Mountain Biking Skills Videos- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Mountain Biking Skills Videos

    Ladies, if just you're just getting into MTB'ing or working on improving your skills here are some videos that can help.


  2. #2
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    ^ Yeah, this stuff should be in a sticky?
    RideGG, Cycle-CNY

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    (I don't love some of the stuff in the first vid)

    Here are some of my go tos:




    https://youtu.be/Hy_PEhsZrPc

    Full one hour version:
    https://youtu.be/F9vakhSvgt8
    Leigh Donovan has been posting some to Instagram #livcycling

  4. #4
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    Not video... but a good read from a great rider

    sauce: Mountain Bike Skills | Bicycling


    You may not know Jay Hoots, but you’re likely familiar with his work. The 44-year-old from Vancouver, British Columbia, has designed cycling gear, earned a reputation as a first-rate coach and instructor, and has built more that 40 bike parks and pump tracks. That mix of experience has given Hoots a unique perspective on what it takes to take your riding to the next level. Whether you’re a beginner or veteran mountain biking, these four steps will make faster, smoother and more confident in any situation.

    Pressure control
    Hoots advises his students to learn to move both the bike and your body around for more traction and control. A pump track is a great place to work on this skill, but you can also use something closer to home: a curb. “Riding up, you want to go from the point of getting the front wheel on and then riding your rear wheel up to getting up and over using pressure control,” Hoots says. “The object is to get up on the curb touching each tire, but not hitting the curb as a square edge.” To practice this, think about more than just hopping up with your feet—it’s weighting and unweighting first the front and then the rear of the bike to get it up and on the curb. “Once you’re up, practice pumping down the same way,” Hoots says. “You want to make it a smooth edge, not a square edge.”

    Pushing into corners
    To turn, most beginners—and even some intermediate riders—just turn their handlebar to corner. Advanced cornering is more active—it’s about pressing the bike into a corner. “You want to look ahead and commit,” Hoots says, “and then, with your pedals level, press through the apex of the corner with your arms and legs. This happens when you start to trust your tires and trust the bike.” The other key component: Speed, since leaning the bike over is a must. You can practice this on any corner.


    Amplified braking
    “A lot of people will tell you that you need to get your ass back when you’re braking, but you never know how far,” Hoots says. “There are a lot of things at play, but if you keep your cranks level but drop your heels, that will usually put you in the right position. It amplifies how much pressure you’re getting from the rear wheel to the ground.” Hoots recommends adding this braking practice to your curb sessions. “Every time you bump off a curb, you’re figuring out where your body is and how to move front and back,” he explains. “I’ve lost track of how much time I’ve spent bumping into curbs.”

    Planning
    Part of planning is looking ahead, which also gets your shoulders and upper body in the right place. But the bigger part is mentally walking through what you’re doing before you do it. “When consistency counts, you need to plan,” Hoots says. “Think about Ryan Leech hopping up and riding on a chain between two posts. He doesn’t jump up there and go, ‘Oh my god I’m riding this! It’s wicked!’ He’s thought through that move as well as what he’s doing after it, and after that, too,” Hoots says. To plan ahead, you need to break down the moves. Think through the steps of getting up and down a curb. Or map out the points you want to hit in a corner. Then plan through all the corners of your local big switchback climb. “Once you have the sequence down, then you can replicate it,” Hoots says. “Because doing something once is great, but being able to do it the same way twice is really a trick.”
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  5. #5
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    The GMBN youtube channel has great, short videos on how to do absolutely everything mountain-bike related. Here's their video on track stands, for example:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_Wa...tO_9j&index=15

    Be warned they're somewhat addictive, so two hours from now you may know how to do a nose wheelie down switchbacks (in theory) but have otherwise gotten no work done!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryetoast View Post
    Be warned they're somewhat addictive, so two hours from now you may know how to do a nose wheelie down switchbacks (in theory) but have otherwise gotten no work done!
    Yup. I have spent a lot of time watching the GMBN! Those guys are hilarious but also have some great stuff. As a complete newbie I am not sure I can do any of it at this point, but still super fun to watch!

  7. #7
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    Not a video but a good read about body position

    Your Body position affects how much fun you are having. | A Singletrack Mind Professional Mountain Bike Skills Coaching



    Name:  body-position.jpg
Views: 743
Size:  35.2 KB

    The picture above shows what your middle range of motion is for a good Offensive riding position.
    My goal for this position is to maintain a centered, or neutral position on the bike.
    As you look at the above picture notice where the COM (center of mass) is.
    Weight is in line with the Bottom Bracket. This is what we would call LOG (line of gravity).
    And is almost centered in the wheelbase, or the BOS (base of support).
    Finally look at where the eyes are focused and what the head position is.
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  8. #8
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    F*ck Cancer

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  9. #9
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    ^ I can use sooo much work on that!
    RideGG, Cycle-CNY

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  11. #11
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    Who makes it through? Just one. Hint, she is the last one...
    https://www.facebook.com/52397425439...5875504204121/

  12. #12
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    Yikes.... The first crash looked very serious, landing on the back of the neck that is very dangerous. You notice he (she?) rolled down the hill and did not even sit up? Scary.
    Last edited by formica; 05-29-2016 at 07:09 PM.

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    Merciful god! That's the best advertisement for neck braces I've ever seen!! D:

  14. #14
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    I've seen some knarly courses but wow. That many riders getting bit the same way...
    '93 Giant Sedona ATX custom
    '93 Giant Sedona AtX aero-edition
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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    "Boobs to the bars, ladies" lol love it!
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbxplorer View Post
    Who makes it through? Just one. Hint, she is the last one...
    https://www.facebook.com/52397425439...5875504204121/
    Ha! Reminds me of some of the DH trails at Mont Ste Anne, Quebec
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  17. #17
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    Good essential skills here:

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  18. #18
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    Has anyone checked out the new Vittoria How To Series on the homepage? So far, there's:

    How to do a wheelie
    Five tips for descending


    I've been digging the Ryan Leech video series. It's a subscription service, but worth it. He breaks down moves step by steps and each video gives you a different technique to learn and build on.

  19. #19
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    Some cornering tips from Jill Kitner: https://dirtmountainbike.com/how-to-...LvaEembpGI2.01

    I so need to work on this!

  20. #20
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  21. #21
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    Kat Sweet is making some awesome bids for REI/ MTBProject

  22. #22
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    lots of good riding info in these videos from Simon Lawton Free Videos Fluidride

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by s h a r i View Post
    lots of good riding info in these videos from Simon Lawton Free Videos Fluidride
    Thanks for sharing! The "use your knees to drive through turns" one was an instant game changer for me. I love those "aha" moments when you can isolate and work on something in your riding that's been holding you back!

  24. #24
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    If you’re thinking about tackling some drops at the local trails, this list of tips will get you on the right track.

    Drops can seem scary when first starting out on your journey towards mountain biking radness, but as with any technique, there’s a few tips and pointers that can make the learning process that much smoother.

    Follows these steps:

    1. Get off your bike and have a look if you need to
    2. Get the speed of your approach right
    3. Get in the right position – bend arms and lean
    4. Unweight the front wheel – lean back
    5. Prepare for landing – let your arms and legs absorb the impact




    Scroll down for more info on each step.

    1. Get off your bike and have a look

    Drops offs often look worse when you’re rolling up to them on the bike, as the high vantage position can make things appear much steeper. The best thing to do is get off your bike and have a good look over the edge of the lip. This will give you some vital information on how you will ride the drop. Is the landing steep? If so you’ll need to keep an eye on your speed. Or does it require some extra momentum to clear a feature below? Either way, just remember to look before you leap when starting out.

    2. It’s all about the approach speed

    The key technique to mastering drop offs, be they big or small, is getting that approach speed just right. It’s tempting to crawl off the drop at a super slow pace, but the front wheel could drop too far before your rear wheel leaves the lip, which will mean a quick tumble over the bars. If you approach too fast then you could end up overshooting the landing, resulting in a nasty crash.

    Getting the speed right takes some practice and watching how other riders approach the drop is a good place to start. Otherwise begin with something very small, no more than a foot off the ground and work on getting that speed just right, with both wheels landing at the same time after you have left the lip. From there you can work your way up to the bigger stuff.

    3. Assume the attack position

    It’s tempting when you see a sizeable drop to lean back like your life depends on it, with your arms locked out straight ready for impact. And while it might be tempting to throw your weight back, you should wait until you actually start to leave the lip.

    Instead, bend your arms and assume the attack position before take off. Don’t forget to cover your brakes as well, as this will have you ready for what comes after landing the drop.

    4. Unweight the front wheel

    As your front wheel begins to leave the lip of the drop, you want to begin straightening your arms and moving your weight over the back of the bike while keeping your knees bent. This should have the bike travelling evenly off the drop. The shift in weight should be smooth and controlled, so avoid jerking back too hard on the bars as you leave the lip.

    5. Prepare for landing

    With the lip of the drop behind you the hard part is done. Now you are sailing through the air with an evenly weighted bike. All that’s left to consider is the landing.

    This should be pretty straightforward and is just a matter of using your arms and legs to absorb the impact. Remember they’re the best shock absorbers you’ll ever have, so use them to their full effect.
    sauce: https://www.redbull.com/ca-en/tips-t...3&kwp_1=722627
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  25. #25
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    Keep in mind that if you go off a drop in attach position, there's nothing left to absorb the landing. My work with Kat Sweet has you extending your body, but not locking it out, so that your body can work as suspension and absorb the landing when you land.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by formica View Post
    Keep in mind that if you go off a drop in attach position, there's nothing left to absorb the landing. My work with Kat Sweet has you extending your body, but not locking it out, so that your body can work as suspension and absorb the landing when you land.
    Ultra true!!! Yes!!

  27. #27
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    Short steep climbs have been my nemesis... throw in some turns, and I'm done. This video is great.




    Some take away : If sitting, my chest should be low to the bars and I'm on the nose of the saddle. When standing, try to get my hips forward and low towards the front of the bike. This will help keep the front end down and gives good traction (When I sit too far back, my front tire lifts up, I lose traction and bail.. and I want to stop that )
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  28. #28
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    Good stuff. I've ridden up in Bellingham.

    https://www.singletracks.com/blog/mt...est-job-world/

  29. #29
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GAaheigvgg


    Lee likes bike with Trainer. Road a good watch
    Four wheels move my body Two wheels move my soul

  30. #30
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    Some excellent tips here to improve balance

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  31. #31
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    In in


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  32. #32
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    Skills with Phill. Lots of vids like this out there. I like his approach and his attention to detail. Enjoy!

    5 beginner skills that you can learn without trails.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=cjNc2R8mAIs

    6 beginner mountain bike skills that you can learn anywhere.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1UuqWeJqOTk

    Introduction to MTB turning techniques | MTB turning basics part #1

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Orwf526tQQk

  33. #33
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    ok not a skills video... but I like Miley Cyrus and this revised version of Santa Baby ... is hilarious!! Equal pay, we’re getting there, slowly but surely.

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  34. #34
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    ^^ Hahaha, hohohoho, well done!

  35. #35
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    okay I'm going to work on this

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  36. #36
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    Sharing a good article on climbing technique: standing vs seated

    STOMP OR CHOMP: Standing vs Seated Climbing

    Everyone has a different riding style. Even when choosing between whether to sit or stand while climbing, riding style comes into play. It may be how you grew up riding, maybe there was an influential coach that pushed you one way or the other, or maybe there was a pro rider you tried to emulate. Regardless of which it is, there’s likely a way you inherently prefer to climb. But science can also help to determine whether you should sit or stand while climbing. Standing while climbing is much more similar to running than turning over the pedals while sitting. A more vertical position on the bike results in higher heart rate and higher oxygen consumption, but not greater energy expenditure according to some detailed studies. Running uses more energy and is less efficient than riding, but the energy expenditure is different in cycling; standing versus sitting uses the same energy.

    Lower Body Mass = More Standing Time

    Larger riders will use more energy proportionally while standing. There is more weight to support along with more weight to bring up the hill. The loose formula to figure out climbing style is to divide weight in pounds by height in inches.A 2 to 1 ratio or lower is usually a pure climber who can ride out of the saddle for long periods of time. A 2.1-2.5 to 1 ratio can benefit from switching between styles. A ratio of 2.5 to 1 or greater should probably stay seated to benefit from the bike supporting the rider’s weight.

    Perceived Excersion


    According to this study on whether to sit or stand while climbing, the subjects experienced a significantly lower perceived exertion on a ten percent grade while standing versus sitting.This is despite a much higher heart rate and oxygen uptake. Good sensations in the legs do not always tell the whole story. In fact, they may even lead you astray of the most efficient method of cresting a climb.

    A Definitive Study

    Ernst Hansen’s 2008 Study of ten well-trained male cyclists is likely the most definitive study on whether to sit or stand while climbing. The subjects were tested on a ten percent climb at four levels of power. There was no difference between standing and sitting at the lowest level;eighty-six percent of VO2 Max power. It is still an intense effort, but it allows for a rider to make a choice whether to sit or stand while climbing.The study found that ninety-four percent of VO2Max power is the tipping point where climbing while standing versus sitting becomes more efficient. At the two upper levels tested, up to a maximum of 165 percent of VO2 Max power,standing was far more efficient.You must remember that this efficiency holds true only if it is a skill that you have honed and allowed your muscles to adapt to. It will be highly inefficient to climb out of the saddle if you have not trained this skill.

    Consider the Gradient

    Some hills do not give you a choice of whether you can sit or stand while climbing. Some hills are so steep (or perhaps your bike is wildly over-geared for steep hills) that to get over them you must climb out of the saddle. This is a consideration of your threshold and how low you will let your cadence go. You may be able to
    grind out a twenty percent climb in a 39/25 at 38rpm, but it probably is not the most efficient way to make it to the top. Engaging your arm muscles to rock the bike is the order of the day when the climbs get really steep.

    A corollary to being over-geared or under- cadenced is whenever cadence becomes uncomfortably low, stand up and climb, even if it is not necessarily based on the gradient.

    Comfort

    Research likely does not consider comfort regardless of the efficiency that it may find. Riding out of the saddle opens your hips to recruit your calves and glutes, which likely remain fresher than your tired quads. Sometimes you want to give a muscle group or your sit bones a rest. Shifting from standing to sitting or vice versa can help keep your body fresher for longer, especially on a really long climb.


    Traction

    When roads or trails get wet, traction changes.A climb that may be perfectly fine to ride out of the saddle in the dry may now spin your rear wheel out when wet. Another traction consideration is loose dirt roads. You will be forced to sit just to make it over a climb that has a lot of dirt and gravel and is loose.All of the data can make for some confusing choices.

    Here are some good rules of thumb to help you decide whether to sit or stand while climbing:

    If the grade is too steep, stand.

    If you can maintain a cadence while climbing near what you maintain on flats, sit.

    If your muscles or sit bones need a break,stand.

    In the end, climbing while standing is not less efficient if you have trained it. Get out there and practice. At the very least it will give your muscles a break on longer climbs.

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  37. #37
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    ^^Interesting, thanks for sharing. One thing I like about commuting on my BMX cruiser about once a week is that I have to stand to make it up the mile hill before work. It's good practice, both on technique of standing and also metering out the energy by not overdoing the cadence. It's easy to "blow up" standing if you just go for it without controlling cadence/effort.

  38. #38
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    Video: Hitting Jumps & Drops for the First Time - Full Enduro Episode 4

    I enjoy watching riders learn new skills. It inspires me to push myself as well. Great video!!

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  39. #39
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    Thanks for posting, interesting read. It would a good comparison for the A Definitive Study if they would update it using a modern bike/geometry. i started standing up on my trainer more and more, it really is a different muscle group and technique.

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