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  1. #101
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    Strength training and cardio is a good balance. I did a 10k race (not my my sport) yesterday. I was pleased with my results 56:39 (I took 4:30 minutes off my time from last year's race... same course). I did well in my age category

    Hubby and I did a celebratory ride in the afternoon

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    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  2. #102
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    Throwback Thursday and a little TGIF

    Strength Training-23472464_10159650820980192_2145931785357732459_n.jpg



    Set up
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    Lift-off

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    success


    Strength Training-23795539_2019951794915928_4928460355213837689_n.jpg

    I love my coach.... she cracks me up
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  3. #103
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    I like how the weight is floating in my hands as I'm dipping quickly under bar during the clean.

    Strength Training-25551873_2034872330090541_7643187082610799636_n.jpg

    Strength Training-25659512_2034871643423943_8575582885215755799_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  4. #104
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    I've been doing crossfit training for 4 years. The benefits outweigh the cons.


    The Female Lifting Revolution
    Has anything advanced the case of female super-fitness more than CrossFit? That's a rhetorical question. The answer is obviously "no."

    Today, more women are lifting weights, getting strong, and looking better than ever because of the popularity of CrossFit training. Bodybuilding couldn't pull it off, and even the popularity of "bodybuilding light" – Figure, bikini, etc. – hasn't drawn in modern women as much as CrossFit has. Love or hate CrossFit, these are the facts.

    In the past I've referred to CrossFit as "the Scientology of fitness" among other unflattering references, but it's hard not to notice the legions of super-jacked, crazy-strong women that seem to be popping up all over the place.

    Back in the late 80's when I was just starting my coaching career, a woman who could clean & jerk 135 was about as rare as seeing someone doing deadlifts at Planet Fitness. Today, however, women who can do "the king of lifts" using 200 pounds are a dime a dozen.

    Strength Training-26114011_2038446063066501_8668195485911326223_n.jpg

    Three decades ago, the only place you could see a six-pack on a woman was at a bodybuilding competition. Today, it's commonplace, and this is mostly due to CrossFit.


    Looking Past CrossFit's Shortcomings
    I can already hear the objections beginning to percolate in that brain of yours. You're thinking CrossFit is dangerous, they all use drugs, yada yada yada. But guess what? Just like the greatest athletes, pretty much all popular training systems get some things wrong, but end up succeeding anyway because they do so many other things right. There's no perfect program.

    Let's look past the shortcomings of CrossFit in an effort to discover why it's producing so many goddamned insanely strong women who could out-lift the average guy during her warm-ups.


    After watching the CrossFit phenomenon with interest for a number of years, I've isolated four primary reasons why you'd probably place dead last if you entered the women's division at the next CrossFit Regionals. (Oh, and you'd also have the worst abs too.)

    Note: CrossFit men are no slouches either, and many of them could (and often do) fare quite well in Olympic lifting, powerlifting, and physique competitions. So don't get sidetracked by the focus on females – there's lots to learn here for all of us.



    Strength Training-25659512_2034871643423943_8575582885215755799_n.jpg

    Reason 1 – Work Capacity
    How many hours a week do you work out? For me, it's between 8-10 hours. That seems like a lot, but in my conversations with a number of CrossFit coaches and competitors, high-level CrossFit competitors train between 6-8 hours a day, at least when the CrossFit Games are coming up. That means they train about 4-5 times more than you do, and manage to recover from it as well.

    What's that? You're concerned about overtraining? Hey, I totally get it, but as the years roll on, I find myself less and less concerned about this much-feared malady.

    Remember that the key driver of muscle growth is training volume, which just means workloads. As long as your intensity is at or above about 60% of 1RM, the more work you do (and as long as you can recover from it, of course), the more adaptations you can make.

    Look, I'm as amazed by the workloads of top CrossFit competitors as you are, but I chalk it up to the gradual evaporation of scientific ignorance. Some of you are too young to know this, but the IOC didn't allow women to compete in the marathon until the 1980's because it was widely assumed that "the weaker sex" wouldn't be able to tolerate the stresses of such long distances.

    Today, less than three decades later, the women's world record is only 15 minutes slower than the men's. Oops, guess we were wrong, and maybe we're also wrong about how much work a resistance-trained athlete can do.

    In related news, I know of trainers who think that if your workout goes past 60 minutes, your efforts will be nullified by a sudden shitstorm of catabolic hormones. This was "common knowledge" in gyms only a few decades ago, despite the fact that some pretty decent bodybuilders (like Arnold, for example) had apparently never caught wind of the idea.

    Take Home Lesson: Maybe the problem isn't that you're doing too much work, maybe it's that you're not doing enough work.

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    Reason 2 – Enforcement Of Progression
    We all know that progressive overload is important, and listen, it's great that you're doing your best to add 5 pounds to the bar every week. In CrossFit, it's a little different.

    Each WOD (workout of the day) is a group competition. WODs typically involve beating your best time for a specific workout, or trying to do more total work within a fixed timeframe. Either way, WOD's are total hell, and likely a lot more intense than YOUR typical workout.

    I'm not suggesting that you should be puking your guts out after every (or any) workout, but many typical gym lifters lose track of the importance of progression and intensity somewhere along the way. Sure, we all try to beat our PR's when we can, but in CrossFit, there's usually a heightened sense of urgency about this subject.

    In CrossFit, it's not like you go in to the gym and "see how I feel today." If you're in, you're ALL in. It's much more of a do or die scenario. Sure, there are some cons to go along with that pro, but it cannot be denied that the typical CrossFitter works hard and is always trying to work harder.

    Take Home Lesson: Maybe you're not working as hard as you think.

    Strength Training-dscn1241.jpg

    Reason 3 – Novel, Unexpected Training Threats
    If you've ever watched a legit CrossFit workout, you might have noticed that it's a bit different from what you're used to doing. You probably never do more than 5 reps on deadlifts, or 2-3 reps per set if you're doing Olympic lifts. And as everyone knows, "low reps are for bulk and high reps are for tone."

    Okay, couldn't help myself with that one (sorry), but you probably do buy into the idea that the "sweet spot" for gains is roughly between 8-12 reps per set. Or, if you're trying to improve strength, you probably do between 1-5 reps per set. In addition, you probably lift during some workouts and do cardio on others. And you know what? Science more or less agrees with you on all this.

    Thing is, CrossFit hasn't really gotten wind of these ideas as of yet, so they do things a little different. So if you wander into a CrossFit box just as they're about to start a WOD, you might see people doing one of the following:

    The Filthy 50
    50 box jumps to a 24-inch box
    50 jumping pull-ups
    50 kettlebell swings
    50 walking lunge steps
    50 knees to elbows
    50 push presses with 45 pounds
    50 back extensions
    50 wallballs with a 20-pound ball
    50 burpees
    50 jump rope double-unders

    Murph
    One-mile run
    100 pull-ups
    200 push-ups
    300 bodyweight squats
    One-mile run

    King Kong
    Three rounds of:

    455-pound deadlift
    2 muscle-ups
    3 squat cleans with 250 pounds
    4 handstand push-ups

    I'm going to go out on a limb and predict that you haven't done anything that even remotely resembles workouts like this. After all, at least at a quick glance, they seem to violate every known training principle ever conceived.

    But as whacked as these workouts seem (and maybe are), they do offer a unique advantage: They impose threatening demands on the body that trigger homeostatic disruption.

    In other words, your body is literally threatened by the extreme novelty of these workouts and begins to increase both muscle size and strength levels to protect itself against similar threats in the future.

    At the core of this premise is the idea that novelty is a key feature of effective training, particularly for muscular hypertrophy. Think about it: If you needed to be sore tomorrow, what would you do today to create that soreness? Would you do something familiar, or something very unfamiliar?

    Further, the more experienced you become, the more it is that novel training sessions grow in importance. After all, as a beginner, everything you do in the gym is novel, right? And of course you grow like a weed no matter what you do. Later on however, it becomes harder and harder to "shock" your system, even if you work hard, because the exercises you do are familiar, and you've already adapted to them.

    Take Home Lesson: Consider (carefully) scaring the shit out of your body with novel, unexpected training challenges.

    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0432.jpg




    Reason 4 – Social Support

    My final observation about why CrossFit seems to be effective for many people involves social pressure, er, I mean social support. We all know the value of having a motivated training partner. When you have a workout buddy, you can push and support each other to bigger and better performances, and a bit of friendly competition definitely helps you push hard when you otherwise might not.

    Now multiply this effect by 15 or 20, which is what happens in a typical CrossFit environment. As you're about to start your WOD, as the large electronic timer mounted on the wall approaches 00:00:01, you and a bunch of other classmates are now involved in a highly charged athletic competition, not just a workout. It's competitive, it's intense, and you can't help but want to do as well as you can to save face.

    Note also that at high levels of sport training, even in individual sports like weightlifting and wrestling, athletes train in team environments. Take a look at the famed Westside Barbell Club in Columbus, Ohio. Over the years, several noted strength experts have told me in confidence that they believe 90% of Westside's success stems from their highly intense team environment, and not the unusual training methodology they espouse.

    Take Home Lesson: You'll train harder in a group environment. Consider finding one.

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    A Little Perspective
    Sure, a lot of what CrossFit does seems (and probably is) flat-out stupid and dangerous, but don't throw the baby out with the bathwater. If you take the time to look a little deeper, there are hidden gems to be discovered.

    And as a final thought, I'll remind you the very activity that we all know to be so valuable to health, performance, and sports preparation – resistance training – was almost universally considered to be a bad idea several decades ago.

    Scientists, doctors, and sport coaches warned that lifting weights would stunt your growth, slow you down, and make you "muscle bound." We laugh at these notions today, but have you ever wondered what they'll be laughing at 50 years from now


    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0372.jpg

    https://www.t-nation.com/training/wh...gn=article5989
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  5. #105
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    People have good intentions to get fit and just because you took longer than others, doesn't mean you failed. Remember that.


    How to Stay Motivated

    Motivation has a way of disappearing. A new year rolls around, we get pumped up and excited, and then suddenly a week goes by and our motivation has gone out the window.

    And it’s no surprise why—making a change is hard. Saying you want to exercise more is simple, but actually making it happen can be terribly difficult, draining your motivation fast.

    So, we thought we’d put together some quick tips to help you stay motivated to move.

    1. STICK TO THE BASICS.
    There is so much information out there on motivation and strategies for making change that it’s easy to get overwhelmed.

    Instead of drowning in info, stick to the basics. Eat well, get 7.5 to 8 hours of good quality sleep each night, and drink plenty of water during the day. Keeping it simple helps you stay focused on the things that matter. When you’re hydrated, well rested, and full of nutritious food, you’ll be more likely to feel motivated to move.

    2. FOCUS ON CONSISTENCY OVER INTENSITY.
    It’s easy to go too hard and too fast out of the gate. We think big changes require big actions. But the truth is that consistency matters far more than intensity. Start small and focus on doing something each day. Change happens slowly and steadily, not overnight. Once you get the hang of consistent action, then you can start upping the intensity.

    3. DON’T TAKE AN ALL-OR-NOTHING APPROACH.
    We’re often quick to judge our goals on a pass/fail basis. Either we did it or we didn’t. Combine this with a lofty New Year’s resolution and you have a recipe for failure.

    Instead, make progress your measuring stick. Are you getting better? Are you taking actions toward your goals? Are you headed in the right direction?

    Don’t get down on yourself if you’ve missed a day or already faced a challenge. Just keep moving forward. The year is long, you’ll go far if you remember something is better than nothing.

    4. REMIND YOURSELF WHAT’S AT STAKE.

    Sometimes we are motivated to take action not by what we’ll get if we do, but by what will happen if we don’t. We drag ourselves out of bed and to work each morning because if we don’t, there will be consequences.

    The same is true of moving more. It may sound a tad morbid, but it’s important to remind yourself what will happen if you don’t make movement a regular part of your day. What will happen to your health and to your happiness?

    Your primary motivation should never be fear, of course, but keeping the consequences of inaction in mind can certainly help push you forward.

    5. DON’T COMPARE YOURSELF TO OTHERS.
    Social media has made it easier than ever before to compare. It’s extremely tempting and hard to resist comparing where we’re at with others. But it can also be super deflating.

    Instead, try to focus on yourself, on your goals and your priorities. Remember that we’re all on different paths and trying to compare them isn’t fair to you, helpful for making progress, or a good way to stay motivated.

    6. START WITH THE SMALLEST POSSIBLE THING.
    You don’t need motivation to brush your teeth or tie your shoes. You just do it. Tiny tasks are effortless.

    When you’re not feeling motivated, focus on a task so tiny that there’s no motivation required. It may seem silly at first, but it also may just lead to forming a new habit.

    7. HAVE FUN!

    The more fun you’re having, the more motivated you’ll feel. Don’t force yourself to do things that feel like bores or chores. They sap your motivation.

    Instead, do something you’ll enjoy. Even if it’s a short walk. Even if it’s dancing to your favourite jam in your living room. Even if it’s just a few stretches to help you relax.

    LIVING THE DREAM
    The dream is for your motivation to grow over time, rather than fading away. And that might not happen at first. That’s okay.

    But if you stick to the basics, consistently take small steps, and have fun with the process, you just might end up living the dream.
    Sauce: https://www.participaction.com/en-ca...otivation-last
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  6. #106
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    Good tips for improving bone density. If you are concerned about your bone health, it doesn’t mean you need to turn your program upside down. Simply include one or two exercises that stress your legs, hips and lumbar spine in a random manner with some impact and force. You might also add vitamin D as a supplement


    3 Ways To Keep Bones Strong For Life

    Strong bones are the pillars of a body that's healthy, athletic, and prepared for the long haul. Learn how to eat and train to help keep your bones strong as you age!

    While you may think you're years away from having to think about bone health, I'm here to tell you that taking care of your bones isn't solely about preparing for the future; it matters now. By age 18, nearly 90 percent of your adult bone structure is solidified. By age 30, the chance of making any further enhancements to your bone density is slim.[1]

    Fortunately, your nutrition and exercise habits can have a profound impact on helping to maintain the bone strength you have and maximizing every opportunity for adding strength.

    Solidify the foundation of your frame today by incorporating the right nutrition and training strategies!


    Calcium: The Backbone Of Bone Health


    Your bones are alive and constantly remodeling. This occurs via the removal and addition of bone tissue, a process referred to as bone turnover. Assuming you're getting adequate nutrition and exercise, your body consistently adds more bone material throughout childhood, and even up until age 30.

    It's around this age, however, that bone turnover begins to net a negative outcome. But lifestyle and nutrition choices may help support the health, density and strength of your bones.

    Strength Training-3-ways-keep-bones-strong-life-v2-1-700xh.jpg


    As you can imagine, if you never actually hit your peak bone density, you're at further risk. In fact, research published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise found that 22-50 percent of female athletes have osteopenia (sub-peak bone density).

    Given that 99.5 percent of your bodily calcium stores are within your bones, it makes sense that calcium plays an integral role in optimizing bone strength and formation. To help support bone health, Martha Pyron, MD, a sports medicine specialist with Medicine in Motion in Austin, Texas, recommends women aim for a minimum of 1,200 milligrams of calcium per day.

    Calcium-rich foods include all dairy products (think milk, cheese, yogurt), as well as cruciferous green veggies (broccoli, bok choy), soy products (tofu, seitan, edamame), and kidney beans. If you don't eat enough of these foods daily, consider supplementing with calcium to help meet your daily goal.

    When selecting a calcium supplement, choose calcium carbonate or citrate. These two options are better absorbed by the body than other options.

    Vitamin D: Calcium's Helping Hands

    Vitamin D may help promote bone strength by facilitating increased calcium absorption. Unfortunately, few foods contain enough vitamin D to give you all you need.

    The good news is that sunshine is the best source of vitamin D. When the UVB rays from the sun contact your skin, they initiate a cascade of reactions that convert the vitamin D precursor molecule in your skin, 7-dehydrocholesterol, into a useable form of vitamin D known as calcitriol. It's calcitriol that works in a hormone-like fashion to increase production of calcium-binding proteins, and ultimately, calcium absorption.

    If only getting out in the sun were enough to make this happen! Lifestyle, geographical location, skin pigmentation, and sunscreen use all impair the absorption of necessary UVB rays to drive this formation. As a result, most of us are vitamin D-deficient. Hence Dr. Pyron's recommendation to supplement with 800-1,000 IU of vitamin D per day.

    To optimize absorption, select a vitamin D-3 supplement, also known as cholecalciferol. This form beats the pants off of vitamin D-2 when it comes to absorption.

    Resistance Training: The Finishing Touch

    Working out with weights can further enhance your bone strength and preservation. That's because resistance training provides a direct stressor to your bones. To adapt to such a stress, your body increases the production of cells responsible for laying down new bone material. As a result, bone density can be maintained or even enhanced.

    Try incorporating weight-bearing exercises at least 2-3 times a week. Push-ups and bodyweight squats work great as well, along with any other move that loads up your frame and makes it work. Jumping rope, walking, and jogging are also great for maintaining bone-mineral density.

    Bottom line: Stay active, stay healthy, stay strong—and your bones will thank you!


    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  7. #107
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    Hey everyone! Poking my head back into the forums to ask... Has anyone found or come up with a good strength program for enduro racing? I keep saying I'm not going to race this year but I know that's a bad joke, sooooo... Might as well do it right!

    Whatcha got? Right now I only do body weight stuff. I'm a total gym newb.

  8. #108
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    Nothing beats more time riding. Look to be riding 3-4x a week, probably something in the 2-3x riding of short sprinty stuff on the XC bike/ Enduro and a good long ride day somewhere in the realm of 15-20mi (24-32km) with some good elevation gain. Additionally 2x a week strength should be great and 1 rest day.

    Some weight and strength training that might help:

    Grip strength- Farmer's carry is a good exercise. Walk 100m carrying heavy kettlebells or dumbells in each hand. 5-8 rds couple times per week

    Core- Front squats are excellent for core. Increase the weight gradually. (figure out what the heaviest you can lift then start with 50% of that weight and do 3-5 reps) Increase weight to 60% 70% 75% 80% 85% 90%.
    Or Figure out 80% of your max and do 5 sets for 6 rounds

    Planks - on your elbows hold for 1 minute. Switch to side plank each side 1 minute and then rest 30sec. Repeat x5
    I recently won our gym plank hold this year... I held the plank for 10:01 minutes.

    Sit-ups or V-ups or hollow holds all good for core

    Push ups- 10 reps (strict) x 5 sets
    Pull ups- excellent for your lats. Even if you can't do them strict , you can start with jumping pull ups or use a band (engage your lats) Some people find chin ups (hand grip facing you is easier)

    I like handstand holds. Try and hold a handstand against the wall for a minute. Try to increase (good for core and shoulders)

    I like high intensity intervals... there's alot of combos to choose from (running sprints, burpees, wall balls, kettlebell swings, trusters, skipping, box jumps etc)

    There are other powerlifting exercises like deadlifts. Works the hamstrings core, grip.

    Lots of options and areas to target. Let me know if this sounds ok. I have more ideas
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  9. #109
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    Strength Training

    What’s your thoughts on stronglifts 5x5, especially for off season training?
    Guerrilla Gravity BAMF, Colorado Front Range
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  10. #110
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    For those not familiar with SL5x5

    https://stronglifts.com/5x5/

    It is a progressive program that is easy to follow. The routine and the app are simple enough to get people into the gym, work out and understand how to follow a routine without having to spend ages figuring out what to do before hand. I understand that the weights start light and the loads are gradually increased. I read that most people see some results (increased strength and some body changes after 5-6 months) which is a good incentive because when you see results you're less likely to give up.

    Some people find that it's not the best for stamina and aesthetics; and not enough upper body work. But it is a good baseline for building habit

    In my experience, I found that it's important to lift correctly, lift safely and lift regularly especially if you want to see results and maintain fitness.
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclelicious View Post
    Nothing beats more time riding. Look to be riding 3-4x a week, probably something in the 2-3x riding of short sprinty stuff on the XC bike/ Enduro and a good long ride day somewhere in the realm of 15-20mi (24-32km) with some good elevation gain. Additionally 2x a week strength should be great and 1 rest day.

    Some weight and strength training that might help:

    Grip strength- Farmer's carry is a good exercise. Walk 100m carrying heavy kettlebells or dumbells in each hand. 5-8 rds couple times per week

    Core- Front squats are excellent for core. Increase the weight gradually. (figure out what the heaviest you can lift then start with 50% of that weight and do 3-5 reps) Increase weight to 60% 70% 75% 80% 85% 90%.
    Or Figure out 80% of your max and do 5 sets for 6 rounds

    Planks - on your elbows hold for 1 minute. Switch to side plank each side 1 minute and then rest 30sec. Repeat x5
    I recently won our gym plank hold this year... I held the plank for 10:01 minutes.

    Sit-ups or V-ups or hollow holds all good for core

    Push ups- 10 reps (strict) x 5 sets
    Pull ups- excellent for your lats. Even if you can't do them strict , you can start with jumping pull ups or use a band (engage your lats) Some people find chin ups (hand grip facing you is easier)

    I like handstand holds. Try and hold a handstand against the wall for a minute. Try to increase (good for core and shoulders)

    I like high intensity intervals... there's alot of combos to choose from (running sprints, burpees, wall balls, kettlebell swings, trusters, skipping, box jumps etc)

    There are other powerlifting exercises like deadlifts. Works the hamstrings core, grip.

    Lots of options and areas to target. Let me know if this sounds ok. I have more ideas
    Thanks!

    I definitely have the time on the bike bit down, as I've trained for endurance XC for several years. But I'm ready to be more well-rounded!

    A lot of these things I do with my gymnastics (handstand? hard to explain ) trainer (we're also working on fall mechanics, which will definitely help me on the bike!), so maybe it's just an issue of filling in the gaps...

  12. #112
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    Calories Burned With Exercise

    Ever wonder how many calories you burn taking the stairs or walking the dog? Find out how you can smoke more calories every day doing fun, easy activities.

    HOW CALORIE BURN WORKS
    There are endless ways to get the exercise you need to stay healthy. Sick of the gym? Try going dancing or cleaning up the yard. Small, fun activities can help you stay fit and lose fat.

    How many calories burned by an exercise depends on how big you are. It takes more energy to move a bigger body. When he was starting out at 600 pounds, Bodybuilding.com model "Possible Pat" Brocco experienced serious weight loss simply by walking to the grocery store every day.

    Keep in mind that the calorie numbers here are just estimates. How hard you work makes a difference in how many calories you burn, so don't just phone it in.

    And of course, hundreds of calories burned won't add up to much weight loss if you're eating hundreds of calories too many. Use our calorie calculator to make sure you're eating the right amount.
    EXERCISES THAT BURN 100 CALORIES

    ACTIVITY DURATION
    Power Walking 15 minutes
    Dancing 20 minutes
    Stretching and Calisthenics 30 minutes
    Shorter Rest Periods 1 workout
    Taking the Stairs 6 times
    Parking Farther Away Every time
    Raking 18 minutes
    Cooking 34 minutes
    Window Shopping 25 minutes
    Forearm Flexing 5-6 sets

    EXERCISES THAT BURN 200 CALORIES

    ACTIVITY DURATION
    Easy Bike Riding 35 minutes
    Supersets 30 minutes
    Scrubbing Floors 40 minutes
    Mowing the Lawn 35 minutes
    Tennis 26 minutes
    Dog Walking 40 minutes
    Walking at Lunch 30 minutes
    Bowling 60 minutes
    Beach Volleyball 23 minutes
    Jumping Rope 17 minutes

    EXERCISES THAT BURN 300 CALORIES

    ACTIVITY DURATION
    Cross Country Skiing 18 minutes
    Rollerblading 26 minutes
    Rock Climbing 36 minutes
    Ultimate Frisbee 48 minutes
    Standing at Work 8 hours
    Shoveling Snow 38 minutes
    Kayaking 52 minutes
    Baseball 90 minutes
    Walking on the Beach 55 minutes
    Washing Your Car 63 minutes
    Running 20 minutes


    Strength Training-27332401_2053472204897220_2654033280928571383_n.jpg

    Strength Training-27539984_2056707471240360_5526823094265119028_n.jpg

    215lb deadlift
    Strength Training-27067329_2054180178159756_1351858276347844283_n.jpg

    85lb Power clean - triple extension
    Strength Training-27544646_2054180424826398_4686104125878557011_n.jpg

    85 lb Power clean finish- elbows up
    Strength Training-27066972_2054180311493076_5789410850649066379_n.jpg



    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bur...SM_FB_Training
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  13. #113
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    Body image.
    The struggle is real. Perfectionism. OCD. Type A. Expectations. Goals. Number on the scale. Clothing size. Beachwear.

    When you look in the mirror, what do you see? Strength? Beauty? Smarts?

    We are our worst critics. It’s ok to want to be a better you.

    Let’s start with the voice in our heads. Listen to how you talk to yourself.

    Here are a couple tips to get you started:

    1. Be positive and kind. Treat yourself as you would someone else. When you look at yourself, instead of zoning in on your so-called trouble area, find something you like about your body and give yourself a compliment.

    2. When it comes to exercise, set performance-based goals. Don't think of exercising as simply burning calories and improving how certain body parts look in the mirror. Instead, take a look at what your body can do. Make it a goal to perform X quality push-ups, more box jumps than you did the last time, or run 1 to 5 km at a certain pace. Choose to focus on becoming the strongest version of yourself.

    3. Focus on your natural talents. Everyone has unique physical talents and abilities, such as jumping high, running fast, or upper body strength. Everyone has non-physical talents as well, like singing, playing an instrument, math, being hilarious or conscientious. Remember what YOUR gifts are.

    4. Don't compare yourself to others. Understand that every body is unique and there is no need to constantly fix things on your body to look like something else. As you look in the mirror, describe yourself with words like beautiful, clever, strong, self-assured, optimistic or amazing.
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  14. #114
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    Strength Training-27973495_1575434222570240_3319631324130703733_n.jpg
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  15. #115
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    The Surprising Mindset Changes Of Every Female Lifter


    Strength Training-28277429_2067279783516462_5591757699564150028_n-1-.jpg


    We’ve come a long way in recent years. Women are well represented in every strength and physique sport from powerlifting to strong(wo)man. But have other people’s attitudes – or our own feelings – always kept pace?

    Think back to your early days of lifting. When you first started noticing your physique changing, your appetite getting bigger, your passion for training sky-rocketing. How did it feel?

    You’re bigger now… but happier to show it

    When you started lifting, phrases like “thunder thighs” were the stuff of nightmares. But these days, when you do indeed have thunderous thighs (and humdinger hamstrings), it feels great. Who wouldn’t want to have big, powerful legs? If anyone doesn’t get it, they’re not your people. Back in the days before you lifted, you couldn’t imagine being happy showing your legs off in shorts. These days, the legs are bigger, and they’re in shorts more often.

    You have to leave some friends behind

    The friends you make through lifting are the best. They understand your love of deadlifting, and share your secret loathing of paused squats. They’re always hungry, and they know the best places to go for lunch (or brunch, or dinner, or snacks). They share your experiences of being a female in the weights room at the gym. And they’ve probably joined in training for a competition, and you know they’ll always be happy to come watch you compete. But some of your non-lifting friends just don’t get it. They don’t get your passion. They think you’re obsessed, and they worry that it’s unhealthy. It becomes a problem when you won’t go out drinking, or prefer to stay in rather than party all night. Of course, some of your non-gym buddies are great about it! They ask the right questions, and listen to you talk about training. And you still have plenty to share But sadly some of your “before lifting” friends might have to fall by the wayside. There’s enough negativity to be found when you’re a female lifter. You don’t need it from your friends.

    You learn discipline


    Growing up, you maybe through discipline was a boring concept. But lifting and training shows you that it’s anything but dull. Discipline, focus, organizational ability and time management enable you to juggle training alongside the rest of your life. Your new skills show you how to get the most out of every training session, every recovery day, and every meal prep. And all of a sudden you discover that you can apply your new-found discipline to your career, relationships, and to challenges outside of the gym. You’re stronger in more ways than one.

    Your circle gets tighter, but everyone in it is awesome


    Your new-found confidence and drive has enabled you to cut out negative people from your life. People who belittle your passion or try to cut your dreams down to size have to go. In their place come new friends, the people you meet through lifting, competing, and coaching. And something else happens, too. Old friends come out of the shadows, inspired by your dedication to lifting, encouraging you every step of the way, and surprising you with their positivity. You learn how to close your ears to those who don’t support you, and welcome good friends who really want the best for you.

    You learn to stand up for yourself

    Times are changing, but women who lift still come up against misinformed, patronising, or downright sexist comments. “Why do you want to do that to yourself?” “Are you trying to look like a man?” “Women with muscles are disgusting.” “Don’t get too big now, will you!” You know the kind of thing. But this is your passion, and you know how amazing training and competing is, not just for your body but for your health, your emotions, your stress levels and confidence. So you learn to respond to the silly comments. You find ways to educate and inform. You work out when it’s worth responding, and when it’s better to turn away and save your breath. You learn to draw on your own confidence and inner strength.

    You become an ambassador

    There’s a strong chance you’re the only female strength athlete in your family, at your office, or in your circle of old friends. You have a fantastic opportunity to educate, inspire and fly the flag for what lifting weights can really look like for women. You’re an ambassador for strength sports, for lifting, for training and being strong. You might find yourself a role model for young women in your life, or for your own daughters.

    You amaze yourself, every day

    There’s an old saying that the iron never lies. Weights are weights. There’s no cheating and no luck in strength sport. And as you progress, you amaze yourself in what you can do. Old limits are blasted away and new ones set. Before long, those new goals are old news too. You can do more than other people thought you could. And more than you realize.
    sauce The Surprising Mindset Changes Of Every Female Lifter -

    Strength Training-28277149_2067279523516488_600286860879813564_n.jpg



    Strength Training-28379317_2069334723310968_6789652014876458087_n.jpg
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  16. #116
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    Happy International Women's day to all the strong ladies who continue to make the world a lovely place to live! Here's a Lisa Simpson thought

    Strength Training-28782784_1206204949510143_5405240051897153517_n.jpg


    Keep shreddin'
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  17. #117
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    So I decided on strength programming.

    I'm doing one of Dee Tidwell's plans: Enduro MTB Training and MTB Strong

    Plus some calisthenics that I'm working with a gymnastics trainer. Lots of straight arm isometric holds and compound bent-arm movements. Doing lots of hip strengthening, too, which is great because lots of it is complementary to muscles used in cycling. Finding tons of weak spots from years spent over the bars and hopeful that full-body functional strength will help me enduro faster! Even though the reason I started training with him was to learn advanced arm balances/presses/etc.

  18. #118
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    Still in knee rehab but released to ride conservatively on dirt last week. This cracks me up: I've been tracking my rehab with little videos on instagram. I have a friend who is a collegiate athelete trainer. She's shaming her 20-somethings who are whining about how hard rehab is with my videos. "This woman is 57 and had surgery sooner than you, and she does her stuff every.single.day.

    @geargrrl on instagram.

  19. #119
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    Strength Training

    I got a new trainer that focuses on body weight for strength training. I’m doing that twice a week and it’s kicking my butt. And my shoulders are no longer the weak link.

    But, it’s working better than anything else I’ve done in a long time.

    And I’m also more tired than I’ve ever been in a while too

    For me, the two main staples are body weight squats and planks. If I stay on those, everything else is a bonus.

    Formica: I’ve been watching your Instagram. Keep up the awesomeness!

    Lucy Juice: I’d love to hear what you think of his program.
    Guerrilla Gravity BAMF, Colorado Front Range
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  20. #120
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    After doing the CrossFit open for my 4th year I noticed huge jumps in my performance. The Open is a good opportunity to test overall strength gains and endurance, and compete against others in the same category (regional location, gender and age)

    This year I completed 4/5 prescribed (I couldn't do the handstand push up so I did that workout scaled). Overall, I've made progressive gains in lifting (due to proper technique) which escalated my overall strength; endurance improvement (cardio efficiency due to running longer distances and more frequently). I've worked hard this last year, and have been able to do a 15' rope climb, 20" box jumps, using 24kg kettlebells, strict pullups, and toes to bar (kipping helps). Not bad for this 55+ yr old

    Needless to say this open was not as disappointing and a big confidence booster! I'm stronger on the bike (Enduro combining climbs and dh), and I'm leaner (less weight to carry around) so my technical riding has improved. My goal is to be safe, stay injury free and have fun.
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  21. #121
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    Work that butt

    As you and I know we have all been blessed with different body types. Some may think of their derriére as a blessing, while others would rather say their rear is a curse! I say, let's work with what you have and turn your butt into your sexiest and most loved body part!

    I have outlined for you some of the most affective proven butt building exercises. Each day that it's time to train your lovely lower body, choose three exercises from the list below. Consistency is absolutely key in seeing, and feeling results.

    The Resistance Exercises

    1. Barbell Squat
    Squats are an excellent and proven way of training your gluteus maximus (butt). You can add resistance by performing them while holding dumbbells in your hands or with a bar across your shoulders. If you opt for the bar (advanced), make sure you have a spotter unless the resistance is very light.

    Strength Training-29684257_2084937418417365_5253464412995860409_n.jpg


    Varying the width of your feet will change the emphasis of the exercise. The closer together your feet are, the more your quads (front of the thighs) will work. As you move your feet further apart, you'll feel the exercise more in your hips and butt. You should always have someone check your form to be sure you're doing squats properly.

    If you go to a gym, the leg press machine may be easier to use than doing squats with a bar, and it attacks the same region.

    2. Lunges
    Lunges are another exercise that works your glutes. Singer Jessica Simpson was noted to have fallen in love with lunges as she sculpted her body to fit her daisy duke shorts in The Dukes of Hazzard.

    Here are several different types of lunges:

    Stationary lunges
    Walking lunges
    Alternating lunges
    Side lunges
    As a refresher on how to do a lunge, let's review the stationary lunge with dumbbells.

    Hold two dumbbells to the side of your body. Bring one leg forward and stand so that you have good balance. Bend both legs and allow the dumbbells to bring your body down towards the ground, making sure your front knee does not go past your toes. At this time the other knee will almost touch the floor; then come back up. Do all of the reps with one leg forward and then continue with the second leg.

    3. Hip Extension
    Hip extension is a movement that I will always include in my pre-contest training or when I want my butt to look its best. This exercise, which I have learned as "Flutter Kicks" will surely make your hamstrings and glutes burn with delight. OK, maybe this doesn't sound like fun to you, but if you simply give me a chance here, you may start enjoying it as much as I do.

    On a step or platform, (or on your bed if you train at home) lie facedown with hips on the edge of the step, legs straight with toes resting lightly on the floor. (If you are using a bed, your legs will be off the edge and your feet high off the floor.) Squeeze your glutes and hamstrings and straighten the legs until they are level with the hips.

    Lift one leg higher then the other and alternate. Move each leg as though you are doing a flutter kick in water. Try doing 3 sets of 20 repetitions on each leg.

    Do you want more? Once you have done your 3 sets of Flutter Kicks, in the same position, contract your glutes and hamstrings so that your legs are parallel with the floor and move your legs open, then close. When you close them, have one leg cross over the other. Alternate each rep, which leg is crossing over. Try doing 2-3 sets of 20 repetitions on each leg.

    4. Deadlifts
    Deadlifts are excellent for your hamstrings, butt and lower back, but form is critical! Start by standing with your feet hip-width apart, and your weights in front of thighs (bar or dumbbells). Keeping back flat and abs in, bend forward from the hips and lower your torso until your weights reach your shins.


    Strength Training-28277429_2067279783516462_5591757699564150028_n.jpg

    This is where it's time to SQUEEZE your butt to raise back up. Remember to keep your weights (bar) close to your legs throughout the entire range of motion, with just the slightest bend in the knees. Make sure that you don't hyper extend your knees. Do 3 sets of 8-12 reps.

    Stepping Your Way To Tight Buns
    Stairmasters and climbers when used at a slower frequency with honest, normal steps will recruit your butt muscles into action. Do you ever see people at the gym leaning on the machine with their arms and staying on their tiptoes? You have either seen them, or are one of them.

    Spending 30 minutes on the climber, cheating your way through each step will not bring you results. Feel your body weight as you step down through your heel of each foot. The benefit of completing full steps rather than short mini steps is that your legs and glutes will be enjoying a better workout, as will your heart.

    Yes this way may be more challenging but it's the challenge that will raise your cheeks and heart rate = burned calories = fat loss. If you think that steppers will make your butt bigger, you may be eating more then you think. Steppers and a treadmill (on a high incline for walking) have been the foundation for keeping my butt firm, and round.

    Start at 20 minutes 3 days / wk. If you want to make noticeable changes, step your way up to 30 - 45 min sessions, 5 - 6 days a week.

    Final Points
    Before I let you hit the gym, there are a few points that are important to know.

    You can't choose where you gain weight. If you start eating more and lifting weights, there is no guarantee that your butt will be the area reaping the benefits.

    The shape of your butt is primarily based on genetics. Looking at your parents or other relatives you will probably notice that you have inherited some of their genes.

    Doing lower body exercises (along with upper body training and cardio) and eating more calories than you burn can help you build muscle but your genetics will decide how much your butt can really change.

    There isn't one magic exercise that will make your butt change. Consistency in the gym paired with a nutrient packed eating plan with adequate amounts of protein will be your keys to bringing out the best your glorious glutes have to offer!






    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...SM_FB_Training
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  22. #122
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    Overtraining: Signs & Solutions!

    Overtraining is a common problem in weight training, but it can also be experienced by runners and other athletes. Learn what it is and how to combat it right here. Check it out!

    Many people train to the point where they are actually getting weaker. How can this be true? The answer is simple: overtraining.

    The dictionary states, "Overtraining is a common problem in weight training, but it can also be experienced by runners and other athletes. It occurs when the volume and intensity of the exercise exceeds an individual's recovery capacity. They cease making progress, and can even begin to lose strength and fitness."

    CASE STUDY
    Since New Years, Jennifer has found her fitness groove. She said her good-byes to her late night TV programs and processed food munching, and hello to a new life. In fact, Jennifer has done a complete lifestyle change choosing foods that are in their natural state or in the least amount of packaging possible; in other words, unprocessed.

    Standing 5'5" and weighing 155 lbs, Jennifer has already lost 10 lbs. Her mind is focused on reaching her goal weight of 125 lb. To help her reach her goal, Jennifer is training two days on and one day off, and is in and out of the gym in about an hour. This training split is allowing plenty of time for her body to rest. Jennifer is feeling great!

    Fast forward six months; Jennifer is not feeling so hot. We can pat her on the back for attaining her goal weight of 125 lbs, but can she? This past month people have complimented on how fit she is looking but commented that she also appeared tired. "Are you getting enough sleep? You haven't been yourself lately." Her friends are concerned and they have every right to be.

    Jennifer's training program has increased to six days a week, with Sundays as her jogging only days. Each morning, she sets her alarm an hour early to make time for her 60-minute run before work. Once her work day is done, she returns to the gym for 60 min of weights and another 60 min of cardio.

    Though she is tired and has little interest in spending time with friends, she is making time for her fitness. What fitness means to Jennifer today is much different then three months ago.

    THE SIGNS
    Jennifer is overtraining. Along with persistent fatigue and a loss of interest in her friends, she may be also experiencing these symptoms of overtraining.

    Persistent muscle soreness
    Elevated resting heart rate
    Increased susceptibility to infections
    Increased incidence of injuries
    Irritability
    Depression
    Loss of motivation
    Insomnia
    Decreased appetite
    Weight loss
    Experiencing a loss of interest in what you once felt passion for is never fun. So, what causes overtraining?

    REST IS KEY

    To see improvement in one's strength and fitness they must rest. The rest period following hard training is a magical process which takes at least 36 hours to complete. By skimping on rest, complete regeneration cannot occur.

    If the amount of training continues to exceed the rest period, however, the individual's performance will plateau and decline. If Jennifer continues to neglect the rest time her body needs, she will indeed get weaker and may experience injuries.

    Other physical and psychological stressors can compound the rate at which a person may experience overtraining, such as:

    Jet Leg
    Ongoing Illness
    Overwork
    Menstruation
    Poor Nutrition
    Bodybuilders and other dieters who exercise intensely while limiting their food intake often find themselves overtraining.

    Though you may be focused and feeling that you need to maintain the degree at which you are training, depending on your circumstance I urge you to consider applying one or more of the following solutions. Your gains will flourish, and your family and friends will be relieved and thankful!

    SOLUTIONS

    1. TAKING A BREAK


    Taking a break from training to allow time for recovery. In knowing that you may be doing more harm than good at the gym, set aside today and tomorrow as a break. Some people allow one week away from fitness to revive their bodies and mind, and then when they return to training, they have more focus and are enjoying themselves again.

    2 REDUCING THE VOLUME
    Reducing the volume and/or the intensity of the training. If you always do five sets for each exercise, why not do just two or three, and lower the weight and focus solely on form? Strengthen your mind and muscle connection by tuning into the exercise at hand.

    3 DEEP-TISSUE MASSAGE
    Deep-tissue or sports massage of the affected muscles. A skillfully applied massage is the most effective therapy for releasing muscle tension and restoring balance to the musculo-skeletal system. Receiving regular massages may help athletes prevent injuries, which might otherwise be caused by overuse. A constant build-up of tension in the muscles from regular activity may lead to stresses on joints, ligaments, tendons, as well as the muscles themselves.

    4 SELF-MASSAGE
    Self-massage of the affected muscles. Self-massage, with either with your hands or a system such as the Yamuna™ Body Rolling (BR) system featuring a specially designed 7" ball will help with pain relief, and can be targeted to hamstrings, calves, knees, quads, shoulder and back; any muscle or joint.

    People who are stiff and inflexible and have, or are prone to, injury will benefit from BR as it elongates and massages muscles and opens and flexs the joints.

    5 TEMPERATURE CONTRAST THERAPY
    Temperature contrast therapy. (Ice baths, hot & cold showers, etc). This uses the body's reaction to hot and cold stimuli. The nerves carry impulses felt at the skin deeper into the body, where they can stimulate the immune system, improve circulation and digestion, influence the production of stress hormones, encourage blood flow, and lessening pain sensitivity.

    6 PROPER CALORIE INTAKE
    Ensuring calorie intake matches (or possibly exceeds) caloric expenditure. When overtraining, the body may be depleted in various nutrients. To assist in the process of recovery, it's important to ensure that a diet high in carbohydrates, lean proteins and healthy fats such as omega 3 oils is met. Carbohydrates will provide the brain with fuel, the oils help relieve depression and proteins will rebuild overtrained muscles.

    7 ADDRESSING VITAMIN DEFICIENCIES
    Addressing vitamin deficiencies with nutritional supplements. It is essential to get vitamins from food, however when overtraining is a concern supplementation is beneficial. Supplements should be taken in addition to meals and with meals for their essential and proper absorption.

    8 SPLIT TRAINING
    Splitting the training program so that different sets of muscles are worked on different days. Once you have rested enough for your body to recover from overtraining, be smart and plan your training split ahead of time.
    This will help to prevent overtraining from occurring again. Allow at least 4 days between training a certain body part again, and always have at least one day of rest from training each week.

    CONCLUSION
    Training towards a goal can be very rewarding, and when seeing the results form, it's hard to believe that one may ever go back to their old habits.

    Allow yourself to take a break from time to time and listen to your body. It's when we rest that the body has time to recover, rebuild, and come back stronger then before!

    https://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/faw...SM_FB_Training
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  23. #123
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    It's never too late to start lifting regularly to improve overall strength. (I'm in my late 50's)

    I'm now able to do several consecutive pull ups. Losing some body fat and gaining muscle has also helped


    Strength Training-30739956_2094921907418916_6846259534332166144_n.jpg

    (Not the prettiest maneuver) My toes to bar are also a work in progress. I've gained a lot of core strength

    Strength Training-01bhygl.jpg

    Strength Training-30624331_2091322797778827_6416236731367948288_n.jpg

    Strength Training-30698774_2091321187778988_1469828703084085248_n.jpg
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  24. #124
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    Tips For Maintaining A Healthy Body Weight

    Learn how to keep your motivation going strong when maintenance is your goal.

    Strength Training-dscn8617.jpg

    The desire to transform is a great motivator to eat right and exercise. Whether you're shedding excess fat or filling out your physique with a few extra pounds of muscle, the desire to capture the perfect physique keeps you motivated and on track.

    But what happens once you've achieved your goal? How do you sustain your transformation and maintain the physique you've worked so hard to build?

    Preserving a healthy body weight is often easier said than done—and for many, it's a lot harder than the transformation. Once you remove the driving force to reach a goal, motivation can become difficult to sustain.

    IFBB pro Amy Updike shares her best tips for maintaining a healthy body—including daily movement, proper hydration, mindful eating, and updated goal setting—so you can stay lean and fit for years to come.

    Be Active Every Day

    Strength Training-30725715_2093257187585388_1773162572250349568_n.jpg

    The key to keeping your metabolism high and sustaining a healthy body weight is to move as often as possible. This doesn't mean you have to hit the gym every day, but it does mean you have to find ways to keep your body moving.

    "Try to do something active every single day," says Updike. "Walk the dog, play with your kids in the park, or clean the house."

    When she decides she needs a break from her normal gym workouts, Updike incorporates other activities to help her burn calories and stay fit.

    "I'll do hiking, trail running, or go out and do some jump squats and walking lunges in the park," she explains.

    For more ideas to get your daily move on, check out my article "Revving Up Your Summer Calorie Burn: Outdoor Activities that Blast Fat Fast!"


    Drink More Water

    Strength Training-31123739_2096632413914532_4458484178496782336_n.jpg

    You've heard it before and you'll hear it again: Healthy bodies need plenty of water. As Updike explains, adequate hydration allows for optimal bodily functions—and that includes fat loss.

    "Drinking enough water also helps prevent those hunger thoughts," she explains. "Usually, you're not hungry, just thirsty."

    Updike makes an excellent point: People often mistake thirst for hunger and eat when they should hydrate instead. This pesky habit can raise your daily calorie intake. It also can destroy your efforts to maintain that chiseled body you worked so hard for.

    A good rule of thumb is to drink 8-10 cups of water per day. But if you want to learn more, check out "Top 10 Reasons We Need To Drink Water."

    Power Up With Protein

    Strength Training-29694505_2085843164993457_3376191903572464005_n.jpg
    (Lunch at Veggie DeLight- all vegan)

    When it comes to eating for a healthy body weight, Amy Updike cannot overstate the importance of protein. In her words, getting a good amount of protein in every meal you eat "allows for stabilized blood sugar levels and helps you feel fuller." Protein is also essential to build and repair muscle and maintain lean mass.

    Choose lean, high quality sources of protein like chicken, turkey, lean red meat, fish, egg whites, and whey protein powder. Consume at least 15-30 grams of protein per snack or meal, increasing this number if needed for your individual macronutrient needs.

    Eat Your Veggies

    Strength Training-29597696_2085878448323262_22907876639209760_n.jpg

    Another must for your diet plan is eating plenty of fresh vegetables.

    "Eating an adequate amount of vegetables each day will help your body maintain regularity, help you feel fuller, and help supply your body with fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Updike.

    Vegetables are low in calories, so they have a minimal impact on your total calorie intake. But avoid high-calorie cooking methods or adding sauces or condiments that contain extra sugar, fat, or other unnecessary calories.

    Updike recommends consuming at least three servings of vegetables per day—if not more—to help maintain a healthy weight. Include a variety of vegetables in your plan to avoid boredom. Experiment with fresh, seasonal vegetables whenever possible for added nutrients.

    Ditch Yo-Yo Dieting

    Strength Training-30261330_2089207077990399_116888660242071552_n.jpg

    If you plan to simply diet your way back down to a healthy weight every time you put on a few pounds, rethink your approach. Up-and-down "yo-yo" dieting is hard on your body and unsustainable—neither of which will help you maintain.

    To keep the body you've worked so hard for, find a plan you can adopt as a lifestyle, not a short-term fix.

    "Focus on eating and living in a way you could maintain lifelong," says Updike.

    Constant hunger, feeling deprived of favorite foods, and viewing meal prep as a major time suck are all signs your current plan is not working for you.

    A proper diet should leave your body, as well as your mind, fulfilled. This is not an excuse to eat as much food as possible whenever you want. But if you're craving chocolate, take a bite or two to satisfy your hunger.

    Maintenance is all about sustainability, which is a huge reason why Updike supports flexible dieting and counting macros. Using this approach—and being mindful of portion control—you can work your favorite foods into your meal plan so you never have to feel deprived again.

    Keep Setting More Goals

    Strength Training-28279780_2068109316765153_1099655687711816009_n.jpg

    Fitness is a journey, not a destination. Just because you've reached one goal doesn't mean you can't set new ones. In fact, you should. However, Updike cautions against using weight as your only measurement of success.

    "It's important not to focus on only appearance or bodyweight related goals," she says.

    Single-minded emphasis on appearance can be dangerous—especially if you've already achieved an ideal body weight and are trying to work beyond what is healthy.

    If you're not looking to add or lose weight, try making your next goal a physical challenge. Examples include training for a half marathon, adding 30 pounds to your squat, or learning a new skill like yoga or boxing.

    Whatever you choose, set the goal and create a plan to reach it. This will help you stay focused so you feel as though you are making progress while you maintain your healthy physique.

    As Updike puts it, "Feeling great and being able to live life to the fullest are the real goals of fitness."


    Strength Training-29542354_2086822411562199_4759509429502321978_n.jpg

    sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
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    3 Ways To Keep Bones Strong For Life


    While you may think you're years away from having to think about bone health, I'm here to tell you that taking care of your bones isn't solely about preparing for the future; it matters now. By age 18, nearly 90 percent of your adult bone structure is solidified. By age 30, the chance of making any further enhancements to your bone density is slim.[1]

    Fortunately, your nutrition and exercise habits can have a profound impact on helping to maintain the bone strength you have and maximizing every opportunity for adding strength.

    Solidify the foundation of your frame today by incorporating the right nutrition and training strategies!

    1.
    Calcium: The Backbone Of Bone Health

    Your bones are alive and constantly remodeling. This occurs via the removal and addition of bone tissue, a process referred to as bone turnover. Assuming you're getting adequate nutrition and exercise, your body consistently adds more bone material throughout childhood, and even up until age 30.

    It's around this age, however, that bone turnover begins to net a negative outcome. But lifestyle and nutrition choices may help support the health, density and strength of your bones.


    Strength Training-3-ways-keep-bones-strong-life-v2-1-700xh.jpg

    As you can imagine, if you never actually hit your peak bone density, you're at further risk. In fact, research published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise found that 22-50 percent of female athletes have osteopenia (sub-peak bone density).

    Given that 99.5 percent of your bodily calcium stores are within your bones, it makes sense that calcium plays an integral role in optimizing bone strength and formation. To help support bone health, Martha Pyron, MD, a sports medicine specialist with Medicine in Motion in Austin, Texas, recommends women aim for a minimum of 1,200 milligrams of calcium per day.

    Calcium-rich foods include all dairy products (think milk, cheese, yogurt), as well as cruciferous green veggies (broccoli, bok choy), soy products (tofu, seitan, edamame), and kidney beans. If you don't eat enough of these foods daily, consider supplementing with calcium to help meet your daily goal.

    When selecting a calcium supplement, choose calcium carbonate or citrate. These two options are better absorbed by the body than other options.

    2. Vitamin D: Calcium's Helping Hands

    Vitamin D may help promote bone strength by facilitating increased calcium absorption. Unfortunately, few foods contain enough vitamin D to give you all you need.

    The good news is that sunshine is the best source of vitamin D. When the UVB rays from the sun contact your skin, they initiate a cascade of reactions that convert the vitamin D precursor molecule in your skin, 7-dehydrocholesterol, into a useable form of vitamin D known as calcitriol. It's calcitriol that works in a hormone-like fashion to increase production of calcium-binding proteins, and ultimately, calcium absorption.

    If only getting out in the sun were enough to make this happen! Lifestyle, geographical location, skin pigmentation, and sunscreen use all impair the absorption of necessary UVB rays to drive this formation.[3] As a result, most of us are vitamin D-deficient. Hence Dr. Pyron's recommendation to supplement with 800-1,000 IU of vitamin D per day.

    To optimize absorption, select a vitamin D-3 supplement, also known as cholecalciferol. This form beats the pants off of vitamin D-2 when it comes to absorption.

    3. Resistance Training: The Finishing Touch

    Working out with weights can further enhance your bone strength and preservation. That's because resistance training provides a direct stressor to your bones. To adapt to such a stress, your body increases the production of cells responsible for laying down new bone material. As a result, bone density can be maintained or even enhanced.

    Try incorporating weight-bearing exercises at least 2-3 times a week. Push-ups and bodyweight squats work great as well, along with any other move that loads up your frame and makes it work. Jumping rope, walking, and jogging are also great for maintaining bone-mineral density.

    Bottom line: Stay active, stay healthy, stay strong—and your bones will thank you!
    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition


    As a vegan I get my calcium by plant based diet. I take a vitamin D supplement . My workouts , including running and weight training has helped.
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  26. #126
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    10 Best Bodyweight Exercises To Train Your Core

    All you need for these 10 bodyweight core exercises is some space, a few minutes, and a motivated attitude—no suspension trainers, stability balls, ab wheels, or dumbbells necessary. The one apparatus you might want on hand is a foam mat to protect your lower back from whatever firm surface you'll be doing these exercises on.

    Ab exercises can improve your posture, reduce and prevent lower-back pain, and advance your athletic performance. With enough reps and a good meal plan, these exercises might even trim up your waist a bit more.

    Add these 10 bodyweight moves to the beginning, middle, or end of your routine to make sure your abs get the attention they need.

    1. Burpee
    Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart. Squat and place your palms on the floor. Keeping your hands on the floor, immediately kick your legs behind you so that you end up in the top of a push-up position. Do a push-up and return to the top position. Still keeping your hands on the floor, quickly draw up your legs so your feet land back between your hands. Now, jump vertically with your hands reaching overhead above your ears. That's one rep.

    Trainer Tip: To do a "mobility burpee," squat down and kick your legs back. Now, instead of doing a push-up, bring your right leg forward and place your foot on the outside of your right hand. (Getting into this position is sometimes known as "doing a groiner.") Bring your right leg back to the push-up position and repeat the process with your left leg, bringing your left foot up to the outside of your left hand. Return your left leg back to the top push-up position, quickly bring both legs back up to the low squat position, then stand and jump. That's one mobility burpee rep.

    2. Jackknife Sit-Up
    Lie on your back with your legs straight out on the floor, your arms extended above your head, and your hands touching the floor. This is the starting position. Bring your body to a "V" shape by lifting your legs and torso toward each other, keeping both your legs straight and your arms extended. Lift your shoulder blades off the ground as you raise your legs as close to perpendicular to the floor as you can. Touch your hands to your legs, then lower your torso, arms, and legs back to the floor. That's one rep.

    Trainer Tip: A modified version is called the X-Up. To do this, lie on your back with your feet and legs spread apart to form an "X" shape on the floor. Keeping your right arm and left leg straight, lift your right shoulder and left leg off the ground and touch your right hand to the outside of your left knee or ankle. Return to the X position and repeat the movement, this time touching your left hand to the outside of your right knee or ankle.

    3. Mountain Climber
    Get into the top of the push-up position. This is the starting position. Keeping your back in a straight line, bring your right knee toward your chest, then quickly bring it back to the starting position. Now, bring your left knee in towards your chest and return to starting position. Now speed up the movement, alternating legs quickly as if you were running in place with your hands on the ground.

    Trainer Tip: To increase tension on your abdominal muscles, place the palms of your hands on sliding discs such as Valslides, SKLZ Slidez, paper plates, or weight plates.

    4. Cocoon
    Lie on your back with legs extended and your heels touching the floor. Straighten your arms above your head with your hands touching the floor. This is the starting position. Simultaneously bend both legs and bring your knees to your chest as you bring your arms down to hug your knees. Now, release your knees and extend your legs and arms again, returning your heels back to the ground. That's one rep.

    Trainer Tip: To increase the difficulty, keep your heels off the ground for all of the reps.

    5. Oblique Crunch
    Lie on your back on the floor. Keep your legs bent in the air at a 90-degree angle. Place your hands on the back of your head with your elbows flared out to each side. This is the starting position. Twist (rotate) your torso to move your right shoulder toward your left thigh until your upper back is off the floor and your right elbow is close to or touching your left knee. Lower yourself back down to the starting position. Repeat the movement, this time rotating your left shoulder toward your right knee. Alternate reps between your right and left sides.

    Trainer Tip: This is not a bicycle crunch or air bike, where you pedal your legs above the ground the entire time. Once your elbow and knee touch, return to the starting position before switching sides for the next rep. For a more intense exercise, kick one leg out straight as you bring your elbow to the other.

    6. Hanging Leg Raise
    Hang from a pull-up bar with your hands shoulder-width apart. Grab the bar using an overhand (pronated) grip. This is the starting position. Lift both of your knees until they make a 90-degree angle with your torso. Hold this position for 2 seconds, then fully extend your legs below you. That's one rep.

    Trainer Tip: To increase intensity, instead of bending your legs as you raise them, keep them straight. Raise them up as high as possible, hold that position for 2 seconds, then return to the starting position.

    7. Plank
    Assume the top push-up position. Now bend your elbows and place your forearms flat on the floor beneath you. Tighten your ab muscles to keep your back flat. Make sure your toes are pointed into the ground. Hold the position for the prescribed duration.

    Trainer Tip: Incorporate side planks into your routine for oblique strength. To do a side plank, rotate from the plank position so that you're supported by your right forearm. Stack your left foot on top of your right foot and extend your left arm towards the ceiling. Hold this position for 30-60 seconds. Roll your body so that you're now supporting your body on your left forearm with your right arm extended toward the ceiling.

    8. Dead Bug
    Lie on your back with your knees bent in the air at 90 degrees and your calves parallel to the floor. Raise both arms up above you so they are pointed toward the ceiling. This is the starting position. Now, straighten your left leg without touching it to the ground. Your back will want to arch, but use your abdominal muscles to keep it pressed firmly into the floor. Return your left leg to the starting position and repeat the movement with your right leg. Return both legs to the starting position. That's one rep.

    Trainer Tip: Instead of keeping both arms pointed to the ceiling, extend them one at a time. As you straighten your left leg to the floor, extend your right arm above your head until your hand touches the floor. One arm should always be in the starting position (above your chest and pointed towards the ceiling) while the other is extended above your head with the hand close to or touching the floor.

    9. Reverse Crunch
    Lie down on your back with your legs fully extended, your arms along your sides, and your palms on the floor. Move your legs up so that your thighs are perpendicular to the floor and your feet are together. This is the starting position.

    As you breathe in, pull your knees toward your chest as you roll your pelvis backward and raise your hips and upper back off the floor. Hold this position for 1-2 seconds, then exhale as you move your legs back to the starting position.

    Trainer Tip: Keep your arms straight along your sides throughout this movement.

    10. Seated Scissor Kick
    Lie down with your back pressed against the floor and your arms fully extended to each side with your palms facing down. With a slight bend in your knees, lift your legs up so that your heels are about 6 inches off the ground. Contract your abs and bring your back slightly off the floor. This is the starting position.

    As if your legs were a pair of scissors, open and close them by crossing one extended leg over the other, alternating which leg is on top. Keep your abs flexed at all times.

    Trainer Tip: Don't let your back round. Keep your abs tight to maintain a strong, straight spine. For more intensity, raise your arms up and make small, slow clockwise circles with your shoulders as you scissor kick your legs.

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...SM_FB_Training
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  27. #127
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    Awesome story about one woman's fitness journey. Transformations don't happen overnight. It take time, dedication and motivation.


    Jessie Pedaled Away 100 Pounds
    Jessie Foss rediscovered her love of mountain biking and used it to crush her fitness goals.



    In 100-degree heat, Jessie Foss pushed the pedals of her mountain bike. On the last stretch of a 3-day ride covering 109 miles in South Dakota's Black Hills, Jessie, who'd trained on the flatter ground of her native Dallas, Texas, was struggling. As it turned out, 44 miles in a day was just as hard as it sounded. But before the ride, Jessie had already lost 50 pounds, and she knew she could surpass this hurdle, too. When she final reached the end of the trail, the sense of accomplishment she felt made every uphill push against the pedals worth it.

    Before beginning her journey, Jessie had undergone a big transformation. She'd previously allowed a desk job and busy schedule to take priority over her healthy lifestyle, which led her to put on more than 100 pounds. When she committed to reversing her weight gain, Jessie rediscovered mountain biking, a sport she and her husband had once enjoyed together.

    Through careful food choices and daily workouts, Jessie was finally able to get back on her bike—and climb further than she'd thought possible.

    This is Jessie's story.
    Strength Training-jessie-foss-transformation-before-700xh.jpg
    Age: 34, Height: 5'2", Weight: 215 lbs., Body Fat: 40%

    Strength Training-jessie-foss-transformation-after-700xh.jpg
    Age: 38, Height: 5'2", Weight: 115 lbs., Body Fat: 16%


    When Did Your Weight Start To Become A Problem?
    I got married when I was 19, and at that time, I weighed 110 pounds. I got a desk job at a law firm soon after the wedding. After a few years, the weight started to pile on. I grew far less active and found myself sitting behind a desk all day.

    Were You Active Before That?
    I delivered newspapers, which was a really active job. I was outside seven days a week.

    What Inspired You To Lose Weight?
    I was actually influenced by a fit friend. I noticed that she read nutrition labels when shopping and chose low-calorie foods with no added sugar. Based on her example, I started to pay a little more attention to what I was eating, though I didn't know much. I started with smaller portions and paid attention to calories per meal.

    I noticed changes from that alone—I was 215 pounds and wearing a size 20 or larger, and suddenly, my clothes loosened. I realized I was doing something right, and I wanted to challenge myself, so I decided I was going to get on my elliptical machine every day after work.

    Did You See Any Results From That?
    After four weeks of using the elliptical for 30 minutes a day—with no changes to my diet—I lost 5 pounds. That was all the motivation I needed. I realized I could do this! I kept up that routine for three months, then increased my elliptical time to 45 minutes a day. I also began using MyFitnessPal to track my calories burned and consumed daily. Logging my food was such an eye opener.

    What Kinds Of Foods Were You Eating At The Time?
    I would have a Dr. Pepper and a doughnut for breakfast every morning. Lunch was usually a hamburger and fries, pizza, or some other high-fat junk. We ate out a lot for dinner, but if I cooked, it was still usually a pretty heavy meal—beef with pasta was pretty standard.

    There wasn't much in the way of vegetables. To top it off, there were usually sweets in the house like cookies, ice cream, and chocolate.

    What Changes Did You Make To Your Eating Habits?
    The first change I made was making more time to work out by meal prepping at the beginning of the week. That way, I didn't have to worry about cooking every day. On Sunday, I'd put together some kind of stew or healthy soup that my husband and I could rely on for the week. That was a huge help and got me started on meal prepping, something I still do to this day.

    Where Do You Get Your Recipes?
    I find a lot of recipes online. I also use a cookbook from the American Heart Association that has healthy, low-calorie CrockPot recipes.

    What Was The Hardest Part About Your Transformation?
    I'm a big coffee drinker, and learning to drink my coffee without sugar was a challenge. Sweet coffee drinks were the hardest thing for me to give up. Even just switching from table sugar to artificial sweeteners was tough. After that, I worked on giving up artificial sweeteners.

    How Did You Give Them Up?
    I eventually weaned myself off of them enough to drink one cup of coffee with Splenda and my next cup of coffee without Splenda. From there, I went to drinking all of my coffee without sweeteners.

    When Did You Start Mountain Biking?
    I was a tomboy growing up, and my younger brother and I would ride our bikes around the woods. When I married my husband, we lived in a house across the street from 15 miles of off-road trails, and we would ride those quite a bit. As I gained weight, I didn't feel confident or comfortable being out there, so the riding dwindled to nothing.

    When Did You Start Biking Again?
    About five months into starting to work out, I pulled out my mountain bike for the first time and got back on the trail.

    What Got You Interested In A Mountain-Biking Trip In South Dakota?
    My husband and I were on vacation with my in-laws, and we stumbled upon this trail. It was once an old train track that had been converted into a gravel trail for walking or biking. It's 109 miles long—from Deadwood, South Dakota, all the way south to Edgemont. We read up on the trail, and it became a bucket-list thing for us.

    After training all year in the area around our house in Dallas, we headed out to bike it. We knew the ride would be tough because of the big hills in South Dakota, but we were up for the challenge.

    Did You Enjoy It?
    It's just an incredible ride. I'd love to do it again, but it was really, really hard.

    What Was The Hardest Part Of The Ride?
    At that point, I had lost about 50 pounds, so I still had some weight on me. On the third day of the ride, we had to cover 44 miles on a gravel trail—this was after riding uphill for 10 miles—plus it was 100 degrees out. That was the longest, hardest day.

    What Was The Best Part?
    It's so quiet and beautiful and just smells wonderful on the hills. I love being out in nature. Spending that ride with someone I care about made the scenery even more beautiful.
    Details about her meal plan and extercise routine:

    Sauce: https://www.bodybuilding.com/content..._FB_Motivation
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  28. #128
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    Looking For Stronger Bones? Try Pumping Some Iron

    Weight lifting and other resistance-based exercises go much deeper than the muscles they work.
    High-impact workouts are often sworn off later in life because of the jarring effect they have on ailing or injury-prone joints. But, the force involved in these workouts isn’t all bad, especially when it comes to building and maintaining bone strength.

    Your bones, which are a living tissue, adapt to the abrupt stress of exercises that involve impact like running and jumping by adding mass to the affected area.

    Unfortunately, lower impact, joint-friendly workouts like water aerobics and cycling don’t apply that same beneficial force to the targeted bone structure — no matter how hard we work.

    Thankfully, there’s a less jarring alternative. Dr. Olivier Abtan, a chiropractor with The Collective Healthcare Group in Toronto recommends strength training for those looking for a safer way to apply the necessary force needed to build and maintain their bone density.

    Strength training involves the use of resistance to induce muscular contraction and includes exercises performed with weights, resistance bands and your own body weight.

    “I think it’s something that everybody should be looking into incorporating. It doesn’t mean we’re saying not to get into the pool,” Abtan says. “There are advantages to aquatic exercises and low-impact exercises in terms of tolerability. But you’re not going to be increasing bone density very well if you just do pool exercises.”

    Similar to high-impact workouts, loading specific bones with more weight or force than they’re used to promotes the formation of new bone.

    As we age, addressing bone mass becomes paramount.

    When we’re young, bone resorption, which is the loss of bone tissue over time, is balanced or exceeded by the production of new bone tissue. But after 40, we lose bone mass at an average rate of one per cent per year. Woman experience an increase of bone loss during menopause to between two and three per cent per year, which persists for about five years after menopause.

    When nothing is done to counteract this loss, our bones can become weak and we can increase our risk of debilitating, and even fatal fractures.

    Osteoporosis, a disease characterized by the rapid loss of bone mass, affects an estimated 2 million Canadians and is responsible for over 80 per cent of all fractures in people aged 50 and older.

    Fortunately, the mechanics of building bone with strength training isn’t overly complicated. A study published in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise showed that increases in the strength of specific muscles coincided with increases in density of the attached bone.

    In other words, you can target specific bones to strengthen by consistently challenging the adjacent muscles.

    Abtan suggests working on the wrists, spine and hips, which are the most common fracture sites in older adults.

    The most dangerous fractures, however, are those of the spine and hip bones, which, according to the Canadian Medical Association Journal, increases the odds of an early death in people aged 50 and over.

    Research has shown that the weighted squat is one of the best ways to strengthen the spine and hip bones.In a study published by The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, patients with osteopenia and osteoporosis (conditions that are characterized by weakened bones) saw substantial increases in spine and hip bone mineral content (an indicator of bone growth) after only 12 weeks of training with a squat machine.

    But resistance training isn’t only about strengthening bones to withstand a fall. It’s also a great way to prevent falls from happening entirely.

    Squats and other lower body workouts that strengthen the legs have been shown to improve balance, which is key in preventing falls.

    The preventative benefits of resistance training extends to improvements in cognition as well. Another study published in The Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that participants over 60 who participated in a six-week full body resistance training program showed improvements in spacial awareness as well as visual and physical reaction time — all three of which are crucial to fall prevention.

    “The problem with having weak bones is not just having weak bones,” Dr. Abtan explains. “It’s having weak bones and then falling.”

    With its benefits to bone strength, balance and cognition, resistance training can help you address both ends of that equation.

    Strength Training-33469271_2113926882185085_3238103821594918912_n.jpg

    sauce Looking For Stronger Bones? Try Pumping Some Iron - Everything Zoomer
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  29. #129
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    I did a few sets of 1 minute battle ropes. Excellent conditioning even though my shoulders are pooched having been the focus of many recent workouts

    Strength Training-pieazsa.jpg


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    4 Moves You Should Steal From CrossFit

    Whether you love it, hate it, or just admire it athletically from afar, you probably know how you feel about CrossFit as a fitness phenomenon at this point. So what about as a collection of training techniques? Sure, you can rail all you want about the butterfly pull-ups and high-rep Oly lifts, but those are honestly a small—and competition-specific—part of the massive CrossFit portfolio.

    If you haven't investigated the overall training approach to see what you can take from it and plug into your own training, well, you're probably missing out. Here are four undeniably awesome movements that could pay off big time for just about any lifter or gym-goer.

    CrossFit athlete Hannah Eden will tell you exactly why they should be part of your overall program, as well as give her tips to perform them flawlessly.

    DOUBLE UNDER
    "At first glance, the double under seems like a ridiculously simple skill to learn," says Eden. "You jump once, and the rope passes under your feet twice." Don't let the simplicity fool you, however.

    "Learning this skill is not for the impatient," she says. "It is a complex skill that'll blast your shoulders, shred your core, and jack your heart rate up while taxing both your aerobic and anaerobic energy system." In other words, it's a solid contender for your program.

    But there's a catch: It's not just as straightforward as jumping higher. "The connection between the mind and muscle is critical for this exercise," warns Eden. "You'll need to practice it constantly in order to master it." That's why she recommends approaching it seriously and strategically.

    Strength Training-32332392_2106330872944686_8862110045391814656_n.jpg

    "First, buy a good jump rope," she says. "Don't cheap out and by the first rope you find. As far as your form is concerned, you'll want to keep your elbows back and extended and think of rotating the rope from your wrists. Imagine drawing a circle on a quarter; you want short, sharp whips."

    She also recommends that you keep your gaze up to where the ceiling meets the wall. This will help you stand tall and get more height to each jump. "Jump on the balls of your feet and extend your legs every time your feet leave the floor," she says. "Remember that you are in control of the rope, not the other way around. You decide how fast or slow the rotation is."

    So where do you put these in your workout? They can work as a finisher, but honestly, you might not have enough in the tank at that point to give them the effort and attention they demand. Instead, try starting your workout with them, like Eden does in her Monster Mondays 30-60-90 workout from the article "4 High-Performance Cardio Workouts."

    BURPEES
    Most people have a love-hate relationship with the burpee; you love the results you get from this exercise, but the cost is that you will hate doing them.

    "A burpee is a dynamic and fast-paced fat burner that strengthens and conditions your entire body," explains Eden. "With each rep, you'll work your arms, chest, quadriceps, glutes, hamstrings, and core. Add 8-10 of these suckers between your lifting sets, and you'll be feeling the effects in no time." In her Monster Mondays workout, she even adds a pull-up at the top of burpee reps, creating one brutal full-body move.

    Strength Training-36394528_2141503422760764_4151130872776491008_n.jpg

    Strength Training-36425150_2141503556094084_4312430594370830336_n.jpg

    "The fundamentals of the burpee are simple: Drop down and get back up," Eden says. But as anyone who has ever done 30-50 of them in a row knows, even the simplest technique becomes a tall order pretty quickly. Eden's solution is to keep your technique airtight from the start so you're not leaking energy unnecessarily.

    "First, place your hands on the ground about shoulder-width apart," she says. "Next, jump your feet back while bringing your chest down to the ground. From here, jump your feet back behind your hands, landing flat-footed to protect your knees. Stand up to full extension, then jump and clap your hands above your head."

    Easy enough, right? Now do it again. And again.

    WALL BALL THROW
    CrossFit's use of weighted medicine balls is a great example of how it can dust off an old-school classic implement and remind us all how effective it really is. "This is a top-notch multijoint functional movement," says Eden. "It utilizes two key movements—a weighted squat and a push press—and can be customized for strength, power, or serious conditioning."

    She notes that the muscles worked during this exercise include, well, all of them: the quads, glutes, calves, hamstrings, abs, lower back, upper back, chest, front deltoids, back deltoids, biceps, and triceps. It's a complete strength builder. But of course, it's all in the execution.

    Strength Training-crossfit-bolton-dsc_0432.jpg

    First, hold the ball in a front-squat position with your elbows in front of your body, then squat deeply. "Imagine tapping your butt in an imaginary hot seat," she explains. "Once you reach the bottom of your squat, explosively drive up through your heels and complete a push-press to launch the ball from the front rack position to a 9- to 10-foot-high target on the wall."

    The higher the target is for this exercise, the more explosive power you'll need to generate. However, aiming too high can result in poor form, so don't go higher than 10-12 feet, depending on how tall you are. If you can easily reach your highest target, that's a sign it's time for a heavier medicine ball, not a higher target.

    This exercise will improve your strength and physique, and you'll probably have a load of fun doing it. It's far too seldom that we get to actually throw stuff around in the gym.

    BARBELL THRUSTER
    "The thruster is the perfect exercise to define what a compound, multijoint exercise really is," says Eden. "It's a front squat that goes into an overhead press." As such, you can expect this exercise to work your quads, hamstrings, glutes, core, shoulders, biceps, triceps, and even your upper back to a surprising degree.

    "Heavier loads with lower reps will improve your overall strength from head to toe, while lighter weight for higher repetitions are great for high-intensity interval training," she says. Depending on whether you want to build muscle or torch fat, you can decide which way you wish to perform this exercise.

    Strength Training-dscn7887.jpg

    Eden recommends standing with your feet in the base of your regular squat position, right around hip-width to shoulder-width apart. From there, you'll want to keep the barbell in the front-rack position with your elbows up. "They should be like headlights of a car," she explains. "Your elbows should remain high as you squat down, and only when you reach the full depth of your squat should you explode up by driving your heels through the floor."

    Add the thruster to your workout routine early on in your session when you're feeling fresh and ready to tackle it with maximum energy. As you become more proficient, you can move it later in the workout and treat it more as conditioning.

    Any of these workouts can be plugged into your current program to make it just a little more challenging or interesting. Conversely, you could stick a couple of them together and make a full-body workout that will have you asking, "Why don't I do that more often?"

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  31. #131
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    1. PERFECT YOUR SQUAT

    Squats are one of the best exercises for the lower body (and really the whole body, when you consider the core work involved). But, as with any multi-joint exercise, there are plenty of places things can go awry, says Leandra Haynes, Tier 2 trainer at Equinox Flatiron. “Surprising limitations could start from as low as the feet,” she says. “Tight muscles and lack of joint mobility are prime causes of squat downfall.” Here’s what could be limiting your squat, and how to fix it.

    2. ROLL YOUR FEET AND CALVES
    If it feels like your arches cave in when you squat, the issue could be in your feet or in your ankles. “It can be calf tightness causing the lack of ankle mobility to have a proper dorsiflexion range of motion when lifting,” Haynes says.

    The fix: Do some pre-workout foam rolling. “You will be surprised to see the improvement from rolling the balls of your feet and all the way up the calves with a lacrosse ball or golf ball,” she says.

    3. MOVE IN ALL PLANES OF MOTION
    You’ve probably heard it’s important to keep the knees from caving in, but it’s likely weak abductor (outer thigh and glute) muscles that aren’t pulling their weight.

    The fix: If you notice your knees often fall on an inward trajectory, integrating more lateral work (like side lunges and mini-band walks) into your weekly routine may help.

    4. LOOSEN YOUR HIPS AND ANKLES
    One common reason for a shallow squat is tightness around the hip and ankle joints.

    The fix: Traditional stretches can help to lengthen the hip flexors (like low lunges) and calves (like heel drops). But also: “Remember the ankles and hips are supposed to allow for 360 degrees range of motion and not just the flexion and extension motions of walking in the sagittal plane,” Haynes says. She suggests adding ankle and hip circles to your warm-up routine.

    5. CONSIDER A LOW-BAR SQUAT
    Your height, or really, your leg length, can impact your squat. Having longer “levers” (in this case, your femurs) can make it more challenging to both move more weight and get as deep a range of motion. “Very simply put, the shorter the femur, the less distance needs to be traveled during a squat to hit depth,” Haynes says.

    The fix: One way to improve matters is to change how you load. Consider trying a low-bar back squat, with the bar resting on your shoulder blades (just a couple of inches below where it would be on your scapula for a high-bar squat).

    TRY VARIATIONS
    “Some fear falling backward when squatting and lean too far forward,” Haynes says.

    The fix: To train your brain for better squats, she recommends starting with box squats (in which you squat back toward a box or bench), then progress to goblet squats—”holding a weight in front of you can counter the feeling of falling backward”—before you back-load. The progression may take a few weeks for the good-form habits to develop (and your brain to get over the bad ones), but it’ll be worth it.


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  32. #132
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    One of my goals when I started crossfit 4 years ago was to get stronger so I would have more power and endurance for mountain biking. I ended up becoming stronger and leaner... this article explains why.

    DAILY WISDOM: MUSCLE VERSUS STRENGTH

    THE SCIENCE
    Weightlifters know that there’s a difference between building strength (what it takes to lift a heavy suitcase into the overhead bin) and building muscle mass (the sheer size of your muscles). While athletes can get similar muscle-building benefits from lifting heavier weights for fewer reps or lighter weights for more reps, your best bet for gaining strength is the former. A new study from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln explains the mechanism behind this phenomenon.

    EXPERT INSIGHT
    “The amount of weight you are working with is important because that is what tells the body how many motor units it needs to recruit from the nervous system,” explains Matt Berenc, director of education at the Equinox Fitness Training Institute. “At lighter loads, it won’t recruit as many motor units as it would with heavier loads.” According to Berenc, the more motor units recruited from the nervous system, the stronger you will become. (The way muscle size develops, on the other hand, is due to increasing the size, not the number, of muscle cells.)

    “The body inherently looks to preserve energy so it won’t stress itself more than it needs to,” says Berenc. “If only 50 percent recruitment is needed to lift a lighter load, then that is all I will recruit so I don’t waste any energy and calories. But in the same instance, if it is a heavier load it will be forced to up the percentage.” This explains why two people lifting different amounts of weight can potentially have the same size muscles, but different levels of strength.

    “If you want to start lifting for strength, the best approach is to focus on slowly lowering the number of reps while increasing the weight of the exercises,” says Berenc. “Most strength training programs will have you working around two to six reps for four to six sets.” Start with a more moderate load, about 60 to 70 percent of your max, he suggests. Multi-joint, compound lifts like deadlifts, squats, pull-ups, overhead press, rows, and bench press tend to involve a greater amount of muscle tissue and lead to larger total body gains in strength, Berenc adds.

    THE BOTTOM LINE
    To challenge your nervous system and get the most strength gains, try lifting heavier weights for fewer reps. But, Berenc recommends alternating your heavy lifting days with lighter or recovery days. “Heavy lifting can put a lot of stress on your body. By spending time with lower intensity drills (stretching, mobility, bodyweight exercises) in between your training days, you allow repair to happen so you can be ready for the next day of lifting.”

    sauce https://furthermore.equinox.com/arti...&kwp_1=1257918

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  33. #133
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    Good points!

    How to Lose Weight and Get Back in Shape

    A personal trainer explains why you don’t need a detox, a fad diet, or a boutique workout to burn fat and build muscle

    Earlier this week, I was talking with one of my best friends. He’d recently started dating again after getting divorced from his wife of 11 years. And let’s just say that he wasn’t quite as lean as he was when they first met. Not only had his waistline expanded considerably, his confidence had taken a hit. He was disappointed with his lot in life, and didn’t feel good about himself and things in general.

    He had, to put it bluntly, let himself go. And he wanted me to help him get rid of his paunch and shape up again. I'm a personal trainer with an advanced degree in exercise science, so I get this a lot. Here’s what I told him:

    First, don’t tell anyone what you’re doing.
    The stock advice is that you should share your goals with other people, because it makes you accountable and gives you more motivation.

    Personally, I think this is a mistake. Research shows that you’re far better off keeping things to yourself.

    Don’t plaster it all over Facebook.

    Don’t tweet about it.

    You want to go about your business like the SAS, on some covert operation behind enemy lines, where nobody hears about it until the job is done.

    I’d also suggest that you go and do something that represents a simple “first step” towards getting in shape.

    Maybe set your alarm 20 minutes early so you have time to get up in the morning and go for a brisk walk. Or take some of the food in your kitchen that you know you shouldn’t be eating and get rid of it.

    You want to go and do something positive. Something that says you’re serious about getting in shape, rather than just contemplating starting to consider thinking about it.

    Next, you’ll need to make some changes to your diet.
    You don’t need anything complicated or fancy.

    Nor do you need to cut out sugar, carbs, fat, lectins, wheat or whatever else the food police say is bad for you this week.

    The first and most important thing to focus on is creating an energy deficit.

    What exactly do I mean by that?

    When you’re in an energy deficit, there is a mismatch between the amount of energy your body needs and the amount it gets from your diet. So, it starts looking for something to make up the deficit.

    As long as your diet and training program are set up right (which I’ll tell you how to do in a moment), that “something” will be the fat you want to get rid of.

    You also need to make sure you’re eating enough protein. Research shows that protein does a better job at filling you up than carbohydrate or fat, as well as helping you retain (or even gain) muscle while you drop fat.

    There are many ways to achieve those two things, from a ketogenic diet to intermittent fasting.

    Ultimately, the “best” diet for losing your gut is one that you can stick to. Compliance and consistency trumps most other things when it comes to getting in shape.

    Are you hitting your calorie and protein targets for the day? Are you eating mostly wholesome, nutrient-dense foods? Are you cutting down on the junk that you know isn’t doing you any good?

    If so, you don’t need to worry too much about the rest.

    You certainly don’t need to eat six small meals a day, avoid carbs late at night, or any of the other minor details that people like to waste time thinking about.

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  34. #134
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    Good article!


    Popping in to update on my own strength training journey this year. I started intense bodyweight calisthenics (lots of pulling!) in January and resistance training in maybe March? I decided to use Dee Tidwell's enduro mtb training program. I can recommend it, with the hesitation that I've run into several exercises I don't have the equipment or space to do at the gym in my complex.

    I think that strength training has been the best thing I've done for injury prevention overall.

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    PREP YOUR CORE TO GET FITTER
    How to build mobility and stability while strengthening your mid-section.

    By now, athletes know that training the core goes far beyond building a visible six-pack. “Research shows that you should always train for good mobility in the upper portion of the core and good stability in the lower portion,” says exercise physiologist Geralyn Coopersmith, former head of the Equinox Fitness Training Institute. “With this foundation, you are able to build a midsection that functions in peak condition, meaning it’s able to flex, rotate, laterally flex and extend.”

    This, she notes, helps carve muscles that are responsive. “They will turn on automatically and be engaged no matter what you're doing."

    For a more functional core, add these mobility- and stability-building moves into your regular routine.

    1. Inchworm Stand with feet together, arms by sides. Reach down and place hands on floor in front of you, then slowly walk hands forward, keeping legs straight, until you are in plank position (palms under shoulders, legs extended behind you, abs engaged). Slowly walk feet forward to meet hands, keeping legs straight. Return to standing and repeat.

    2. Plank to Downward-Facing Dog Touches Start in plank position. Shift back into downward-facing dog (upside down V) and touch toes with right hand as you do. Return to plank and repeat, touching toes with left hand. Continue alternating sides with each rep.

    3. Bird-Dog Push-Up Perform a push-up, keeping elbows by sides. Extend right arm in front of you and left leg behind you; hold balance for one count, then lower. Do another push-up, and repeat balance on other side (left arm; right leg). Repeat.

    4. Plank Reach-Through to Side Plank Start in plank position. Lift right hand off floor and reach arm under your body and over to left, rotating torso to left. Rotate torso back through center and open arm up to ceiling, going into a left side plank. Return to start and repeat on the other side.

    5. Alternating forward lunge with rotation Stand with feet hip-width apart and bend your elbows, clasping your hands together in front of your chest. Take a big step forward with right foot as you extend your arms in front of you. Bend knees into a lunge as you rotate shoulders to the right. Rotate back to center and step back to the starting position. Repeat, this time lunging forward with left foot and rotating to the left. Continue, alternating sides.

    6. Renegade Arm Extension Get in plank position. Raise right arm to shoulder height in front of you with palm facing left. Lower right hand to starting position and repeat with left arm. Continue at a medium tempo, alternating arms.


    Strength Training-37884252_2171127936464979_8476433071816572928_n.jpg

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  36. #136
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    Study highlights fragility of motivation for regular exercise
    “Even a full year of exercise wasn’t enough to get the habit ingrained” in group of inactive 35- to 65-year-olds, says researcher who cites busyness of life.

    People who haven’t found a way of making exercise a priority early in life will struggle to make it a priority by the time they’re in their 30s and beyond, new University of Alberta-led research suggests.

    According to interviews taken from a comprehensive fitness study that recruited 273 non-exercising adults between the ages of 35 and 65 to exercise on campus three times a week for a year, people who gave up exercising regularly did so largely because they had trouble making it a priority and got disillusioned with the results.

    “While those who quit the program said they had some positive outcomes—like feeling less stress, sleeping better and having more energy—many said they were also disappointed with a lack of visible results in terms of their appearance or losing weight,” said Heather Larson, a PhD candidate in the Faculty of Kinesiology, Sport, and Recreation who led the study.

    Larson interviewed about 20 people who finished the year-long exercise regimen and a similar number of people who quit.

    She noted that more than 60 per cent of the study’s participants dropped out before the study concluded. Also discouraging was that even among those who stuck it out until the end, most reported they stopped working out soon after the study wrapped up.

    “Even a full year of exercise wasn’t enough to get the habit ingrained,” said Larson. “It seems what actually kept many of them going was a sense of responsibility to the study and to the researchers.”

    She added that making exercise a priority for this group was a challenge because they were unable to navigate the various barriers of developing a fitness routine.

    “People have lots of different things in their lives, especially in this age group. There are parents, there are people taking care of their parents, and it’s also a time when careers are kind of ramping up. Making time for exercise was hard,” she said.

    In the end, she said, the study confirmed just how fragile the motivation to exercise regularly is, and how easily an exercise routine can be broken or thrown off by the smallest changes—whether it be a vacation, something at work or an illness.

    “For people who have been exercising for years, they will deal with it and get back into exercise. For someone who is just starting out, it is a real challenge to get back in there,” said Larson, who recommended that people focus more on building exercise into their lifestyle one small step at a time.

    “People need to look for those opportunities to do things like active transportation, walking to work or cycling to work, activities that are built into their day, rather than having to make room for it,” she said.

    Two papers were published as a result of the interviews: the first focused on the successes, and showed that social support is instrumental for people to keep working out.

    “It actually seemed to work better if (the workout buddy) was someone (the participant) wasn’t too close to,” she said. “With a family member or a really close friend, it seems it is easy to talk each other out of it.

    “It’s almost better to have a little more distance, then you feel more accountable to the person and you don’t want to let them down.”

    Along with Larson, the research team for the fitness study included fellow PhD candidate Kimberley McFadden and professors Tara-Leigh McHugh, Tanya Berry and Wendy Rodgers, as well as researchers at Western University.
    sauce https://www.folio.ca/study-highlight...ular-exercise/

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  37. #137
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    Since I bikecommute and my Dad walked to work every day of his working life, I agree with this part:
    “People need to look for those opportunities to do things like active transportation, walking to work or cycling to work, activities that are built into their day, rather than having to make room for it,” she said.

    But otherwise it sounds like the exercisers were not having enough fun. I would quit too. People need to find something they enjoy, not just "work" out. I bike, and walk in the woods, my sister paddleboards, ettc. In addition to enjoying the sport, you feed off the community you build around it, so that it is a way of life.

  38. #138
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    Optical illusion. The box and platform line up

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    I'm still working on my pull-ups

    “7 Reasons Why You’re Struggling With Pull-ups!”


    Ah…Pull-ups. The pull-up is one of the most versatile exercises out there; you can do them with your body weight, throw on some chains, use wide and narrow grips, even turn your palms over and do a chin-up. This staple movement not only develops strength and muscularity, but it carries over to any real-world scenario where you might need to…pull yourself up and over something. It’s also vital to master the pull-up if you ever expect to do a muscle-up. While the pull-up doesn’t seem all that hard to do, it’s one of the most difficult exercises to even get started with so I came up with this short list of the 7 reasons why you STILL haven’t mastered pull-ups!

    1. You’re too heavy.

    More often than not, the folks who have the most trouble with body weight movements like pull-ups are a little on the heavy side and they’ve developed little-to-no general physical preparedness (GPP). Six-seven years from now when you’re carrying 20 more lbs. of muscle you can probably get away with being heavier, but right now, losing that fat will make a massive difference in your body weight movements.

    Be honest with yourself: if you have a lot of fat to lose and you’re out of shape, you need to tackle one obstacle at a time. Start by getting your nutrition in order so you can drop some weight. We can help with that. As you work to trim off some fluff, you’ll need to improve your work capacity by doing heavy resistance training with a barbell and dumbbells (more on that in a bit), biking, swimming, walking, rowing, sprinting, sled dragging, and even carrying heavy stuff – which brings us to our second point.

    2. Your grip strength isn’t up to par.

    If you come from a sedentary background – i.e. you don’t play sports, work a physically demanding job, or get a lot of activity in general – chances are your grip isn’t anything to write home about. If your grip strength isn’t sufficient to hold your body weight, there’s only a slim chance that you’ll be able to do a pull-up. How do you fix this? Contrary to what you may see at your local globo gym, doing thousands of repetitions of wrist curls with 2.5 lb. plates is NOT the ticket to a bone-crushing grip. To improve your grip strength, you need to perform exercises that involve static contractions of the hands, forearms, shoulders and upper back. Hang from the pull-up bar for time, carry heavy dumbbells for distance, load up a barbell and do timed holds for 30-60 seconds, or use a grip trainer. Grip training is hard, so don’t bite off more weight than you can chew; start off light and go for endurance.

    3. Your back needs to get stronger.

    This may seem like a no brainer – that’s why you’re trying to incorporate pull-ups into your routine anyway, isn’t it? Although pull-ups are one of the best ways to develop back strength, the fact of the matter is that staring at the rig isn’t building a single ounce of muscle. Whether you can’t do a single pull-up or you can only bust out a few ugly reps before you’re gassed, you should add a few upper body pulling movements into your back workout to ensure that you’re getting stronger each week. Try these exercises for 3 sets of 10 repetitions each:

    -Pull-up negatives have tremendous carryover to the pull-up. Stand on something or jump up to the bar and get yourself in the top position of a pull-up. Lower yourself in a controlled fashion until your arms are fully extended, then get right back up there and keep going until you’re done with your set!

    -Ring rows are a go-to pull for building strength in your entire back and core because they get you working with your body weight and can be easily modified as you progress. Start with your feet on the floor, then elevate your feet with a box as you get stronger.

    -Single-arm dumbbell rows are great because they offer freedom of movement and an increased range of motion. Support your body with one arm by leaning on a bench and explosively pull the dumbbell back like you’re trying to elbow someone in the gut.

    -Lat Pulldowns or any vertical pull done with a cable machine can help you develop pulling strength along the same plane as a pull-up and they offer the same freedom of movement as a dumbbell.

    These specific physical preparedness (SPP) exercises use the same muscle groups and similar motor recruitment patterns as the pull-up. If you improve at a number of SPP exercises, you can bet your bottom dollar you’ll get better at pull-ups too.

    4. Your form needs work.

    Pull-ups are like any other exercise or movement – there’s a right way and a wrong way to do them. You can’t just grab the bar and pull all willy-nilly! Here are some tips on maximizing your leverage and getting your back into it:

    Take a shoulder-width grip! Not only will you tear your shoulders apart by taking too wide a grip, but you’ll also limit your range of motion and use less of your back. You can always work in wider grips as you progress but most of your pull-ups should be done with a moderate, shoulder-width grip.
    Keep your head up! By lifting your chin and tucking your neck backwards (packing your neck as some may call it), you can engage your upper back muscles and put yourself into a much better position to pull from. To get an idea of what I mean, try first shoving your head forward, looking down, and tucking your chin into your body – do the opposite of that!
    Pull Up and back! Don’t think of the pull-up as a strictly vertical movement. Instead, lean back and pull the bar to your upper chest, not your chin or neck. Your lower body will be slightly out in front of you and your back will remain neutral – the classic hollow gymnastics position – NOT arched like crazy. Don’t curl your legs – at least not at first.

    5. You don’t stay tight.

    If you can’t maintain relative body position throughout the pull-up and you flop around like a mudkip, you have what we call an energy leak. What this means is that instead of using your entire body to pull, you’re relying on whatever muscles will do the work – most likely your rotator cuff. (Hint: that’s bad.) Everything should stay tight when you pull; point your toes, lock your legs, squeeze your glutes, pack your neck, tuck your chin, take a big breath, and squeeze your core out as you pull your upper chest to the bar with a vice grip around the handles. Don’t loosen up until you’re done with the set! Sounds uncomfortable, eh? It should be.

    6. You aren’t practicing often enough.

    You are what your repeatedly do. If your form is on point, but your specific work capacity sucks and you have to jerk your body around to get your chin over the bar after the first repetition, you’re just teaching your body to express an inefficient movement pattern. It’s much more difficult to unlearn bad form than it is to teach it, so you’re going to want to add in some specialized practice whenever possible. One of the best ways to practice pull-ups is to hang a cheap doorframe pull-up bar in a room you enter/exit frequently and knock out 1-2 explosive reps every time you pass through that door. In his book “Power To The People”, Pavel Tsatsouline describes this as “greasing the groove” and it takes advantage of increased training frequency and specificity to perfect whatever movement you apply to it. Here’s a real world example of how you can use this technique over the course of a week if you can only d 5-6 pull-ups in a row right now:

    Monday 10 sets of 2

    Tuesday 2 sets of 3

    Wednesday 12 sets of 2

    Thursday off

    Friday 3 sets of 3

    Saturday 10 sets of 3

    Sunday 2 sets to failure


    What’s going on here is that you’re accumulating a large volume of perfect repetitions throughout the week. The volume undulates between 9 and 30 repetitions per day with only one day off. By focusing on sets of 2-3 reps, you can focus on form yet still elicit the fatigue required to grow stronger. At the end of the week, you’re trying to hit as many reps as possible across two sets. Over time, you’ll gain pull-up repetitions and really dial in your form.

    7. You’re over-reliant on assisted pull-ups.

    This is going to shock some people, but doing assisted pull-ups exclusively in your workouts may be preventing you from doing a real, unassisted pull-up. Why? Look back at reason #5 where we went over technique/form. Your whole body needs to stay tight during a pull-up, and assistance – whether it’s on a machine or with a band – removes the legs and core from the equation almost completely. It’s difficult to use your back efficiently with a loose core so you end up pulling with less lat engagement and develop improper mechanics. Assisted pull-ups have their place as a developmental exercise (see reason #3), but you absolutely cannot rely upon them too much. When it comes time to WOD, modify and save the assisted movements for your strength/skill sessions. With these tips in mind, go forth and conquer the pull-up!
    Strength Training-40541211_2207522536158852_2441721369138823168_n.jpg


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    "Don’t Earn Your Food in the Gym’ and Six Other Lessons I Wish I’d Learned Sooner”

    I heard this saying recently: “Don’t Earn Your Food in the Gym.” It’s haunted my ears since. So many of us think this way, like we’re eight years old again and if we do our work, then we get a cupcake.

    The concept of food as a treat is baked into our society. I’m not immune to this concept and, before I learned to love lifting iron for the sake of how it made me feel (versus the way it made me look), I was much more of an outcome-motivated gal. I was in that gym thinking that an extra set of this or more time doing that allowed me to eat more. I was earning my food in the gym.

    Strength Training-39929217_2200614193516353_2768003686654279680_n.jpg

    But those days are gone now. Why? Because I do what I love and I let those old proverbial chips fall where they may. I’m deadlifting and squatting (and doing all sorts of other things) because I love how strong and powerful these movements makes me feel. The fact that those deadlifts work my glutes and make my butt look firmer? Icing on that cake that I’m not eating. (I’m not a big cake fan. Go figure. Chocolate chip cookies, however, have taken my virtue many times.)

    Back to earning/not earning your food, though. The road to an invincible mindset that can lead you to success in nutrition and exercise and so many areas of your life? That road starts in your mind, as well as your body. You need to get your head and your butt in gear. Clear thinking plus movement is the road, and you need to get on that road.

    So, reorder your thoughts. Earn your strength in the gym. You don’t have to earn your food. You’re not a dog dancing for treats. You’re an independent badass uncovering even more awesomeness inside you. If you want a sustainable lifestyle that will unlock your potential and supercharge your happiness, then you need to prioritize your mind: fuel your body to increase your performance, instead of increasing your performance in order to fuel your body.

    Some other things I’ve learned that I wish I’d known sooner:

    1.) I’m happier and more focused when I’m not starving.

    Strength Training-41215850_2210359682541804_4574349223478165504_n.jpg

    Who can concentrate when your stomach is rumbling and all you can think about is getting something to eat? These are the weak points in your day, when you’re distracted by hunger. Better to eat smartly and keep your body fueled. Now your mind can stay on the task in front of you.

    2.) Food is the original “5-hour Energy.”

    Strength Training-40541211_2207522536158852_2441721369138823168_n.jpg

    I didn’t come up with this saying, but I’m a believer. So many products out there that you can buy, but they’re all variations on the basic stuff our bodies need: food for fuel. Plan your day, plan your meals, and set yourself up for success, not failure. Be smart.

    3.) Most of us are not eight years old anymore, so we don’t need motivation designed for that age.

    Strength Training-42284196_2220085214902584_5350269085936517120_n.jpg

    Food is not a treat for being a good girl or boy. This is tremendously freeing when you really think about it. If you have to propel yourself with the treat mentality (because you like it or you’re used to it), just pick something else. Run a mile and your treat is back squats. Finish your workout and your treat is a nap. Learn to pick different treats, and rewire your own thoughts. You’re not eight years old so you get to set the rules (and the treats) now!

    4.) Naps are more useful than cupcakes.

    Strength Training-dscn8165.jpg

    Who doesn’t like naps? Plus, sleep helps repair your body and get you stronger. Win win. Next time you’re faced with the choice of cupcakes or naps, pick the nap. It will do far more for you than any cupcake ever could.

    5.) Guilt helps no one, and it definitely does not help your deadlift.

    Strength Training-30724612_2092674270977013_5338414001241980928_n.jpg

    If guilt built strength, we’d all be lifting 900 pounds. But it doesn’t. Stop beating yourself up about what you’ve done. Just do better now. Your last decision may have been poor, but this next one? It could be spot on. Make it so.

    6.) Life is more fun if you’re not miserable.

    Strength Training-41661031_2215746468669792_8742418390708125696_n.jpg

    There are enough things in life that will beat you down. You can’t control everything. So control what you can: your attitude. Set yourself up for success by adopting a mindset that will lead to success. Make smart, healthy choices. And if you veer off your path? Correct your course, and get back on the right path. Don’t earn your food in the gym. Perform in the gym. Fuel your body for life, and go kick some butt.
    sauce https://www.eattoperform.com/2015/03...lisbeth-darsh/
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  42. #142
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    “But I Don’t Want to Bulk Up”: Killing the Zombie of Women’s Fitness

    “But I don’t want to bulk up.”

    There it is AGAIN: the Zombie of Women’s Fitness.

    “I don’t want to bulk up” is the excuse that never dies. It comes back again and again, no matter how many times we explain, argue, cajole, prove it to be false, or madly aggressively obsessively pursue its complete and long-past-due death. (This one really should have died years ago.) A million words have been sacrificed to kill this particular beast, yet it lives.

    It is one of the most moronic statements of the modern gym era, yet “I don’t want to bulk up” refuses to go away. And it propagates itself, like some mad virus that only certain women catch but they feed it and spread it to the others, who feed it and spread it to others.

    “I don’t want to bulk up” is the fear that never dies. And it’s total and complete BS.
    When faced with this zombie, though, don’t bore your listeners with a slide show or PowerPoint presentation on why this fact-free fear is fallacious. (Nobody likes a PPP, not even the people who create them!)

    Instead, here are 9 Things to Say When Someone Says “I Don’t Want to Bulk Up”:

    1.) “There is no such thing as bulking up”
    It’s called gaining muscle, and gaining muscle is a good thing. More muscle makes you stronger and more capable of living this life.

    You don’t gain bulk. You gain muscle. And even if you do not lose body fat at the same time, you actually bulk down, because the mass you have will be denser. (This is the nature of muscle and fat by volume. That pound of fat takes up 4x the space of that pound of muscle.) You make yourself a more efficient package of a person. And you become healthier and more useful in general—to yourself and to this world.

    2.) “No one builds massive amounts of muscle instantly”
    It’s not easy to build muscle. You’re not going to walk through the door of a gym, and an hour later walk out with huge muscles. The human body doesn’t work that way.

    The hard truth is that it takes most people (especially women) years and years and YEARS to gain a lot of muscle. (Unless you’re taking steroids or other such substances—and you’re not doing that, are you?) Most women have far lower levels of testosterone than men, thus making it much more difficult to build muscle. And if you’re over 40? It’s a whole different game, Sister.

    Honestly, my arms and my ass took me close to a decade to build. ALMOST 10 YEARS. Think about that. 10 years of hard work to get the arms, the lats, the back, the booty. Concentrated, dedicated effort day after day for years. It didn’t happen overnight. (Believe me, sometimes I wish it did.)

    Whether you’re an easy gainer or a hard gainer, building muscle is going to take time. Maybe not ten years, but definitely time of a significant magnitude. Nothing happens overnight.

    3.) “If you do find yourself building what you think is ‘too much muscle,’ you can always quit”
    Quit if you think things are getting out of your control. Don’t go to the gym anymore. Abandon the barbell and the dumbbells and the kettlebells. Take up running or Zumba or bowling or something that will stop the muscle-building train, or at least slow it considerably.

    Nobody says you have to keep going. If you don’t like the results, quit. Those muscles will not continue to grow larger, and eventually (through disuse) your body will take back on that flabby, untoned state that you walked into the gym with.

    4.) “Have you considered that you might be lazy?”
    This question will not go over well with the recipient. Be prepared to run away.

    5.) “Are you scared of being really hot?”
    Run REALLY fast. In fact, say this one over your shoulder as you start to run.

    6.) “Are you scared?”
    This is an honest question. Some people are hesitant to start new things. That’s understandable. Exercise can be intense and weightlifting is hard, and both can be scary to people. So, ask this question gently and with great care.

    Remember, nobody gets shamed or scared out of their fear. People do, however, get coaxed out of their fear in a manner not dissimilar to a stray cat learning that it’s safe to venture onto your porch. Put out the bowl of milk, and talk in a loving voice. Listen for the purr. Then decode the mystery for them and help to unravel their fear.

    7.) “Do you just not want to work that hard?”
    This is another valid question. Some folks just don’t want to do hard work, and they’re using “I don’t want to bulk up” as their excuse. It’s easier on the ego than “I don’t want to work hard.” And building muscle is hard work. Really hard work. If they don’t want to do the work, you can sort of understand that, right?

    Remember, often you need to talk to people from where they are, not from where you want them to be. So, do that. Once you make an effort to accept and understand them, you might get to a place where they want to put forth the effort. Don’t beat them up. Listen to what they have to say.

    8.) “Are you worried about not looking ‘feminine’?”
    Some women worry that having muscles is a “masculine” look. But guess what? If you’re a woman, then you’re a woman—having developed muscles or not having developed muscles doesn’t change that. Still, some women accept a view propagated by our society that certain genders should look certain ways. If your friend is worried about this effect, take them back to points #2 and #3 in this article. They can gain as much muscle as they want or don’t want. It’s up to them.

    9.) “Okay”
    Seriously. If none of the above statements works to convince your friend of their erroneous assumption, you can just walk away. Unless you’re on a mission to change all the misguided opinions in the world, think about taking a pass and moving onto another subject. You’re not the Muscle Myths Explainer or the Truth Champion or even the Jackass Whisperer. You’re just you, another person with a love of training and a heart that wants to help.

    Instead of continuing to sink all your effort into a cause that appears to be lost, walk away. Find someone who does want your help, and help them.

    This is not a perfect list, but it’s a start! What other things might you say to a woman who says she doesn’t want to “bulk up”?
    sauce https://www.eattoperform.com/2016/09/17/killing-zombie/
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  43. #143
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    Do Men And Women Need The Same Amount Of Protein?

    Men may consume much more protein per day than women, but this is generally due to the fact that men tend to weigh more and have more fat-free mass than women. A 150-pound woman would need to consume the same amount of protein as a 150-pound man, assuming they both had the same physical goals in mind.

    Women and men are far more similar than they are different, both genetically and in terms of their nutritional needs. This applies not only to protein, but to all other nutrients as well.

    Bill Campbell, Ph.D., the director of the Performance & Physique Enhancement Laboratory at the University of South Florida, has studied how varying amounts of protein in the diet influence body composition in resistance-trained women.[4] In the article "How Much Protein do Women Really Need?" he explained that adding an additional 400 or more calories of protein—in other words, 100 grams of pure protein—to the diets of women who were strength training several times a week had a surprising effect.

    Not only did the women gain muscle, but as Campbell writes, "The women on the higher-protein diet actually lost more body fat than women on the lower-protein diet, even though they consumed more calories!"

    That said, women may have different goals and want different things from their protein powder, like lower carbs, extra collagen, and so on. The best protein powders for women will address not just protein needs but other nutritional considerations.

    Strength Training-43762276_2232713583639747_7050690270995677184_n.jpg

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...M_FB_Nutrition
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  44. #144
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    Every movement you make either swimming, biking or running starts from the core, that's why core strengthening is so important for both injury prevention and performance:

    Core Strength for Athletes: A Workout to Improve Performance and Prevent Injury

    As you take your training into the new year, this is a perfect time to revisit strength training concepts related to the “core”. You have likely heard about the importance of having a strong core. In fact, the term “core” is used so frequently, that it is often misunderstood and poorly represented. For this piece, I am taking this highly complex anatomical landmark and distilling it down to it’s key features. When discussing the core, I am talking about the body without the arms, legs, or head. For me, the core is the anatomy of the pelvis and the trunk including the entire spinal column, thoracic cavity, abdominal cavity, and the pelvic basin.

    Almost any motion the body experiences is transmitted through the core system. Anytime you move a limb (in any way), turn your head, or engage in any physical activity, the core is involved to some degree. Your core functions primarily to absorb, redirect and transfer forces throughout the body. While your hips can produce tremendous amounts of force, the spinal column and trunk are more effective at providing stability and transfer of energy instead of generating it.

    Benefits of Strength Training
    In order to realize your potential as an athlete, and reduce the risk of injuries, you must incorporate strength training into your program. Unfortunately, when you are under pressure or tight on time, strength training is often the first thing to get ejected from your schedule. In reality, however, strength training should be an inextricable component of your performance strategy.

    Strength training provides you with benefits that you cannot achieve through aerobic training alone. In fact, the mechanical and repetitive nature of most aerobic training leads to breakdown of tissue and dysfunction at the joints. Too much aerobic training actually pushes the endocrine system into a catabolic state. Conjure a mental projection of any endurance activity, and you will see that at its essence, it is continuous and repetitious. This constant movement, occurring predominantly in one plane and with set/limited range of motion sets the stage for injury to propagate. The human body is designed to move across multiple planes with varied ranges of motion.

    Repetitious Movement
    Consider cycling, where the hips are fixed atop the saddle, the feet are bound to the pedals and the arms are spatially anchored on the handlebar in various positions. From this highly fixed anatomical position, the rider performs thousands of repetitions in a predetermined path of motion, restricting range through the joints and tissues.

    With this image, imagine two riders equal in all things (fitness and equipment) except one of the riders has a strong and stable core system. As a race goes on, the rider with the stronger core will win every time. Why? Because the strengthened athlete can more efficiently transfer power into the pedal transferring that energy into desired momentum without the common power “leaks” that arise over time as various structures buckle or fatigue.

    It is very much the same with running. All distance running (particularly anything over 3k) is very repetitive. An athlete with poor postural control and core stability will display more and more “leaks” as an event goes on. Any collapse in postural control or core rigidity is inefficient and represents sub-optimal athletic performance. The same can be said for cross country skiing, rowing, swimming or any other endurance event.

    Back Pain
    Clean, quality movement is governed by structural efficiency and postural control. When we have a stable hip and core, we are well on our way towards better performance and lower exposure to back injury. Biomechanical models continually demonstrate that strength training significantly reduces injury rates and enhances performance.

    Most evidence suggests athletes experience the same, or even higher rates of injury as the general public does. Here are a few interesting fact about back pain:

    1. Low back pain is the leading cause of disability across the globe
    2. Half of working Americans reported having back pain within the year.
    3. Hip and back pain is the second most common reason to visit the doctor’s office (the leading cause is respiratory infection
    4. Most back pain is mechanical (not acute, or from an accident), but from faulty movement patterns
    5. As many as 85 percent of us will experience at least one episode of back pain in our life, according to the National Institutes of Health and World Health Organization.

    Hip and Core Strength Session
    Below is a hip and core session that will help get the season off on the right footing.

    Always let the repetition scheme guide your selection of load. Never lift more than you are capable of. Always trust your intuition when it comes to exercise. Less is better, particularly at the onset of any strength protocol.

    I recommend organizing these exercises in “groups” or “circuits” of three or four exercises at a time.
    Take as little rest as you need between exercises, while still performing them safely and effectively. We should aim to trim the rest to somewhere between :10 and :20 between exercises and 1-2 minutes between “groups” or “circuits”
    DO NOT draw the navel in (often referred to as the drawing in maneuver or hollowing out) as many of us were taught. Instead, brace the entire trunk by stiffening the anatomy as if bracing for a physical impact. A stable trunk is one that is “super stiff”, which can only be created through bracing the entire trunk. Spine biomechanist Stuart McGill has very eloquently demonstrated this multiple times.



    Introduction
    Lateral Crawl- 3 sets of 6 repetitions.
    Squat and Press: 3 sets of 8-12 reps, make sure to allow the ankle, knee and hip to articulate.
    Prone med ball toss: 3 sets of 8-12 reps, be very careful and mindful here. do not extend too much, and never use too much load.
    Take a break of 1 to 2 minutes if need be before the next grouping:

    Core contract and hold: 3 sets of 4-6 reps of :10 contract and hold, with :03-:05 rests between.
    Walking chest press on cable cross: 4 sets of 6-9 reps per limb. If you do not have access to similar machine, you can use a band or regular pulley and just move one limb at a time, stepping forward once, then back to neutral.
    Torso twist with cable or band: 3-4 sets of 9-12 reps. Select the load carefully and never force the range of motion or anatomical position.
    Take a break of 1 to 2 minutes if need be before the next grouping:

    Walking shoulder abduction with press: 3-4 sets of 6-9 reps per limb on both phases (abduction and adduction).
    Bulgarian split squat with rotation: 3 sets of 8-12 reps. Be careful and very controlled throughout.
    Vertical med ball toss: 3-4 sets of 10-15 reps. Be sure to lead with the chest and do not allow the low back to come off the ground.
    Take a break of 1 to 2 minutes if need be before the next grouping:

    Suitcase squat: 3-4 sets of 8 reps per hemisphere.
    Stir the pot: 3 sets of :40-:60, be sure to change direction.

    sauce: https://www.trainingpeaks.com/blog/c...revent-injury/
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  45. #145
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    I'm going to work on this move... you never know when you need it

    The Bodyweight Skill You Didn't Know You Needed

    One of the most exciting aspects of calisthenics is learning unique skills that take weeks or even months to build up to. Then, when you can finally do a clean rep or two, you discover that you did a lot more than just add a cool parlor trick to your resume. You're also just straight-up stronger! Maybe your push-ups, pull-ups, or handstand push-ups also mysteriously took a big step forward, or you can just rock through your normal workout a little easier than before.

    The elbow lever is this kind of move. The first time I successfully pulled one off, it made me feel like an athlete and reminded me of what made working out fun in the first place. Skills training can keep you enthusiastic about working out and training for life. Not only can you get the results you desire physically, you can also have fun doing it!

    Train the elbow lever seriously, and you'll discover that it's also a great exercise for strengthening your spinal erectors, pecs, abs, quads, glutes, and wrists. Curious? You should be!

    Did You Say Wrist Strength?
    A common weakness for many of my female clients has been their wrists. The elbow lever is great for strengthening the extensor muscles of your arms, and it will help you build strength to support your wrists in moves like push-ups, handstands, and even front-squat variations.

    Furthermore, for spinal extension, which is the type of exercise the elbow lever is, your choices at the gym are often limited to waiting for the Roman chair or flopping around on the ground doing back extensions. You can practice lever progressions at home, work, or pretty much anyplace else you want, and they're also perfect for active-recovery days when you're resting from heavy training but are still itching to do something physical.

    Perhaps most importantly, mastering a skill like this demands that you work out more! Focusing on creativity in your training will shift your focus from just trying to build muscle or lose weight to improving your movement arsenal. You will be more enthusiastic during your workouts, but as a side effect, you will most definitely be making strength gains.

    Here's how to take your training to the next level with the elbow lever. It took me over a year to finally nail this move, so be patient with your progress, milk each step, and enjoy the ride. Remember, you're building strength as you get closer to the movement, not just when you nail it!

    Warm-Up Essential 1: Eagle Arms
    This is a stretch from yoga that can help you warm up your shoulders for the intense mobility required to perform an elbow lever. I recommend doing it regularly, but especially before you start your lever practice.

    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-1-700xh.jpg

    To do this stretch, cross your arms so your top arm's elbow is in the elbow pit of your bottom arm. Then, cross your wrists so you can bring your palms together. You should feel a deep stretch in your upper back, delts, biceps, and wrists. Hold for 30 seconds on both sides.

    Remember to switch the crossing of your arms so you stretch both sides of your body evenly.

    Warm-Up Essential 2: Bridge ... Haa! I can already do this!
    The ability to hold a lever takes tremendous back and glute strength as well as serious wrist strength and flexibility. Bridge training can help you develop all of those while also improving your posture and opening up your thoracic spine like nothing else.


    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-2-700xh.jpg

    I usually warm up with a few bridges, focusing on glute activation, before I work on levers. This will help you learn to fire up your posterior chain during a lever hold. Build up to three 20-second holds.

    Progression 1: Elevated Lever ... I'm going to start with this one
    It can help when you're learning the elbow lever to practice on an elevated surface. This will allow some room for your legs to hang while you work on getting strong enough to extend your back and lift your legs completely horizontal.

    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-3-700xh.jpg

    Find a box, bench, or other stable object to practice on, and stand in front of it. Bring your elbows inward toward your midline, and place your palms flat on the bench/box with your fingers pointing towards you. Ideally, your elbows should be bent and positioned inside your hip bones. Slowly begin to shift your weight onto your arms as you bend your knees and lift your feet off the floor. Keep opening the angle at your elbows as you squeeze your glutes and extend your chest upward.

    When starting out, keep your knees bent in a tucked position. As you build strength in your abs, shoulders, back, arms, and wrists, your next step should be to extend your legs into a straddle position and eventually work toward bringing them together.

    Progression 2: Wall Lever... I am ready for this too
    Once you feel confident practicing your elbow lever on an elevated surface, the next step is to bring it to the ground—but still with some help. I recommend using a wall for support to give you an idea of the muscle tension required to get into the full elbow lever.

    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-4-700xh.jpg

    Begin in a plank position, facing away from a wall, with your legs fully extended and your heels pressed up against the wall. Position your arms in the lever position, with your elbows inside of your hip bones, and begin to shift your weight onto your hands as you walk your feet a few inches up the wall. Focus on pushing your feet into the wall to help you engage your quads and glutes and extend your chest upward.

    Tuck Lever, Straddle Lever, And The Full Lever... ok that looks interesting
    When you're ready to try this move away from the wall, follow all the same steps as the above variations. It will probably help to keep your knees bent in order to "shorten" the length of your body and make the move slightly more manageable.

    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-5-700xh.jpg

    As you get stronger, work toward slowly extending your legs out into a straddle position, again to make the leverage more favorable. With practice, you will be able to fully extend your legs and bring them together. Remember to move your legs slowly to stay balanced as you transition from tuck, to straddle, to the full elbow lever. This is a precise move that's all about control. And yes, it may take a while, so be patient!

    Beyond The Elbow Lever ... the goal
    The variations of this move don't stop once you get your legs together. Once you can hold an elbow lever for a few seconds, you can try a staggered hand variation that will help you work up toward the mighty one-arm elbow lever. In this exercise, you balance on one arm as you extend your other arm in front of you.

    Strength Training-bodyweight-skill-you-didnt-know-you-needed-v2-6-700xh.jpg

    For this variation, position one elbow in the center of your hip bones, and fully extend your other arm in front of you. The idea is to eventually lift the hand of your extended arm while only balancing on one arm. You can progress it gradually by lifting all your fingers individually until you can lift your entire hand.

    When you can do that, you've developed not only balance, but also crazy full-body strength and muscle control. Now, that's the full package!

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/content...=content_posts
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    ^^^

  48. #148
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    4 Female Training Myths Debunked: Sculpt Feminine Muscle Without Masculine Bulk!

    "I just want to lose fat around my stomach and nowhere else." "I just want to tone my inner thighs." "Lifting weights is just going to turn me into a man!" I have heard these statements from women about 3,000 times. Those 3 desires have one thing in common; they are pretty much impossible.
    COMMON MYTHS
    MYTH 1: SPOT REDUCTION


    Let's start off with the theory of burning fat or toning a certain area of the body. Toning involves two constituents: adipose tissue (the subcutaneous body fat) and muscle tissue. In order to appear more toned, a reduction in body fat and increase in muscle mass will have to occur.

    The human body does not allow spot reducing, which would include losing fat exclusively in the abdominal area. If you were to lose weight, it would occur all over your entire body. Unfortunately, body fat is not necessarily reduced evenly.

    People often have trouble areas where the fat is last to go. Women especially find this to be their stomach, legs or arms. There is not much that can be done about this aside from continuing to lean out.

    A reduction in body fat occurs when a person is in a caloric deficit. This occurs with two variables: decreasing the amount of calories you consume, increasing the amount of exercise you participate in, or doing both. Resistance training is used to help build and maintain muscle tissue, while cardiovascular training is a tool used to help achieve a caloric deficit.

    Here is a statement that many of you probably do not want to believe: There is no exercise out there that is going to burn fat off of your body in a specific area! No resistance training exercise will help tone or reduce fat on top of any muscle in your body. It is a reduction of calories and an increase in exercise that will take care of that.

    There is a very big misconception regarding that "burn" you feel after performing many repetitions during an exercise. Some people actually believe that is the fat melting off the body right before our very eyes! That burn is actually caused by lactic acid, which is used by your muscles to form adenosine triphosphate (ATP) for immediate energy.

    I often see a female lying on the ground at the gym performing sets of 100 crunches. She probably assumes that burning sensation is actually helping her "toning her stomach". If you are performing a set of 100 repetitions on any exercise, don't you think it is time to move on to something a little harder?

    Strength Training-45381066_2245982435646195_619338982777421824_n.jpg

    MYTH 2: LOSING YOUR FEMININITY
    The theory that lifting weights will cause a woman to appear bulky and manly is completely false. I used resistance training to bring my body weight up 60 pounds over the course of about five years.

    I must say that the actual weight training was the easy part. The difficult part included eating like a horse, because a calorie surplus is needed to gain muscle mass. I often gagged during some meals as I was pretty much force-feeding myself like a mother would to a small child eating their vegetables.

    Now, I am pretty sure that most women do not force feed themselves by mistake. Extreme muscle mass gains are not something that occurs out of the blue. You have to really want it for it to happen. It is pretty safe to say that muscle gain is much, much harder than fat loss for most people.

    Another little fact that most women forget is testosterone. Testosterone is a very anabolic hormone found in the human body, males and females, which is very important for gains in muscle mass. Men usually have about ten times more testosterone than women.

    Even if a woman were to put the time into eating a crazy amount, it would still be about ten times harder to look like a man. It sounds like it is fairly difficult for a woman to gain an incredible amount of muscle mass and be mistaken for a man, doesn't it?

    Strength Training-44339352_2237156906528748_3963372456126709760_n.jpg

    MYTH 3: AVOIDING CHEST EXERCISES
    Another fairly popular fallacy is the theory that a woman should not perform any chest exercises, as this would "shrink her breasts". A woman's breasts are an area of fat deposit just like anywhere else on her body. The breasts will shrink as body fat levels of the entire body are reduced.

    Resistance exercises for the chest would not cause a reduction in size. In fact, it might help your breasts appear larger as you can stimulate growth of your pectoral muscles. The larger pectoral muscles would help push out the fat found on your breasts and assist them in looking bigger.

    Strength Training-43950506_2232715040306268_3062652380328755200_n.jpg

    MYTH 4: EATING LESS TO LOSE WEIGHT
    Most women claim to have a sound diet, but this usually ends up being in the form of a starvation diet. It probably includes skipping breakfast, eating a salad at lunch and one slice of cheese for dinner if you are lucky.

    Breakfast is known as the most important meal of the day for a reason. Your body is begging for fuel, as it has not received any in most likely a good eight to ten hours. Skipping meals frequently actually slows your metabolism down as it is much more beneficial to eat five to six smaller meals spaced evenly throughout the day.

    A lot of people are always confused by this as they think eating so frequently will cause them to gain weight. This simply is not true unless you eat many calories above your maintenance level.

    Let's say 1,500 calories is adequate for your goal of weight loss. Instead of eating two 700-calorie meals, five meals consisting of about 300 calories would be much better. If you happen to eat 500 calories for one meal and 200 calories for another, this will not break you. As long as you finish the day with the same amount of calories and you eat several times per day, you will be fine.

    THERE IS NO REPLACEMENT FOR HARD WORK
    I have known too many ladies who have purchased far too many fitness gadgets seen on television at 4am on any random weeknight. There are things like the famous "ab belts," which "electronically stimulate your abdominal muscles".

    How many people actually think a little belt will trim down belly fat without breaking a sweat at all? I think we have struck gold here! There isn't an overweight person in the world anymore due to this cool belt!

    Wait, it is time to enter reality again as there are no tricks or gadgets that replace the hard work you have to put in to achieve your goal. It all comes down to diet and exercise, which has always been the equation and always will be.

    I have thrown a lot of information at you, and you are probably wondering what you should do. Well, I hope you have realized that resistance training is an important tool you can use to achieve a better-looking body.

    It is important to focus on compound movements, which use more than one muscle group. These include all variations of squats, lunges, bench presses, rows and shoulder presses.

    These are the biggest bang for your buck exercises, as you are using many muscle groups. Focus on performing variations of these exercises at least twice a week for about 40 minutes, and you will reap the benefits in your physique.

    Do not forget to include cardiovascular training, which doesn't have to be running on a treadmill. It is important to find an activity you enjoy and look forward to, such as hiking, tennis, swimming or even rowing a boat.

    If you love the activity you perform, you are much more likely to stick to your program in the long run, which will improve your chance of succeeding.

    THE IMPORTANCE OF DIET
    A sound diet is just as important as exercise, if not more important. Make sure to eat frequently throughout the day, but control the portion sizes.

    Eating the right types of foods will definitely help your progress as well. Protein rich foods are very important, as they are necessary for recovery from your workouts. Lean meats, eggs, and whey protein are great examples.

    Moderate carbohydrates should also be included in your diet, as it is your body's main fuel source after all. Whole grains are the keys here as they are much slower digesting and help keep you fuller longer.

    Fat is also important for recovery and hormone production; examples of good fat sources include: olive oil, canola oil, any variety of nuts, fatty fish such as salmon and mackerel.

    Fruits and vegetables also need to be incorporated as they are packed with vitamins and minerals necessary for everyday body functions. The fiber found in them promotes digestive health as well as helps keep your belly satisfied.

    Strength Training-45299613_1721363911325943_3278511647009800192_n.jpg

    (I follow a vegan diet. Since I giving up dairy 4 years ago, it's made a big difference in my health (energy, weight loss etc. ... plus it's my contribution for the animals and planet )

    CONCLUSION
    All the pieces of the puzzle must be taken into consideration for you to reach your goals. Make sure to treat every aspect as important as the others.

    sauce https://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ton...ntent_training
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

  49. #149
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    Who Says Allie Kieffer Isn’t Thin Enough to Run Marathons?


    Strength Training-merlin_145838910_040ef662-f3d9-4ab0-a83b-d047a1b9f1a2-superjumbo.jpg

    Allie Kieffer, one of the best Americans running the New York City Marathon next Sunday, spent a lot of her life feeling as if she didn’t really fit in among the competition. She was good enough to land an athletic scholarship to college and hoped to continue running after graduating. But she wasn’t as thin as the women she raced against. Her coaches suggested she diet. She eventually gave in, and her body broke down.

    Kieffer moved back to New York from Boulder, Colo., and took a job as a nanny. After a few years, she missed running and started again — but this time was different. There were no goals, no opponents to compare herself with and no times to record. Everything was on her own terms. She made friends jogging in Central Park. She joined CrossFit, unheard-of in elite running, a sport whose athletes are not exactly known for their bulging musculature. She began running more miles than ever, she was healthier than ever, and she was happier, too. And then something unexpected happened: She got faster. Much faster.

    Last year, Kieffer ran the New York City Marathon and finished, astonishingly, in fifth place. She was the second American woman, and she logged her best time by nearly 15 minutes in one of the world’s most competitive footraces. Barely anyone knew who the unsponsored 30-year-old American with the topknot sprinting past Olympians in the final miles of Central Park was.

    Suddenly, Kieffer wasn’t just trying to be one of the hundreds of elite runners in the country. She had become one of the best runners in the world.

    In doing so, Kieffer has given us a powerful example of what can happen when we stop trying to force ourselves to meet preconceived notions of how to achieve success — especially unhealthy, untrue ideas — and go after our goals on our own terms. When we focus less on fixing what we consider to be inadequacies and more on reinforcing our strengths, we can realize potential we didn’t even know we had.

    “Sometimes, the act of trying takes so much energy that it can prevent you from actually doing the thing you want to do,” Brad Stulberg, the author of Peak Performance, told me. “If it starts to feel like performance shackles, you’re going to want to say screw it, to break out of rigid patterns and rip those shackles off. And only then are you able to really achieve what you were trying for the whole time.”

    Kieffer’s story also proves that we can achieve far more when we value all women’s bodies less for how they look, and more for what they can do.

    Not that being underestimated can’t serve as motivation.

    “I’ve always gotten a lot of satisfaction by being the big girl everyone thought they were going to beat,” says Kieffer.

    This is not to say that Kieffer represents what an “un-thin” woman looks like. By regular-person standards, she is quite thin. But she knows firsthand how the word “strong” can be a euphemism for “too big,” and how the goal of running fast is consistently equated with weight loss. As her extraordinary athletic success continued this year — and she weighed 10 pounds more than she did at her last peak, in 2012 — she faced speculation on whether her speed was related to drugs, since, in the words of one online commenter, “nobody runs that time at that weight without EPO or blood doping.”

    Of course, there is a growing movement telling us to embrace the bodies we’ve got — thank you — but it’s hard to drown out the other messages. Whether it’s for a race or a wedding, women are told that they are at their most valuable when their bodies are their most diminished. Resisting the impulse to feed yourself is an accomplishment we praise. You don’t have to buy into these values, but you’ll probably still be judged by them.

    And you don’t have to be as talented as Kieffer for her story to resonate. It certainly felt familiar to me. Since I started racing, in high school, I’ve been the kind of runner who’s lucky to just make the medal podium. Every so often, people will remind me that I don’t look as if I belong out there, that my doubts aren’t just in my head. A few years ago, I told a new colleague that I was running a marathon over the weekend and interpreted her wide eyes as a reflection of how much I’d clearly just impressed her — except she was struck by something else.

    “But you’re not even skinny!” she exclaimed.

    (No, I learned in high school that not eating enough food won’t get you everything you might have hoped it would.)

    In my case, I wasn’t just thinking about how I looked compared with my peers or what I ate. My approach was about all the other powerful temptations of discipline versus excess that it takes to push your limits in this sport: more mileage, more working, more, more, more, even when it didn’t really get me anywhere.

    After five years of pushing through injuries doing what I was certain the successful version of myself should do, I never made it to the starting line of a race. I’d get injured, get upset, and try the same thing again, hoping that maybe by the seventh or the eighth or the ninth try it would finally work.

    Then, one summer, I realized I wasn’t even trying anymore — without even deciding to, I’d given up and let go. And then last year, I started running again, without any pressure, because I love it. And I decided to try racing again; now, the only goal would be simply making it to the starting line. I made it, and I reached the finish line too — faster than I’d ever run. And it all somehow felt easier, and more satisfying, than whatever nonsense I’d been attempting before. Sometimes, trying to keep up is less productive — and far more frustrating — than motivating yourself on your own terms.

    “When you think about what high performers have in common, it’s striking that motivation is so internal: they’re obsessed with what they do, they love it. ” said Angela Duckworth, the psychologist who wrote the book “Grit.” “Dropping out can help you re-evaluate and reflect on why you’re doing this in the first place. It’s hard to both paddle really hard and navigate at the same time.”

    Kieffer has embraced her healthy approach to training, which was honed growing up on Long Island. She recalls afternoons spent rollerblading with friends and eating heaps of Italian food and ice cream — in the same outing. And she jokes that part of her edge now is that she is able to ingest more food than her competition on the run — because, after all, food is fuel.

    Operating on your own terms can also give you the confidence to bounce back when things don’t go as planned. When I first met Kieffer in March, she was in a cast. She had broken her foot after ramping up her training. Instead of despairing, she focused on a comeback plan. Now, she has run her best time in nearly every event she has entered this year. Taking a more flexible approach to your end goal helps you cut yourself breaks that keep you in the game.

    And staying in the game is critical. For most of her life, Kieffer was one amid scores of good, anonymous runners. She only reached the national stage after investing in herself, sponsorless, for a decade.

    It shows that if we decide that the only people who have the potential to succeed are the ones who meet our idea of what successful looks like — when they’re gifted children of 12 or high achieving 20-year-olds — and only invest in them, we’ll prove ourselves right.

    Doing things on your own terms is hard work. Kieffer makes far less money as a runner than she made as a professional nanny. And of course, you have to know what you’re doing. Giving up on your narrow definition of success only works if, after you reset, your autopilot leads you to a finish line, not to a couch.

    “There’s a time for making something happen, and then there’s letting something happen,” said Stulberg. “You’re not going to tell a novice not to follow a recipe, but at elite levels of performance, letting go and simply letting something happen can lead to a real breakthrough.”

    After Kieffer had success doing some things on her own terms, she let go of other norms as well, and as a professional runner she hasn’t adhered to a traditional path at all. Since her comeback, she has transformed her living situation (instead of a home base, she rents a different house every month to train at different altitudes); her training plan is full of workouts so hard that she often can’t finish them (before, she wouldn’t start a workout she didn’t know she could complete); she races far more frequently than her competitors (she ran two half marathons each of the past two weekends); she shares a remarkable amount of her training on social media; and she has continued to emphasize strength training (she regularly front-squats more than 135 pounds).

    By conventional standards, she is doing nearly everything wrong. But she’s beating a lot of the people who are still training the “right” way, so perhaps her path shows there’s room for a more flexible definition of what the right way can be. This is probably true for more than just distance running.

    And when that fresh path translates to success — when the wrong way becomes a new right way — the pressure you were escaping in the first place can return. The trick is to turn that pressure into fresh motivation. Last year, the only person with any expectations for Kieffer was Kieffer herself. Now, she’s aiming for the medal podium of the New York marathon next Sunday. And this time, she thinks, she belongs there.

    sauce https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/27/s...8MZ5MpUfDD3yn0
    F*ck Cancer

    Eat your veggies

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