fix things on your body to look like something else. As you look in the mirror, describe yourself with words like beautiful, clever, strong, self-assured, optimistic or amazing.
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  114. #114
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    Strength Training-27973495_1575434222570240_3319631324130703733_n.jpg
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  115. #115
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    The Surprising Mindset Changes Of Every Female Lifter


    Strength Training-28277429_2067279783516462_5591757699564150028_n-1-.jpg


    We’ve come a long way in recent years. Women are well represented in every strength and physique sport from powerlifting to strong(wo)man. But have other people’s attitudes – or our own feelings – always kept pace?

    Think back to your early days of lifting. When you first started noticing your physique changing, your appetite getting bigger, your passion for training sky-rocketing. How did it feel?

    You’re bigger now… but happier to show it

    When you started lifting, phrases like “thunder thighs” were the stuff of nightmares. But these days, when you do indeed have thunderous thighs (and humdinger hamstrings), it feels great. Who wouldn’t want to have big, powerful legs? If anyone doesn’t get it, they’re not your people. Back in the days before you lifted, you couldn’t imagine being happy showing your legs off in shorts. These days, the legs are bigger, and they’re in shorts more often.

    You have to leave some friends behind

    The friends you make through lifting are the best. They understand your love of deadlifting, and share your secret loathing of paused squats. They’re always hungry, and they know the best places to go for lunch (or brunch, or dinner, or snacks). They share your experiences of being a female in the weights room at the gym. And they’ve probably joined in training for a competition, and you know they’ll always be happy to come watch you compete. But some of your non-lifting friends just don’t get it. They don’t get your passion. They think you’re obsessed, and they worry that it’s unhealthy. It becomes a problem when you won’t go out drinking, or prefer to stay in rather than party all night. Of course, some of your non-gym buddies are great about it! They ask the right questions, and listen to you talk about training. And you still have plenty to share But sadly some of your “before lifting” friends might have to fall by the wayside. There’s enough negativity to be found when you’re a female lifter. You don’t need it from your friends.

    You learn discipline


    Growing up, you maybe through discipline was a boring concept. But lifting and training shows you that it’s anything but dull. Discipline, focus, organizational ability and time management enable you to juggle training alongside the rest of your life. Your new skills show you how to get the most out of every training session, every recovery day, and every meal prep. And all of a sudden you discover that you can apply your new-found discipline to your career, relationships, and to challenges outside of the gym. You’re stronger in more ways than one.

    Your circle gets tighter, but everyone in it is awesome


    Your new-found confidence and drive has enabled you to cut out negative people from your life. People who belittle your passion or try to cut your dreams down to size have to go. In their place come new friends, the people you meet through lifting, competing, and coaching. And something else happens, too. Old friends come out of the shadows, inspired by your dedication to lifting, encouraging you every step of the way, and surprising you with their positivity. You learn how to close your ears to those who don’t support you, and welcome good friends who really want the best for you.

    You learn to stand up for yourself

    Times are changing, but women who lift still come up against misinformed, patronising, or downright sexist comments. “Why do you want to do that to yourself?” “Are you trying to look like a man?” “Women with muscles are disgusting.” “Don’t get too big now, will you!” You know the kind of thing. But this is your passion, and you know how amazing training and competing is, not just for your body but for your health, your emotions, your stress levels and confidence. So you learn to respond to the silly comments. You find ways to educate and inform. You work out when it’s worth responding, and when it’s better to turn away and save your breath. You learn to draw on your own confidence and inner strength.

    You become an ambassador

    There’s a strong chance you’re the only female strength athlete in your family, at your office, or in your circle of old friends. You have a fantastic opportunity to educate, inspire and fly the flag for what lifting weights can really look like for women. You’re an ambassador for strength sports, for lifting, for training and being strong. You might find yourself a role model for young women in your life, or for your own daughters.

    You amaze yourself, every day

    There’s an old saying that the iron never lies. Weights are weights. There’s no cheating and no luck in strength sport. And as you progress, you amaze yourself in what you can do. Old limits are blasted away and new ones set. Before long, those new goals are old news too. You can do more than other people thought you could. And more than you realize.
    sauce The Surprising Mindset Changes Of Every Female Lifter -

    Strength Training-28277149_2067279523516488_600286860879813564_n.jpg



    Strength Training-28379317_2069334723310968_6789652014876458087_n.jpg
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  116. #116
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    Happy International Women's day to all the strong ladies who continue to make the world a lovely place to live! Here's a Lisa Simpson thought

    Strength Training-28782784_1206204949510143_5405240051897153517_n.jpg


    Keep shreddin'
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  117. #117
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    So I decided on strength programming.

    I'm doing one of Dee Tidwell's plans: Enduro MTB Training and MTB Strong

    Plus some calisthenics that I'm working with a gymnastics trainer. Lots of straight arm isometric holds and compound bent-arm movements. Doing lots of hip strengthening, too, which is great because lots of it is complementary to muscles used in cycling. Finding tons of weak spots from years spent over the bars and hopeful that full-body functional strength will help me enduro faster! Even though the reason I started training with him was to learn advanced arm balances/presses/etc.

  118. #118
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    Still in knee rehab but released to ride conservatively on dirt last week. This cracks me up: I've been tracking my rehab with little videos on instagram. I have a friend who is a collegiate athelete trainer. She's shaming her 20-somethings who are whining about how hard rehab is with my videos. "This woman is 57 and had surgery sooner than you, and she does her stuff every.single.day.

    @geargrrl on instagram.

  119. #119
    always licking the glass
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    Strength Training

    I got a new trainer that focuses on body weight for strength training. I’m doing that twice a week and it’s kicking my butt. And my shoulders are no longer the weak link.

    But, it’s working better than anything else I’ve done in a long time.

    And I’m also more tired than I’ve ever been in a while too

    For me, the two main staples are body weight squats and planks. If I stay on those, everything else is a bonus.

    Formica: I’ve been watching your Instagram. Keep up the awesomeness!

    Lucy Juice: I’d love to hear what you think of his program.
    Guerrilla Gravity BAMF, Colorado Front Range
    https://classifieds.mtbr.com/showpro...product=116154

  120. #120
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    After doing the CrossFit open for my 4th year I noticed huge jumps in my performance. The Open is a good opportunity to test overall strength gains and endurance, and compete against others in the same category (regional location, gender and age)

    This year I completed 4/5 prescribed (I couldn't do the handstand push up so I did that workout scaled). Overall, I've made progressive gains in lifting (due to proper technique) which escalated my overall strength; endurance improvement (cardio efficiency due to running longer distances and more frequently). I've worked hard this last year, and have been able to do a 15' rope climb, 20" box jumps, using 24kg kettlebells, strict pullups, and toes to bar (kipping helps). Not bad for this 55+ yr old

    Needless to say this open was not as disappointing and a big confidence booster! I'm stronger on the bike (Enduro combining climbs and dh), and I'm leaner (less weight to carry around) so my technical riding has improved. My goal is to be safe, stay injury free and have fun.
    F*ck Cancer

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  121. #121
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    Work that butt

    As you and I know we have all been blessed with different body types. Some may think of their derriére as a blessing, while others would rather say their rear is a curse! I say, let's work with what you have and turn your butt into your sexiest and most loved body part!

    I have outlined for you some of the most affective proven butt building exercises. Each day that it's time to train your lovely lower body, choose three exercises from the list below. Consistency is absolutely key in seeing, and feeling results.

    The Resistance Exercises

    1. Barbell Squat
    Squats are an excellent and proven way of training your gluteus maximus (butt). You can add resistance by performing them while holding dumbbells in your hands or with a bar across your shoulders. If you opt for the bar (advanced), make sure you have a spotter unless the resistance is very light.

    Strength Training-29684257_2084937418417365_5253464412995860409_n.jpg


    Varying the width of your feet will change the emphasis of the exercise. The closer together your feet are, the more your quads (front of the thighs) will work. As you move your feet further apart, you'll feel the exercise more in your hips and butt. You should always have someone check your form to be sure you're doing squats properly.

    If you go to a gym, the leg press machine may be easier to use than doing squats with a bar, and it attacks the same region.

    2. Lunges
    Lunges are another exercise that works your glutes. Singer Jessica Simpson was noted to have fallen in love with lunges as she sculpted her body to fit her daisy duke shorts in The Dukes of Hazzard.

    Here are several different types of lunges:

    Stationary lunges
    Walking lunges
    Alternating lunges
    Side lunges
    As a refresher on how to do a lunge, let's review the stationary lunge with dumbbells.

    Hold two dumbbells to the side of your body. Bring one leg forward and stand so that you have good balance. Bend both legs and allow the dumbbells to bring your body down towards the ground, making sure your front knee does not go past your toes. At this time the other knee will almost touch the floor; then come back up. Do all of the reps with one leg forward and then continue with the second leg.

    3. Hip Extension
    Hip extension is a movement that I will always include in my pre-contest training or when I want my butt to look its best. This exercise, which I have learned as "Flutter Kicks" will surely make your hamstrings and glutes burn with delight. OK, maybe this doesn't sound like fun to you, but if you simply give me a chance here, you may start enjoying it as much as I do.

    On a step or platform, (or on your bed if you train at home) lie facedown with hips on the edge of the step, legs straight with toes resting lightly on the floor. (If you are using a bed, your legs will be off the edge and your feet high off the floor.) Squeeze your glutes and hamstrings and straighten the legs until they are level with the hips.

    Lift one leg higher then the other and alternate. Move each leg as though you are doing a flutter kick in water. Try doing 3 sets of 20 repetitions on each leg.

    Do you want more? Once you have done your 3 sets of Flutter Kicks, in the same position, contract your glutes and hamstrings so that your legs are parallel with the floor and move your legs open, then close. When you close them, have one leg cross over the other. Alternate each rep, which leg is crossing over. Try doing 2-3 sets of 20 repetitions on each leg.

    4. Deadlifts
    Deadlifts are excellent for your hamstrings, butt and lower back, but form is critical! Start by standing with your feet hip-width apart, and your weights in front of thighs (bar or dumbbells). Keeping back flat and abs in, bend forward from the hips and lower your torso until your weights reach your shins.


    Strength Training-28277429_2067279783516462_5591757699564150028_n.jpg

    This is where it's time to SQUEEZE your butt to raise back up. Remember to keep your weights (bar) close to your legs throughout the entire range of motion, with just the slightest bend in the knees. Make sure that you don't hyper extend your knees. Do 3 sets of 8-12 reps.

    Stepping Your Way To Tight Buns
    Stairmasters and climbers when used at a slower frequency with honest, normal steps will recruit your butt muscles into action. Do you ever see people at the gym leaning on the machine with their arms and staying on their tiptoes? You have either seen them, or are one of them.

    Spending 30 minutes on the climber, cheating your way through each step will not bring you results. Feel your body weight as you step down through your heel of each foot. The benefit of completing full steps rather than short mini steps is that your legs and glutes will be enjoying a better workout, as will your heart.

    Yes this way may be more challenging but it's the challenge that will raise your cheeks and heart rate = burned calories = fat loss. If you think that steppers will make your butt bigger, you may be eating more then you think. Steppers and a treadmill (on a high incline for walking) have been the foundation for keeping my butt firm, and round.

    Start at 20 minutes 3 days / wk. If you want to make noticeable changes, step your way up to 30 - 45 min sessions, 5 - 6 days a week.

    Final Points
    Before I let you hit the gym, there are a few points that are important to know.

    You can't choose where you gain weight. If you start eating more and lifting weights, there is no guarantee that your butt will be the area reaping the benefits.

    The shape of your butt is primarily based on genetics. Looking at your parents or other relatives you will probably notice that you have inherited some of their genes.

    Doing lower body exercises (along with upper body training and cardio) and eating more calories than you burn can help you build muscle but your genetics will decide how much your butt can really change.

    There isn't one magic exercise that will make your butt change. Consistency in the gym paired with a nutrient packed eating plan with adequate amounts of protein will be your keys to bringing out the best your glorious glutes have to offer!






    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...SM_FB_Training
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  122. #122
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    Overtraining: Signs & Solutions!

    Overtraining is a common problem in weight training, but it can also be experienced by runners and other athletes. Learn what it is and how to combat it right here. Check it out!

    Many people train to the point where they are actually getting weaker. How can this be true? The answer is simple: overtraining.

    The dictionary states, "Overtraining is a common problem in weight training, but it can also be experienced by runners and other athletes. It occurs when the volume and intensity of the exercise exceeds an individual's recovery capacity. They cease making progress, and can even begin to lose strength and fitness."

    CASE STUDY
    Since New Years, Jennifer has found her fitness groove. She said her good-byes to her late night TV programs and processed food munching, and hello to a new life. In fact, Jennifer has done a complete lifestyle change choosing foods that are in their natural state or in the least amount of packaging possible; in other words, unprocessed.

    Standing 5'5" and weighing 155 lbs, Jennifer has already lost 10 lbs. Her mind is focused on reaching her goal weight of 125 lb. To help her reach her goal, Jennifer is training two days on and one day off, and is in and out of the gym in about an hour. This training split is allowing plenty of time for her body to rest. Jennifer is feeling great!

    Fast forward six months; Jennifer is not feeling so hot. We can pat her on the back for attaining her goal weight of 125 lbs, but can she? This past month people have complimented on how fit she is looking but commented that she also appeared tired. "Are you getting enough sleep? You haven't been yourself lately." Her friends are concerned and they have every right to be.

    Jennifer's training program has increased to six days a week, with Sundays as her jogging only days. Each morning, she sets her alarm an hour early to make time for her 60-minute run before work. Once her work day is done, she returns to the gym for 60 min of weights and another 60 min of cardio.

    Though she is tired and has little interest in spending time with friends, she is making time for her fitness. What fitness means to Jennifer today is much different then three months ago.

    THE SIGNS
    Jennifer is overtraining. Along with persistent fatigue and a loss of interest in her friends, she may be also experiencing these symptoms of overtraining.

    Persistent muscle soreness
    Elevated resting heart rate
    Increased susceptibility to infections
    Increased incidence of injuries
    Irritability
    Depression
    Loss of motivation
    Insomnia
    Decreased appetite
    Weight loss
    Experiencing a loss of interest in what you once felt passion for is never fun. So, what causes overtraining?

    REST IS KEY

    To see improvement in one's strength and fitness they must rest. The rest period following hard training is a magical process which takes at least 36 hours to complete. By skimping on rest, complete regeneration cannot occur.

    If the amount of training continues to exceed the rest period, however, the individual's performance will plateau and decline. If Jennifer continues to neglect the rest time her body needs, she will indeed get weaker and may experience injuries.

    Other physical and psychological stressors can compound the rate at which a person may experience overtraining, such as:

    Jet Leg
    Ongoing Illness
    Overwork
    Menstruation
    Poor Nutrition
    Bodybuilders and other dieters who exercise intensely while limiting their food intake often find themselves overtraining.

    Though you may be focused and feeling that you need to maintain the degree at which you are training, depending on your circumstance I urge you to consider applying one or more of the following solutions. Your gains will flourish, and your family and friends will be relieved and thankful!

    SOLUTIONS

    1. TAKING A BREAK


    Taking a break from training to allow time for recovery. In knowing that you may be doing more harm than good at the gym, set aside today and tomorrow as a break. Some people allow one week away from fitness to revive their bodies and mind, and then when they return to training, they have more focus and are enjoying themselves again.

    2 REDUCING THE VOLUME
    Reducing the volume and/or the intensity of the training. If you always do five sets for each exercise, why not do just two or three, and lower the weight and focus solely on form? Strengthen your mind and muscle connection by tuning into the exercise at hand.

    3 DEEP-TISSUE MASSAGE
    Deep-tissue or sports massage of the affected muscles. A skillfully applied massage is the most effective therapy for releasing muscle tension and restoring balance to the musculo-skeletal system. Receiving regular massages may help athletes prevent injuries, which might otherwise be caused by overuse. A constant build-up of tension in the muscles from regular activity may lead to stresses on joints, ligaments, tendons, as well as the muscles themselves.

    4 SELF-MASSAGE
    Self-massage of the affected muscles. Self-massage, with either with your hands or a system such as the Yamuna™ Body Rolling (BR) system featuring a specially designed 7" ball will help with pain relief, and can be targeted to hamstrings, calves, knees, quads, shoulder and back; any muscle or joint.

    People who are stiff and inflexible and have, or are prone to, injury will benefit from BR as it elongates and massages muscles and opens and flexs the joints.

    5 TEMPERATURE CONTRAST THERAPY
    Temperature contrast therapy. (Ice baths, hot & cold showers, etc). This uses the body's reaction to hot and cold stimuli. The nerves carry impulses felt at the skin deeper into the body, where they can stimulate the immune system, improve circulation and digestion, influence the production of stress hormones, encourage blood flow, and lessening pain sensitivity.

    6 PROPER CALORIE INTAKE
    Ensuring calorie intake matches (or possibly exceeds) caloric expenditure. When overtraining, the body may be depleted in various nutrients. To assist in the process of recovery, it's important to ensure that a diet high in carbohydrates, lean proteins and healthy fats such as omega 3 oils is met. Carbohydrates will provide the brain with fuel, the oils help relieve depression and proteins will rebuild overtrained muscles.

    7 ADDRESSING VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES
    Addressing vitamin deficiencies with nutritional supplements. It is essential to get vitamins from food, however when overtraining is a concern supplementation is beneficial. Supplements should be taken in addition to meals and with meals for their essential and proper absorption.

    8 SPLIT TRAINING
    Splitting the training program so that different sets of muscles are worked on different days. Once you have rested enough for your body to recover from overtraining, be smart and plan your training split ahead of time.
    This will help to prevent overtraining from occurring again. Allow at least 4 days between training a certain body part again, and always have at least one day of rest from training each week.

    CONCLUSION
    Training towards a goal can be very rewarding, and when seeing the results form, it's hard to believe that one may ever go back to their old habits.

    Allow yourself to take a break from time to time and listen to your body. It's when we rest that the body has time to recover, rebuild, and come back stronger then before!

    https://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/faw...SM_FB_Training
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    Eat your veggies

  123. #123
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    It's never too late to start lifting regularly to improve overall strength. (I'm in my late 50's)

    I'm now able to do several consecutive pull ups. Losing some body fat and gaining muscle has also helped


    Strength Training-30739956_2094921907418916_6846259534332166144_n.jpg

    (Not the prettiest maneuver) My toes to bar are also a work in progress. I've gained a lot of core strength

    Strength Training-01bhygl.jpg

    Strength Training-30624331_2091322797778827_6416236731367948288_n.jpg

    Strength Training-30698774_2091321187778988_1469828703084085248_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  124. #124
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    Tips For Maintaining A Healthy Body Weight

    Learn how to keep your motivation going strong when maintenance is your goal.

    Strength Training-dscn8617.jpg

    The desire to transform is a great motivator to eat right and exercise. Whether you're shedding excess fat or filling out your physique with a few extra pounds of muscle, the desire to capture the perfect physique keeps you motivated and on track.

    But what happens once you've achieved your goal? How do you sustain your transformation and maintain the physique you've worked so hard to build?

    Preserving a healthy body weight is often easier said than done—and for many, it's a lot harder than the transformation. Once you remove the driving force to reach a goal, motivation can become difficult to sustain.

    IFBB pro Amy Updike shares her best tips for maintaining a healthy body—including daily movement, proper hydration, mindful eating, and updated goal setting—so you can stay lean and fit for years to come.

    Be Active Every Day

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    The key to keeping your metabolism high and sustaining a healthy body weight is to move as often as possible. This doesn't mean you have to hit the gym every day, but it does mean you have to find ways to keep your body moving.

    "Try to do something active every single day," says Updike. "Walk the dog, play with your kids in the park, or clean the house."

    When she decides she needs a break from her normal gym workouts, Updike incorporates other activities to help her burn calories and stay fit.

    "I'll do hiking, trail running, or go out and do some jump squats and walking lunges in the park," she explains.

    For more ideas to get your daily move on, check out my article "Revving Up Your Summer Calorie Burn: Outdoor Activities that Blast Fat Fast!"


    Drink More Water

    Strength Training-31123739_2096632413914532_4458484178496782336_n.jpg

    You've heard it before and you'll hear it again: Healthy bodies need plenty of water. As Updike explains, adequate hydration allows for optimal bodily functions—and that includes fat loss.

    "Drinking enough water also helps prevent those hunger thoughts," she explains. "Usually, you're not hungry, just thirsty."

    Updike makes an excellent point: People often mistake thirst for hunger and eat when they should hydrate instead. This pesky habit can raise your daily calorie intake. It also can destroy your efforts to maintain that chiseled body you worked so hard for.

    A good rule of thumb is to drink 8-10 cups of water per day. But if you want to learn more, check out "Top 10 Reasons We Need To Drink Water."

    Power Up With Protein

    Strength Training-29694505_2085843164993457_3376191903572464005_n.jpg
    (Lunch at Veggie DeLight- all vegan)

    When it comes to eating for a healthy body weight, Amy Updike cannot overstate the importance of protein. In her words, getting a good amount of protein in every meal you eat "allows for stabilized blood sugar levels and helps you feel fuller." Protein is also essential to build and repair muscle and maintain lean mass.

    Choose lean, high quality sources of protein like chicken, turkey, lean red meat, fish, egg whites, and whey protein powder. Consume at least 15-30 grams of protein per snack or meal, increasing this number if needed for your individual macronutrient needs.

    Eat Your Veggies

    Strength Training-29597696_2085878448323262_22907876639209760_n.jpg

    Another must for your diet plan is eating plenty of fresh vegetables.

    "Eating an adequate amount of vegetables each day will help your body maintain regularity, help you feel fuller, and help supply your body with fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Updike.

    Vegetables are low in calories, so they have a minimal impact on your total calorie intake. But avoid high-calorie cooking methods or adding sauces or condiments that contain extra sugar, fat, or other unnecessary calories.

    Updike recommends consuming at least three servings of vegetables per day—if not more—to help maintain a healthy weight. Include a variety of vegetables in your plan to avoid boredom. Experiment with fresh, seasonal vegetables whenever possible for added nutrients.

    Ditch Yo-Yo Dieting

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    If you plan to simply diet your way back down to a healthy weight every time you put on a few pounds, rethink your approach. Up-and-down "yo-yo" dieting is hard on your body and unsustainable—neither of which will help you maintain.

    To keep the body you've worked so hard for, find a plan you can adopt as a lifestyle, not a short-term fix.

    "Focus on eating and living in a way you could maintain lifelong," says Updike.

    Constant hunger, feeling deprived of favorite foods, and viewing meal prep as a major time suck are all signs your current plan is not working for you.

    A proper diet should leave your body, as well as your mind, fulfilled. This is not an excuse to eat as much food as possible whenever you want. But if you're craving chocolate, take a bite or two to satisfy your hunger.

    Maintenance is all about sustainability, which is a huge reason why Updike supports flexible dieting and counting macros. Using this approach—and being mindful of portion control—you can work your favorite foods into your meal plan so you never have to feel deprived again.

    Keep Setting More Goals

    Strength Training-28279780_2068109316765153_1099655687711816009_n.jpg

    Fitness is a journey, not a destination. Just because you've reached one goal doesn't mean you can't set new ones. In fact, you should. However, Updike cautions against using weight as your only measurement of success.

    "It's important not to focus on only appearance or bodyweight related goals," she says.

    Single-minded emphasis on appearance can be dangerous—especially if you've already achieved an ideal body weight and are trying to work beyond what is healthy.

    If you're not looking to add or lose weight, try making your next goal a physical challenge. Examples include training for a half marathon, adding 30 pounds to your squat, or learning a new skill like yoga or boxing.

    Whatever you choose, set the goal and create a plan to reach it. This will help you stay focused so you feel as though you are making progress while you maintain your healthy physique.

    As Updike puts it, "Feeling great and being able to live life to the fullest are the real goals of fitness."


    Strength Training-29542354_2086822411562199_4759509429502321978_n.jpg

    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  125. #125
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    3 Ways To Keep Bones Strong For Life


    While you may think you're years away from having to think about bone health, I'm here to tell you that taking care of your bones isn't solely about preparing for the future; it matters now. By age 18, nearly 90 percent of your adult bone structure is solidified. By age 30, the chance of making any further enhancements to your bone density is slim.[1]

    Fortunately, your nutrition and exercise habits can have a profound impact on helping to maintain the bone strength you have and maximizing every opportunity for adding strength.

    Solidify the foundation of your frame today by incorporating the right nutrition and training strategies!

    1.
    Calcium: The Backbone Of Bone Health

    Your bones are alive and constantly remodeling. This occurs via the removal and addition of bone tissue, a process referred to as bone turnover. Assuming you're getting adequate nutrition and exercise, your body consistently adds more bone material throughout childhood, and even up until age 30.

    It's around this age, however, that bone turnover begins to net a negative outcome. But lifestyle and nutrition choices may help support the health, density and strength of your bones.


    Strength Training-3-ways-keep-bones-strong-life-v2-1-700xh.jpg

    As you can imagine, if you never actually hit your peak bone density, you're at further risk. In fact, research published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise found that 22-50 percent of female athletes have osteopenia (sub-peak bone density).

    Given that 99.5 percent of your bodily calcium stores are within your bones, it makes sense that calcium plays an integral role in optimizing bone strength and formation. To help support bone health, Martha Pyron, MD, a sports medicine specialist with Medicine in Motion in Austin, Texas, recommends women aim for a minimum of 1,200 milligrams of calcium per day.

    Calcium-rich foods include all dairy products (think milk, cheese, yogurt), as well as cruciferous green veggies (broccoli, bok choy), soy products (tofu, seitan, edamame), and kidney beans. If you don't eat enough of these foods daily, consider supplementing with calcium to help meet your daily goal.

    When selecting a calcium supplement, choose calcium carbonate or citrate. These two options are better absorbed by the body than other options.

    2. Vitamin D: Calcium's Helping Hands

    Vitamin D may help promote bone strength by facilitating increased calcium absorption. Unfortunately, few foods contain enough vitamin D to give you all you need.

    The good news is that sunshine is the best source of vitamin D. When the UVB rays from the sun contact your skin, they initiate a cascade of reactions that convert the vitamin D precursor molecule in your skin, 7-dehydrocholesterol, into a useable form of vitamin D known as calcitriol. It's calcitriol that works in a hormone-like fashion to increase production of calcium-binding proteins, and ultimately, calcium absorption.

    If only getting out in the sun were enough to make this happen! Lifestyle, geographical location, skin pigmentation, and sunscreen use all impair the absorption of necessary UVB rays to drive this formation.[3] As a result, most of us are vitamin D-deficient. Hence Dr. Pyron's recommendation to supplement with 800-1,000 IU of vitamin D per day.

    To optimize absorption, select a vitamin D-3 supplement, also known as cholecalciferol. This form beats the pants off of vitamin D-2 when it comes to absorption.

    3. Resistance Training: The Finishing Touch

    Working out with weights can further enhance your bone strength and preservation. That's because resistance training provides a direct stressor to your bones. To adapt to such a stress, your body increases the production of cells responsible for laying down new bone material. As a result, bone density can be maintained or even enhanced.

    Try incorporating weight-bearing exercises at least 2-3 times a week. Push-ups and bodyweight squats work great as well, along with any other move that loads up your frame and makes it work. Jumping rope, walking, and jogging are also great for maintaining bone-mineral density.

    Bottom line: Stay active, stay healthy, stay strong—and your bones will thank you!
    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition


    As a vegan I get my calcium by plant based diet. I take a vitamin D supplement . My workouts , including running and weight training has helped.
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  126. #126
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    10 Best Bodyweight Exercises To Train Your Core

    All you need for these 10 bodyweight core exercises is some space, a few minutes, and a motivated attitude—no suspension trainers, stability balls, ab wheels, or dumbbells necessary. The one apparatus you might want on hand is a foam mat to protect your lower back from whatever firm surface you'll be doing these exercises on.

    Ab exercises can improve your posture, reduce and prevent lower-back pain, and advance your athletic performance. With enough reps and a good meal plan, these exercises might even trim up your waist a bit more.

    Add these 10 bodyweight moves to the beginning, middle, or end of your routine to make sure your abs get the attention they need.

    1. Burpee
    Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Squat and place your palms on the floor. Keeping your hands on the floor, immediately kick your legs behind you so that you end up in the top of a push-up position. Do a push-up and return to the top position. Still keeping your hands on the floor, quickly draw up your legs so your feet land back between your hands. Now, jump vertically with your hands reaching overhead above your ears. That's one rep.

    Trainer Tip: To do a "mobility burpee," squat down and kick your legs back. Now, instead of doing a push-up, bring your right leg forward and place your foot on the outside of your right hand. (Getting into this position is sometimes known as "doing a groiner.") Bring your right leg back to the push-up position and repeat the process with your left leg, bringing your left foot up to the outside of your left hand. Return your left leg back to the top push-up position, quickly bring both legs back up to the low squat position, then stand and jump. That's one mobility burpee rep.

    2. Jackknife Sit-Up
    Lie on your back with your legs straight out on the floor, your arms extended above your head, and your hands touching the floor. This is the starting position. Bring your body to a "V" shape by lifting your legs and torso toward each other, keeping both your legs straight and your arms extended. Lift your shoulder blades off the ground as you raise your legs as close to perpendicular to the floor as you can. Touch your hands to your legs, then lower your torso, arms, and legs back to the floor. That's one rep.

    Trainer Tip: A modified version is called the X-Up. To do this, lie on your back with your feet and legs spread apart to form an "X" shape on the floor. Keeping your right arm and left leg straight, lift your right shoulder and left leg off the ground and touch your right hand to the outside of your left knee or ankle. Return to the X position and repeat the movement, this time touching your left hand to the outside of your right knee or ankle.

    3. Mountain Climber
    Get into the top of the push-up position. This is the starting position. Keeping your back in a straight line, bring your right knee toward your chest, then quickly bring it back to the starting position. Now, bring your left knee in towards your chest and return to starting position. Now speed up the movement, alternating legs quickly as if you were running in place with your hands on the ground.

    Trainer Tip: To increase tension on your abdominal muscles, place the palms of your hands on sliding discs such as Valslides, SKLZ Slidez, paper plates, or weight plates.

    4. Cocoon
    Lie on your back with legs extended and your heels touching the floor. Straighten your arms above your head with your hands touching the floor. This is the starting position. Simultaneously bend both legs and bring your knees to your chest as you bring your arms down to hug your knees. Now, release your knees and extend your legs and arms again, returning your heels back to the ground. That's one rep.

    Trainer Tip: To increase the difficulty, keep your heels off the ground for all of the reps.

    5. Oblique Crunch
    Lie on your back on the floor. Keep your legs bent in the air at a 90-degree angle. Place your hands on the back of your head with your elbows flared out to each side. This is the starting position. Twist (rotate) your torso to move your right shoulder toward your left thigh until your upper back is off the floor and your right elbow is close to or touching your left knee. Lower yourself back down to the starting position. Repeat the movement, this time rotating your left shoulder toward your right knee. Alternate reps between your right and left sides.

    Trainer Tip: This is not a bicycle crunch or air bike, where you pedal your legs above the ground the entire time. Once your elbow and knee touch, return to the starting position before switching sides for the next rep. For a more intense exercise, kick one leg out straight as you bring your elbow to the other.

    6. Hanging Leg Raise
    Hang from a pull-up bar with your hands shoulder-width apart. Grab the bar using an overhand (pronated) grip. This is the starting position. Lift both of your knees until they make a 90-degree angle with your torso. Hold this position for 2 seconds, then fully extend your legs below you. That's one rep.

    Trainer Tip: To increase intensity, instead of bending your legs as you raise them, keep them straight. Raise them up as high as possible, hold that position for 2 seconds, then return to the starting position.

    7. Plank
    Assume the top push-up position. Now bend your elbows and place your forearms flat on the floor beneath you. Tighten your ab muscles to keep your back flat. Make sure your toes are pointed into the ground. Hold the position for the prescribed duration.

    Trainer Tip: Incorporate side planks into your routine for oblique strength. To do a side plank, rotate from the plank position so that you're supported by your right forearm. Stack your left foot on top of your right foot and extend your left arm towards the ceiling. Hold this position for 30-60 seconds. Roll your body so that you're now supporting your body on your left forearm with your right arm extended toward the ceiling.

    8. Dead Bug
    Lie on your back with your knees bent in the air at 90 degrees and your calves parallel to the floor. Raise both arms up above you so they are pointed toward the ceiling. This is the starting position. Now, straighten your left leg without touching it to the ground. Your back will want to arch, but use your abdominal muscles to keep it pressed firmly into the floor. Return your left leg to the starting position and repeat the movement with your right leg. Return both legs to the starting position. That's one rep.

    Trainer Tip: Instead of keeping both arms pointed to the ceiling, extend them one at a time. As you straighten your left leg to the floor, extend your right arm above your head until your hand touches the floor. One arm should always be in the starting position (above your chest and pointed towards the ceiling) while the other is extended above your head with the hand close to or touching the floor.

    9. Reverse Crunch
    Lie down on your back with your legs fully extended, your arms along your sides, and your palms on the floor. Move your legs up so that your thighs are perpendicular to the floor and your feet are together. This is the starting position.

    As you breathe in, pull your knees toward your chest as you roll your pelvis backward and raise your hips and upper back off the floor. Hold this position for 1-2 seconds, then exhale as you move your legs back to the starting position.

    Trainer Tip: Keep your arms straight along your sides throughout this movement.

    10. Seated Scissor Kick
    Lie down with your back pressed against the floor and your arms fully extended to each side with your palms facing down. With a slight bend in your knees, lift your legs up so that your heels are about 6 inches off the ground. Contract your abs and bring your back slightly off the floor. This is the starting position.

    As if your legs were a pair of scissors, open and close them by crossing one extended leg over the other, alternating which leg is on top. Keep your abs flexed at all times.

    Trainer Tip: Don't let your back round. Keep your abs tight to maintain a strong, straight spine. For more intensity, raise your arms up and make small, slow clockwise circles with your shoulders as you scissor kick your legs.

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...SM_FB_Training
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  127. #127
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    Awesome story about one woman's fitness journey. Transformations don't happen overnight. It take time, dedication and motivation.


    Jessie Pedaled Away 100 Pounds
    Jessie Foss rediscovered her love of mountain biking and used it to crush her fitness goals.



    In 100-degree heat, Jessie Foss pushed the pedals of her mountain bike. On the last stretch of a 3-day ride covering 109 miles in South Dakota's Black Hills, Jessie, who'd trained on the flatter ground of her native Dallas, Texas, was struggling. As it turned out, 44 miles in a day was just as hard as it sounded. But before the ride, Jessie had already lost 50 pounds, and she knew she could surpass this hurdle, too. When she final reached the end of the trail, the sense of accomplishment she felt made every uphill push against the pedals worth it.

    Before beginning her journey, Jessie had undergone a big transformation. She'd previously allowed a desk job and busy schedule to take priority over her healthy lifestyle, which led her to put on more than 100 pounds. When she committed to reversing her weight gain, Jessie rediscovered mountain biking, a sport she and her husband had once enjoyed together.

    Through careful food choices and daily workouts, Jessie was finally able to get back on her bike—and climb further than she'd thought possible.

    This is Jessie's story.
    Strength Training-jessie-foss-transformation-before-700xh.jpg
    Age: 34, Height: 5'2", Weight: 215 lbs., Body Fat: 40%

    Strength Training-jessie-foss-transformation-after-700xh.jpg
    Age: 38, Height: 5'2", Weight: 115 lbs., Body Fat: 16%


    When Did Your Weight Start To Become A Problem?
    I got married when I was 19, and at that time, I weighed 110 pounds. I got a desk job at a law firm soon after the wedding. After a few years, the weight started to pile on. I grew far less active and found myself sitting behind a desk all day.

    Were You Active Before That?
    I delivered newspapers, which was a really active job. I was outside seven days a week.

    What Inspired You To Lose Weight?
    I was actually influenced by a fit friend. I noticed that she read nutrition labels when shopping and chose low-calorie foods with no added sugar. Based on her example, I started to pay a little more attention to what I was eating, though I didn't know much. I started with smaller portions and paid attention to calories per meal.

    I noticed changes from that alone—I was 215 pounds and wearing a size 20 or larger, and suddenly, my clothes loosened. I realized I was doing something right, and I wanted to challenge myself, so I decided I was going to get on my elliptical machine every day after work.

    Did You See Any Results From That?
    After four weeks of using the elliptical for 30 minutes a day—with no changes to my diet—I lost 5 pounds. That was all the motivation I needed. I realized I could do this! I kept up that routine for three months, then increased my elliptical time to 45 minutes a day. I also began using MyFitnessPal to track my calories burned and consumed daily. Logging my food was such an eye opener.

    What Kinds Of Foods Were You Eating At The Time?
    I would have a Dr. Pepper and a doughnut for breakfast every morning. Lunch was usually a hamburger and fries, pizza, or some other high-fat junk. We ate out a lot for dinner, but if I cooked, it was still usually a pretty heavy meal—beef with pasta was pretty standard.

    There wasn't much in the way of vegetables. To top it off, there were usually sweets in the house like cookies, ice cream, and chocolate.

    What Changes Did You Make To Your Eating Habits?
    The first change I made was making more time to work out by meal prepping at the beginning of the week. That way, I didn't have to worry about cooking every day. On Sunday, I'd put together some kind of stew or healthy soup that my husband and I could rely on for the week. That was a huge help and got me started on meal prepping, something I still do to this day.

    Where Do You Get Your Recipes?
    I find a lot of recipes online. I also use a cookbook from the American Heart Association that has healthy, low-calorie CrockPot recipes.

    What Was The Hardest Part About Your Transformation?
    I'm a big coffee drinker, and learning to drink my coffee without sugar was a challenge. Sweet coffee drinks were the hardest thing for me to give up. Even just switching from table sugar to artificial sweeteners was tough. After that, I worked on giving up artificial sweeteners.

    How Did You Give Them Up?
    I eventually weaned myself off of them enough to drink one cup of coffee with Splenda and my next cup of coffee without Splenda. From there, I went to drinking all of my coffee without sweeteners.

    When Did You Start Mountain Biking?
    I was a tomboy growing up, and my younger brother and I would ride our bikes around the woods. When I married my husband, we lived in a house across the street from 15 miles of off-road trails, and we would ride those quite a bit. As I gained weight, I didn't feel confident or comfortable being out there, so the riding dwindled to nothing.

    When Did You Start Biking Again?
    About five months into starting to work out, I pulled out my mountain bike for the first time and got back on the trail.

    What Got You Interested In A Mountain-Biking Trip In South Dakota?
    My husband and I were on vacation with my in-laws, and we stumbled upon this trail. It was once an old train track that had been converted into a gravel trail for walking or biking. It's 109 miles long—from Deadwood, South Dakota, all the way south to Edgemont. We read up on the trail, and it became a bucket-list thing for us.

    After training all year in the area around our house in Dallas, we headed out to bike it. We knew the ride would be tough because of the big hills in South Dakota, but we were up for the challenge.

    Did You Enjoy It?
    It's just an incredible ride. I'd love to do it again, but it was really, really hard.

    What Was The Hardest Part Of The Ride?
    At that point, I had lost about 50 pounds, so I still had some weight on me. On the third day of the ride, we had to cover 44 miles on a gravel trail—this was after riding uphill for 10 miles—plus it was 100 degrees out. That was the longest, hardest day.

    What Was The Best Part?
    It's so quiet and beautiful and just smells wonderful on the hills. I love being out in nature. Spending that ride with someone I care about made the scenery even more beautiful.
    Details about her meal plan and extercise routine:

    Sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content..._FB_Motivation
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    Looking For Stronger Bones? Try Pumping Some Iron

    Weight lifting and other resistance-based exercises go much deeper than the muscles they work.
    High-impact workouts are often sworn off later in life because of the jarring effect they have on ailing or injury-prone joints. But, the force involved in these workouts isn’t all bad, especially when it comes to building and maintaining bone strength.

    Your bones, which are a living tissue, adapt to the abrupt stress of exercises that involve impact like running and jumping by adding mass to the affected area.

    Unfortunately, lower impact, joint-friendly workouts like water aerobics and cycling don’t apply that same beneficial force to the targeted bone structure — no matter how hard we work.

    Thankfully, there’s a less jarring alternative. Dr. Olivier Abtan, a chiropractor with The Collective Healthcare Group in Toronto recommends strength training for those looking for a safer way to apply the necessary force needed to build and maintain their bone density.

    Strength training involves the use of resistance to induce muscular contraction and includes exercises performed with weights, resistance bands and your own body weight.

    “I think it’s something that everybody should be looking into incorporating. It doesn’t mean we’re saying not to get into the pool,” Abtan says. “There are advantages to aquatic exercises and low-impact exercises in terms of tolerability. But you’re not going to be increasing bone density very well if you just do pool exercises.”

    Similar to high-impact workouts, loading specific bones with more weight or force than they’re used to promotes the formation of new bone.

    As we age, addressing bone mass becomes paramount.

    When we’re young, bone resorption, which is the loss of bone tissue over time, is balanced or exceeded by the production of new bone tissue. But after 40, we lose bone mass at an average rate of one per cent per year. Woman experience an increase of bone loss during menopause to between two and three per cent per year, which persists for about five years after menopause.

    When nothing is done to counteract this loss, our bones can become weak and we can increase our risk of debilitating, and even fatal fractures.

    Osteoporosis, a disease characterized by the rapid loss of bone mass, affects an estimated 2 million Canadians and is responsible for over 80 per cent of all fractures in people aged 50 and older.

    Fortunately, the mechanics of building bone with strength training isn’t overly complicated. A study published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise showed that increases in the strength of specific muscles coincided with increases in density of the attached bone.

    In other words, you can target specific bones to strengthen by consistently challenging the adjacent muscles.

    Abtan suggests working on the wrists, spine and hips, which are the most common fracture sites in older adults.

    The most dangerous fractures, however, are those of the spine and hip bones, which, according to the Canadian Medical Association Journal, increases the odds of an early death in people aged 50 and over.

    Research has shown that the weighted squat is one of the best ways to strengthen the spine and hip bones.In a study published by The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis (conditions that are characterized by weakened bones) saw substantial increases in spine and hip bone mineral content (an indicator of bone growth) after only 12 weeks of training with a squat machine.

    But resistance training isn’t only about strengthening bones to withstand a fall. It’s also a great way to prevent falls from happening entirely.

    Squats and other lower body workouts that strengthen the legs have been shown to improve balance, which is key in preventing falls.

    The preventative benefits of resistance training extends to improvements in cognition as well. Another study published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that participants over 60 who participated in a six-week full body resistance training program showed improvements in spacial awareness as well as visual and physical reaction time — all three of which are crucial to fall prevention.

    “The problem with having weak bones is not just having weak bones,” Dr. Abtan explains. “It’s having weak bones and then falling.”

    With its benefits to bone strength, balance and cognition, resistance training can help you address both ends of that equation.

    Strength Training-33469271_2113926882185085_3238103821594918912_n.jpg

    sauce Looking For Stronger Bones? Try Pumping Some Iron - Everything Zoomer
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  129. #129
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    I did a few sets of 1 minute battle ropes. Excellent conditioning even though my shoulders are pooched having been the focus of many recent workouts

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    4 Moves You Should Steal From CrossFit

    Whether you love it, hate it, or just admire it athletically from afar, you probably know how you feel about CrossFit as a fitness phenomenon at this point. So what about as a collection of training techniques? Sure, you can rail all you want about the butterfly pull-ups and high-rep Oly lifts, but those are honestly a small—and competition-specific—part of the massive CrossFit portfolio.

    If you haven't investigated the overall training approach to see what you can take from it and plug into your own training, well, you're probably missing out. Here are four undeniably awesome movements that could pay off big time for just about any lifter or gym-goer.

    CrossFit athlete Hannah Eden will tell you exactly why they should be part of your overall program, as well as give her tips to perform them flawlessly.

    DOUBLE UNDER
    "At first glance, the double under seems like a ridiculously simple skill to learn," says Eden. "You jump once, and the rope passes under your feet twice." Don't let the simplicity fool you, however.

    "Learning this skill is not for the impatient," she says. "It is a complex skill that'll blast your shoulders, shred your core, and jack your heart rate up while taxing both your aerobic and anaerobic energy system." In other words, it's a solid contender for your program.

    But there's a catch: It's not just as straightforward as jumping higher. "The connection between the mind and muscle is critical for this exercise," warns Eden. "You'll need to practice it constantly in order to master it." That's why she recommends approaching it seriously and strategically.

    Strength Training-32332392_2106330872944686_8862110045391814656_n.jpg

    "First, buy a good jump rope," she says. "Don't cheap out and by the first rope you find. As far as your form is concerned, you'll want to keep your elbows back and extended and think of rotating the rope from your wrists. Imagine drawing a circle on a quarter; you want short, sharp whips."

    She also recommends that you keep your gaze up to where the ceiling meets the wall. This will help you stand tall and get more height to each jump. "Jump on the balls of your feet and extend your legs every time your feet leave the floor," she says. "Remember that you are in control of the rope, not the other way around. You decide how fast or slow the rotation is."

    So where do you put these in your workout? They can work as a finisher, but honestly, you might not have enough in the tank at that point to give them the effort and attention they demand. Instead, try starting your workout with them, like Eden does in her Monster Mondays 30-60-90 workout from the article "4 High-Performance Cardio Workouts."

    BURPEES
    Most people have a love-hate relationship with the burpee; you love the results you get from this exercise, but the cost is that you will hate doing them.

    "A burpee is a dynamic and fast-paced fat burner that strengthens and conditions your entire body," explains Eden. "With each rep, you'll work your arms, chest, quadriceps, glutes, hamstrings, and core. Add 8-10 of these suckers between your lifting sets, and you'll be feeling the effects in no time." In her Monster Mondays workout, she even adds a pull-up at the top of burpee reps, creating one brutal full-body move.

    Strength Training-36394528_2141503422760764_4151130872776491008_n.jpg

    Strength Training-36425150_2141503556094084_4312430594370830336_n.jpg

    "The fundamentals of the burpee are simple: Drop down and get back up," Eden says. But as anyone who has ever done 30-50 of them in a row knows, even the simplest technique becomes a tall order pretty quickly. Eden's solution is to keep your technique airtight from the start so you're not leaking energy unnecessarily.

    "First, place your hands on the ground about shoulder-width apart," she says. "Next, jump your feet back while bringing your chest down to the ground. From here, jump your feet back behind your hands, landing flat-footed to protect your knees. Stand up to full extension, then jump and clap your hands above your head."

    Easy enough, right? Now do it again. And again.

    WALL BALL THROW
    CrossFit's use of weighted medicine balls is a great example of how it can dust off an old-school classic implement and remind us all how effective it really is. "This is a top-notch multijoint functional movement," says Eden. "It utilizes two key movements—a weighted squat and a push press—and can be customized for strength, power, or serious conditioning."

    She notes that the muscles worked during this exercise include, well, all of them: the quads, glutes, calves, hamstrings, abs, lower back, upper back, chest, front deltoids, back deltoids, biceps, and triceps. It's a complete strength builder. But of course, it's all in the execution.

    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0432.jpg

    First, hold the ball in a front-squat position with your elbows in front of your body, then squat deeply. "Imagine tapping your butt in an imaginary hot seat," she explains. "Once you reach the bottom of your squat, explosively drive up through your heels and complete a push-press to launch the ball from the front rack position to a 9- to 10-foot-high target on the wall."

    The higher the target is for this exercise, the more explosive power you'll need to generate. However, aiming too high can result in poor form, so don't go higher than 10-12 feet, depending on how tall you are. If you can easily reach your highest target, that's a sign it's time for a heavier medicine ball, not a higher target.

    This exercise will improve your strength and physique, and you'll probably have a load of fun doing it. It's far too seldom that we get to actually throw stuff around in the gym.

    BARBELL THRUSTER
    "The thruster is the perfect exercise to define what a compound, multijoint exercise really is," says Eden. "It's a front squat that goes into an overhead press." As such, you can expect this exercise to work your quads, hamstrings, glutes, core, shoulders, biceps, triceps, and even your upper back to a surprising degree.

    "Heavier loads with lower reps will improve your overall strength from head to toe, while lighter weight for higher repetitions are great for high-intensity interval training," she says. Depending on whether you want to build muscle or torch fat, you can decide which way you wish to perform this exercise.

    Strength Training-dscn7887.jpg

    Eden recommends standing with your feet in the base of your regular squat position, right around hip-width to shoulder-width apart. From there, you'll want to keep the barbell in the front-rack position with your elbows up. "They should be like headlights of a car," she explains. "Your elbows should remain high as you squat down, and only when you reach the full depth of your squat should you explode up by driving your heels through the floor."

    Add the thruster to your workout routine early on in your session when you're feeling fresh and ready to tackle it with maximum energy. As you become more proficient, you can move it later in the workout and treat it more as conditioning.

    Any of these workouts can be plugged into your current program to make it just a little more challenging or interesting. Conversely, you could stick a couple of them together and make a full-body workout that will have you asking, "Why don't I do that more often?"

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    1. PERFECT YOUR SQUAT

    Squats are one of the best exercises for the lower body (and really the whole body, when you consider the core work involved). But, as with any multi-joint exercise, there are plenty of places things can go awry, says Leandra Haynes, Tier 2 trainer at Equinox Flatiron. “Surprising limitations could start from as low as the feet,” she says. “Tight muscles and lack of joint mobility are prime causes of squat downfall.” Here’s what could be limiting your squat, and how to fix it.

    2. ROLL YOUR FEET AND CALVES
    If it feels like your arches cave in when you squat, the issue could be in your feet or in your ankles. “It can be calf tightness causing the lack of ankle mobility to have a proper dorsiflexion range of motion when lifting,” Haynes says.

    The fix: Do some pre-workout foam rolling. “You will be surprised to see the improvement from rolling the balls of your feet and all the way up the calves with a lacrosse ball or golf ball,” she says.

    3. MOVE IN ALL PLANES OF MOTION
    You’ve probably heard it’s important to keep the knees from caving in, but it’s likely weak abductor (outer thigh and glute) muscles that aren’t pulling their weight.

    The fix: If you notice your knees often fall on an inward trajectory, integrating more lateral work (like side lunges and mini-band walks) into your weekly routine may help.

    4. LOOSEN YOUR HIPS AND ANKLES
    One common reason for a shallow squat is tightness around the hip and ankle joints.

    The fix: Traditional stretches can help to lengthen the hip flexors (like low lunges) and calves (like heel drops). But also: “Remember the ankles and hips are supposed to allow for 360 degrees range of motion and not just the flexion and extension motions of walking in the sagittal plane,” Haynes says. She suggests adding ankle and hip circles to your warm-up routine.

    5. CONSIDER A LOW-BAR SQUAT
    Your height, or really, your leg length, can impact your squat. Having longer “levers” (in this case, your femurs) can make it more challenging to both move more weight and get as deep a range of motion. “Very simply put, the shorter the femur, the less distance needs to be traveled during a squat to hit depth,” Haynes says.

    The fix: One way to improve matters is to change how you load. Consider trying a low-bar back squat, with the bar resting on your shoulder blades (just a couple of inches below where it would be on your scapula for a high-bar squat).

    TRY VARIATIONS
    “Some fear falling backward when squatting and lean too far forward,” Haynes says.

    The fix: To train your brain for better squats, she recommends starting with box squats (in which you squat back toward a box or bench), then progress to goblet squats—”holding a weight in front of you can counter the feeling of falling backward”—before you back-load. The progression may take a few weeks for the good-form habits to develop (and your brain to get over the bad ones), but it’ll be worth it.


    Strength Training-dscn6048.jpg
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    One of my goals when I started crossfit 4 years ago was to get stronger so I would have more power and endurance for mountain biking. I ended up becoming stronger and leaner... this article explains why.

    DAILY WISDOM: MUSCLE VERSUS STRENGTH

    THE SCIENCE
    Weightlifters know that there’s a difference between building strength (what it takes to lift a heavy suitcase into the overhead bin) and building muscle mass (the sheer size of your muscles). While athletes can get similar muscle-building benefits from lifting heavier weights for fewer reps or lighter weights for more reps, your best bet for gaining strength is the former. A new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln explains the mechanism behind this phenomenon.

    EXPERT INSIGHT
    “The amount of weight you are working with is important because that is what tells the body how many motor units it needs to recruit from the nervous system,” explains Matt Berenc, director of education at the Equinox Fitness Training Institute. “At lighter loads, it won’t recruit as many motor units as it would with heavier loads.” According to Berenc, the more motor units recruited from the nervous system, the stronger you will become. (The way muscle size develops, on the other hand, is due to increasing the size, not the number, of muscle cells.)

    “The body inherently looks to preserve energy so it won’t stress itself more than it needs to,” says Berenc. “If only 50 percent recruitment is needed to lift a lighter load, then that is all I will recruit so I don’t waste any energy and calories. But in the same instance, if it is a heavier load it will be forced to up the percentage.” This explains why two people lifting different amounts of weight can potentially have the same size muscles, but different levels of strength.

    “If you want to start lifting for strength, the best approach is to focus on slowly lowering the number of reps while increasing the weight of the exercises,” says Berenc. “Most strength training programs will have you working around two to six reps for four to six sets.” Start with a more moderate load, about 60 to 70 percent of your max, he suggests. Multi-joint, compound lifts like deadlifts, squats, pull-ups, overhead press, rows, and bench press tend to involve a greater amount of muscle tissue and lead to larger total body gains in strength, Berenc adds.

    THE BOTTOM LINE
    To challenge your nervous system and get the most strength gains, try lifting heavier weights for fewer reps. But, Berenc recommends alternating your heavy lifting days with lighter or recovery days. “Heavy lifting can put a lot of stress on your body. By spending time with lower intensity drills (stretching, mobility, bodyweight exercises) in between your training days, you allow repair to happen so you can be ready for the next day of lifting.”

    sauce https://furthermore.equinox.com/arti...&kwp_1=1257918

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  133. #133
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    Good points!

    How to Lose Weight and Get Back in Shape

    A personal trainer explains why you don’t need a detox, a fad diet, or a boutique workout to burn fat and build muscle

    Earlier this week, I was talking with one of my best friends. He’d recently started dating again after getting divorced from his wife of 11 years. And let’s just say that he wasn’t quite as lean as he was when they first met. Not only had his waistline expanded considerably, his confidence had taken a hit. He was disappointed with his lot in life, and didn’t feel good about himself and things in general.

    He had, to put it bluntly, let himself go. And he wanted me to help him get rid of his paunch and shape up again. I'm a personal trainer with an advanced degree in exercise science, so I get this a lot. Here’s what I told him:

    First, don’t tell anyone what you’re doing.
    The stock advice is that you should share your goals with other people, because it makes you accountable and gives you more motivation.

    Personally, I think this is a mistake. Research shows that you’re far better off keeping things to yourself.

    Don’t plaster it all over Facebook.

    Don’t tweet about it.

    You want to go about your business like the SAS, on some covert operation behind enemy lines, where nobody hears about it until the job is done.

    I’d also suggest that you go and do something that represents a simple “first step” towards getting in shape.

    Maybe set your alarm 20 minutes early so you have time to get up in the morning and go for a brisk walk. Or take some of the food in your kitchen that you know you shouldn’t be eating and get rid of it.

    You want to go and do something positive. Something that says you’re serious about getting in shape, rather than just contemplating starting to consider thinking about it.

    Next, you’ll need to make some changes to your diet.
    You don’t need anything complicated or fancy.

    Nor do you need to cut out sugar, carbs, fat, lectins, wheat or whatever else the food police say is bad for you this week.

    The first and most important thing to focus on is creating an energy deficit.

    What exactly do I mean by that?

    When you’re in an energy deficit, there is a mismatch between the amount of energy your body needs and the amount it gets from your diet. So, it starts looking for something to make up the deficit.

    As long as your diet and training program are set up right (which I’ll tell you how to do in a moment), that “something” will be the fat you want to get rid of.

    You also need to make sure you’re eating enough protein. Research shows that protein does a better job at filling you up than carbohydrate or fat, as well as helping you retain (or even gain) muscle while you drop fat.

    There are many ways to achieve those two things, from a ketogenic diet to intermittent fasting.

    Ultimately, the “best” diet for losing your gut is one that you can stick to. Compliance and consistency trumps most other things when it comes to getting in shape.

    Are you hitting your calorie and protein targets for the day? Are you eating mostly wholesome, nutrient-dense foods? Are you cutting down on the junk that you know isn’t doing you any good?

    If so, you don’t need to worry too much about the rest.

    You certainly don’t need to eat six small meals a day, avoid carbs late at night, or any of the other minor details that people like to waste time thinking about.

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  134. #134
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    Good article!


    Popping in to update on my own strength training journey this year. I started intense bodyweight calisthenics (lots of pulling!) in January and resistance training in maybe March? I decided to use Dee Tidwell's enduro mtb training program. I can recommend it, with the hesitation that I've run into several exercises I don't have the equipment or space to do at the gym in my complex.

    I think that strength training has been the best thing I've done for injury prevention overall.

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    PREP YOUR CORE TO GET FITTER
    How to build mobility and stability while strengthening your mid-section.

    By now, athletes know that training the core goes far beyond building a visible six-pack. “Research shows that you should always train for good mobility in the upper portion of the core and good stability in the lower portion,” says exercise physiologist Geralyn Coopersmith, former head of the Equinox Fitness Training Institute. “With this foundation, you are able to build a midsection that functions in peak condition, meaning it’s able to flex, rotate, laterally flex and extend.”

    This, she notes, helps carve muscles that are responsive. “They will turn on automatically and be engaged no matter what you're doing."

    For a more functional core, add these mobility- and stability-building moves into your regular routine.

    1. Inchworm Stand with feet together, arms by sides. Reach down and place hands on floor in front of you, then slowly walk hands forward, keeping legs straight, until you are in plank position (palms under shoulders, legs extended behind you, abs engaged). Slowly walk feet forward to meet hands, keeping legs straight. Return to standing and repeat.

    2. Plank to Downward-Facing Dog Touches Start in plank position. Shift back into downward-facing dog (upside down V) and touch toes with right hand as you do. Return to plank and repeat, touching toes with left hand. Continue alternating sides with each rep.

    3. Bird-Dog Push-Up Perform a push-up, keeping elbows by sides. Extend right arm in front of you and left leg behind you; hold balance for one count, then lower. Do another push-up, and repeat balance on other side (left arm; right leg). Repeat.

    4. Plank Reach-Through to Side Plank Start in plank position. Lift right hand off floor and reach arm under your body and over to left, rotating torso to left. Rotate torso back through center and open arm up to ceiling, going into a left side plank. Return to start and repeat on the other side.

    5. Alternating forward lunge with rotation Stand with feet hip-width apart and bend your elbows, clasping your hands together in front of your chest. Take a big step forward with right foot as you extend your arms in front of you. Bend knees into a lunge as you rotate shoulders to the right. Rotate back to center and step back to the starting position. Repeat, this time lunging forward with left foot and rotating to the left. Continue, alternating sides.

    6. Renegade Arm Extension Get in plank position. Raise right arm to shoulder height in front of you with palm facing left. Lower right hand to starting position and repeat with left arm. Continue at a medium tempo, alternating arms.


    Strength Training-37884252_2171127936464979_8476433071816572928_n.jpg

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  136. #136
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    Study highlights fragility of motivation for regular exercise
    “Even a full year of exercise wasn’t enough to get the habit ingrained” in group of inactive 35- to 65-year-olds, says researcher who cites busyness of life.

    People who haven’t found a way of making exercise a priority early in life will struggle to make it a priority by the time they’re in their 30s and beyond, new University of Alberta-led research suggests.

    According to interviews taken from a comprehensive fitness study that recruited 273 non-exercising adults between the ages of 35 and 65 to exercise on campus three times a week for a year, people who gave up exercising regularly did so largely because they had trouble making it a priority and got disillusioned with the results.

    “While those who quit the program said they had some positive outcomes—like feeling less stress, sleeping better and having more energy—many said they were also disappointed with a lack of visible results in terms of their appearance or losing weight,” said Heather Larson, a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation who led the study.

    Larson interviewed about 20 people who finished the year-long exercise regimen and a similar number of people who quit.

    She noted that more than 60 per cent of the study’s participants dropped out before the study concluded. Also discouraging was that even among those who stuck it out until the end, most reported they stopped working out soon after the study wrapped up.

    “Even a full year of exercise wasn’t enough to get the habit ingrained,” said Larson. “It seems what actually kept many of them going was a sense of responsibility to the study and to the researchers.”

    She added that making exercise a priority for this group was a challenge because they were unable to navigate the various barriers of developing a fitness routine.

    “People have lots of different things in their lives, especially in this age group. There are parents, there are people taking care of their parents, and it’s also a time when careers are kind of ramping up. Making time for exercise was hard,” she said.

    In the end, she said, the study confirmed just how fragile the motivation to exercise regularly is, and how easily an exercise routine can be broken or thrown off by the smallest changes—whether it be a vacation, something at work or an illness.

    “For people who have been exercising for years, they will deal with it and get back into exercise. For someone who is just starting out, it is a real challenge to get back in there,” said Larson, who recommended that people focus more on building exercise into their lifestyle one small step at a time.

    “People need to look for those opportunities to do things like active transportation, walking to work or cycling to work, activities that are built into their day, rather than having to make room for it,” she said.

    Two papers were published as a result of the interviews: the first focused on the successes, and showed that social support is instrumental for people to keep working out.

    “It actually seemed to work better if (the workout buddy) was someone (the participant) wasn’t too close to,” she said. “With a family member or a really close friend, it seems it is easy to talk each other out of it.

    “It’s almost better to have a little more distance, then you feel more accountable to the person and you don’t want to let them down.”

    Along with Larson, the research team for the fitness study included fellow PhD candidate Kimberley McFadden and professors Tara-Leigh McHugh, Tanya Berry and Wendy Rodgers, as well as researchers at Western University.
    sauce https://www.folio.ca/study-highlight...ular-exercise/

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  137. #137
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    Since I bikecommute and my Dad walked to work every day of his working life, I agree with this part:
    “People need to look for those opportunities to do things like active transportation, walking to work or cycling to work, activities that are built into their day, rather than having to make room for it,” she said.

    But otherwise it sounds like the exercisers were not having enough fun. I would quit too. People need to find something they enjoy, not just "work" out. I bike, and walk in the woods, my sister paddleboards, ettc. In addition to enjoying the sport, you feed off the community you build around it, so that it is a way of life.

  138. #138
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    Optical illusion. The box and platform line up

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    I'm still working on my pull-ups

    “7 Reasons Why You’re Struggling With Pull-ups!”


    Ah…Pull-ups. The pull-up is one of the most versatile exercises out there; you can do them with your body weight, throw on some chains, use wide and narrow grips, even turn your palms over and do a chin-up. This staple movement not only develops strength and muscularity, but it carries over to any real-world scenario where you might need to…pull yourself up and over something. It’s also vital to master the pull-up if you ever expect to do a muscle-up. While the pull-up doesn’t seem all that hard to do, it’s one of the most difficult exercises to even get started with so I came up with this short list of the 7 reasons why you STILL haven’t mastered pull-ups!

    1. You’re too heavy.

    More often than not, the folks who have the most trouble with body weight movements like pull-ups are a little on the heavy side and they’ve developed little-to-no general physical preparedness (GPP). Six-seven years from now when you’re carrying 20 more lbs. of muscle you can probably get away with being heavier, but right now, losing that fat will make a massive difference in your body weight movements.

    Be honest with yourself: if you have a lot of fat to lose and you’re out of shape, you need to tackle one obstacle at a time. Start by getting your nutrition in order so you can drop some weight. We can help with that. As you work to trim off some fluff, you’ll need to improve your work capacity by doing heavy resistance training with a barbell and dumbbells (more on that in a bit), biking, swimming, walking, rowing, sprinting, sled dragging, and even carrying heavy stuff – which brings us to our second point.

    2. Your grip strength isn’t up to par.

    If you come from a sedentary background – i.e. you don’t play sports, work a physically demanding job, or get a lot of activity in general – chances are your grip isn’t anything to write home about. If your grip strength isn’t sufficient to hold your body weight, there’s only a slim chance that you’ll be able to do a pull-up. How do you fix this? Contrary to what you may see at your local globo gym, doing thousands of repetitions of wrist curls with 2.5 lb. plates is NOT the ticket to a bone-crushing grip. To improve your grip strength, you need to perform exercises that involve static contractions of the hands, forearms, shoulders and upper back. Hang from the pull-up bar for time, carry heavy dumbbells for distance, load up a barbell and do timed holds for 30-60 seconds, or use a grip trainer. Grip training is hard, so don’t bite off more weight than you can chew; start off light and go for endurance.

    3. Your back needs to get stronger.

    This may seem like a no brainer – that’s why you’re trying to incorporate pull-ups into your routine anyway, isn’t it? Although pull-ups are one of the best ways to develop back strength, the fact of the matter is that staring at the rig isn’t building a single ounce of muscle. Whether you can’t do a single pull-up or you can only bust out a few ugly reps before you’re gassed, you should add a few upper body pulling movements into your back workout to ensure that you’re getting stronger each week. Try these exercises for 3 sets of 10 repetitions each:

    -Pull-up negatives have tremendous carryover to the pull-up. Stand on something or jump up to the bar and get yourself in the top position of a pull-up. Lower yourself in a controlled fashion until your arms are fully extended, then get right back up there and keep going until you’re done with your set!

    -Ring rows are a go-to pull for building strength in your entire back and core because they get you working with your body weight and can be easily modified as you progress. Start with your feet on the floor, then elevate your feet with a box as you get stronger.

    -Single-arm dumbbell rows are great because they offer freedom of movement and an increased range of motion. Support your body with one arm by leaning on a bench and explosively pull the dumbbell back like you’re trying to elbow someone in the gut.

    -Lat Pulldowns or any vertical pull done with a cable machine can help you develop pulling strength along the same plane as a pull-up and they offer the same freedom of movement as a dumbbell.

    These specific physical preparedness (SPP) exercises use the same muscle groups and similar motor recruitment patterns as the pull-up. If you improve at a number of SPP exercises, you can bet your bottom dollar you’ll get better at pull-ups too.

    4. Your form needs work.

    Pull-ups are like any other exercise or movement – there’s a right way and a wrong way to do them. You can’t just grab the bar and pull all willy-nilly! Here are some tips on maximizing your leverage and getting your back into it:

    Take a shoulder-width grip! Not only will you tear your shoulders apart by taking too wide a grip, but you’ll also limit your range of motion and use less of your back. You can always work in wider grips as you progress but most of your pull-ups should be done with a moderate, shoulder-width grip.
    Keep your head up! By lifting your chin and tucking your neck backwards (packing your neck as some may call it), you can engage your upper back muscles and put yourself into a much better position to pull from. To get an idea of what I mean, try first shoving your head forward, looking down, and tucking your chin into your body – do the opposite of that!
    Pull Up and back! Don’t think of the pull-up as a strictly vertical movement. Instead, lean back and pull the bar to your upper chest, not your chin or neck. Your lower body will be slightly out in front of you and your back will remain neutral – the classic hollow gymnastics position – NOT arched like crazy. Don’t curl your legs – at least not at first.

    5. You don’t stay tight.

    If you can’t maintain relative body position throughout the pull-up and you flop around like a mudkip, you have what we call an energy leak. What this means is that instead of using your entire body to pull, you’re relying on whatever muscles will do the work – most likely your rotator cuff. (Hint: that’s bad.) Everything should stay tight when you pull; point your toes, lock your legs, squeeze your glutes, pack your neck, tuck your chin, take a big breath, and squeeze your core out as you pull your upper chest to the bar with a vice grip around the handles. Don’t loosen up until you’re done with the set! Sounds uncomfortable, eh? It should be.

    6. You aren’t practicing often enough.

    You are what your repeatedly do. If your form is on point, but your specific work capacity sucks and you have to jerk your body around to get your chin over the bar after the first repetition, you’re just teaching your body to express an inefficient movement pattern. It’s much more difficult to unlearn bad form than it is to teach it, so you’re going to want to add in some specialized practice whenever possible. One of the best ways to practice pull-ups is to hang a cheap doorframe pull-up bar in a room you enter/exit frequently and knock out 1-2 explosive reps every time you pass through that door. In his book “Power To The People”, Pavel Tsatsouline describes this as “greasing the groove” and it takes advantage of increased training frequency and specificity to perfect whatever movement you apply to it. Here’s a real world example of how you can use this technique over the course of a week if you can only d 5-6 pull-ups in a row right now:

    Monday 10 sets of 2

    Tuesday 2 sets of 3

    Wednesday 12 sets of 2

    Thursday off

    Friday 3 sets of 3

    Saturday 10 sets of 3

    Sunday 2 sets to failure


    What’s going on here is that you’re accumulating a large volume of perfect repetitions throughout the week. The volume undulates between 9 and 30 repetitions per day with only one day off. By focusing on sets of 2-3 reps, you can focus on form yet still elicit the fatigue required to grow stronger. At the end of the week, you’re trying to hit as many reps as possible across two sets. Over time, you’ll gain pull-up repetitions and really dial in your form.

    7. You’re over-reliant on assisted pull-ups.

    This is going to shock some people, but doing assisted pull-ups exclusively in your workouts may be preventing you from doing a real, unassisted pull-up. Why? Look back at reason #5 where we went over technique/form. Your whole body needs to stay tight during a pull-up, and assistance – whether it’s on a machine or with a band – removes the legs and core from the equation almost completely. It’s difficult to use your back efficiently with a loose core so you end up pulling with less lat engagement and develop improper mechanics. Assisted pull-ups have their place as a developmental exercise (see reason #3), but you absolutely cannot rely upon them too much. When it comes time to WOD, modify and save the assisted movements for your strength/skill sessions. With these tips in mind, go forth and conquer the pull-up!
    Strength Training-40541211_2207522536158852_2441721369138823168_n.jpg


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  140. #140
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    "Don’t Earn Your Food in the Gym’ and Six Other Lessons I Wish I’d Learned Sooner”

    I heard this saying recently: “Don’t Earn Your Food in the Gym.” It’s haunted my ears since. So many of us think this way, like we’re eight years old again and if we do our work, then we get a cupcake.

    The concept of food as a treat is baked into our society. I’m not immune to this concept and, before I learned to love lifting iron for the sake of how it made me feel (versus the way it made me look), I was much more of an outcome-motivated gal. I was in that gym thinking that an extra set of this or more time doing that allowed me to eat more. I was earning my food in the gym.

    Strength Training-39929217_2200614193516353_2768003686654279680_n.jpg

    But those days are gone now. Why? Because I do what I love and I let those old proverbial chips fall where they may. I’m deadlifting and squatting (and doing all sorts of other things) because I love how strong and powerful these movements makes me feel. The fact that those deadlifts work my glutes and make my butt look firmer? Icing on that cake that I’m not eating. (I’m not a big cake fan. Go figure. Chocolate chip cookies, however, have taken my virtue many times.)

    Back to earning/not earning your food, though. The road to an invincible mindset that can lead you to success in nutrition and exercise and so many areas of your life? That road starts in your mind, as well as your body. You need to get your head and your butt in gear. Clear thinking plus movement is the road, and you need to get on that road.

    So, reorder your thoughts. Earn your strength in the gym. You don’t have to earn your food. You’re not a dog dancing for treats. You’re an independent badass uncovering even more awesomeness inside you. If you want a sustainable lifestyle that will unlock your potential and supercharge your happiness, then you need to prioritize your mind: fuel your body to increase your performance, instead of increasing your performance in order to fuel your body.

    Some other things I’ve learned that I wish I’d known sooner:

    1.) I’m happier and more focused when I’m not starving.

    Strength Training-41215850_2210359682541804_4574349223478165504_n.jpg

    Who can concentrate when your stomach is rumbling and all you can think about is getting something to eat? These are the weak points in your day, when you’re distracted by hunger. Better to eat smartly and keep your body fueled. Now your mind can stay on the task in front of you.

    2.) Food is the original “5-hour Energy.”

    Strength Training-40541211_2207522536158852_2441721369138823168_n.jpg

    I didn’t come up with this saying, but I’m a believer. So many products out there that you can buy, but they’re all variations on the basic stuff our bodies need: food for fuel. Plan your day, plan your meals, and set yourself up for success, not failure. Be smart.

    3.) Most of us are not eight years old anymore, so we don’t need motivation designed for that age.

    Strength Training-42284196_2220085214902584_5350269085936517120_n.jpg

    Food is not a treat for being a good girl or boy. This is tremendously freeing when you really think about it. If you have to propel yourself with the treat mentality (because you like it or you’re used to it), just pick something else. Run a mile and your treat is back squats. Finish your workout and your treat is a nap. Learn to pick different treats, and rewire your own thoughts. You’re not eight years old so you get to set the rules (and the treats) now!

    4.) Naps are more useful than cupcakes.

    Strength Training-dscn8165.jpg

    Who doesn’t like naps? Plus, sleep helps repair your body and get you stronger. Win win. Next time you’re faced with the choice of cupcakes or naps, pick the nap. It will do far more for you than any cupcake ever could.

    5.) Guilt helps no one, and it definitely does not help your deadlift.

    Strength Training-30724612_2092674270977013_5338414001241980928_n.jpg

    If guilt built strength, we’d all be lifting 900 pounds. But it doesn’t. Stop beating yourself up about what you’ve done. Just do better now. Your last decision may have been poor, but this next one? It could be spot on. Make it so.

    6.) Life is more fun if you’re not miserable.

    Strength Training-41661031_2215746468669792_8742418390708125696_n.jpg

    There are enough things in life that will beat you down. You can’t control everything. So control what you can: your attitude. Set yourself up for success by adopting a mindset that will lead to success. Make smart, healthy choices. And if you veer off your path? Correct your course, and get back on the right path. Don’t earn your food in the gym. Perform in the gym. Fuel your body for life, and go kick some butt.
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    “But I Don’t Want to Bulk Up”: Killing the Zombie of Women’s Fitness

    “But I don’t want to bulk up.”

    There it is AGAIN: the Zombie of Women’s Fitness.

    “I don’t want to bulk up” is the excuse that never dies. It comes back again and again, no matter how many times we explain, argue, cajole, prove it to be false, or madly aggressively obsessively pursue its complete and long-past-due death. (This one really should have died years ago.) A million words have been sacrificed to kill this particular beast, yet it lives.

    It is one of the most moronic statements of the modern gym era, yet “I don’t want to bulk up” refuses to go away. And it propagates itself, like some mad virus that only certain women catch but they feed it and spread it to the others, who feed it and spread it to others.

    “I don’t want to bulk up” is the fear that never dies. And it’s total and complete BS.
    When faced with this zombie, though, don’t bore your listeners with a slide show or PowerPoint presentation on why this fact-free fear is fallacious. (Nobody likes a PPP, not even the people who create them!)

    Instead, here are 9 Things to Say When Someone Says “I Don’t Want to Bulk Up”:

    1.) “There is no such thing as bulking up”
    It’s called gaining muscle, and gaining muscle is a good thing. More muscle makes you stronger and more capable of living this life.

    You don’t gain bulk. You gain muscle. And even if you do not lose body fat at the same time, you actually bulk down, because the mass you have will be denser. (This is the nature of muscle and fat by volume. That pound of fat takes up 4x the space of that pound of muscle.) You make yourself a more efficient package of a person. And you become healthier and more useful in general—to yourself and to this world.

    2.) “No one builds massive amounts of muscle instantly”
    It’s not easy to build muscle. You’re not going to walk through the door of a gym, and an hour later walk out with huge muscles. The human body doesn’t work that way.

    The hard truth is that it takes most people (especially women) years and years and YEARS to gain a lot of muscle. (Unless you’re taking steroids or other such substances—and you’re not doing that, are you?) Most women have far lower levels of testosterone than men, thus making it much more difficult to build muscle. And if you’re over 40? It’s a whole different game, Sister.

    Honestly, my arms and my ass took me close to a decade to build. ALMOST 10 YEARS. Think about that. 10 years of hard work to get the arms, the lats, the back, the booty. Concentrated, dedicated effort day after day for years. It didn’t happen overnight. (Believe me, sometimes I wish it did.)

    Whether you’re an easy gainer or a hard gainer, building muscle is going to take time. Maybe not ten years, but definitely time of a significant magnitude. Nothing happens overnight.

    3.) “If you do find yourself building what you think is ‘too much muscle,’ you can always quit”
    Quit if you think things are getting out of your control. Don’t go to the gym anymore. Abandon the barbell and the dumbbells and the kettlebells. Take up running or Zumba or bowling or something that will stop the muscle-building train, or at least slow it considerably.

    Nobody says you have to keep going. If you don’t like the results, quit. Those muscles will not continue to grow larger, and eventually (through disuse) your body will take back on that flabby, untoned state that you walked into the gym with.

    4.) “Have you considered that you might be lazy?”
    This question will not go over well with the recipient. Be prepared to run away.

    5.) “Are you scared of being really hot?”
    Run REALLY fast. In fact, say this one over your shoulder as you start to run.

    6.) “Are you scared?”
    This is an honest question. Some people are hesitant to start new things. That’s understandable. Exercise can be intense and weightlifting is hard, and both can be scary to people. So, ask this question gently and with great care.

    Remember, nobody gets shamed or scared out of their fear. People do, however, get coaxed out of their fear in a manner not dissimilar to a stray cat learning that it’s safe to venture onto your porch. Put out the bowl of milk, and talk in a loving voice. Listen for the purr. Then decode the mystery for them and help to unravel their fear.

    7.) “Do you just not want to work that hard?”
    This is another valid question. Some folks just don’t want to do hard work, and they’re using “I don’t want to bulk up” as their excuse. It’s easier on the ego than “I don’t want to work hard.” And building muscle is hard work. Really hard work. If they don’t want to do the work, you can sort of understand that, right?

    Remember, often you need to talk to people from where they are, not from where you want them to be. So, do that. Once you make an effort to accept and understand them, you might get to a place where they want to put forth the effort. Don’t beat them up. Listen to what they have to say.

    8.) “Are you worried about not looking ‘feminine’?”
    Some women worry that having muscles is a “masculine” look. But guess what? If you’re a woman, then you’re a woman—having developed muscles or not having developed muscles doesn’t change that. Still, some women accept a view propagated by our society that certain genders should look certain ways. If your friend is worried about this effect, take them back to points #2 and #3 in this article. They can gain as much muscle as they want or don’t want. It’s up to them.

    9.) “Okay”
    Seriously. If none of the above statements works to convince your friend of their erroneous assumption, you can just walk away. Unless you’re on a mission to change all the misguided opinions in the world, think about taking a pass and moving onto another subject. You’re not the Muscle Myths Explainer or the Truth Champion or even the Jackass Whisperer. You’re just you, another person with a love of training and a heart that wants to help.

    Instead of continuing to sink all your effort into a cause that appears to be lost, walk away. Find someone who does want your help, and help them.

    This is not a perfect list, but it’s a start! What other things might you say to a woman who says she doesn’t want to “bulk up”?
    sauce https://www.eattoperform.com/2016/09/17/killing-zombie/
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  143. #143
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    Do Men And Women Need The Same Amount Of Protein?

    Men may consume much more protein per day than women, but this is generally due to the fact that men tend to weigh more and have more fat-free mass than women. A 150-pound woman would need to consume the same amount of protein as a 150-pound man, assuming they both had the same physical goals in mind.

    Women and men are far more similar than they are different, both genetically and in terms of their nutritional needs. This applies not only to protein, but to all other nutrients as well.

    Bill Campbell, Ph.D., the director of the Performance & Physique Enhancement Laboratory at the University of South Florida, has studied how varying amounts of protein in the diet influence body composition in resistance-trained women.[4] In the article "How Much Protein do Women Really Need?" he explained that adding an additional 400 or more calories of protein—in other words, 100 grams of pure protein—to the diets of women who were strength training several times a week had a surprising effect.

    Not only did the women gain muscle, but as Campbell writes, "The women on the higher-protein diet actually lost more body fat than women on the lower-protein diet, even though they consumed more calories!"

    That said, women may have different goals and want different things from their protein powder, like lower carbs, extra collagen, and so on. The best protein powders for women will address not just protein needs but other nutritional considerations.

    Strength Training-43762276_2232713583639747_7050690270995677184_n.jpg

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
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  144. #144
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    Every movement you make either swimming, biking or running starts from the core, that's why core strengthening is so important for both injury prevention and performance:

    Core Strength for Athletes: A Workout to Improve Performance and Prevent Injury

    As you take your training into the new year, this is a perfect time to revisit strength training concepts related to the “core”. You have likely heard about the importance of having a strong core. In fact, the term “core” is used so frequently, that it is often misunderstood and poorly represented. For this piece, I am taking this highly complex anatomical landmark and distilling it down to it’s key features. When discussing the core, I am talking about the body without the arms, legs, or head. For me, the core is the anatomy of the pelvis and the trunk including the entire spinal column, thoracic cavity, abdominal cavity, and the pelvic basin.

    Almost any motion the body experiences is transmitted through the core system. Anytime you move a limb (in any way), turn your head, or engage in any physical activity, the core is involved to some degree. Your core functions primarily to absorb, redirect and transfer forces throughout the body. While your hips can produce tremendous amounts of force, the spinal column and trunk are more effective at providing stability and transfer of energy instead of generating it.

    Benefits of Strength Training
    In order to realize your potential as an athlete, and reduce the risk of injuries, you must incorporate strength training into your program. Unfortunately, when you are under pressure or tight on time, strength training is often the first thing to get ejected from your schedule. In reality, however, strength training should be an inextricable component of your performance strategy.

    Strength training provides you with benefits that you cannot achieve through aerobic training alone. In fact, the mechanical and repetitive nature of most aerobic training leads to breakdown of tissue and dysfunction at the joints. Too much aerobic training actually pushes the endocrine system into a catabolic state. Conjure a mental projection of any endurance activity, and you will see that at its essence, it is continuous and repetitious. This constant movement, occurring predominantly in one plane and with set/limited range of motion sets the stage for injury to propagate. The human body is designed to move across multiple planes with varied ranges of motion.

    Repetitious Movement
    Consider cycling, where the hips are fixed atop the saddle, the feet are bound to the pedals and the arms are spatially anchored on the handlebar in various positions. From this highly fixed anatomical position, the rider performs thousands of repetitions in a predetermined path of motion, restricting range through the joints and tissues.

    With this image, imagine two riders equal in all things (fitness and equipment) except one of the riders has a strong and stable core system. As a race goes on, the rider with the stronger core will win every time. Why? Because the strengthened athlete can more efficiently transfer power into the pedal transferring that energy into desired momentum without the common power “leaks” that arise over time as various structures buckle or fatigue.

    It is very much the same with running. All distance running (particularly anything over 3k) is very repetitive. An athlete with poor postural control and core stability will display more and more “leaks” as an event goes on. Any collapse in postural control or core rigidity is inefficient and represents sub-optimal athletic performance. The same can be said for cross country skiing, rowing, swimming or any other endurance event.

    Back Pain
    Clean, quality movement is governed by structural efficiency and postural control. When we have a stable hip and core, we are well on our way towards better performance and lower exposure to back injury. Biomechanical models continually demonstrate that strength training significantly reduces injury rates and enhances performance.

    Most evidence suggests athletes experience the same, or even higher rates of injury as the general public does. Here are a few interesting fact about back pain:

    1. Low back pain is the leading cause of disability across the globe
    2. Half of working Americans reported having back pain within the year.
    3. Hip and back pain is the second most common reason to visit the doctor’s office (the leading cause is respiratory infection
    4. Most back pain is mechanical (not acute, or from an accident), but from faulty movement patterns
    5. As many as 85 percent of us will experience at least one episode of back pain in our life, according to the National Institutes of Health and World Health Organization.

    Hip and Core Strength Session
    Below is a hip and core session that will help get the season off on the right footing.

    Always let the repetition scheme guide your selection of load. Never lift more than you are capable of. Always trust your intuition when it comes to exercise. Less is better, particularly at the onset of any strength protocol.

    I recommend organizing these exercises in “groups” or “circuits” of three or four exercises at a time.
    Take as little rest as you need between exercises, while still performing them safely and effectively. We should aim to trim the rest to somewhere between :10 and :20 between exercises and 1-2 minutes between “groups” or “circuits”
    DO NOT draw the navel in (often referred to as the drawing in maneuver or hollowing out) as many of us were taught. Instead, brace the entire trunk by stiffening the anatomy as if bracing for a physical impact. A stable trunk is one that is “super stiff”, which can only be created through bracing the entire trunk. Spine biomechanist Stuart McGill has very eloquently demonstrated this multiple times.



    Introduction
    Lateral Crawl- 3 sets of 6 repetitions.
    Squat and Press: 3 sets of 8-12 reps, make sure to allow the ankle, knee and hip to articulate.
    Prone med ball toss: 3 sets of 8-12 reps, be very careful and mindful here. do not extend too much, and never use too much load.
    Take a break of 1 to 2 minutes if need be before the next grouping:

    Core contract and hold: 3 sets of 4-6 reps of :10 contract and hold, with :03-:05 rests between.
    Walking chest press on cable cross: 4 sets of 6-9 reps per limb. If you do not have access to similar machine, you can use a band or regular pulley and just move one limb at a time, stepping forward once, then back to neutral.
    Torso twist with cable or band: 3-4 sets of 9-12 reps. Select the load carefully and never force the range of motion or anatomical position.
    Take a break of 1 to 2 minutes if need be before the next grouping:

    Walking shoulder abduction with press: 3-4 sets of 6-9 reps per limb on both phases (abduction and adduction).
    Bulgarian split squat with rotation: 3 sets of 8-12 reps. Be careful and very controlled throughout.
    Vertical med ball toss: 3-4 sets of 10-15 reps. Be sure to lead with the chest and do not allow the low back to come off the ground.
    Take a break of 1 to 2 minutes if need be before the next grouping:

    Suitcase squat: 3-4 sets of 8 reps per hemisphere.
    Stir the pot: 3 sets of :40-:60, be sure to change direction.

    sauce: https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/c...revent-injury/
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    I'm going to work on this move... you never know when you need it

    The Bodyweight Skill You Didn't Know You Needed

    One of the most exciting aspects of calisthenics is learning unique skills that take weeks or even months to build up to. Then, when you can finally do a clean rep or two, you discover that you did a lot more than just add a cool parlor trick to your resume. You're also just straight-up stronger! Maybe your push-ups, pull-ups, or handstand push-ups also mysteriously took a big step forward, or you can just rock through your normal workout a little easier than before.

    The elbow lever is this kind of move. The first time I successfully pulled one off, it made me feel like an athlete and reminded me of what made working out fun in the first place. Skills training can keep you enthusiastic about working out and training for life. Not only can you get the results you desire physically, you can also have fun doing it!

    Train the elbow lever seriously, and you'll discover that it's also a great exercise for strengthening your spinal erectors, pecs, abs, quads, glutes, and wrists. Curious? You should be!

    Did You Say Wrist Strength?
    A common weakness for many of my female clients has been their wrists. The elbow lever is great for strengthening the extensor muscles of your arms, and it will help you build strength to support your wrists in moves like push-ups, handstands, and even front-squat variations.

    Furthermore, for spinal extension, which is the type of exercise the elbow lever is, your choices at the gym are often limited to waiting for the Roman chair or flopping around on the ground doing back extensions. You can practice lever progressions at home, work, or pretty much anyplace else you want, and they're also perfect for active-recovery days when you're resting from heavy training but are still itching to do something physical.

    Perhaps most importantly, mastering a skill like this demands that you work out more! Focusing on creativity in your training will shift your focus from just trying to build muscle or lose weight to improving your movement arsenal. You will be more enthusiastic during your workouts, but as a side effect, you will most definitely be making strength gains.

    Here's how to take your training to the next level with the elbow lever. It took me over a year to finally nail this move, so be patient with your progress, milk each step, and enjoy the ride. Remember, you're building strength as you get closer to the movement, not just when you nail it!

    Warm-Up Essential 1: Eagle Arms
    This is a stretch from yoga that can help you warm up your shoulders for the intense mobility required to perform an elbow lever. I recommend doing it regularly, but especially before you start your lever practice.

    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-1-700xh.jpg

    To do this stretch, cross your arms so your top arm's elbow is in the elbow pit of your bottom arm. Then, cross your wrists so you can bring your palms together. You should feel a deep stretch in your upper back, delts, biceps, and wrists. Hold for 30 seconds on both sides.

    Remember to switch the crossing of your arms so you stretch both sides of your body evenly.

    Warm-Up Essential 2: Bridge ... Haa! I can already do this!
    The ability to hold a lever takes tremendous back and glute strength as well as serious wrist strength and flexibility. Bridge training can help you develop all of those while also improving your posture and opening up your thoracic spine like nothing else.


    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-2-700xh.jpg

    I usually warm up with a few bridges, focusing on glute activation, before I work on levers. This will help you learn to fire up your posterior chain during a lever hold. Build up to three 20-second holds.

    Progression 1: Elevated Lever ... I'm going to start with this one
    It can help when you're learning the elbow lever to practice on an elevated surface. This will allow some room for your legs to hang while you work on getting strong enough to extend your back and lift your legs completely horizontal.

    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-3-700xh.jpg

    Find a box, bench, or other stable object to practice on, and stand in front of it. Bring your elbows inward toward your midline, and place your palms flat on the bench/box with your fingers pointing towards you. Ideally, your elbows should be bent and positioned inside your hip bones. Slowly begin to shift your weight onto your arms as you bend your knees and lift your feet off the floor. Keep opening the angle at your elbows as you squeeze your glutes and extend your chest upward.

    When starting out, keep your knees bent in a tucked position. As you build strength in your abs, shoulders, back, arms, and wrists, your next step should be to extend your legs into a straddle position and eventually work toward bringing them together.

    Progression 2: Wall Lever... I am ready for this too
    Once you feel confident practicing your elbow lever on an elevated surface, the next step is to bring it to the ground—but still with some help. I recommend using a wall for support to give you an idea of the muscle tension required to get into the full elbow lever.

    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-4-700xh.jpg

    Begin in a plank position, facing away from a wall, with your legs fully extended and your heels pressed up against the wall. Position your arms in the lever position, with your elbows inside of your hip bones, and begin to shift your weight onto your hands as you walk your feet a few inches up the wall. Focus on pushing your feet into the wall to help you engage your quads and glutes and extend your chest upward.

    Tuck Lever, Straddle Lever, And The Full Lever... ok that looks interesting
    When you're ready to try this move away from the wall, follow all the same steps as the above variations. It will probably help to keep your knees bent in order to "shorten" the length of your body and make the move slightly more manageable.

    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-5-700xh.jpg

    As you get stronger, work toward slowly extending your legs out into a straddle position, again to make the leverage more favorable. With practice, you will be able to fully extend your legs and bring them together. Remember to move your legs slowly to stay balanced as you transition from tuck, to straddle, to the full elbow lever. This is a precise move that's all about control. And yes, it may take a while, so be patient!

    Beyond The Elbow Lever ... the goal
    The variations of this move don't stop once you get your legs together. Once you can hold an elbow lever for a few seconds, you can try a staggered hand variation that will help you work up toward the mighty one-arm elbow lever. In this exercise, you balance on one arm as you extend your other arm in front of you.

    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-6-700xh.jpg

    For this variation, position one elbow in the center of your hip bones, and fully extend your other arm in front of you. The idea is to eventually lift the hand of your extended arm while only balancing on one arm. You can progress it gradually by lifting all your fingers individually until you can lift your entire hand.

    When you can do that, you've developed not only balance, but also crazy full-body strength and muscle control. Now, that's the full package!

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...=content_posts
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    ^^^

  148. #148
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    4 Female Training Myths Debunked: Sculpt Feminine Muscle Without Masculine Bulk!

    "I just want to lose fat around my stomach and nowhere else." "I just want to tone my inner thighs." "Lifting weights is just going to turn me into a man!" I have heard these statements from women about 3,000 times. Those 3 desires have one thing in common; they are pretty much impossible.
    COMMON MYTHS
    MYTH 1: SPOT REDUCTION


    Let's start off with the theory of burning fat or toning a certain area of the body. Toning involves two constituents: adipose tissue (the subcutaneous body fat) and muscle tissue. In order to appear more toned, a reduction in body fat and increase in muscle mass will have to occur.

    The human body does not allow spot reducing, which would include losing fat exclusively in the abdominal area. If you were to lose weight, it would occur all over your entire body. Unfortunately, body fat is not necessarily reduced evenly.

    People often have trouble areas where the fat is last to go. Women especially find this to be their stomach, legs or arms. There is not much that can be done about this aside from continuing to lean out.

    A reduction in body fat occurs when a person is in a caloric deficit. This occurs with two variables: decreasing the amount of calories you consume, increasing the amount of exercise you participate in, or doing both. Resistance training is used to help build and maintain muscle tissue, while cardiovascular training is a tool used to help achieve a caloric deficit.

    Here is a statement that many of you probably do not want to believe: There is no exercise out there that is going to burn fat off of your body in a specific area! No resistance training exercise will help tone or reduce fat on top of any muscle in your body. It is a reduction of calories and an increase in exercise that will take care of that.

    There is a very big misconception regarding that "burn" you feel after performing many repetitions during an exercise. Some people actually believe that is the fat melting off the body right before our very eyes! That burn is actually caused by lactic acid, which is used by your muscles to form adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for immediate energy.

    I often see a female lying on the ground at the gym performing sets of 100 crunches. She probably assumes that burning sensation is actually helping her "toning her stomach". If you are performing a set of 100 repetitions on any exercise, don't you think it is time to move on to something a little harder?

    Strength Training-45381066_2245982435646195_619338982777421824_n.jpg

    MYTH 2: LOSING YOUR FEMININITY
    The theory that lifting weights will cause a woman to appear bulky and manly is completely false. I used resistance training to bring my body weight up 60 pounds over the course of about five years.

    I must say that the actual weight training was the easy part. The difficult part included eating like a horse, because a calorie surplus is needed to gain muscle mass. I often gagged during some meals as I was pretty much force-feeding myself like a mother would to a small child eating their vegetables.

    Now, I am pretty sure that most women do not force feed themselves by mistake. Extreme muscle mass gains are not something that occurs out of the blue. You have to really want it for it to happen. It is pretty safe to say that muscle gain is much, much harder than fat loss for most people.

    Another little fact that most women forget is testosterone. Testosterone is a very anabolic hormone found in the human body, males and females, which is very important for gains in muscle mass. Men usually have about ten times more testosterone than women.

    Even if a woman were to put the time into eating a crazy amount, it would still be about ten times harder to look like a man. It sounds like it is fairly difficult for a woman to gain an incredible amount of muscle mass and be mistaken for a man, doesn't it?

    Strength Training-44339352_2237156906528748_3963372456126709760_n.jpg

    MYTH 3: AVOIDING CHEST EXERCISES
    Another fairly popular fallacy is the theory that a woman should not perform any chest exercises, as this would "shrink her breasts". A woman's breasts are an area of fat deposit just like anywhere else on her body. The breasts will shrink as body fat levels of the entire body are reduced.

    Resistance exercises for the chest would not cause a reduction in size. In fact, it might help your breasts appear larger as you can stimulate growth of your pectoral muscles. The larger pectoral muscles would help push out the fat found on your breasts and assist them in looking bigger.

    Strength Training-43950506_2232715040306268_3062652380328755200_n.jpg

    MYTH 4: EATING LESS TO LOSE WEIGHT
    Most women claim to have a sound diet, but this usually ends up being in the form of a starvation diet. It probably includes skipping breakfast, eating a salad at lunch and one slice of cheese for dinner if you are lucky.

    Breakfast is known as the most important meal of the day for a reason. Your body is begging for fuel, as it has not received any in most likely a good eight to ten hours. Skipping meals frequently actually slows your metabolism down as it is much more beneficial to eat five to six smaller meals spaced evenly throughout the day.

    A lot of people are always confused by this as they think eating so frequently will cause them to gain weight. This simply is not true unless you eat many calories above your maintenance level.

    Let's say 1,500 calories is adequate for your goal of weight loss. Instead of eating two 700-calorie meals, five meals consisting of about 300 calories would be much better. If you happen to eat 500 calories for one meal and 200 calories for another, this will not break you. As long as you finish the day with the same amount of calories and you eat several times per day, you will be fine.

    THERE IS NO REPLACEMENT FOR HARD WORK
    I have known too many ladies who have purchased far too many fitness gadgets seen on television at 4am on any random weeknight. There are things like the famous "ab belts," which "electronically stimulate your abdominal muscles".

    How many people actually think a little belt will trim down belly fat without breaking a sweat at all? I think we have struck gold here! There isn't an overweight person in the world anymore due to this cool belt!

    Wait, it is time to enter reality again as there are no tricks or gadgets that replace the hard work you have to put in to achieve your goal. It all comes down to diet and exercise, which has always been the equation and always will be.

    I have thrown a lot of information at you, and you are probably wondering what you should do. Well, I hope you have realized that resistance training is an important tool you can use to achieve a better-looking body.

    It is important to focus on compound movements, which use more than one muscle group. These include all variations of squats, lunges, bench presses, rows and shoulder presses.

    These are the biggest bang for your buck exercises, as you are using many muscle groups. Focus on performing variations of these exercises at least twice a week for about 40 minutes, and you will reap the benefits in your physique.

    Do not forget to include cardiovascular training, which doesn't have to be running on a treadmill. It is important to find an activity you enjoy and look forward to, such as hiking, tennis, swimming or even rowing a boat.

    If you love the activity you perform, you are much more likely to stick to your program in the long run, which will improve your chance of succeeding.

    THE IMPORTANCE OF DIET
    A sound diet is just as important as exercise, if not more important. Make sure to eat frequently throughout the day, but control the portion sizes.

    Eating the right types of foods will definitely help your progress as well. Protein rich foods are very important, as they are necessary for recovery from your workouts. Lean meats, eggs, and whey protein are great examples.

    Moderate carbohydrates should also be included in your diet, as it is your body's main fuel source after all. Whole grains are the keys here as they are much slower digesting and help keep you fuller longer.

    Fat is also important for recovery and hormone production; examples of good fat sources include: olive oil, canola oil, any variety of nuts, fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel.

    Fruits and vegetables also need to be incorporated as they are packed with vitamins and minerals necessary for everyday body functions. The fiber found in them promotes digestive health as well as helps keep your belly satisfied.

    Strength Training-45299613_1721363911325943_3278511647009800192_n.jpg

    (I follow a vegan diet. Since I giving up dairy 4 years ago, it's made a big difference in my health (energy, weight loss etc. ... plus it's my contribution for the animals and planet )

    CONCLUSION
    All the pieces of the puzzle must be taken into consideration for you to reach your goals. Make sure to treat every aspect as important as the others.

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ton...ntent_training
    F*ck Cancer

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    Who Says Allie Kieffer Isn’t Thin Enough to Run Marathons?


    Strength Training-merlin_145838910_040ef662-f3d9-4ab0-a83b-d047a1b9f1a2-superjumbo.jpg

    Allie Kieffer, one of the best Americans running the New York City Marathon next Sunday, spent a lot of her life feeling as if she didn’t really fit in among the competition. She was good enough to land an athletic scholarship to college and hoped to continue running after graduating. But she wasn’t as thin as the women she raced against. Her coaches suggested she diet. She eventually gave in, and her body broke down.

    Kieffer moved back to New York from Boulder, Colo., and took a job as a nanny. After a few years, she missed running and started again — but this time was different. There were no goals, no opponents to compare herself with and no times to record. Everything was on her own terms. She made friends jogging in Central Park. She joined CrossFit, unheard-of in elite running, a sport whose athletes are not exactly known for their bulging musculature. She began running more miles than ever, she was healthier than ever, and she was happier, too. And then something unexpected happened: She got faster. Much faster.

    Last year, Kieffer ran the New York City Marathon and finished, astonishingly, in fifth place. She was the second American woman, and she logged her best time by nearly 15 minutes in one of the world’s most competitive footraces. Barely anyone knew who the unsponsored 30-year-old American with the topknot sprinting past Olympians in the final miles of Central Park was.

    Suddenly, Kieffer wasn’t just trying to be one of the hundreds of elite runners in the country. She had become one of the best runners in the world.

    In doing so, Kieffer has given us a powerful example of what can happen when we stop trying to force ourselves to meet preconceived notions of how to achieve success — especially unhealthy, untrue ideas — and go after our goals on our own terms. When we focus less on fixing what we consider to be inadequacies and more on reinforcing our strengths, we can realize potential we didn’t even know we had.

    “Sometimes, the act of trying takes so much energy that it can prevent you from actually doing the thing you want to do,” Brad Stulberg, the author of Peak Performance, told me. “If it starts to feel like performance shackles, you’re going to want to say screw it, to break out of rigid patterns and rip those shackles off. And only then are you able to really achieve what you were trying for the whole time.”

    Kieffer’s story also proves that we can achieve far more when we value all women’s bodies less for how they look, and more for what they can do.

    Not that being underestimated can’t serve as motivation.

    “I’ve always gotten a lot of satisfaction by being the big girl everyone thought they were going to beat,” says Kieffer.

    This is not to say that Kieffer represents what an “un-thin” woman looks like. By regular-person standards, she is quite thin. But she knows firsthand how the word “strong” can be a euphemism for “too big,” and how the goal of running fast is consistently equated with weight loss. As her extraordinary athletic success continued this year — and she weighed 10 pounds more than she did at her last peak, in 2012 — she faced speculation on whether her speed was related to drugs, since, in the words of one online commenter, “nobody runs that time at that weight without EPO or blood doping.”

    Of course, there is a growing movement telling us to embrace the bodies we’ve got — thank you — but it’s hard to drown out the other messages. Whether it’s for a race or a wedding, women are told that they are at their most valuable when their bodies are their most diminished. Resisting the impulse to feed yourself is an accomplishment we praise. You don’t have to buy into these values, but you’ll probably still be judged by them.

    And you don’t have to be as talented as Kieffer for her story to resonate. It certainly felt familiar to me. Since I started racing, in high school, I’ve been the kind of runner who’s lucky to just make the medal podium. Every so often, people will remind me that I don’t look as if I belong out there, that my doubts aren’t just in my head. A few years ago, I told a new colleague that I was running a marathon over the weekend and interpreted her wide eyes as a reflection of how much I’d clearly just impressed her — except she was struck by something else.

    “But you’re not even skinny!” she exclaimed.

    (No, I learned in high school that not eating enough food won’t get you everything you might have hoped it would.)

    In my case, I wasn’t just thinking about how I looked compared with my peers or what I ate. My approach was about all the other powerful temptations of discipline versus excess that it takes to push your limits in this sport: more mileage, more working, more, more, more, even when it didn’t really get me anywhere.

    After five years of pushing through injuries doing what I was certain the successful version of myself should do, I never made it to the starting line of a race. I’d get injured, get upset, and try the same thing again, hoping that maybe by the seventh or the eighth or the ninth try it would finally work.

    Then, one summer, I realized I wasn’t even trying anymore — without even deciding to, I’d given up and let go. And then last year, I started running again, without any pressure, because I love it. And I decided to try racing again; now, the only goal would be simply making it to the starting line. I made it, and I reached the finish line too — faster than I’d ever run. And it all somehow felt easier, and more satisfying, than whatever nonsense I’d been attempting before. Sometimes, trying to keep up is less productive — and far more frustrating — than motivating yourself on your own terms.

    “When you think about what high performers have in common, it’s striking that motivation is so internal: they’re obsessed with what they do, they love it. ” said Angela Duckworth, the psychologist who wrote the book “Grit.” “Dropping out can help you re-evaluate and reflect on why you’re doing this in the first place. It’s hard to both paddle really hard and navigate at the same time.”

    Kieffer has embraced her healthy approach to training, which was honed growing up on Long Island. She recalls afternoons spent rollerblading with friends and eating heaps of Italian food and ice cream — in the same outing. And she jokes that part of her edge now is that she is able to ingest more food than her competition on the run — because, after all, food is fuel.

    Operating on your own terms can also give you the confidence to bounce back when things don’t go as planned. When I first met Kieffer in March, she was in a cast. She had broken her foot after ramping up her training. Instead of despairing, she focused on a comeback plan. Now, she has run her best time in nearly every event she has entered this year. Taking a more flexible approach to your end goal helps you cut yourself breaks that keep you in the game.

    And staying in the game is critical. For most of her life, Kieffer was one amid scores of good, anonymous runners. She only reached the national stage after investing in herself, sponsorless, for a decade.

    It shows that if we decide that the only people who have the potential to succeed are the ones who meet our idea of what successful looks like — when they’re gifted children of 12 or high achieving 20-year-olds — and only invest in them, we’ll prove ourselves right.

    Doing things on your own terms is hard work. Kieffer makes far less money as a runner than she made as a professional nanny. And of course, you have to know what you’re doing. Giving up on your narrow definition of success only works if, after you reset, your autopilot leads you to a finish line, not to a couch.

    “There’s a time for making something happen, and then there’s letting something happen,” said Stulberg. “You’re not going to tell a novice not to follow a recipe, but at elite levels of performance, letting go and simply letting something happen can lead to a real breakthrough.”

    After Kieffer had success doing some things on her own terms, she let go of other norms as well, and as a professional runner she hasn’t adhered to a traditional path at all. Since her comeback, she has transformed her living situation (instead of a home base, she rents a different house every month to train at different altitudes); her training plan is full of workouts so hard that she often can’t finish them (before, she wouldn’t start a workout she didn’t know she could complete); she races far more frequently than her competitors (she ran two half marathons each of the past two weekends); she shares a remarkable amount of her training on social media; and she has continued to emphasize strength training (she regularly front-squats more than 135 pounds).

    By conventional standards, she is doing nearly everything wrong. But she’s beating a lot of the people who are still training the “right” way, so perhaps her path shows there’s room for a more flexible definition of what the right way can be. This is probably true for more than just distance running.

    And when that fresh path translates to success — when the wrong way becomes a new right way — the pressure you were escaping in the first place can return. The trick is to turn that pressure into fresh motivation. Last year, the only person with any expectations for Kieffer was Kieffer herself. Now, she’s aiming for the medal podium of the New York marathon next Sunday. And this time, she thinks, she belongs there.

    sauce https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/27/s...8MZ5MpUfDD3yn0
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  150. #150
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    I continue to cross train (riding, running and strength training). The benefits are endless: I'm stronger, lighter, improved cardio and endurance both on and off the bike.

    On Saturday I deadlifted my max 225lbs. In a deadlift, you generate massive power by driving your hips forward while stabilizing all the way from your hands to your feet. Humans are built to drive power from their hips: Run. Jump....The better you are at deadlifting, the better you can be at many of the important things humans do. That’s why many trainers consider dl to be the king of strength exercises.

    Strength Training-47576396_2270645836513188_279990081962377216_n.jpg


    More about deadlifts and mtb: https://www.leelikesbikes.com/how-do...ly-to-mtb.html
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  151. #151
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    Upper body training.

    I maxed 85lbs on my push press. That's the heaviest I've achieved in a long time. Hope to PR 90+lbs soon.

    Strength Training-48275368_2275989925978779_7951228184345706496_n.jpg
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  152. #152
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    We did the 12 Days of Christmas workout Christmas Eve

    1 Thruster (ladies 55lbs) men: 75 lbs
    2 Push Presses (ladies 55lbs) men 75lbs
    3 Front Squats (ladies 55 lbs)men 75lbs
    4 Power Cleans (ladies 55 lbs)men 75lbs
    5 Deadlifts (ladies 55 lbs)men 75lbs
    6 Kettle bell swings (35 lbs) men 53 lbs
    7 Pushups
    8 Toes to bar
    9 Pull ups
    10 Burpees
    11 Double Unders
    12 Lunges (ladies 35lbs) men 53 lbs

    Complete each exercise in ascending order then work back down to 1, adding one exercise per round. Like this: 1; 2-1; 3-2-1; 4-3-2-1; etc – for a total of 364 reps. I completed it in 25 minutes 26 secends... It was a tough challenge


    Strength Training-48414699_2282203852024053_1350680748310396928_n.jpg
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  153. #153
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    ^^^^Woohoo, looking strong!

  154. #154
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    ^ Thank you mtbxplorer! Improving strength and cardio makes mountain biking easier. All the strength training helps but one exercise where I do notice more specific applications is the deadlift/back squat/front squat. The ability to generate explosive power under fatigue is very helpful for technical climbs. Shoulder presses for arms.
    Last edited by cyclelicious; 12-31-2018 at 06:01 AM.
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  155. #155
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    Good points

    The 4 Most Important Lessons Every New Lifter Should Learn

    Strength Training-fpcrovf.jpg


    If you're new to weight training, you might feel completely overwhelmed by the equipment, the grunting and groaning, or the pressure to do the right exercises the right way with the right weight.

    So let's step back from all the noise and focus on the most important aspects of weight training. Here are four critical concepts you'll want to get familiar with during your first few months of training. They'll help you make satisfying, safe progress toward your goals.

    By the way, beginners have a huge advantage over the long-timers: In the first few weeks of training, you can make steady gains in strength that those of us who've been at it awhile can only dimly recall.

    Lesson 1: Learn Basic Movement Patterns And How To Control Them
    First, the basics: Your body is made up of a number of major muscle groups—notably the pecs, back, deltoids (shoulders), biceps, triceps, abdominals, quads, glutes, hamstrings, and calves. Each group consists of several individual muscles. The biceps is a muscle with two heads, the deltoids are a three-headed muscle group, the quads are four distinct muscles, and so on.

    Each exercise is designed to work an individual head, an entire muscle group, or multiple muscle groups. Each exercise has a specific movement pattern or pathway. For example, to work your biceps, you flex your arm. There is a whole group of exercises called "arm curls" (or just "curls") designed to work your biceps in different ways.

    A good way to learn movement patterns is by using exercise machines. With most machines, the movement's range of motion is predetermined; all you do is adjust the machine to your body and move the load. In the process, you start to learn how your body should move. As you start to get a good feel for the movement pattern, try doing the exercise with dumbbells, barbells, kettlebells, or some combination.

    Free weights are worth getting to know. They can recruit more of your musculature to provide the stabilization you would otherwise get from a machine. Later on, they'll also enable you to do more advanced exercises and techniques. And when the gym is really busy and all the machines are being used, they'll give you a way to keep working out.

    Strength Training-49064885_2285409995036772_2732272225926250496_n.jpg

    Whether you're on a machine or using free weights, there are few common guidelines for beginners:

    As a rule, exhale as you lift or push the weight. Inhale as you lower the weight or return to the starting position.
    Never lock out a joint to hold a weight in the top position.
    Lower the weight just a little more slowly than you lifted it.
    Reverse direction smoothly at the bottom position. Don't use momentum to bounce the weight up again.

    Lesson 2: Choose The Most Anabolic Exercises
    When you start hanging around gyms more, you'll probably start to hear the terms "anabolic" and "catabolic" tossed around. "Anabolic" refers to the process of building up muscle, as opposed to "catabolic," when muscle is broken down. Exercises that recruit the most muscles are the most anabolic.

    Resistance exercises are divided into two camps: those that "isolate" a muscle (called single joint) and those that recruit other muscle groups into the effort (called multijoint, or compound). Multijoint simply means multiple sets of joints are working together to complete a given lift. A bench press, for example, recruits the elbow and shoulder joints—and the muscles that attach to them. When your goal is to build muscle, put more of the multijoint moves in your workout.

    Experienced lifters do multijoint exercises first in their workouts, when their energy levels are higher. Squats, rows, bench presses, overhead presses, deadlifts, and dips are multijoint exercises that should, over time, become the core of your training program.

    Strength Training-48396386_2281489782095460_2146343497391669248_n.jpg
    Since you can't lift nearly the same amount of weight with single-joint exercises, it's better to do them toward the end of your training session. The advantage of these exercises is that they enable you to focus the workload on a single muscle group. For example, biceps curls work just your biceps, leg curls focus only on your hamstrings, and lateral raises hit your middle delts.

    Lesson 3: Understand The Relationship Between Load And Reps
    The first question beginners often ask is how much weight they should try to lift. When first starting out, you should "go light"; choose a weight that allows you to do 12-15 reps without reaching muscle failure. Go light so you can practice your form, then keep adding a bit more weight as you progress.

    When you move on to more advanced training, you'll start doing fewer reps with heavier loads. But as a novice, steer clear of very heavy weights and forget about trying to see how much you can lift for a single rep. You never want to sacrifice form to lift a weight that's too heavy.

    Strength Training-48357058_2273758946201877_198674256421191680_n.jpg
    Even as a novice, it's good practice to start doing warmup sets using very light weights to loosen up your muscles and joints, rehearse the movement pattern, and focus your mind on the task. Warming up will help you avoid injury and enable you to lift heavier weights. Once you're warmed up, start doing your "working" sets.

    If you want an overview of some of the important training factors to think about as you start lifting, take a look at "Building Muscle: A Scientific Approach."

    Lesson 4: Train Your Whole Body Every Other Day
    As a beginner, you'll probably want to start with a "whole body" routine that works every muscle group in a single session. Aim to do them every other day to ensure ample recovery time.

    If you don't wait long enough between workouts, your body won't have enough time to repair your muscle fibers. If you wait too long, you start missing the compounding benefits of consistent workouts.

    Later, as you split your workouts to focus on individual muscle groups, you'll train each body part less frequently—once or twice per week. But with the decrease in frequency comes an increase in training volume (the number of sets you do multiplied by weight).
    Strength Training-49589731_2285412668369838_3531115119117336576_n.jpg

    Building muscle is a process of making microscopic tears in muscle fibers, then allowing those tears to heal and grow bigger and stronger with good nutrition and rest. You feel sore after a workout because the cumulative microtrauma causes inflammation, which can last 1-2 days. If you feel too much soreness, you may have pushed your body too hard.

    Don't make the mistake of thinking that daily, aggressive workouts will get you swole in no time; progress comes with a combination of hard work and ample rest.

    Be Patient. Be Consistent
    Like many other skills, learning how to resistance train is a marathon, not a sprint. Start by using light loads, and focus on learning proper form. Add weight gradually, and give your body the rest and nutrition it needs to grow.

    Do those things, and you'll move forward quickly and safely. Don't be that person who just strolls into a gym and has no plan, randomly walking from one exercise to the next. To get the most out of your efforts, use your head and your body.

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...ntent_training
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  156. #156
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    Strength Training-49662910_2293327707578334_3335305193565716480_n.jpg


    What I Learned During 13 Years Of Strength Training

    It all started when I was 18. At the time, I was slowly recovering from an eating disorder known as anorexia nervosa, and my dad was trying to help me get healthy again.

    "You know, there's a way you can eat a lot more and still be skinny!" he said. "Come to the gym and workout with me."

    It's funny how different my ideal body was back then, 13 years ago. I was judging myself by what I saw online and in magazines. I wanted to be emaciated-looking. I wanted to be small and petite. I wanted to be "less."

    My first trip to the gym was immensely unproductive. My "hardcore workout" consisted of some abdominal machine work, some crunches, and…wait for it…sleeping on the mat. Yup, I fell asleep on a mat about 15 minutes after walking into a gym for the first time in my life.

    Despite what happened during that first visit, I've been steadily going to the gym for more than 13 years now. In that time, I've completed countless numbers of lifting sessions. But it didn't take long for me to fall in love with the process of strength training and how it made me feel. I soon became passionate, determined, and dedicated to making gains, both physically and mentally.

    Today, I'd like to share with you 13 lessons I've learned along the road to becoming a stronger, more fit, and more confident me.

    Lesson 1: Women, You Will Not Look Like Men
    No matter how hard you work out at the gym, you will not—I repeat—not look like a man. Women simply do not have enough testosterone in their bodies to increase their muscle mass to the point where they look like Arnold Schwarzenegger. The women you see pictured online with huge muscles use steroids.

    Without these dangerous drugs, you can still see amazing changes in your body shape and tone. You get there by following a healthy diet and by lifting weights—real weights. Don't be afraid to go beyond the colored-plastic 5-pounders and grab some iron. It won't make you bulky, but it will make you strong and lean.

    Lesson 2: Strength Training Shapes Your Body Much More Than Cardio Does
    There are two components to physique: muscle and the visibility of that muscle. We increase muscle mass when we strength train. We increase muscle visibility when we lower our body fat percentage. To increase muscle visibility, you must strength train. In other words, in order to display your muscles, you have to have them! In contrast, cardio is great for heart and overall health, but won't do anything for your muscle tone.

    Lesson 3: Strength Train The Major Muscle Groups
    When most people decide they want to change their physique and improve their health, they tend to focus on the body parts that bother them the most. For women, often this means lower body and stomach. For their part, men often focus on biceps and chest. To improve muscular balance, prevent injuries, improve overall appearance and strength, and increase caloric burn, you must train all the major muscle groups—the ones you see in the mirror and the ones you don't.

    Focus on compound exercises that use large muscle groups—exercises such as squats, deadlifts, overhead presses, and rows. Then add accessory, or isolation, exercises that target smaller muscle groups. Such exercises include leg curls, triceps extensions, and rear-delt raises.

    Strength Training-46333650_2255347008043071_7163765575804518400_n.jpg

    Lesson 4: Going For Spot Reduction? If Only!
    Newsflash: There is no such thing as spot reduction, meaning no exercise can burn fat in a specific area. Your genetics, not your workouts, determine the areas where you can gain and lose fat. A good diet combined with intensive strength training is what creates an aesthetically pleasing physique.

    Lesson 5: Continuous Progress Requires Progressive Overload
    The SAID principle (Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands) is simple: Your body adapts to stress (in the form of exercise) by gaining muscle mass and strength. To continue building your physique, you must constantly increase what you demand of your body through a concept called progressive overload. One way to achieve this is by adding more weight to the bar. But you can also do it through any combination of increasing your reps per set, increasing your range of motion for a certain exercise, improving your technique, or reducing the rest time between sets. All these techniques give you the freedom to change, monitor, and adjust your program so you can keep challenging yourself.

    Lesson 6: Diet Schmiet—Mind Your Calories!
    I've attempted all kinds of diets—low fat, high fat, zero sugar, only "specific foods" diet, and on and on. None of them worked. About three years into my weight-lifting career, I decided to dive deeper into the science behind body composition changes. I hoped to answer several questions: Why do we get fat? How do we lose fat? Are certain foods fattening? Do some foods burn calories just by digesting them?

    Along the way, I realized there are three possible scenarios for an individual's body weight and caloric intake:

    The number of calories you consume each day is equivalent to the number of calories your body burns per day. In this scenario, you maintain your weight.
    The number of calories you consume per day is greater than the number of calories your body burns. In this scenario, you gain weight.
    The number of calories you consume daily is less than the number of calories your body burns per day. In this scenario, you lose weight.
    Simply put, we gain fat when we eat too many damn calories, not because we eat or avoid specific foods. I'm a big proponent of the 80/20 rule, whereby 80 percent of your diet consists of highly nutritious, minimally processed foods, and 20 percent consists of low-nutrient, processed foods. The good news is you can still eat those foods you love. Just eat less of them. Maybe a lot less.

    Strength Training-what-i-learned-during-13-years-strength-training-4-700xh.jpg

    Lesson 7: Food Has No Moral Code
    Have these thoughts ever crossed your mind?

    A cookie is bad for you, while a salad is good for you.
    I was bad because I had a piece of chocolate cake. I'd be good if I had broccoli and chicken.
    Thinking of foods as "good" and "bad" is called orthorexia, "an obsession with eating foods that one considers healthy." Orthorexia sounds great but, in reality, it undermines your long-term success, both physically and emotionally.

    Labeling foods as good or bad only encourages a negative relationship with them. In reality, food is neutral; it's meant to be used as fuel for the body—and to be enjoyed! A healthy diet isn't all black or all white—it comes in shades of grey. Yes, it's rich in nutrients, but if you want your diet to last the long haul, it also needs to include foods that give you pleasure.

    Lesson 8: Be Realistic About Your Expectations
    You've finally decide to start your fitness journey. You're excited. You're motivated. You think to yourself, "I'm going to have my dream body in 3-6 months!"

    Good for you—but not so fast. For most mortals, it takes way more than three months to achieve that dream body, whatever it may be. With consistency in your exercise and diet program, you will see measurable and noticeable changes in three months—just maybe not the kind of before/after transformation you see so often on social media. (OK, some rare individuals can see dramatic results in a few months. For the rest of us, though, it usually just takes a lot more time.)

    Getting a fit body and adding quality muscle can take years. Get into it for the long term. Be prepared for ups and downs, times when you see the changes in your body—and when you don't. Progress is never linear. You progress, then you regress, plateau, then progress again. Find a program that works for you, then stick with it. The changes you dream of will happen.

    Lesson 9: Consistency And Patience Are Keys
    Motivation can get you started, but habits keep you going. It won't always be sunshine and rainbows, but putting in a not-so-great workout beats no workout at all every time. Keep at it and don't give up. Being consistent will bring you closer to your goals while also helping you develop the grit and work ethic needed to continue despite obstacles. Treat every day as an opportunity to grow and improve, and rely on your discipline—not your motivation—to get you to the gym. If you miss a workout, don't get down on yourself. Just get right back into it!

    Strength Training-49384911_10156035695441149_4031832959219662848_n.jpg

    Lesson 10: Don't Be Obsessed With Scale Weight
    For years I've been attached to a magical number on the scale, a number that would make my life so much easier, fuller, and happier. In reality, there is no such number. Your weight comprises fat mass and fat-free mass (bones, muscles, connective tissue, organs, and water), and it's a dynamic measurement, one that fluctuates in response to stress, hydration, carb intake, fiber intake, types of foods, time of the day, and sleep.

    In the course of a week, your weight might fluctuate 5-10 pounds simply because of these variables. Plus, once you start strength training, your weight may actually increase as you lose fat and gain dense muscle. That's a good thing! The number your scale shows is usually an inaccurate gauge of your progress. Measure your progress by how your clothes fit, how you feel, and how you look in the mirror.

    Lesson 11: Mental And Emotional Strength Gains Are Coming Your Way
    Just as muscles grow by repeatedly overcoming resistance, we grow as people the same way. Sometimes life can seem like a daily resistance workout you never signed up for. If you're lucky, strength training can help you learn how to show up and do the work.

    I fell in love with strength training because it has better prepared me for life. Strength training tests your will power. It challenges your patience and dedication as you progress, regress, plateau, and progress again. There's something empowering about that, especially for us women.

    Lesson 12: You Won't Always Have The Support Of Others
    Some people—even those closest to you—may not understand your new fit lifestyle. That's OK. Not everyone has to agree with you, because the most important person in your life, you, will understand why you're doing what you're doing. Take care of your own health and well-being first. Focus on getting stronger, healthier, and fitter. The rest will follow.

    Lesson 13: Remember, You're Much More Than Your Body
    Strength training doesn't guarantee you'll find happiness once you're lean. Or that your life will be any more meaningful than it was before. Or that your friends and family will love you more. It doesn't guarantee you'll get wiser or become a better person. All your troubles and hardships may not vanish into thin air, but you will feel healthier, stronger, and, hopefully, more confident. And that is huge!

    Over the years, I've witnessed so many people (mainly women) attaching their self-worth to the number on the scale or the size they wear. Know that you're so much more than that. No matter what your body is up to on any given day, learn to love it all and treat your body well. After 13 years of strength training, today I am healthy, energized, and strong. I am a capable human being, and I'm much more than just my body. And so are you.

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...ntent_training

    Strength Training-49575830_2288595321384906_6742219685367906304_n.jpg
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  157. #157
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    Good guide related to Cardio

    Cardio Controversy - Are You Dropping Too Much?

    Cardiovascular exercise is a vital part of every fitness regimen but along with implementing it into your daily active lifestyle may come a variety of questions such as "What is the best kind of cardio?", "How much cardio should I do to be effective," "How do I know when I am overtraining?" and "What are the best ways to rest and recover from overtraining?"

    These questions are very common and I am here to provide you with the knowledge you need about cardio to either help you design or supplement an effective fitness regimen.

    QUESTION 1: WHAT IS THE BEST KIND OF CARDIO?
    Many want to know if there is one form of cardio that's better than another. While some people opt to crank out their cardio in the gym on indoor cardio equipment such as the elliptical trainer, Stairmaster or treadmill, others turn to the great outdoors to get their sweat on.

    Regardless of the kind of cardio you enjoy, whether it be bicycling, jogging or jumping rope, as long as you elevate your heart rate and keep it within your target heart rate zone, you are doing effective cardio exercise.

    According to the American Heart Association, you should perform cardio exercise within your target heart rate zone. The way you can calculate your maximum heart rate by using the Karnoven Method which is basically calculating 220 minus your age. It is important to stay within 50 to 85% of your maximum heart rate zone in order to be effective.

    HEART RATE
    Age Target HR Zone 50-85% Average Maximum Heart Rate
    20 years 100-170 beats per minute 200 beats per minute
    25 years 98-166 beats per minute 195 beats per minute
    30 years 95-162 beats per minute 190 beats per minute
    35 years 93-157 beats per minute 185 beats per minute
    40 years 90-153 beats per minute 180 beats per minute
    45 years 88-149 beats per minute 175 beats per minute
    50 years 85-145 beats per minute 170 beats per minute
    55 years 83-140 beats per minute 165 beats per minute
    60 years 80-136 beats per minute 160 beats per minute
    65 years 78-132 beats per minute 155 beats per minute
    70 years 75-128 beats per minute 150 beats per minute

    Just like anything, it's important to have a balanced approach when constructing your fitness program. While some studies suggest that intense cardio is great for burning maximum calories in minimal time, other studies have indicated that prolonged cardio training can actually diminish the muscle-building effects of resistance training.

    The key is to listen to your body and be cautious that you don't over train your muscles. To keep things fresh, try incorporating a variety of activities into your exercise program. You can always mix up your routine by adding speed or distance, increasing/decreasing the incline on your indoor cardio equipment or if you are exercising outdoors, you can simply change your route. All of these variations can improve fitness, prevent injury, and keep your motivation high.

    QUESTION 2: HOW MUCH CARDIO IS ENOUGH?
    Ideally your fitness program should be a balance of both cardio and resistance training. You don't want to do too little or too much. Overtraining will take a toll on your body thus causing you to lose the muscle you are working so hard to gain/maintain through resistance/weight training; therefore you don't want to be counterproductive.

    Generally a cardio session should last between 30-90 minutes, depending on one's stamina and fitness level. It is acceptable to do 3-5 days of moderate cardio per week but be sure to listen to your body's reaction to exercise.

    QUESTION 3: HOW DO I KNOW WHEN I AM OVERTRAINING?
    Too much cardio may also have negative effects on your metabolism, the same way that eating too few calories can take a toll on you. Be sure to listen to your body and keep your cardio within your range. Be careful to not "over-do" it. Too much of a good thing can be bad and cause you to take a step in the wrong direction if you do something in excess.

    Many seek the best "fitness solution" and might tend to overcompensate by doing too much cardio. Also if you are starting a fitness routine for the first time be sure to not do too much, too soon. When you take the "all-or-nothing" approach, going from a sedentary lifestyle to exercising for 45 minutes or more, 5-6 days per week, your body will not respond favorably causing you to feel fatigued with aching joints and muscles.

    You should ease into a fitness routine one day at a time so that you can stick to it rather than becoming frustrated and throw in the towel.

    To ensure that you don't deplete your system, be sure to consume enough carbohydrates on a daily basis to fuel your body for vigorous cardio workouts or training sessions. Your diet should be high in protein, complex carbs and fibrous carbs. For best results you should eat 4-5 small meals per day.

    Too much cardio will result in muscle loss. If you are working on sculpting your physique you need a balanced approach to your fitness routine. While some may think that they must focus on doing cardio before implementing any sort of weight training, it is proven that weight training helps speed up the metabolism, therefore causing the body to burn more fat.

    SIGNS OF OVERTRAINING
    If you see signs of general fatigue, irritability or physical soreness, or if your workouts start feeling harder than before, you'll probably need to take a rest from cardio for a couple of days. When you don't let your body recover you are being counterproductive and putting your health in jeopardy.

    Here are some common symptoms of overtraining:

    Feeling fatigued and lacking energy
    General body aches or mild muscle soreness
    Decrease in performance
    Inability to complete workouts
    Headaches
    Insomnia/Sleep Problems
    Lack of motivation

    QUESTION 4: WHAT ARE THE BEST WAYS TO REST AND RECOVER?
    Sometimes taking a few days off from the gym will give your body some time to recover and repair itself both physically and mentally. Also make sure to get enough sleep (at least 7-8 hours a night) and be sure to focus on eating well by getting adequate amounts of protein, complex carbohydrates, and lots of fruits and veggies.

    Most importantly, take care of yourself. Make sure you are eating a well-balanced diet and getting adequate sleep. If you're not feeling well, give yourself a break. You may end up doing more harm than good by pushing yourself to exercise if you're getting sick.

    REST AND RECOVERY
    Allowing your body to rest and recover for a day (or two) gives your hard working muscles time to repair those tears, and a wonderful thing happens-your muscles start to grow back stronger! Without ample recovery time, you continue breaking down the muscle fibers and that's when fatigue and injury can occur.

    By taking one day off from your workouts a week, you are able to give your body the proper rest and recovery that it needs to repair itself.

    It is important to balance your exercise with rest and recovery. It is this alteration of adaptation and recovery that will take you to a higher level of fitness. Remember, the greater the training intensity and effort you put into your workouts, the greater the need for planned recovery. There are limits to how much stress the body can tolerate before it breaks down and injury little, too slowly will not result in any improvement.

    There are 2 types of recovery that you should be aware of:

    SHORT-TERM RECOVERY VS ACTIVE RECOVERY
    Short-term recovery is active recovery that occurs in the hours immediately after exercise. Active recovery refers to engaging in low-intensity exercise after workouts during both the cool-down phase immediately after a hard workout as well as during the days following the workout.

    Another major focus of recovery, immediately following exercise, has to do with replenishing energy stores and fluids lost during exercise. It is important to have a post-exercise meal to aid in your recovery.

    This is the time when your soft tissue (muscles, tendons, ligaments) repairs and the chemicals that build up as a result of cell activity during exercise are removed from your system. It is recommended to drink a protein shake after a vigorous workout.

    LONG-TERM RECOVERY
    Long-term recovery refers to recovery that is built in to a seasonal training program. This is usually reserved for athletes and coaches who have well-designed training schedules which include recovery days and or weeks that are built into an annual training schedule.

    This is also the reason athletes and coaches change their training program throughout the year (modifications can include adding cross training and also changes in intensity, time, distance and all the other training variables).

    BENEFITS OF CARDIO
    There are so many health benefits that one can reap from incorporating cardio into their lifestyle including:

    Weight loss
    Stronger heart and lungs
    Increased bone density
    Reduced stress
    Reduced risk of heart disease and some types of cancer
    Temporary relief from depression and anxiety
    More confidence about how you feel and how you look
    Better quality of sleep
    More energy

    CONCLUSION
    If you are a beginner, embracing cardio as part of your workout regimen is one of the best things you can do to increase your endurance for exercise. Be sure to pace yourself, know your body's limitations but always challenge yourself and strive for improvement as time goes on!

    If you are focusing on increasing your stamina, set small goals on a weekly basis and record your workouts in a journal so that you can continue to challenge yourself. For more articles on exercise and nutrition visit

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/car...ntent_training
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  158. #158
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  159. #159
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    Nothing like doing 150 wallballs, burpees and step-ups ... followed by back squats to help fuhgeddabout today's commute!

    Strength Training-51805329_2316858491891922_8295195300285382656_n.jpg


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  160. #160
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    Training for my first XC race


  161. #161
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    6 Stretches You Can Do At Your Desk

    If you sit all day long in an office, you could be sacrificing your effectiveness in the gym, or even putting yourself at risk for injury. Continuous sitting causes certain muscles to tighten up over time, becoming so stiff they pull on your skeletal system and alter your posture, making various movements in the gym and everyday life much harder.

    The good news is you can avoid all this with some quick and easy stretches. All it takes is a few moments out of your workday every hour or so to perform these movements, all of which you can do right at your desk. Do them regularly, and you can kiss stiff muscles and weak posture goodbye.

    1. Neck Stretch
    You've probably noticed the shoulder and neck muscles are the first to tighten up after a long day of work, so start by rolling these out.

    Strength Training-6-stretches-you-can-do-your-desk-1-700xh.jpg

    Sit upright with both feet flat on the floor and your back straight. Take a few deep breaths in and out. Once comfortable, slowly roll your head to one side and then roll it forward, chin to chest, following in a circle to the other side. Repeat this slow and controlled movement pattern as you roll back to the first side. Never roll your head directly to the back.

    Hold the stretch for 10-15 seconds on each side, and repeat as necessary.

    2. Side Stretch
    Sit up straight in your chair and bring both arms above your head. Clasp your hands together. Gently shift your hands over to one side as you rotate the lower part of your shoulder blade up toward the ceiling. This should have you feeling a deep stretch in your underarm and lat region.

    Strength Training-6-stretches-you-can-do-your-desk-2-700xh.jpg

    Hold this for 20-30 seconds, then switch sides and repeat.

    3. Hamstring Stretch
    The hamstrings are one of the highest risk muscle groups for becoming tight and shortened due to long sedentary periods.

    To stretch the hamstrings, simply stand up out of your chair (step back about a foot or two) and lean forward, placing your forearms on the desk.

    Strength Training-6-stretches-you-can-do-your-desk-3-700xh.jpg

    Once you are in this position, maintain a flat back as you straighten your knees and press your hip bones up toward the ceiling. You should feel a nice deep stretch in your hamstring muscles.

    If you are more flexible, omit the desk and just bend straight down toward your toes, keeping your legs straight. Hold this position for 15-30 seconds.

    4. Back Stretch
    If your lower back feels tight while you're sitting at your desk, a back stretch might be in order.

    While in the seated position, cross one leg over the other in a comfortable manner. Now take the arm opposite the crossed leg and place it on the outer side of the knee. Twist your shoulders to face that direction and feel a stretch all through your spinal column.

    Strength Training-6-stretches-you-can-do-your-desk-4-700xh.jpg

    Hold this position for 10-15 seconds, then switch sides and repeat. Remember to take deep breaths in and out as you perform the stretch. This will help ensure that you aren't holding any extra tension in your back that could prevent you from deepening the stretch.

    5. Upper-Back Stretch
    Sit upright. Place both hands together in front of your body, hands clasped parallel to your shoulders.

    Now round your upper back as you envision an imaginary string pulling your back toward the wall behind you as you simultaneously reach forward.

    Strength Training-6-stretches-you-can-do-your-desk-5-700xh.jpg

    Hold this position for 30 seconds, feeling the muscles in your upper back and shoulders relax.

    Once you've finished, come out of the stretch. Repeat throughout the day, as necessary.

    6. Hip-Flexor Stretch
    Finally, a main muscle group you should stretch at work is your hip flexors. These muscles get quite tight and tense while you're sitting at your desk all day. You may notice they limit your range of motion on such exercises as squats and lunges. Tight hip flexors can also cause your hips to rotate forward, potentially altering your spinal column position and eventually contributing to the development of lower-back pain.

    To stretch your hip flexors, stand up and place one foot on top of the chair.

    If your office chair is immobile, that's perfect. If not, put something in front it so it doesn't roll forward.


    Strength Training-6-stretches-you-can-do-your-desk-6-700xh.jpg

    Now, keeping your foot on top of the seat of the chair, shift forward onto your standing leg, bringing your back hip forward as well. You will feel a nice stretch through the hip flexor of that back leg. It is very important to keep your lower back as straight as possible, so activate your core by pulling your belly button back toward your spine.

    Hold this for 10-15 seconds, then switch sides and repeat. Do this a second time if your hips feel particularly tight.

    Now that you've practiced these exercises, it's time to create a quick office-desk stretching routine you can do daily. This routine should only take 3-5 minutes and is a great way to help break up your day, do something good for your body, and give yourself a nice boost of energy.

    Office-Desk Stretching Routine
    Neck Stretch 2 rounds per side, 10-15 sec. hold
    Side Stretch 1 round, 20-30 sec. hold per side
    Hamstring Stretch 1 round, 15-30 sec. hold
    Back Stretch 2 rounds, 10-15 sec. hold per side
    Upper-Back Stretch 1 round, 30 sec. hold
    Hip-Flexor Stretch 2 rounds, 10-15 sec. hold per side

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...ource=facebook
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  162. #162
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    I'm doing the Cross fit Open again this year. This is my 5th year competing. 19.1 workout was 19 wallballs and 19 calorie row (AMRAP) in 15 minutes. I did a solid good 6 rounds... all things considering.
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  163. #163
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    Favorite Quotes from Strong Women

    Type "motivating workout quotes" into Google and you'll find list after list of inspirational quotes by famous bodybuilders such as Arnold Schwarzenegger and strength coaches like Dave Tate. What you won't find much of, though, are lists of motivational quotes from strong women.

    So, we made our own!

    Over the last few years, there has been a surge in female participation in strength sports. Whether it's CrossFit, weightlifting, strongwoman, powerlifting, you name it—women are doing big things with big weights, and it's time they're heard from more often.

    Each of the women on this list has made an enormous impact on the world of fitness, especially for aspiring female athletes. It includes athletes over a span of 100 years and a myriad of sports, each with a different story and background, yet so much wisdom to share.

    Females often fall victim to the idea that weights will automatically make them bulky, or they're told that they are incapable of an impressive performance in the realm of strength sports. But these strong women have proven that wrong—and that there is beauty in physical power.

    The sweeping message in all of these quotes: Don't be afraid of the barbell, of competition, or of the opinion of others. Nothing will limit your potential faster.

    So, whether you're in need of some workout motivation or just love a good hit of girl power, here are 10 quotes that will leave you hyped for your next squat session.



    1. Judy Glenney: 4-Time Women's National Weightlifting Champion (1981-84)
    "I wanted to show I could do it on their terms. If I could show them I could lift with correct technique, that's how I would win respect. I let my lifting do the talking."

    2. Meg Squats: Powerlifter, Coach, Team Bodybuilding.Com Athlete
    "I've been called every name. I've been called too skinny. I've been called too fat. I've been called too muscular. I think once you get to a place where there are so many more important things, like how you're training and what your training goals are, you stop caring. I'm at a point where I don't even care how I look. I think I look fine and I look happy, but that's not my main focus anymore, which is so freeing. I can go to the gym and only focus on this one thing—getting better and getting stronger."

    3. Abbye "Pudgy" Stockton: Women's Strength Pioneer
    "People used to say that if women worked out, they would become masculine-looking or wouldn't be able to get pregnant. We just laughed because we knew they were wrong."

    4. Jan Todd: First Woman To Deadlift 400 Pounds
    "Strength should be an attribute of all humanity. It's not a gift that belongs solely to the male of the species."

    5. Katie Sandwina: Historical Strongwoman
    (From an interview in 1910)

    "A very discreet question, my dear madam! Are you married?"

    "No, I'm not married. I'm still single but nobody dares to end this situation."

    "Are you interested in men, anyway?"

    "What shall I say? Men are like air to me, you can't live without them. Every now and then I breathe good, fresh air, you know? I'm just a 'weak woman,' after all."

    6. Stefi Cohen, DPT: Powerlifting World-Record Holder
    "I've heard it all. I can't say it doesn't hurt when what you do has nothing to do with your looks, yet as women we're constantly subjected to comments about our appearance. I'm not a runway model, I'm an athlete. I'm a Doctor of physical therapy. I'm a student. I'm a strength coach. I'm a business owner. I won't lie and say I'm 100 percent comfortable with it, because I'm not. But thinking about it objectively, none of what anyone says matters. What matters is how you see yourself. Own your shit."

    7. Mattie Rogers: USA Weightlifter, U.S. Record Holder

    "There is no perfect time. No perfect opportunity. No perfect situation. No perfect moment. You either make it happen, or you don't. You don't wait for it to fall in your lap. You take it."

    8. Ronda Rousey: Judo Olympic Gold Medalist, Mixed Martial Artist
    "I want her to look at me. I want her to stare me in the eye. I want her to see that I have no fear. I want her to know she stands no chance. I want her to be scared. I want her to know she is going to lose."

    9. Quiana "Chuckie" Welch: Snatch American Record Holder
    "Me doing what I'm doing is letting other people of color and other black women know: 'Hey you can lift weights, too.' Not only can you lift weights. You can try CrossFit, go backpacking, hike mountains, the list goes on. You don't have to be a certain color to do any of these things. You can do whatever you want."

    10. Tia-Clair Toomey: 2-Time CrossFit Games Champion And 2016 Olympian
    "I always think about my 'why.' Setting an intention can keep you fired up even when the going gets tough—it'll remind you why you started in the first place, and what you're hoping to achieve by pushing yourself."
    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...vfVk3guJbNDtX8
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  164. #164
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    ^^ Nice! Also, when is your crossfit open competition, or did we miss it?

  165. #165
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    Than you for asking!

    The Crossfit Open spans 5 weeks. One workout competition every week. I completed #3 and I did it prescribed
    .
    19.3 Was a 200 metre lunge holding the prescribed dumbbell weight overhead
    Followed by 50 box step- ups (20" box) holding the prescribed weight
    Followed by 50 handstand pushups
    Followed by 200 metre handstand walk

    Time cap 10 minutes. Needless to say I didn't make it to the handstand walk! But I did manage to squeak in a few handstand pushup

    Two more to go!


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  166. #166
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    I just discovered this series. and I find it inspiring

    Brute Showdown, is well shot, well edited, and the contestants are all AWESOME personalities and accomplished athletes
    No emphasis was made on the fact that they're female. Other than pronoun use. They're being treated with the same respect and given many accolades, just as any athlete would be given. On top of that? Their competition is so friendly, the camaraderie is so present on camera, that it warms my heart to see everyone cheer each other on and coach each other through less familiar movements across disciplines. women!

    Here's episode 1

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  167. #167
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    Well ...duh! I continue to build muscle and strength as I age... since I started weight lifting 5 years ago

    Women's muscles as well-equipped as men's for weightlifting, study finds