So bummed. Huge maintenance issue.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    So bummed. Huge maintenance issue.

    I went to take my rear wheel off to replace my brake pads, but the spindle is completely seized inside the axle. I lubed that sucker up the last time the wheel was off. So I'm not sure what happened. To add insult to injury, I rounded out the spindle while trying to break it free. So now my next option is to drill it out. Any other ideas??

    I have a 2018 Ibis mojo3 with the 148 boost.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  2. #2
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    Photos?

    However, if you don't know what to do next I suggest you take it to a shop to fix before you damage it more.

  3. #3
    Hitching a ride
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    Probably let the shop do it. None of the ways of getting the axle out will be pretty or easy.

    Good news is that new ones are only $20

    And there's a big raised head so you can dremel a slot and use a flat head screwdriver.

    https://www.fanatikbike.com/products...exle-thru-axle

  4. #4
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    Oh no. 😢. I had that problem with my husbandís bike today. I put something similar to WD-40 on it and let it sit for a bit. I needed to use a snipe and ended up bending some of the metal on the outer part of the axle and also had to stick a large Allen key into the axle and pound the whole thing out, but I finally got it. Cleaned it up real well, sanded down the axle where it seemed to be sticking and then greased it up really well and itís still usable! Fingers crossed that same goes for you!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by plummet View Post
    Photos?

    However, if you don't know what to do next I suggest you take it to a shop to fix before you damage it more.
    I've attached photos. They don't show much.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    That *shouldn't* be difficult for a shop to remove but it will be terminal for the axle.

    If you've got access to a drill and an ez-out then you could do it yourself.

  7. #7
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    Another option is to get a hacksaw and gently cut a slot into the non drive side axle. Use a wide flat head screw driver in the slot with a spanner tightened on the blade and gently but firmly undo.

    Note that this issue has been caused by over tightening combined with damage of the internal hex. It is totally user error.

    On a side note a alloy 6mm hex head is stupid ass for a high stress component that needs to be undo regularly. They should also put an external hex on the part so it can be ondone in the workshop without wearing the internal hex.

    See attached photo of one i cut a slot into to undo because the previous owner rounded out the internal hex.

    Now a internal hex does not immediately and instantly become rounded off. It is damaged over successive over torquing of the axle. You need to inspect the hex and replace the axle if you notice any wear. Dont wait unitl its this stuffed to replace it.


    So bummed. Huge maintenance issue.-img_20181007_082622.jpg

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by plummet View Post
    Another option is to get a hacksaw and gently cut a slot into the non drive side axle. Use a wide flat head screw driver in the slot with a spanner tightened on the blade and gently but firmly undo.

    Note that this issue has been caused by over tightening combined with damage of the internal hex. It is totally user error.

    On a side note a alloy 6mm hex head is stupid ass for a high stress component that needs to be undo regularly. They should also put an external hex on the part so it can be ondone in the workshop without wearing the internal hex.

    See attached photo of one i cut a slot into to undo because the previous owner rounded out the internal hex.

    Now a internal hex does not immediately and instantly become rounded off. It is damaged over successive over torquing of the axle. You need to inspect the hex and replace the axle if you notice any wear. Dont wait unitl its this stuffed to replace it.


    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is super helpful! It seems odd and also annoying that I could have over-tightened it given that I used a torque wrench based on Ibis specs.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bees_by_the_sea View Post
    This is super helpful! It seems odd and also annoying that I could have over-tightened it given that I used a torque wrench based on Ibis specs.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
    If you have always used a torque wrench then it may be the hex is worn out due to over use and you haven't noticed the damage on the hex. Also look at depth of insertion of the tool. If not inserted enough that could cause wear. Sometimes the hex gets filled up with dirt and beeds cleaning prior to disassembly.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by plummet View Post
    If you have always used a torque wrench then it may be the hex is worn out due to over use and you haven't noticed the damage on the hex. Also look at depth of insertion of the tool. If not inserted enough that could cause wear. Sometimes the hex gets filled up with dirt and beeds cleaning prior to disassembly.
    Thank you!!

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  11. #11
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    I've found that the factory torque specs for thru axles seem to be on the high side. I tried using a torque wrench and went by a factory torque spec...I don't remember exactly what the number is...but it was really tight. I don't think I would have been able to remove the axle with my mini tool. The aluminum used for these lightweight axles are pretty soft. What I usually do is I'll use whatever tool I keep in my pack. This way...I'll know that I'll be able to remove the axle when I'm on the trail. Good thing that this did not happen on the trail and you needed to fix a flat.

  12. #12
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    That's good to know! I'll keep that in mind when I replace the axle.

    Omg....if I tried to fix a flat on the trail, this would have been a huge buzzkill!!

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  13. #13
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    Trek uses really soft alloy for their suspension bolts. Even with a good allen wrench I need to be really careful that it's properly inserted... and even then it still marks the alloy.

    Good tools are the key !!

  14. #14
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    On a side note I'm considering 3D printing myself some titanium axles.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by plummet View Post
    On a side note I'm considering 3D printing myself some titanium axles.
    This sounds

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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    What I usually do is I'll use whatever tool I keep in my pack. This way...I'll know that I'll be able to remove the axle when I'm on the trail. Good thing that this did not happen on the trail and you needed to fix a flat.
    This is what I do too. It'll be under torqued per specs, but at least you'll know you can undo it on the trail.

    I also do this with the lug nuts on my car after I have a tyre rotation done. That way I know I can change my own wheel with the lug wrench I have on board.
    Ride like a girl! :cornut:

  17. #17
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    Let us know how you get it fixed up. I would also be inclined to take it to a trusted shop as they have the tools and the tricks of the trade. For those using trail tools, I see the sense in this, but a friend recently crashed on a jump when the rear axle came loose, so you will need to be rechecking it often. I rarely flat so I would rather torque it. One solution would be to bring along a single long hex wrench, toss it in the bottom of your pack or tape it somewhere safe. Mini tools don't have much oomph, although I like the MT-1 better than most https://www.parktool.com/product/mul...ry=Multi-Tools

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Let us know how you get it fixed up. I would also be inclined to take it to a trusted shop as they have the tools and the tricks of the trade. For those using trail tools, I see the sense in this, but a friend recently crashed on a jump when the rear axle came loose, so you will need to be rechecking it often. I rarely flat so I would rather torque it. One solution would be to bring along a single long hex wrench, toss it in the bottom of your pack or tape it somewhere safe. Mini tools don't have much oomph, although I like the MT-1 better than most https://www.parktool.com/product/mul...ry=Multi-Tools
    Update!
    So we were able to get it off. Managed to pull the wheel away from the frame enough to expose the axle. Then we just cut it in half with a dremel and got the wheel off.

    The kicker was that once we did that, we were able to turn the threaded part of the axle out.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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