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  1. #1
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    Strength Training

    Hey ladies- New to here and I was wondering what everyone does for strength training? I'm doing mainly all mountain riding. I am looking for exercises to get stronger for technical downhills and jumps. Thanks!

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    I started working out with a personal trainer at my gym once every other week back in July. It keeps my motivation up. Otherwise, I've looked to http://www.bikejames.com/, Girls Gone Strong: Free Workouts, Nutrition and Lifestyle Information for Women., and https://www.fitnessblender.com/ for inspiration on they days when I'm working out on my own.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    What I do that seems to help with my biking the most: squats, squats, and more squats. It keeps your hips strong and keeps my body from getting out of whack.
    The winter I spent doing squats + lunges religiously made a noticeable difference in my biking strength the following spring - hills that used to be grunts, and technical features that were "ehhh maybe I'll make it today" were suddenly easy.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    One other thing: YOGA. While it's not strength training in the sense where you go and pick up heavy things and put them down repeatedly, there are a lot of strength and flexibility components to yoga that not only help me ride better, but let me ride without pain.
    +1. Yoga is also amazing for balance.

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  4. #4
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    I'm lucky enough to be genetically disposed to carrying muscle and being strong, so, for me, I mainly do yoga- everything from the easiest/most relaxing to the harder, advanced power stuff, depending on how I feel. Any time I see a chiropractor or massage therapist, they assume I lift weights on a regular basis.

    Like the other ladies said- awesome for strength and balance, AND in addition to that, proprioception... which is the ability to know where your body/body parts are in space without actually looking at them.
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    This is great info! I used to be an ultrarunner and was just as bad about strength training as I am now. However I realize now I really need it. I'll take a look at some of the links provided. I have done a little yoga in the past and really like pilates so it looks like that is a must for sure! Thanks everyone for taking the time to provide info. I am going to check it all out!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mudgirl View Post
    I started working out with a personal trainer at my gym once every other week back in July. It keeps my motivation up. Otherwise, I've looked to http://www.bikejames.com/, Girls Gone Strong: Free Workouts, Nutrition and Lifestyle Information for Women., and https://www.fitnessblender.com/ for inspiration on they days when I'm working out on my own.
    Have you done the fitnessblender videos? Are they any good?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    Sure, if you want, send me a PM and I'll be happy to give you some pointers when you get started.

    Also, don't forget about bodyweight exercises. It's really a good way to get started, and it doesn't require the gym.

    Resting is important too. Yer body, no matter what yer mind says, always needs time to heal. I always allow a day in between strength training sessions.
    Definitely thank you!

  8. #8
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    I started doing crossfit training 2 years ago. The training, typically is short, high intensity workouts (combines weight lifting, gymnastics and cardio) made a significant and noticeable difference in my overall fitness in terms of strength and endurance riding. I built muscle and burned body fat through increased metabolism.

    I had a terrible DH crash in August last year and suffered serious polytrauma. My fitness level prior to my crash was pivotal to ensuring a steady healthy recovery. I eased back into training and got back to riding when I was medically cleared. It's been 5 months post crash/injury, and I'm now surpassing my previous PRs prior to injury.

    In addition you cannot out train a bad diet. If you are eating the wrong foods, it will be very difficult to see optimum results for either health, fitness or body composition.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    I started doing crossfit training 2 years ago. The training, typically is short, high intensity workouts (combines weight lifting, gymnastics and cardio) made a significant and noticeable difference in my overall fitness in terms of strength and endurance riding. I built muscle and burned body fat through increased metabolism.

    I had a terrible DH crash in August last year and suffered serious polytrauma. My fitness level prior to my crash was pivotal to ensuring a steady healthy recovery. I eased back into training and got back to riding when I was medically cleared. It's been 5 months post crash/injury, and I'm now surpassing my previous PRs prior to injury.

    In addition you cannot out train a bad diet. If you are eating the wrong foods, it will be very difficult to see optimum results for either health, fitness or body composition.
    Good job on the PRs! Diet is all good. My BF is a stage 4 cancer survivor and I have Celiac's Disease so we eat very clean. I ride or run almost everyday but really need that strength piece of it. I am determined after reading these posts to incorporate it asap!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeni-mtb View Post
    Have you done the fitnessblender videos? Are they any good?
    Yeah, I started doing them a few months ago, and I have a couple that I incorporate into my workouts fairly regularly: Kelli's Upper Body Workout for People Who Get Bored Easily, and Kelli's Brutal Butt & Thigh workout. I've done a handful of others as well, but those two I go back to often when I don't feel like searching through all of the videos.

    It's a couple who just started making workout videos about 6 years ago, and IMO, their more recent videos are better. The ones from the beginning of their endeavor are more dry, the narrations kind of boring. But I think they are all good workouts. I don't always follow the workouts to a T, as there are some moves I just don't have the flexibility/mobility to do, but I just substitute with something else until they move on to the next exercise.

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    +2 for yoga. I do Shaun T's Insanity videos, because I'd rather jump around like an idiot in the basement where no one can see me than at the gym! It's essentially intervals of body weight exercises (squats, jumps, push-ups, planks etc) and routinely reduces me to lying on the floor feeling sorry for myself... Which, I grant you, is not exactly hard to do before 6:00 in the morning.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ryetoast View Post
    +2 for yoga. I do Shaun T's Insanity videos, because I'd rather jump around like an idiot in the basement where no one can see me than at the gym! It's essentially intervals of body weight exercises (squats, jumps, push-ups, planks etc) and routinely reduces me to lying on the floor feeling sorry for myself... Which, I grant you, is not exactly hard to do before 6:00 in the morning.
    I will wake up before sunrise any day of the week to go riding but not to do anything else. I tried Insanity once. I would rather run a 50k haha. I am super uncoordinated too so the privacy of my own home is always good. I did do some cross fit type classes once at a gym and the poor instructor spent the entire time running over to correct me cause despite how many times I would do the specific exercise I would forget and do it wrong.

  13. #13
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    I liked the first phase of New Rules of Weight Lifting for Women, it got complicated after that. The text of the book has some great info too even if you don't do the routine.

    I also did Stronglifts 5x5 for a while but I found that squats 3 days a week just didn't mix with biking.

    The routine described here is also good:
    Two day full body strength training routine - MyFitnessPal.com

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rae6503 View Post
    I liked the first phase of New Rules of Weight Lifting for Women, it got complicated after that. The text of the book has some great info too even if you don't do the routine.

    I also did Stronglifts 5x5 for a while but I found that squats 3 days a week just didn't mix with biking.

    The routine described here is also good:
    Two day full body strength training routine - MyFitnessPal.com
    I like the concept of the two day routine. I did something similar yesterday but for 30 mins. I did a combo of pushups, weights concentrating on arms and back, abs and ended with plank. Needless to say it hurts to lift my arms today.

  15. #15
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    Deadlifts for riding

    11 Ways Dead Lifts Will Make You a Better Rider


    I recently PR'd my deadlift at 195lb. I should be blasting past 200lb soon
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rae6503 View Post
    I liked the first phase of New Rules of Weight Lifting for Women, it got complicated after that. The text of the book has some great info too even if you don't do the routine.

    I also did Stronglifts 5x5 for a while but I found that squats 3 days a week just didn't mix with biking.

    The routine described here is also good:
    Two day full body strength training routine - MyFitnessPal.com

    The 5x5 is a great program, but a bit much during the riding season. Also, it emphasizes squats way over the deadlift, and I think they should be equal. Use it in off season. In the on season, expect to reduce the weight a bit and back off to four sets per lift. And, lift roughly only twice per week.

    If you want to get real benefit from lifting weights, you have to use the basic, heavy lifts, and expect to suffer at least a bit. The mental conditioning that comes from hard lifting carries over well to pushing yourself on a bike.

    If you are messing around with light weights you'd be better off doing trail work.

  17. #17
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    I am way better at deads than squats anyway.

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    Where/how did y'all learn to lift? It sounds like a great thing to do but I'm always worried that if I try I'll throw my back out because I have no idea what I'm doing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ryetoast View Post
    Where/how did y'all learn to lift? It sounds like a great thing to do but I'm always worried that if I try I'll throw my back out because I have no idea what I'm doing.
    I took classes in both highschool and college. The book Starting Strength has a LOT of really good information, and if you google you can find videos and such. Or maybe you could find a trainer that you like, but make sure it's one that knows/does the basic big lifts like squats and deadlifts, not one that does weird "balance on a ball while pretending to drive a car with a weight plate" things (I've seriously seen this).

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rae6503 View Post
    I took classes in both highschool and college. The book Starting Strength has a LOT of really good information, and if you google you can find videos and such. Or maybe you could find a trainer that you like, but make sure it's one that knows/does the basic big lifts like squats and deadlifts, not one that does weird "balance on a ball while pretending to drive a car with a weight plate" things (I've seriously seen this).
    Absolutely!!!

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rae6503 View Post
    I took classes in both highschool and college. The book Starting Strength has a LOT of really good information, and if you google you can find videos and such. Or maybe you could find a trainer that you like, but make sure it's one that knows/does the basic big lifts like squats and deadlifts, not one that does weird "balance on a ball while pretending to drive a car with a weight plate" things (I've seriously seen this).
    Like Nino's???

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xW-nWnl5hYk

  22. #22
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    Following this thread because I really ought to lift more... But I really don't want to pay for a gym membership.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy Juice View Post
    Thats what I thougth too! But...

    Genentically gifted pro atheletes who have all day to work out have the time and stamina to dabble in whacky fringe exercises.

    For the everyday, working man or woman, it is not time effective. I'd soon work on better bike balance by balancing on my bike while riding a techy trail. Hard core explosive power and injury resistance comes from heavy weights - and can be attained in a very time effective manner if you know how strength train correctly.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    Thats what I thougth too! But...

    Genentically gifted pro atheletes who have all day to work out have the time and stamina to dabble in whacky fringe exercises.

    For the everyday, working man or woman, it is not time effective. I'd soon work on better bike balance by balancing on my bike while riding a techy trail. Hard core explosive power and injury resistance comes from heavy weights - and can be attained in a very time effective manner if you know how strength train correctly.
    Yep, no doubt. Plus he (and all the other pros doing this stuff) have trainers with years and years of experience working with elites... They're not some dudebro who saw something cool on Instagram.


    I'm kind of coming around to thinking that without a personal trainer and access to gym equipment, sticking with yoga and a couple simple circuits of properly-performed bodyweight exercises (squats, lunges, core) are better than nothing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy Juice View Post
    Yep, no doubt. Plus he (and all the other pros doing this stuff) have trainers with years and years of experience working with elites... They're not some dudebro who saw something cool on Instagram.


    I'm kind of coming around to thinking that without a personal trainer and access to gym equipment, sticking with yoga and a couple simple circuits of properly-performed bodyweight exercises (squats, lunges, core) are better than nothing.
    Right on. Anything is better than nothing, well, except maybe a walk to the donut shop.


    Actually, if you know how to separate the good from the bad, learning how to do core exercises with good form by watching youtube shouldn't be too hard. You still need gym access though. I'm lucky enough to have an old olympic weight set and rack in my basement. Cost was way less than a year's gym membership and I have 24 hour access to every exercise I need. And, I can play my own classic rock!

  26. #26
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    Sure Stripes, it's worth a sticky for all the links and resources! Always looking for new stuff to try. I have some basic home equipment, (yoga ball, some weights, even a dead lift bar) that I use, along with yoga mat.

    I've been taught a few workout routines, and the commonalities are all summarized nicely here, and you can use lighter weights or no weights than depicted here. It's more about getting the form down in the beginning:
    Heavy Lifting For the Endurance Athlete Part 1: Learning the 7 Key Exercises | TrainingPeaks

    Also if you have lower back issues, or if you drive a lot or sit at a computer a lot, or ride a bike a lot, or all 3 then these foundation training exercises pretty much act to reverse all of those poor posture/core weakness related spinal issues. It helped me more than any chiropractic session with my own lower back issues:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BOT...ature=youtu.be

    A core strength routine that I like because it hits all of the basics is this one:
    Core exercises for cyclists | Bicycling

    Yoga is fantastic - +1 that it helps with body awareness, breathing, relaxation and proprioception! Great for the DH gnar. I do some restorative poses, and have gone to Hot Yoga (bikram) a lot in the past, but it takes a lot of time out of my schedule. I do love it though. Does anyone have any good youtube links to any yoga routines to share? The ones I've been finding are all poor quality, or a little well, hokey.
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    Quote Originally Posted by shredchic View Post
    Also if you have lower back issues, or if you drive a lot or sit at a computer a lot, or ride a bike a lot, or all 3 then these foundation training exercises pretty much act to reverse all of those poor posture/core weakness related spinal issues. It helped me more than any chiropractic session with my own lower back issues:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BOT...ature=youtu.be
    I've seen this video shared in several places, but it says not to do if you've never done their exercises before... Is there a good beginner video you can recommend?

    Also, what kind of yoga videos are you looking for? I can keep an eye out.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucy Juice View Post
    I've seen this video shared in several places, but it says not to do if you've never done their exercises before... Is there a good beginner video you can recommend?

    Also, what kind of yoga videos are you looking for? I can keep an eye out.
    I did it without any formal introduction. It took a couple of tries to get it right, but I certainly didn't hurt myself! It moves at workout pace, so it might take a little sitting out and just watching at first. On the foundation training website, there is a page with some intro videos. Here is one explaining what the "founder position" is all about: Our back pain solution: The Founder - Foundation Training » Foundation Training

    Mainly looking for a good restorative routine. I guess ones that address specific areas like Neck and shoulders, or something cycling specific, like hammies, glutes, IT band, etc. But anything people find helpful would be of interest.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stripes View Post
    There are plenty of core exercises you can do without a gym. Planks and mountain climbers come to mind. Plenty of martial arts exercises (kicking and knee raises above the waist) automatically work the abs without you trying.
    Sorry I wasn't clear, but by core exercises I meant core/fundamental lifts. Like the deadlift, squat, bench, military press, and chin up (or bent over row).

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    I've heard that Convict Conditioning and You are Your Own Gym are good bodyweight routines but I haven't used either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shredchic View Post
    I did it without any formal introduction. It took a couple of tries to get it right, but I certainly didn't hurt myself! It moves at workout pace, so it might take a little sitting out and just watching at first. On the foundation training website, there is a page with some intro videos. Here is one explaining what the "founder position" is all about: Our back pain solution: The Founder - Foundation Training » Foundation Training

    Mainly looking for a good restorative routine. I guess ones that address specific areas like Neck and shoulders, or something cycling specific, like hammies, glutes, IT band, etc. But anything people find helpful would be of interest.
    I teach yoga, so I usually just do my own thing based on what I feel my body needs, but Lynda Wallenfels often recommends this sequence, which I've done and found very helpful: https://www.doyogawithme.com/content...and-lower-back

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    I do not agree that heavy weights are the only way you are going to make gains. I did body building way back in the day, and now I do what's called "functional fitness" type regime. It incorporates a little bit of everything - TRX, body weights, plyometrics, balance, med balls blah blah what lots of people are doing. ( Think Core Performance ala Verstegen type training)

    For reference, I'm 5-4,125 ish, age 55. One of my shoulders is 50/50 up for reconstruction with a torn labrum. I never work with anything heavier than a 15 lb dumbbell other than the occasional sled pull.Mostly I work with 8.10, 12. The rest is all body weight work. No barbells, no heavy lifts, but lots of pyramids, core, functional movements, mixed up failure and endurance type sets,metabolic/circuit type muscle confusion..

    And you know what? I am stronger than I have ever been in my life, including when I was body building. I'm biking and skiing the best I have ever. I can help with any household project my husband dreams up that involves lifting, carrying, holding heavy things over my head while he attaches them...

    So define heavy weight. Even in my body building days, I'm small and lean and could never bench more than 125.

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    "San-greeea"... funny stuff from Dom

    F*ck Cancer

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    lol, that's hilarious.

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    10 Things That Strong Women Do


    1) Strong Women Hold Their Heads High

    Whether you’ve got a bodyweight deadlift (or 2x BW or more!) or you’re just working on learning how to use the barbell, strong women know that earning your strength is nothing to be ashamed of. You work hard for any muscle gain, so be proud of it!

    2.) Strong Women Work on Pull-ups

    If there’s one thing I’ve learned about this training life, it’s this: pull-ups come and go. At some points in your life, you might have a bunch of pull-ups. And at some points, you might be back on the band or the machine, recovering from an injury or some over indulgences of the nutritional kind. And some folks are still working on getting their first pull-ups! Pull ups are tough... I'm now able to hold the bar at my chin and slowly lower.

    It’s all good. The point is that strong women do the work. Pull-ups are hard fun! Strong women work on their pull-ups!

    3.) Strong Women Eat What/When They Need To Eat

    You can’t expect to perform if you don’t eat to perform. But, seriously, fuel the tank. Be smart and eat what your body needs in order to do good things. Besides, starving yourself is so 1992.


    4.) Strong Women Make Noise In The Gym (or on the trail!)

    They might grunt when lifting, they might swear when they miss a lift, they might yell in joy when they get a PR. But rarely does a strong woman glide into the gym and out without someone noticing her energy, even if she didn’t say a word. There’s just something about a strong woman that turns heads.

    5.) Strong Women Spend Time On Protein

    We ask our friends, we ask our coaches, we look online. And we talk about powders and shakes. Whey protein?Egg protein? Pea protein? What kind is best? Least expensive? Won’t make my skin break out? For all we talk about protein shakes, you would think there should be a name for this obsession and knowledge accumulation, like wine lovers get to be called wine connoisseurs. Maybe we’re protein specialists?

    I'm vegan so I'm a bit of an enigma to my coaches at the gym. But I'm definitely building muscle and I'm getting stronger

    6.) Strong Women Wash Their Workout Gear In Some Unique Solutions

    You know how this is: after a certain time, your workout clothes get this “fragrance” that won’t quit. (I’m being nice with the word “fragrance”—it’s actually a weird musty stink.) Some women use vinegar in their wash to get the smell out. I use Tide and hang dry my stuff and it works great too. (Are there other good solutions? Let me know!)

    Mtb apparel/gear has a way to go re the anti-bactirial/antistink technology. Most of my workout/running gear is all antistink.


    7.) Strong Women Don’t Ask The Question “Does this make my ass look big?”

    Mostly, we don’t give a damn if it does. For some of us, no matter what we wear, we can’t hide our tuckus/booty/butt. (And we don’t want to, anyhow. We earned those big, beautiful glutes! We’re happy that our work paid off!) And for others, we’re working on growing that posterior chain. But, for strong women of any shape, usually the last of our concerns are opinions about our buttocks.

    8.) Strong Women Don’t Waste Time Worrying Whether They Have “Too Much” Muscle

    We don’t look in the mirror and think “my arms are too big” or “my quads are way too strong.” We see our bodies for what they are: marvelous human machines that are the result of a lot of hard work in the gym and in life. Let the rest of society waste time debating what a “real woman” looks like. We are real women and we’ve got stuff to do.

    9.) Strong Women Enjoy Training; They Don’t Just Suffer Through It

    This mindset helps so much. Not every day is going to be lovely (and strong women accept that fact), but strong women don’t look at each training session as some form of punishment or a way to earn their food. On some level, strong women come to really enjoy training: the basic measure of oneself, the push, the pull, the lift, the practice, the testing of limits, the agony, the sweat, the joy—all of it. In many ways, training is just like life: it’s got the good parts and the bad parts and a whole lot of in-betweens.

    Sure, some of training might be enjoyed more in hindsight than in the moment, but there is a joy found in the process that keeps us going day after day. Many people start with distractions or rewards in order to get into a routine, but once they’re in that routine, strong women settle down and learn to enjoy the process. And that’s the real secret of longevity. If you hate something, you won’t usually keep doing that thing for the rest of your life. So, learn to love training—it’s a fabulous gift to give to yourself!

    10.) Strong Women Pull Other People Up. They Don’t Push Them Down

    I’m not a big fan of the word “empower” (read “Do Not Empower Me”) because I like to earn my strength (and not be given it), but I do think it’s very important to think about how you’re using your power. Are you helping to elevate other people around you? Or are you making other people smaller so you can feel bigger?

    Strong women know that true strength is not selfish. In the movie “Mad Max: Fury Road” there’s a scene at the end where the platform is rising and strong women are on it, leaning down and offering a hand and boosting people up onto the platform so they can rise together. That’s how I think about strong women: we help each other to rise.

    10 Things That Strong Women Do by Lisbeth Darsh - Eat to Perform
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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    Thanks cyclelicious! Some of the best advice I've ever had .

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    #2. I would love to work on pull up. I have a torn labrum in my right shoulder, and hanging body weight from bars is a non-starter. So I focus on pushups instead.
    #6. soak in a combo of Biz and oxyclean. Do a search for "stinky bike gear recipe".

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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    #2. I would love to work on pull up. I have a torn labrum in my right shoulder, and hanging body weight from bars is a non-starter. So I focus on pushups instead.
    #6. soak in a combo of Biz and oxyclean. Do a search for "stinky bike gear recipe".
    My husband had surgery last week to for labral tear. His initial injury about a year ago, limited him to what he could do (on the bike and at the gym) and the pain and ROM got progressively worse. MRI confirmed the diagnosis but the extent of damage wasn't known until actual surgery. He's already started his physio and we are hopeful that he will make a full recovery.
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    Getting Started in Strength Training later in Life - summary of article here


    Strength Training-hires.jpg

    Being older could be a benefit in strength sports. Age brings strength, muscle density, and the calm focus of a successful athlete.

    What do women who first take up strength sports in their 40s, 50s, and beyond need to consider?

    Benefits Of Strength Training For Older Women

    1) It’s time efficient. Unlike running, you don’t need to train for a long time to get the benefits. And you can add intensity (rather than duration or distance) to keep the progress coming.

    2) You set your own schedule. Weight training fits around work and family, so you can set your own schedule and stick to it.

    3) It gives you a competitive outlet. And if you want to compete, there are tons of avenues open to you. The main strength and physique based sports are bodybuilding, strongman, powerlifting, and Cross Fit. All welcome older women. Most actually have dedicated age categories or Masters divisions to champion older athletes

    4) There’s a strong community feel. Women who lift share a distinct bond. It doesn’t matter what weight you have on the bar. If you step up to the squat rack, or load up a bar for a deadlift, other women in the gym will know you’re part of the clan.

    5) It promotes bone density. Skeletal strength becomes even more dramatic after menopause. Older women are at significant risk from osteoporosis and fractures. Strength training is an amazing tool for tackling loss of bone density.

    6) You’ll maintain your metabolic rate. Muscle mass starts to drop from our 30s onwards. This loss contributes to creeping weight gain (typically 10lbs a decade), and so-called problem areas. Boost your muscle mass (even by a little) and you’ll keep your metabolic rate higher. This means you can control your weight without having to take calories so low. Strength training is a far more effective weight management tool than dieting.

    7) Keep up with the kids. Or the grandkids! Strength training won’t make you heavy, slow, or muscle bound. It’ll make you stronger, more agile, and less prone to aches and pains.

    8) You’ll add or retain your muscle mass. More muscle means more calories burned (even at rest), and helps you shape your physique. The common areas older women worry about – arms, stomach, hips, thighs, butt – are lifted and filled out by strength training.

    9) Your posture and skin tone will be better. Strength training will help maintain your postural muscles, meaning you’ll look taller and slimmer. And older women who strength train report that it seems to keep their skin tone looking better, too. Perhaps it’s down to the muscle filling out the skin.

    10) You might experience fewer aches and pains. Getting older tends to mean back pain, joint pain, and general feelings of wear and tear. A smart strength training program can reduce aches and pains from everyday life.

    Did You Know?

    As women grow older, our physical activity levels tend to drop. The 35-44 age group is still the most active, but only around 1/3 of this age group meets activity guidelines.

    In the 55-64 age group, less than 1/5 women take part in moderate activity on a regular basis.

    Older women taking part in sport report two main benefits (aside from health improvements): a boost in self-confidence about body image, and access to a new network of social support.
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    Tips for Women New To Lifting

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    1. Don’t do too much too soon.
    Having big goals and numbers to hit, is fantastic, but it’s important to remember that won’t happen overnight. Practice technique, progressively increase weights to avoid injury. “It’s a marathon not a sprint!”

    2. Eventually, your huge PR jumps will slow down.

    Your first year, or two, you will make huge jumps in your lifts and it will feel great. That will eventually slow down after those initial years. I deadlifted 175 lbs. after my first 4 months of crossfit training. Then I worked my butt off, for over a year, to get over 215 lbs. This is normal; Don’t let it discourage you, or make you feel weak. After your body gets accustom to the heavy work load and adapts, you will have to put in more effort to see those gains.

    3. Stop comparing yourself to anyone else.

    This is not just advice for new lifters. You will be much happier not worrying about someone else’s numbers, or what they were going to lift. You should definitely be competitive, and a little friendly competition can be good; but, if you are constantly comparing your journey and situation to others you’re going to be disappointed. You will never feel good enough doing this—its negative self-talk, and not productive. It’s necessary to have a goal, and others you look up to, but don’t downplay your hard work and achievements in the process.

    4. There isn’t a “one-size-fits-all” approach.

    One program isn’t going to work for everyone; we all have different weaknesses. There is no absolute correct form for everyone. It’s like with many things, there are multiple ways of doing something and finding what works best for you and your body type will give you the best success. Yes, there are dangerous/ blatantly wrong forms of performing a lift, but there are things that will never be the same for everyone.

    5. Have fun with training and competing!

    If you don’t, what’s the point? There is enough negativity in life, and you will encounter plenty in a strength sport. Lots of people will tell you what you’re doing is dumb and they will not understand it. You will get asked some of the dumbest questions possible; learn to laugh at them. People will talk negative about others, but don’t let that influence you. If you are bored, injured, or not having fun with training or competition (if you choose to) change what you are doing, and dismiss the negative input from others—it’s no one’s happiness but your own!

    Strength Training-deadlift-day.jpg
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    Are female bodies really that different to male when it comes to the mechanics of lifting weights?

    Females tend to respond better to higher training frequencies than men. This is probably because we aren’t as physically strong, so are less likely to place max demands on our nervous system and muscle tissue as a result of workouts. Higher training frequency is not just possible for us, but can often be the best course of action. Plenty of women thrive on a training frequency that would cripple a lot of guys. Full body workouts, or upper/lower and push/pull splits can be a great way for women to strength train (rather than traditional body part splits).

    And, of course, female athletes have much lower levels of testosterone than men (even men who don’t train), and our levels of estrogen, progesterone, follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone rise and fall.

    If you look at a male and female skeleton side-by-side, there are very few differences. The main one (and certainly the main one which would affect lifting) is the structure and width of the pelvis and hips.

    So what about the structural and mechanical differences between women and men? What are they and how do they affect how we train and compete?

    1. Wider Q-Angles
    Women tend to have a wider angle between points on the quadriceps and patella tendon. This won’t necessarily lead to any problems when lifting, but can be a factor in knee injuries, valgus collapse (medial knee displacement), and hip internal rotation. It’s certainly worth being aware of this mechanical difference if you like to squat!

    2. Lower Body Strength
    Women tend to have greater lower body strength compared to upper body strength, and less of a hamstring/quad strength ratio. This is just one good reason to pay particular attention to strengthening and stabilizing the entire posterior chain.

    3. Greater Flexibility
    Women tend to be naturally more flexible than men, which means they can stand to do more stability work in their routines. Don’t neglect flexibility and mobility work altogether, but tip the balance in favor of more stability and activation work. Working through full range strength exercises will train your strength and stability, whilst encouraging your natural flexibility. And be aware that at certain points in your life, you may experience unusual levels of joint laxity, so be sure to program your workouts accordingly.

    4. Hyper-Extension Of The Lower Back
    Pay attention to your low back when you lift. Some women tend towards over-extension of the lumbar spine during compound lifts, and body weight movements like push ups and plank holds. Spend time learning how to control your core to prevent hyper-extension.

    Sauce: How Your Female Body Mechanics Affect Your Lifting - Lift Big Eat Big
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    Why Squats and Deadlifts Are Good For Your Health


    I love to squat and deadlift. In fact, I am a firm believer that every person needs to do some type of squatting and deadlifting multiple days per week. This does not mean that we need to throw a bar on our back or load up a bar with maximum weights.

    People fall on different spectrums in terms of their capabilities in the gym. I have a specific assessment that helps me identify where upon this spectrum they fall. If a client is not capable of putting a bar on their back or pulling weight from the floor, the plan is to get them there.

    Many will argue there are other ways to get strong and healthy in the gym. I agree that you can do other training programs in the gym, but they will not be as beneficial as one that makes you squat and deadlift. There are a few reasons for this.

    We live in a time period where we sit throughout the majority of the day, and even when we are up and moving, our heads tend to be buried in our phones. We have all heard the dangers of too much sitting. In fact, the media even titled stories stating that sitting was more negative for your health than smoking.

    I would strongly discourage you from smoking, but I think we all know that sitting is bad. Often times we chalk up too much sitting as a major cause to the obesity epidemic. I do not disagree with this, but there is much more that comes along with too much sitting.

    Gravity is one of the forces that is always enacting upon our bodies. Our ability to withstand gravity is critical to our health. When we sit down in a chair all day long, we do not need to fight against gravity, the chair does it for us. Due to the way that we sit all day long, our posture rolls forward.

    Our head comes forward, shoulders internally rotate, and our spine and hips flex. We tend to get very tight in the front of our bodies and our muscles lengthen in the back. On top of being in this position for prolonged periods of time, we do not need to stabilize ourselves against gravity. Again, the chair is doing this for us.

    Our posture collapsing in is a safe position. This is why you see many nervous system disorders present with this postural adaptation. We are built to have muscles stabilize and organize our joints, while the large muscles on the backside of our bodies propel us into movement. The problem is these muscles are nonexistent and weak.

    We then tend to go to the gym and ride the bike and do some crunches, which continues to strengthen the poor posture we are in all day long. We don’t want to squat or deadlift because we don’t want to hurt our knees and our back.

    The problem is sitting down all day long is far worse for your knees and lower back. The muscles responsible for stabilizing your spine are asleep and from having our knees bent all day long sitting, we lose terminal knee extension, placing increasing shear forces on the joint. You need to squat and deadlift to make your back and knees healthy. Of course with proper form, this should be able to go without saying.

    Squats and deadlifts teach us how to fight gravity. I know the research shows inconsistent results when looking at bad posture and pain, but we cannot ignore all of the anecdotal evidence out there. When people get stronger at resisting gravity they tend to feel a hell of a lot better. Chronic joint pain dissipates, mood elevates, people get less sick, and even digestion can improve.

    When we compress against gravity a few things happen. For one, our breathing is compromised. Our ribs cannot expand allowing us to take a deep belly breath. This for one, weakens spinal stabilizers, because our breathing muscles play a major role in that. It also negatively effects our mood and can even cause pain.

    The research is pretty clear in showing that taking deep breaths can allow us to relax by turning on our parasympathetic nervous system. If our ribs are compressed, we never get these deep breaths. This actually can negatively affect our immune system as well, leading us to be more prone to illness.

    Our spine is a highway for nerves to run up and down. When we develop poor posture these nerves cannot relay messages quite as efficiently. This alters the mechanics of our movements. Moving with poor mechanics over time can lead to a lot of wear and tear and chronic pain. Roughly 1 out of 3 Americans over the age of 50 suffers from chronic back pain. That is an incredibly high number and only looking at pain in one part of the body.

    Our nerves play a critical role in our immunity to illness as well. This is known as the neuroimmune system. Our nerves help to maintain barriers such as the blood-brain barrier, control inflammation, and mobilize our immune defenses. Our poor posture, limiting the efficiency of our nerves, can be a major reason why we tend to get more colds then others during the winter.

    One of our largest nerves, the vagus nerve, goes from our brain to our guts. When this nerve gets compressed it can negatively affect our digestion as well as our mood. Not only does the vagus nerve send signals controlling our digestion, but it also passes signals to the brain.

    90% of our serotonin is found in the gut. When serotonin levels fall we can get depression, anxiety, and anger issues. Serotonin is not the only neurotransmitter found in our guts. Our opioids also have receptors in our gastrointestinal tracts. All of these neurotransmitters can negatively affect our moods. They may not be able to adequately pass through the vagus nerve and/or cross over the blood-brain barrier, because remember, the blood-brain barrier is maintained by our nerves.

    Partaking in exercise is always a good option. However, a couple of days per week we should dedicate some time to helping us get out of our poor posture and teaching us to fight back against gravity. This not only can make us strong, but can help improve nearly every function of the human body.

    There are no better exercises to teach you how to fight gravity than the squat and deadlift. The squat requires you to place a bar on your back. The weight being placed here is constantly trying to push you forward. You need to stand up tall, breathe deep into your belly and brace hard, and then move through a full range of motion. This helps with everything that we discussed earlier, even teaching you how to breathe right.

    The deadlift does the same thing as the squat. As you break the floor with the weight you have to continue to fight gravity to maintain position and lock the weight out. The stronger we get at fighting gravity, the less prolonged poor postures are going to negatively affect us.

    This doesn’t mean we squat and deadlift a couple of times per week that we can just sit down all day long and be fine. We still want to be up and moving around as much as possible. However, life requires us to sit down for periods of time. This is something that is a lot of times out of our control. Getting stronger in the squat and deadlift will help us get through these periods of time that are out of our control.

    Other exercises can make us stronger, I will not argue against that. However, squats and deadlifts allow us to load the movements more than other exercises. Of course weight is a measure of gravity. The more we load it up, the better we are at resisting gravity with no weight.

    If you suffer from chronic pain, poor mood, gastrointestinal distress, or frequent colds, I highly recommend you find a good coach and start adding in some strength training that includes squats and deadlifts. Of course, still get adequate sleep and eat well. That is a powerful combination.

    Why Squats and Deadlifts Are Good For Your Health
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    Not so much about strength training per se... but more about mental strength and pursuing your goals.


    Strength Training-13557800_1035136336577072_7388683546335469637_n.jpg

    ''I think midlife is when the universe gently places her hands upon your shoulders, pulls you close, and whispers in your ear:
    I’m not screwing around. It’s time. All of this pretending and performing – these coping mechanisms that you’ve developed to protect yourself from feeling inadequate and getting hurt – has to go.

    Your armor is preventing you from growing into your gifts. I understand that you needed these protections when you were small. I understand that you believed your armor could help you secure all of the things you needed to feel worthy of love and belonging, but you’re still searching and you’re more lost than ever.

    Time is growing short. There are unexplored adventures ahead of you. You can’t live the rest of your life worried about what other people think. You were born worthy of love and belonging. Courage and daring are coursing through you. You were made to live and love with your whole heart. It’s time to show up and be seen.''

    ~ Brené Brown

    Photo: Helen Mirren, age 70 (will turn 71 on July 26) . 70 is the "new" middle age.
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    Thank you for the motivational and technical advice everyone ❗

    My .02 :
    No decent gyms in my area.
    MTB time serves my aerobic workout throughout the week.
    For strength training I use SPRI resistance bands (red or blue) .
    Also bodyweight exercises such as: walking lunges, wall sits, squats, calf raises, push-ups, Iplanks, and 1 leg balance squats etc...

    Having specific goals is very motivational for me so I
    love me some 30 Day Challenges !
    Right now my sister and I are doing a plank challenge and we are up to 95 seconds !
    The goal is to be at a full 2 minutes on July 31. The purpose to build stronger core muscles.

    On august second we will start a new 30 day Planking Challenge, where we will begin with the month with only a 30 second hold, but add an additional twist, such as raising 1 arm and 1 leg off the floor for half the time, then switching to the other diagonal arm/leg. We will gradually increase time by 5 seconds everyday until the end of 30 days.
    Also I just started doing a 30 day pushup challenge. I do regular military style pushups. Could only do 3 everyday until I could do 4 .
    4 everyday until I can do 5 etcetera.

    And yes rest of days are crucial. Rest days for your body to recover for the challenges ahead, and the help prevent burn out.

    All for now.
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    Good article about metabolism

    Your metabolism has nothing to do with why you gain weight as you age

    You've probably heard that once you hit 40, it's all downhill when it comes to your weight.

    That inexplicable force we call our "metabolisms" does begin to grind a bit slower every year from age 30 onwards.

    Here's the good news: The rate at which your metabolism slows down is actually rather minimal. In reality, most weight gain that happens in mid-life isn't the result of a slower metabolism at all.

    Instead, it comes down to a simple, but changeable truth: As we get older, we get less and less active.

    While this might sound depressing, it's actually great news. There's plenty we can do to counteract the slow, seemingly inevitable onset of poundage.
    Some highlights:

    Most of the things people say will boost your metabolism won't
    When we're eating, we burn a small amount of calories (roughly 10% of our total calories burned for the day). This is called the "thermic effect of food," and it's the first of those three phases I mentioned earlier. We can turn up the heat on this process a tiny bit (but remember, not by a whole lot) by doing things like drinking stimulant beverages like coffee and eating large amounts of protein.

    "Eating foods like green tea, caffeine, or hot chili peppers will not help you shed excess pounds," notes an entry in the A.D.A.M. Medical Encyclopedia, hosted by the National Institutes of Health. "Some may provide a small boost in your metabolism, but not enough to make a difference in your weight."
    And

    Instead, get active
    Not surprisingly, the most important calorie-burning activity we engage in is just that — activity.

    Whether we're taking the stairs, stepping away from our desks for a coffee, or sweating it out in a hot yoga class, we're expending energy. Researchers call this second phase "physical-activity expenditure." After a strenuous workout, we continue to burn more calories than we would while at rest — and that's the third phase, or what's called "excess post-exercise oxygen consumption."

    When it comes to counteracting weight gain, these two phases — the ones related to physical activity — are the most important. Your best bet for burning more calories throughout the day is to increase your levels of any kind of activity, be it running or walking.
    ....

    Your best bet for burning more calories throughout the day is to increase your levels of any kind of activity, be it by adding miles to your runs or simply by taking the stairs at work. Better yet, do both.

    Read more:

    How to not gain weight as you age - INSIDER
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    10 Things The Best Athletes Do

    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0037-640x428.jpg

    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0007-640x428.jpg


    1. They don’t look for a quick fix.

    The best athletes with the best physiques – the people you admire – have been working on their bodies for a long, long time. They’ve been dedicated to their craft for years or in some cases decades. It’s simply unreasonable to give up on a dream because you couldn’t make it happen in a matter of weeks. Likewise, if you’re dissatisfied with your results, you won’t improve by throwing in the towel. You need to be in it for the long haul.

    2. They know where they are, where they want to go, and how to get there.
    The best athletes move from goal to goal, constantly setting their sites on new horizons to maintain a sense of interest along the way. Even if they aren’t competing, they are training for something.

    If you find yourself in a state of listlessness with no clear direction of where you’re going, do not despair. Set a goal like putting 50 lbs. on your squat or PRing your Fran time, give yourself a realistic deadline (3-6 months), and commit to it. Picking out a sport to compete in and entering a competition is a great way to motivate yourself and remain accountable too. If competition doesn’t seem worthwhile because you don’t want to embarrass yourself, remember that your first and foremost competition is you.

    3. They don’t try to reach their physique goals by cutting Calories.

    The best athletes are rarely looking to be in a calorie deficit – they view food as a way to enhance work capacity and they focus on maintaining and building the muscle they are earning in the gym.

    4. They don’t obsess over their abs.

    Ultra endurance athlete, elite powerlifter, and beer enthusiast Alex Viada once said (I’m paraphrasing) “The best athletes I know don’t spend a whole lot of time thinking about how to get abs; the work they do ultimately just lands them in that spot.” Judging by Alex’s success with his consultation company, Complete Human Performance, his impressive physique, and the fact that he can deadlift 700 lbs. then run a 5 minute mile, I think he knows what he’s talking about.

    5. They don’t worry about putting on body fat due to overeating.

    Fat is easy to lose but muscle is hard to gain. Most athletes spend a good part of their life chasing the latter and so they don’t have to worry so much about the former. For that reason, the best athletes in the world actively seek out weight gain. They do this by lowering their activity level and building their bodies for a specific result. In that process, they are often intentionally put on a bit of fat.

    The best way to say it is “ass moves mass”. Want to squat more? You need to put a lot of quality work into developing your quads and glutes, perfecting your form, and increasing your work capacity. That cannot be accomplished in a Calorie deficit, and it’s a lot harder to do if you’re worried about your scale weight.

    6. They train smart and focus on incremental performance increases.

    Most people think that to perform at the highest level possible, you need to train 24/7 and push yourself to the point of exhaustion every single workout – more of everything, harder workouts, longer workouts, etc. News flash: the best athletes don’t work out this way. Their approach doesn’t even resemble the casual athletes approach.

    The fittest people on the planet vary their training with a combination of intensities, activities, and modes of training. You might for instance see someone doing high intensity interval training in the morning to build anaerobic capacity, then weightlifting in the evening to develop maximal strength. They didn’t start out like that (and they typically do either or).

    7. They don’t feel guilty when they miss workouts.

    The fittest people take time off or reduce their work volume as part of the plan to get better. When you’re pushing the limit of human performance, rest isn’t just beneficial – it’s necessary.

    Yeah, if you’re chronically missing workouts and you haven’t been to the gym in months, you might want to do something about it and work on your time management…but don’t feel guilty if you have to push a workout a day late or you miss one session after months of consistency. Consider it extra recovery and get back at it hungrier than you were before.

    8. They surround themselves with people who’re better than they are.

    The “Big fish-little pond” effect is what happens when you’re the strongest/fastest/best athlete in your gym and you no longer have anyone to compete with; you’ve caught the biggest fish in your little pond and it’s time to expand your horizons. This concept can be applied to pretty much any situation where you’re no longer challenged by your environment.

    When a lack of competition stifles your growth, what do you do? The fittest people on earth change perspective. They put themselves out there and seek out new challengers. They don’t shy away from a reality check that perhaps their squat could be stronger; perhaps they could stand to work on their conditioning.

    9. They constantly seek out new information and develop a broad knowledge base.

    Elite athletes don’t have access to any training, nutrition, or motivational materials that your average person doesn’t, but they are constantly studying and applying new methods.

    10. They do EVERYTHING they need to do to be the best they can be.

    Many of the best athletes we work with are moms and dads. They serve our communities as firefighters or police officers, nurses and some are serving/have served in the military. They have very demanding lives, but they make no excuses when it comes to training, eating, and recovering.

    Being the best version of yourself is largely mental; it’s about starting on the path that is the opposite of the one you were on and just never looking back. When you spend enough time living your life, striving for constant improvement, nourishing your body, and being in control of yourself, you realize how much it sucks to live any other way.


    sauce: 10 Things The Best Athletes Do (That You Don't) - Eat to Perform
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    This guy...cracked me up.

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    Horror show... but I do them anyway

    Strength Training-14708368_10153955377391027_7989427302125250096_n.jpg
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    We’re very different from each other, so no one should ever assume that one speaks for all. So here is the thoroughly unofficial and totally incomplete list of 10 Things Strong Women Won’t (Usually) Tell You.


    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0037-640x428.jpg

    1.) We hurt

    Strong women won’t tell you right away when they’re injured, either physically or emotionally. We’ve spent our lives brushing things off.

    • Insult? Brush it off.
    • Bruise? Scrape? Brush it off.
    • Torn ACL? Bleeding head wound? Broken heart? Brush it off.



    Seriously though, many strong women have a hard time admitting weakness (just like many strong men). We’re working at it but keep in mind that we don’t always show what’s going on under the hood, and sometimes we need help.

    2.) We’re not fans of that phrase “for a girl”

    “You’re strong for a girl“
    “You’re pretty good at this for a girl“
    “You’re pretty tough for a girl“

    Those sentences never sound right or feel right. Can we please just stop using them?

    3.) We prefer the women’s barbell for certain lifts

    We use the bigger/heavier barbell at times (for movements like deadlifting and press and back squats) but many of us like the smaller circumference/lighter weight barbell (the “women’s barbell”) for movements like cleans and snatches. We can manipulate this barbell more easily and it just feels better for pulling movements. It’s not lesser, just different. Please stock it in your gyms so we have options. (It’s not a luxury as much as a necessity for some of us with smaller hands.) Thanks!

    4.) Our accomplishments don’t need to be compared to men’s in order to be accomplishments

    Ever watch a powerful woman pull 300 or 350 pounds (or more) on a deadlift? Ever hear men comment and say things like “Wow! That’s close to what I deadlift!” Ever really think about that compliment?

    We get that you’re trying to be nice, and we appreciate it. Really, we do! You’re sweet. But our accomplishments are important on their own, not just in comparison to men’s. Let us have our moments totally on their own. Thanks for understanding.

    5.) We do like our gym outfits

    I know, I know. We say things like “What we lift is important, not what we wear” and we mean that. But many of us also enjoy putting together our gym outfits and we do not mind receiving compliments from women and men. As long as nobody is leering or over-salivating, a “You look great!” or “Nice pants!” is appreciated whether it comes from women or men. We like to do good and look good.

    6.) We’ve never been big fans of only one “RX weight” in a workout description
    We get it. You’re putting a workout on the board and the tradition at CrossFit.com is to just list one weight, and everyone scales from there. But not all traditions are meant to be kept. (Think fruitcake at the holidays, smoking, and men-only golf clubs: traditions best left to die.)

    Many gyms take the RX weight and adjust it down 30% for women, so women have a weight approximation for which to scale. That’s cool. Also, some coaches write the workout and then put a percentage (like 70% of 1 RM, or bodyweight) so everyone calculates their own numbers. That’s cool, as well. There are probably other options, too: something to think about.

    7.) We won’t object if you want to help put away our weights

    Seriously. Who objects when someone helps? It’s a pain to put away all that gear when you’re finished with a workout.

    If everybody helps put away all the gear (not just their own), everything gets done quicker. Never hesitate to help a fellow gym member. We’re cool with helping and being helped. (Or we should be.) Everybody pitch in!



    8.) We (usually) love encouragement, but we (usually) don’t love being yelled at

    We’re strong and we can take it, but we usually only like yelling when it’s during a nasty met-con or one of our lifts, and it’s something like “GO! GO! GO!” or “STAND UP! STAND UP! STAND UP!”

    The rest of the time? We’d rather you spoke in a regular voice and talked to us. It’s easier to hear what you’re saying when we’re not having to also deal with how you’re saying it.

    9.) When we fail (which we do often) sometimes the best thing to say is nothing. Just be with us

    We know we failed, and often we know the errors that caused our failure. We don’t always need solutions, and sometimes we just need company—someone to share our pain but not fix it. We can (probably) fix it ourselves, but we would enjoy a little company along the way.

    Besides, we’re not experts on everything in the gym, and we don’t expect you to be, either. Just being our friend is enough. (Well, unless you’re the coach, then we do expect you to be an expert.)

    10) We can tell when someone is looking at our assets instead of our eyes

    It doesn’t matter if we’re turned in the other direction and pulling 250 lbs from the floor. We know. Don’t be a creep, and don’t be a criticizer: that goes for men and women. We’re all in this space together, trying to be healthy and do something good for our bodies. Let’s enjoy this time and each other.

    Remember, most people aren’t even getting off their couches and breaking a sweat, so the fact that we’re all working towards strength and fitness means we have something in common. Let’s celebrate that and each other! Strong women help this world become stronger, and so we all benefit. Raise a barbell to strong women and to strong men! (Or we’ll just raise it ourselves because we’re good with that, too.)







    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0007-640x428.jpg


    Sauce: 10 Things Strong Women Won't Tell You by Lisbeth Darsh - Eat to Perform
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  52. #52
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    Morning Workouts

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    What's the Least Amount of Exercise I Need to Do to Look Good?

    The short answer: ninety minutes per week. But those minutes have to count.

    "Shorter workouts need to create a serious amount of metabolic demand," Trink says. "That means you're using a lot of energy and accelerating your heart rate, while also developing strength and muscle mass. These workouts need to hit both ends of the spectrum: You're using weight training to develop some lean muscle tissue while elevating your heart rate and using up a lot of energy to keep your body fat low."

    That means using short rest periods and almost exclusively compound exercises, meaning movements that use multiple joints and larger muscle groups. There are two different kinds of workouts you can do:


    Option 1: The 3-Day Approach
    If you're really short on time, this one's the best: three full-body gym sessions per week, each about 25 to 35 minutes long. Here, you're going to be doing three sets of supersets, which is a pair of exercises that are performed back-to-back and typically use different muscle groups, so that (in this case), your back is resting while you're hitting your legs, so your heart rate stays high and your fat loss continues. Here's a sample. (For all the workouts in this article, start with a three to five minute warm-up; jogging is fine.)

    4 supersets of front squats and pull-ups, 8 to 10 reps per exercise, 45-60 seconds rest after each superset. If pull-ups are tough, there's no shame in jumping while you pull yourself upward, or you can try starting at the top of the movement and lowering yourself down as slowly as you can. The lat pull-down machine can also work if things get too tough.

    Rest 2 minutes.

    3 supersets of step-ups and single-arm dumbbell overhead presses, 10 to 12 reps each per side, 45-60 seconds rest after each superset.

    Rest 2 minutes.

    3 supersets of push-ups (if that's tough, do them on your knees or with your hands on a wall) and jump squats, 25 reps each, 45-60 seconds rest after each superset.

    You'll feel like you've run ten 100-meter sprints while being kicked in the lungs by a steel-capped boot, but the entire session shouldn't last more than 35 minutes. It's important to note the structure, so you can come up with your own workouts: Start with two big compound exercises, and as you fatigue, move to slightly less-demanding unilateral exercises (that's movements that use one arm or leg at a time), and finish with high-volume bodyweight exercises. This way, you're a lot less likely to hurt yourself as your energy drops and in case your form starts to slip.

    Option 2: The Six-Day Approach
    Three workouts will get the job done, but Trink's favorite approach is six workouts of 10 to 15 minutes apiece. This actually results in less time spent in the gym, but if yours is hard to get to, it may wind up more time-consuming. He thinks it's still worth it.

    "In my experience, high-frequency exercise is optimal when it comes to body composition, strength improvements, and movement quality improvements," he says. "You're getting into that fatigued state more often and even if, at the end of the week, your net training time is the same, I almost always see better results with more frequent workouts."

    Here's Dan Trink's perfect week. For selecting the weight, err on the lighter side and increase the weight next time you work out.

    Day 1: Alternate 10 trap bar deadlifts and 10 push-ups for 10 minutes.

    Day 2: 10 minutes of rowing on an ergonomic rower for max distance.

    Day 3: Put 50 percent of your bodyweight on a barbell and squat as much as you can for 8 minutes. (Form is important here. If you sense that you're losing integrity, don't be a hero; decrease the weight.)

    Day 4: Alternate 50 burpees and 50 calories on an assault bike for 10 minutes.

    Day 5: Do 10 pull-ups and 1 dip, then 9 pull-ups and 2 dips, continue until your pull-ups hit zero. (Or try the pull-up substitutions above.)

    Day 6: 50-calorie row, 50-calorie bike, 50 calories on the ski machine or elliptical, 500-meter run. Do that for 12 minutes.

    Cakewalks they ain't. But if you're a little tired of hearing that an hour per day is the only road to a healthy, strong, and lean body, this plan combines the benefits of the traditional weights-and-cardio plan in a fraction of the time. Why not do more with less?


    Sauce: https://tonic.vice.com/en_us/article...ource=vicefbca
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    I think that yoga is the biggest waste of an hour that anyone can do for exercise.

    I wish that weight lifting classes were as proliferate as yoga classes, because I think people are intimidated by weights and don't know how to get started or to progress, so they don't do it. But yoga classes are a dime a dozen and they are marketed to the max, so that's where people go, and then they wonder why they aren't strong.

    A hard weight workout is just that, hard, and can be really uncomfortable for the first month for beginners. But nothing gives as much bang for the buck. It's too bad that bad personal trainers are an absolute plague. Probably the best method is to find an experienced friend and ask to work out with them in the weight room for a few weeks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geargals View Post
    I think that yoga is the biggest waste of an hour that anyone can do for exercise.

    I wish that weight lifting classes were as proliferate as yoga classes, because I think people are intimidated by weights and don't know how to get started or to progress, so they don't do it. But yoga classes are a dime a dozen and they are marketed to the max, so that's where people go, and then they wonder why they aren't strong.

    A hard weight workout is just that, hard, and can be really uncomfortable for the first month for beginners. But nothing gives as much bang for the buck. It's too bad that bad personal trainers are an absolute plague. Probably the best method is to find an experienced friend and ask to work out with them in the weight room for a few weeks.
    I'm pretty sure a lot of prominent MTB and trials athletes will disagree with you. A well rounded athlete tends to use many different forms of training and yoga is often one of them and not just for strength.

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  57. #57
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    Good story and I can relate. In my case I started crossfit in 2014 ( I was 55) Never lifted weights , never ran, or did gymnastics... i just rode my bike. Now I'm hitting some pretty decent PRs lately (all post injury) : . But I am also accelerating (burning fat and getting stronger) when I doing slightly lighter weights and lots of reps during high intensity intervals. And yup it all helps my riding. I am also pleased to I have lost weight, gained muscle and gone done in a size as well (size 6 and getting closer to a size 4)


    My workout: 'I worried I'd get big if I did powerlifting, but I've dropped a dress size’


    I started weightlifting three years ago at the age of 46. I’d done competitive athletics in my 20s and wanted to find a physical activity that would challenge me. I loved the film Rocky, and the classic training sequence from it, so I decided to join a boxing club. Non-competitive boxing became my second love for 10 years. But eventually it started to take a toll on my body, and I quit just after my 40th birthday.

    If you’re not a runner (and I never enjoyed running), the options for fitness in the middle years really narrow down to a handful of activities. Many play tennis (which yields a high chronic injury rate in the over-40s), take up yoga (which is fine, but doesn’t really get the heart rate up), or try golf (which isn’t my thing).

    I tried British Military Fitness for a year, but you need the stamina of a younger athlete. I considered CrossFit, but there was no way I was going to manage the dynamic moves. I was intrigued by the strength-based exercises and set out to find a qualified strength and conditioning trainer. Will Davis at Performance Pro started me off with body weight exercises, and at first, when he asked me to pick up a bar bell, I told him I didn’t want to lift heavy weights; I worried that I would get big. He guaranteed I would not. I thought about the women I’ve seen lifting weights who look lean, and changed my mind.

    Powerlifting consists of three lifts: the squat, the bench press and the deadlift. Lifting weights is technical, but that’s what I love about it. You make improvements every week. It has a huge health impact for women as they age. I had a bone density scan last year and the technician told me mine was “off the charts”. I have also dropped a dress size as fat has gradually become muscle.

    Lifting provides a challenge for me, and I love the training environment. My gym is full of athletes of all ages, each with their own goals. No one is there to show off. It really is empowering.

    My weekend workout
    Sessions per week? Three.
    Best pre-workout meal? Peanut butter on toast.
    Most exhausting move? My maximum deadlift of 92.5kg; one and a half times my body weight.




    Sauce:

    My workout: 'I worried I'd get big if I did powerlifting, but I've dropped a dress size’
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    Can I Get A Hallelujah? Can I Get An Amen?


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    Strength Training-wsszkkb.jpg


    Ladies, I’m going to give it to you straight. Once you commit to lifting and working out, certain things are going to happen and they’re unavoidable for most women, just like being fabulous. But we all know that if being fabulous had a meter, we would break that sucker every single day.

    As we get stronger and more fit, we learn that we have to deal with some things. So here are 5 Things That Lifting Women Learn:

    As your glutes get firmer, the girls up front might get smaller.

    Weird, right? But it’s our form of shrinkage. I know this is not the news you’re hoping for, but it’s the truth. Breasts are made up of glands, ducts, and fat — and some of us simply carry more fat here. But when you’re losing fat (and building muscle), you don’t get to select where that fat comes off. Your body chooses, and it might choose to take some fat from your breasts. That’s the (often) unhappy news. The good news? You still look better than ever! (And those stronger pectoral muscles might hold your girls high as gravity tries to do its thing.)

    Your hands will change.

    We call them calluses, and know they’re a sign of doing work. Your mom might call them “those rough things on your palm, honey” and ask if they’re normal. Oh Mom, we passed that point long ago. Fabulous women are not normal, because it’s impossible to remain normal when you keep getting better and better.

    No matter how feminine you are, if you gain ANY muscle, at some point a jack-wagon is going to say something about how you “look like a man.”

    You don’t look anything like a man, but some fool will write that because you have some muscular definition. So this is where you get to practice the most useful skill of all time: pushing the ignore button. Press on with whatever you’re doing. Which matters more: how fantastic you feel OR what some jack-wagon thinks? Strong will carry you in your later years, and weak will not, nor will the opinions of idiots on the internet. Morons are like milk past the expiration date — don’t drink that garbage unless you want to be up at 3am and miserable.

    Your bathroom scale becomes like Allison from the 3rd grade: she used to be your best friend but you just don’t see her value anymore.


    Sure, the scale gives you a number, but that number only tells you how much you weigh, not who you are or how wonderful you might be. What you really want to know is how strong you are and how fantastic your clothes feel — and you already know that! So why do you keep looking at the scale? Toss her and stick with your new best friend: the barbell.

    You want to eat more and — get this — it’s OKAY!

    You’re not just stuffing your face with pizza and cake anymore — you’re priming your body with fuel like steak and veggies. Nobody accomplishes much on a starvation diet, so you stop starving yourself. Instead, you learn what to eat when to accomplish your goals of building muscle and reducing body fat. You learn to make peace with your body and work with it, instead of fight it. And now you feel FREE.

    Bonus: You’re improving your longevity.


    Now, that may not sound as exciting as “you look way hot” but it’s an important point. Strong people live more productively longer. It’s not enough to be skinny, and it’s not enough to have a healthy heart; you need to actively build muscle to combat its natural loss. Consequently, being strong is what we all need to age with grace. High-five yourself, women! Getting strong and staying strong increases your quality of life for years to come! Go celebrate with a deadlift!

    Strength Training-14925569_1834805426763900_8766877958412552424_n.jpg


    Sauce: "The Girls Might Shrink (And 4 Other Lessons Lifting Women Learn)" by Lisbeth Darsh - Eat to Perform
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    Five Signs You Should Be Eating More Protein

    The Paleo Diet. Protein powder. Gourmet burgers. In case you haven't noticed, our culture has become obsessed with consuming protein—which means few of us are skimping on the stuff. "These days, most of the hot fad diets are very pro-protein." says DR Dawn Jackson Blatner, R.D., author of The Flexitarian Diet.

    But despite our preoccupation with protein, some of us are still slipping through the cracks—namely vegetarians or people who tend to under-eat, says Blatner. Problem is, it can be tricky to identify what's considered "not enough" since the recommended intake of protein is a broad range, rather than one hard number.

    Afraid you're short-changing your system? Forget crunching numbers—just look for these signs that your body is begging for protein:

    You Crave Sweets
    One of the first signs you're low on protein: You start craving sweets and feel like you're never quite full, says Blatner. You'd think a protein shortage would trigger an urge for steak and eggs, right? But one of protein's most critical functions is keeping your blood sugar steady—which means if you're lacking, your glucose levels will be all over the place, encouraging you to reach for a quick fix like lollies. "If all you ate in the morning was a handful of cereal, you're going to get energy right away, then your energy is going to wane," she says. "That up-and-down is where cravings come in."


    Your Brain Feels Foggy
    Balanced blood sugar is essential for staying focused. So when you're protein-deprived and your glucose levels are fluctuating constantly, Blatner says you may feel a little foggy—like you can't quite get with the program at work, for example. Why? Because you don't have a steady stream of carbs to fuel your brain. Protein at meals helps time-release the carbs for steady energy rather than up and down spikes. If you're relying only on "fleeting foods," such as crackers or bread, you'll only experience short bursts of mental energy, followed by the fog.

    Your Hair is Falling Out
    Protein is the building block of all of your cells—your hair follicles included. "If your hair follicles are strong, they keep your hair on your head, despite the tugging we do all day and the wind going through your hair," says Blatner. But if you're chronically skimping on the scalp-stabilising nutrient, you may notice that your strands start thinning (although, keep in mind, this can also be a sign of other conditions, like thyroid trouble).


    You Feel Weak
    We all know that protein is essential for building muscle. And if you don't get enough of it, your muscles may start to shrink over time, says Blatner. As a result, you may feel weak and unable to do the exercises you once excelled at.

    You Get Sick Constantly
    Your biceps aren't the only thing that protein reinforces. "Protein is needed to build all the compounds in our immune systems," says Blatner. So if you seem to catch colds or infections more often than everyone else—and you're otherwise in good health—a protein deficiency may be to blame. Another sign: You constantly get hangnails. "Our skin is a huge immune organ because it protects us from the environment," says Blatner. If your skin isn't strong due to a shortage of protein, you may start to notice cracks and tears (like hang nails), potentially exposing you to pathogens and leading to infections.


    sauce: Five Signs You Should Be Eating More Protein - Fitness, Sex, Health, Wellbeing & Weight Loss | Women's Health Magazine Australia
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    “Are Low Carb Diets Good for Leaning Out?”



    Should you be on a low carb diet if you’re trying to lose fat? The answer can be tricky, depending upon your goals. Let’s be honest – we’ve all seen people gut it out and achieve some level of success on this style of diet. Typically, the number on the scale goes down, and certain parts of them look a little tighter because they’re no longer as inflamed as they were before. This has a lot to do with what kind of diet they were on prior to going low carb. In other words, it’s not all fat loss.

    Now, you have to realize that I am having a discussion about populations that exercise intensely. This isn’t a knock on low carb – it can be an effective diet for sedentary people, and some athletes say it works for them. However, most athletes don’t do well on these types of diets. Glucose is the primary source of fuel during high intensity activtity, and performance practically always takes a backseat on a low carb diet. That’s not acceptable.

    Some of the negative effects of low carb dieting can be attributed to reduction in Calories. This can be made up for by increasing fat intake, but most folks eat about the same amount of fat as they were before, and end up in a huge Calorie deficit created by the reduction of carbs. It basically becomes a less effective version of Weight Watchers – call it “Carb Watchers” if you will. The single-minded focus on reducing carbs leaves out one of the most basic components of fat loss.

    Here are a few common pitfalls you’re bound to run into on a low carb diet:

    1. Insomnia becomes “normal” and sleep quality is reduced

    2. Cardio workouts might be slightly better, but during weight training you’ll never really feel strong

    3. Stress levels will elevate

    4. Your hormone function can get seriously thrown out of whack and your metabolism can be effected negatively

    Keeping all of this in mind, there are ways to employ periods of lower carbohydrate/calorie intake and achieve all the positives without the negatives. In short, it’s overwhelmingly unnecessary to restrict carbohydrates in such an extreme fashion if you’re maintaining a high level of activity. The end result tends to be a lethargic, broken, confused athlete.

    There is a better way.


    Sauce: "Are Low Carb Diets Good for Leaning Out?" - Eat to Perform

    January 2017
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    Don't Tell Me What Strong Looks Like

    As motivating and inspiring as the health and fitness industry can be, too often we perpetuate one particular image of a strong body: climbers are chiseled like statues, yogis are lean and flexible, runners are slender and toned.

    Today, I have a personal record (PR) marathon time of 3 hours and 41 minutes, and I don’t look anything like your stereotypical runner. I have cellulite, love handles, beefy thighs, and a slightly defined stomach. I’m a far cry from the slim bodies I see on running magazine covers or Instagram posts from my favorite brands.

    For years, I struggled to call myself a runner, or even an athlete, because I didn’t think I looked like one. I started running regularly in December 2013 because it helped me get out of bed in the morning. For the first time in my life, I wasn’t motivated to get active with the sole intention of losing weight. I was slow, but I loved the way running made me feel about myself. I felt strong and empowered by what my body could do—a radical change from the two-decade pursuit of a “perfect body” that I assumed would make me happy.

    With time, my goals evolved from simply getting to the finish line in one piece to hitting a particular time. I set goals to run a sub-two-hour half marathon and a sub-four marathon. In the back of my mind, I assumed that the faster I ran, the stronger I’d look—stronger, in my mind, meaning more slender. So I kept pushing myself, and though I did notice my body changing, I never really lost any weight. How could I be strong if I still didn’t look it?

    Then, in April 2016, I started working toward a goal to take my marathon PR from 3:59 to 3:35 in an attempt to qualify for the Boston Marathon.

    As weeks of training went by, I developed a nasty habit of assessing my weight while I got dressed to run. I’d stand in front of my mirror wearing shorts and a sports bra, look at my reflection, and feel defeated because I wasn’t developing what I thought of as a runner’s body. I was working harder than I’d ever worked in my life, but I didn’t think I looked the part.

    As the summer heat intensified, so did my training. Running in a heavy, sweat-drenched shirt was becoming increasingly uncomfortable, but I was too insecure to ditch it and run only in my sports bra. Women my size—a U.S. 8/10—don’t run in their sports bras, I thought. I would look at the thin women rocking their sports bras in my running group and feel frustrated that I didn’t look like them. I could keep up with them, but I didn’t think that I was as athletic because I didn’t have a body like theirs.

    But the problem wasn’t that I wasn’t fit or toned enough. It was that I had failed to embrace my own strength beyond my appearance. So what if I didn’t see any women my size running in their sports bras? I figured if I was this insecure about my shape, then I probably wasn’t alone. I also realized that the only person stopping me from feeling confident in a sports bra was me. So, one disgustingly hot and humid summer day, I shed my shirt and shared a video on Instagram, encouraging other women to do the same.

    That first run in my sports bra was terrifying. I spent the entire run on edge, ready to defend myself to anyone who dared to put me down. But to my total surprise, nobody paid attention to me. Not a single person looked my way or validated my fear that my body wasn’t good enough to be seen in a sports bra.

    The #SportsBraSquad was born, and suddenly women of all different sizes were ditching their shirts with me. Whenever I felt too insecure to run in my sports bra at a race, I’d scroll through the #SportsBraSquad hashtag and read stories of women, both slender and curvier, who struggled just like I did to feel proud of their strong bodies.

    All my life, the fitness industry has shown me how strength is supposed to look, and it never looked like me. Today, I call ********. Because at 160 pounds, I ran a marathon in 3:41. And this year, I plan to do it in 3:30. Strength doesn’t look a certain way—it feels a certain way. My marathon PR isn’t a step toward “the perfect body.” It represents me at the happiest, strongest, and best version of myself yet.


    Sauce: https://www.outsideonline.com/215624...n=facebookpost
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Yes!!!

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    Why working out on an empty stomach is a bad idea


    The going belief in the fitness world has long been that working out on an empty stomach results in increased fat loss. In fact, a 2013 study published in the British Journal of Nutrition concluded that working out on an empty stomach, or fasted, burned nearly 20 per cent more fat than doing so after breakfast.

    But nutritionists warn that this might not be the best course of action. The logic behind increased fat burn is that when hungry, the body has depleted glycogen stores — stored up carbohydrates that give us energy — and so it needs to use fat as fuel. It sounds like a great way to get fit faster, but it could actually be counterproductive.

    “If someone hasn’t eaten in an extended period of time — and we talk about fasted exercise as taking place first thing in the morning, so your last meal would have been dinner the night before — your glycogen is depleted and your body will use fat as fuel, but it could also use muscle,” says Kirstin Schell, a registered holistic nutritionist. “And since muscle fuels our metabolism, it’s actually not very helpful.”

    Studies have shown that doing a regular exercise routine at your normal intensity would not cause you to tap into muscle mass for added energy, but if your goal is to increase your intensity (and if you want to achieve results, you’ll need to do this), then you will use valuable muscle to fuel your workout.

    Schell says another downside to exercising fasted is that you’ll simply have less energy to push yourself harder. And while a study published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport showed that the effects of fasted exercise are different on men than on women — they’re more beneficial for men — both groups showed decreased performance when they worked out on an empty stomach.

    Plus, you run the risk of experiencing the natural effects of physical exertion without sufficient nutritional fuel: lightheadedness.

    Experts also point out that since the body doesn’t like to be starved, your metabolism will respond to the increase in fat burn by slowing down. And the next time you eat, it will inherently store more fat to compensate for the loss.

    Instead of hitting the treadmill or the running trail hungry, go for a breakfast that amounts to 200 to 300 calories, and includes a balance of protein, carbohydrates and fat.

    “You want something that’s easily digestible but provides you with enough energy,” Schell says. “Try a banana with nut butter or a small smoothie with Greek yogurt, a piece of fruit and some protein powder. Overall, it’s pretty small in terms of volume but energy dense so you won’t crash.”

    If you’re working out later in the day, Schell says there’s less risk of being in a fasted state, even if you ate at noon and are hitting the gym at 6 p.m., but you could supplement with a snack-sized meal about an hour before to top out your energy stores.

    Sauce: Why working out on an empty stomach is a bad idea | 102.1 the Edge

    Doing the Crossfit Open 17.3 today. Snatches and Pull Ups

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  66. #66
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    Jumping back into this thread...

    I got into Orangetheory Fitness a few months ago, and I LOVE what it did for my fitness and strength, but man, it is NOT sustainable for my wallet. The local rec center, however, is $5 for a day pass. So... I'm looking to somewhat recreate the OTF workouts at the gym. Does anyone incorporate HIIT with weights into their fitness routine?

    Related--just got a bigger (read: heavier...) bike, so I'm really hoping to build some strength so I can ride the thing properly!

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    Yes. I work out at a gym that is part of a PT/athlete training facilty. A NCAA Sweet-16 team trains some of its members here.
    It's called functional fitness boot camp which really doesn't say what we do. We incorporate everything from high intensity intervals to plyometrics to weights to supersets to agility to metabolic to...... it's mixed up always and I never know what to expect. I do all around weights but I'm not doing barbells at the level of cycleicious.

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    Yes. I work out at a gym that is part of a PT/athlete training facilty. A NCAA Sweet-16 team trains some of its members here.
    It's called functional fitness boot camp which really doesn't say what we do. We incorporate everything from high intensity intervals to plyometrics to weights to supersets to agility to metabolic to...... it's mixed up always and I never know what to expect. I do all around weights but I'm not doing barbells at the level of cycleicious.
    That sounds a lot like what I'm interested in! So it's a class with an instructor?

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    Yes, the workouts are laid out by the trainers but we do them at our own pace. The trainer supervises, helps with modifications and form if needed.

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    Throwback Thursday...Old school training


    Strength Training-eileen-p-58.jpg


    And here is the amazing story behind that pic! https://rouleur.cc/editorial/eileen-...eid=df90402e36
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    Use Your Own Strength to Get Strong

    Save your cash, you have all the tools you need to build strength. Your own body!

    Do the words ‘free weights’, ‘gym’ and ‘strength training’ have to be in the same sentence? C’mon, you’ve got a 50/50 chance at this one. Well, not in my world they don’t. Whether you’re home, at the park, the beach or on vacation, anytime is a good time to do these 10 easy bodyweight exercises. Some tackle the core, some the legs, some the upper body, and some incorporate a feel-good stretch.

    Lunge – Great for leg strength. With your feet shoulder width apart, step your left foot forward and lower your right knee until it’s almost on the ground. Then, return to a standing position. Do this several times on each leg. Focus on good form.

    Pistol squat - Start by holding your arms out straight out in front of you. Raise your right leg out in front of you, too. Balancing on your left leg, bend your knee until you’re close to the ground. (Your right leg should still be extended!) After holding this position for several seconds, unbend your left leg to rise back to an upright position.

    Step-up – You’ll need a step, bench, or high curb. Any surface located slightly above ground level will do. Place your right foot flat on this surface and simply straighten your leg. Basically, you’re stepping up and then stepping back down again. Do this between 10 and 15 times on each leg.

    Standing calf raises - You’ll need a vertical wall. To start, stand about a foot away from the wall. Put your hands on that surface at about shoulder height and rise up on your toes. Make sure to keep your knees straight. Lower yourself back to the floor and repeat.

    Worm-walk - Start in a standing position, but double over and let your hands touch the floor. If you can’t reach the floor, get them as close as possible. Walk your hands forward until you’re in push-up position, then take tiny steps until your feet meet your hands again.

    Mountain climbers – Like horizontal climbing on the floor. Start by getting onto your hands and knees. Put your right foot on the floor under your chest and extend your left leg behind you. Bend over your right foot so that your palms are flat on the floor. Then, jump. Switch the position of your legs while they’re in mid-air.

    Push-up - To do a push-up, place your hands flat on the floor about shoulder width apart and extend your legs behind you. Your feet should be together and your elbows should be straight but not locked. Keeping your back flat, lower yourself toward the floor until your elbows are at 90 degree angles. Then, push yourself back up

    Burpee – A Cross fit favourite. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart, then crouch down to the floor, putting your palms flat on the ground. From that position, kick your legs out behind you as though you were going to do a push-up. Instead, jump and pull your legs back underneath you. As soon as they’re planted, leap straight up into the air.

    Planks – Lie on your front, holding yourself off the floor with your elbows. Extend your legs behind you as though you were going to do some push-ups. Then, just hold that position. Make sure your back is straight.

    Arm circles – Stand relaxed and then extend your arms out to the sides, parallel to the ground. Keeping them extended, rotate them in clockwise circles fisting crunches for about thirty seconds. Switch direction and repeat.

    Twisting Crunches- While lying on your back, lace your fingers behind your head. Rotate your right elbow inward as you raise your left knee. Your elbow and knee should meet over your midsection. Return to your starting position and repeat with your opposite side.

    Oh, that’s 11 exercises! Throw in that last one for good measure and thank me later.

    So don’t feel obligated to use the gym or a set of dumbbells for strength training. Sure, they’re both beneficial, but so is pumping out a few sets of the above exercises next time you’re out walking or at the park with the kids and/or dog. Experiment with incorporating some of them into a run as a means of getting the blood moving all through your body.

    Free and easy, they’ll have your body burning bright in no time!
    Burpees schurpees Ugh!

    Strength Training-16939682_1887672014810574_2132933696793648704_n.jpg

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  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Throwback Thursday...Old school training


    Click image for larger version. 

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    And here is the amazing story behind that pic! https://rouleur.cc/editorial/eileen-...eid=df90402e36
    Love that! Thanks for sharing.

  73. #73
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  74. #74
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    Ok so question for you ladies now that I'm working on downhilling and jumping mainly these days.

    Just did two days of DH runs and OW. These things hurt:
    Forearms
    Glutes
    Shoulders
    Abs
    Triceps
    Hamstrings

    And on the second day it was KILLING me to be off the saddle.

    So I've decided it's time to go back to gym ratting in addition to the yoga/calestinestics.

    So here's what I'm thinking I need:
    - assisted pull-ups
    - deadlifts
    - tricep pull downs

    And then I get stuck. I do bridges, body weight squats, planks, and single leg RDLs without weights.

    Any suggestions on other exercises and if I should do high rep/low weight or heavier weight/low rep?



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  75. #75
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    ^You might want to start talking with a fitness coach or personal trainer about your goals and what are you able to commit and want to achieve. They can design a training program to get you started and that the works for you. Building strength, gaining muscle, is as hard as losing fat...
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  76. #76
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    I second that. A good trainer will do an assessment to identify strength, weakness and any imbalance. They will listen to your goals and design a plan for you. One problem with self assessment is that you may miss key components of balanced training which can excaberate any weakness, set you up for injury, or create more imbalance.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    ^You might want to start talking with a fitness coach or personal trainer about your goals and what are you able to commit and want to achieve. They can design a training program to get you started and that the works for you. Building strength, gaining muscle, is as hard as losing fat...
    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    I second that. A good trainer will do an assessment to identify strength, weakness and any imbalance. They will listen to your goals and design a plan for you. One problem with self assessment is that you may miss key components of balanced training which can excaberate any weakness, set you up for injury, or create more imbalance.
    Yep, already on that. Meeting on June 10.

  78. #78
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    Here's one I really like, T-spine pushups.Great for core and shoulder stablization

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SgeUqvNzag


  79. #79
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    ^T-spine pushups are excellent!

    Another functional exercise I like for core and shoulder stabilization is the turkish get up. Seems a little complicated at first but once you get the hang of it ... starting with really light weight. It's a full workout that walks your body through all its possible motions.


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  80. #80
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    Wow, never seen it broken down like that before!!

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    Ok, so I finally have a trainer. After moving to CO 9 months ago and finally getting my health straightened out, a friend of mine who lives up in Ft. Collins is now doing my weight training program.

    It's definitely has a mix of calisthenics and picking up heavy things and putting them down repeatedly, but it's a good strong program.

    My riding has changed too. I don't do much XC these days and mainly DH and playing in the local parks, but I'm hoping that in the next month or two it'll make a big difference.

    The first time I really thinned down it was from weight training. Apparently just living at altitude helps you build muscles after living at sea level most of my life (lungs haven't caught up yet), but between MTB, weight training, yoga, and during the off-season Aikido; I'm hoping I can get really strong.

    Because strong is the new sexy

  82. #82
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    Strong is definitely sexy and healthy. Weight lifting will increase bone density... an older study but still relevant https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9927006


    Doing full body weight lifting, like Olympic style lifts, will stimulate body producing hormones that will trigger growth. If you examine the skeletons of weightlifters and football players, you will see that their bones are more dense and often even larger diameter.

    But no, ladies, you aren't "big boned" because you lift. I weigh a lot less than when I started lifting /strength training 3 years ago. Cardio workouts and diet has also contributed to my body getting leaner.
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  83. #83
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    I've done two weeks of my weight training program. Now that I finally have a trainer week 3 is this week. I can't believe what a difference even two weeks makes.


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  84. #84
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    I see a couple personal trainers (one at my work gym and one by my house) and I also travel for work periodically. One of my trainers recommended the SLAAP workout for travel:

    SLAAP workout is best anywhere you are.

    (S)quats
    (L)unges
    (A)ny
    (A)bdominal exercise (crunches, Russian twist, etc.)
    (P)ush ups

    Doing just 3 set of 15 of these fundamental exercises will help keep your base intact and give you a good burn.

    -laine

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by laine View Post
    I see a couple personal trainers (one at my work gym and one by my house) and I also travel for work periodically. One of my trainers recommended the SLAAP workout for travel:

    SLAAP workout is best anywhere you are.

    (S)quats
    (L)unges
    (A)ny
    (A)bdominal exercise (crunches, Russian twist, etc.)
    (P)ush ups

    Doing just 3 set of 15 of these fundamental exercises will help keep your base intact and give you a good burn.

    -laine
    Not a bad one at all! Right now I'm doing 3 sets of 15-20 (I'm building up from 10 reps) to develop a base). But there is nothing wrong with body weight.

    For push-ups I have to do wall push-ups though. Otherwise they kill my shoulders.
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  86. #86
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    [QUOTE=stripes;13219284

    It's definitely has a mix of calisthenics and picking up heavy things and putting them down repeatedly[/QUOTE]

    Training has change! It is more "multidimensional" than ever, and better for it. My trainer calls it functional movement. We do different things all the time. I love it. A good whole body med ball workout is my favorite. Balance, core, plyometrics, weights, pyramids. Super sets, cardio, bosu, functional movement..... It's all good stuff especially when you put it all together.

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    I was a dedicated mountain biker who moved to the beach and had 2 kids so took up surfing. I started doing Cris Millls surfing training workout, look it up surfstrengthcoach.com.
    Do it and you will get ripped and strong and have great balance and flexibility, all things good for mountain biking too!
    I am able to go from surfing all the time to mountain biking again easily

  88. #88
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    “I played everything. I played lacrosse, baseball, hockey, soccer, track and field. I was a big believer that you played hockey in the winter and when the season was over you hung up your skates and you played something else.”
    ―Wayne Gretzky


    Wayne Gretzky participated in a variety of sports. Variety makes better athletes who are less likely to get hurt and more likely to stay interested in all sports.

    Good article that supports this idea:

    Sauce: https://olympiafitnessri.com/blog/on...vm8MY.facebook
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  89. #89
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    Anyone here do 5x5s? I'm thinking that's not a bad winter strength training to do.


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  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by harperbikebeer View Post
    I was a dedicated mountain biker who moved to the beach and had 2 kids so took up surfing. I started doing Cris Millls surfing training workout, look it up surfstrengthcoach.com.
    Do it and you will get ripped and strong and have great balance and flexibility, all things good for mountain biking too!
    I am able to go from surfing all the time to mountain biking again easily
    In the winter here, I'm thinking of getting a pair of roller skates so I can cross train in the winter. Roller skating is popular here, and there's a rink nearby. Not many beaches here in Colorado

    I'm a big fan of cross training. I might have to look at getting a pair of snowshoes for the winter.
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  91. #91
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    On other notes, I blew up my knee July 1. I have a partial MCL tear and full ACL, and I have surgery sometime in the future. The timeline has not been set, yet.

    Needless to day, the enforced lack of activity is driving me nuts. My body hurts from lack of activity and movement restriction. For now, I'm on crutches and non-weight bearing.

    I sat down this weekend and came up with a list that I can do at home.
    1-legged body weight squats
    SL dead lifts

    (above holding on for balance. If I fall I'm screwed)
    1-legged planks (braced leg not touching)
    3 different kinds of crunches
    Seated Dumbbells- shoulder matrix, curls, triceps, rowing.
    Using the ball is out.

    Bike season is over for me.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    On other notes, I blew up my knee July 1. I have a partial MCL tear and full ACL, and I have surgery sometime in the future. The timeline has not been set, yet.

    Needless to day, the enforced lack of activity is driving me nuts. My body hurts from lack of activity and movement restriction. For now, I'm on crutches and non-weight bearing.

    I sat down this weekend and came up with a list that I can do at home.
    1-legged body weight squats
    SL dead lifts

    (above holding on for balance. If I fall I'm screwed)
    1-legged planks (braced leg not touching)
    3 different kinds of crunches
    Seated Dumbbells- shoulder matrix, curls, triceps, rowing.
    Using the ball is out.

    Bike season is over for me.
    Seems a little weird every time (except in the early nineties) they get me to physic right away....and the rehab starts even if i am on crutches and a brace...

    Usually just knee extensions against the wall, to improve rang of motion....

    I am surprised they haven't got you moving a little yet....I had no ACL for thirty years....tore the MCL within the last ten.

  93. #93
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    This is for outside of the knee rehab so I don't lose ALL my muscle. I still have to meet with the surgeon for the injured knee.

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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    This is for outside of the knee rehab so I don't lose ALL my muscle. I still have to meet with the surgeon for the injured knee.
    So are you looking to work other body parts in the meantime that don't require any weight on your leg?

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    On other notes, I blew up my knee July 1. I have a partial MCL tear and full ACL, and I have surgery sometime in the future. The timeline has not been set, yet.

    Needless to day, the enforced lack of activity is driving me nuts. My body hurts from lack of activity and movement restriction. For now, I'm on crutches and non-weight bearing.

    I sat down this weekend and came up with a list that I can do at home.
    1-legged body weight squats
    SL dead lifts

    (above holding on for balance. If I fall I'm screwed)
    1-legged planks (braced leg not touching)
    3 different kinds of crunches
    Seated Dumbbells- shoulder matrix, curls, triceps, rowing.
    Using the ball is out.

    Bike season is over for me.
    Man, I'm so sorry. I've been there I had to rehab my ACL/meniscus a few years ago. Then my upper body a year later with the breast reduction.

    As soon as you can, start pedaling. I was able to pedal 9 days post op. It hurt, but it helped.

    If you have access to a gym with a handbike, use that. While it's not pedaling with your feet, it'll help you get exercising. And stronger shoulders. And anything at all to get the heart rate up and the blood pumping will help you heal.

    Walking on crutches was quite the workout for me, especially when I was strong enough to put the weight on the crutches and use them to go. I could cruise at one point

    If you have some dumbbells at home, you can do all the upper body fun (lat pulldowns, shoulder raises both lateral and front, tricep exercises, shrugs, and bicep curls).

    Yoga helps:
    8 Seated Yoga Poses You Can Do from a Chair | SparkPeople

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    Friday funnies ... keep workin it



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    Damn, that's a lot of muesli

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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    LOL yep
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  100. #100
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    I did my first 15' rope climb. This was a big achievement for me... feeling stoked

    https://www.facebook.com/badkat.ljub...1057601674570/

    Grip and upper body strength helps but the main power is legs... never skip leg day
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