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  1. #1
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    A word about seating the bead.

    I don't have much experience with tubeless tires and mtb in general but I would like to add what I have learned to the pool of knowledge. Hopefully someone who would have given up on seating their tubeless tires will have the tips to make it happen after reading this.

    I used Kenda Klaw XT (standard wire bead clincher) and WTB frequency i23 (ust compatible tubeless rim) in my example.

    Update: Method #2 (see below)



    A word about seating the bead.-rim.jpg
    I have had the most difficulty mounting tires on wheels with a "true" seat (blue arrow). Rims with a true seat are designed specifically so that the diameter of the seat is "too big" for the bead of the tire to easily fit onto. The green arrows represent the difference in rim diameter at the center of the rim and at the seat. In the center of the rim (red arrow) the diameter is the least and at the seat it is the most. Taking a look at your own rim you may think that the difference between the green arrows is not that big. However that distance is doubled when you count the same space (between green arrows) on the opposite side of the rim. If you are having difficulty mounting your tires it is likely because the tire is resting in its most comfortable position towards the center of the rim where the gap between the tire and the rim is the greatest. This gap is the enemy of tire mounting. No matter how fast you pump air into the tire you won't be able to fill faster than air will leak out.

    Now look at the yellow box. This represents the part of the rim where the diameter starts to increase. Somewhere in this box is where the tire diameter will naturally fit against the rim to form a seal. The concept of seating the bead is forcing the tire passed its natural diameter to fit tightly around the rim on the seat(blue arrow).

    As for the little bumps on edge of the rim seat... those are to secure the bead of the tire on the seat. Not all rims have these bumps


    First things first, the tire bead has to fit snuggly-tightly around the seat.
    To determine if the tire will fit mount the tire onto the rim and try to press the bead onto the seat all the way around the rim. If it seems impossible that is fine and actually will mean that you'll have a secure seating. If the bead fits onto the seat easily that means the tire diameter is too large or the rim diameter is too small. Either way this can be remedied by adding layers of rim tape (your choice) to effectively increase the rim diameter.
    A word about seating the bead.-rim-tape.jpg
    In this diagram the layers on the right side (grey and red) represent layers of tape used to build up the seat diameter. Do not add layers of tape to build up the center of the rim. As long as the seat has been adequately built up the bead should contact the rim somewhere in the yellow box. Using too much tape will increase the weight of the rim and using too little will create a sloppy seat. The layers in the diagram can also represent an inner-tube if you are using the split tube method to convert a non-tubeless rim.

    Second, the tire must press outward against the rim to create a seal during inflation. Most tires are shipped folded so that the tire lays flat. However tires that are shipped without being folded are prone to having the beads rest closely together.
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    Tire beads resting closely together.
    A word about seating the bead.-update-expanded-tire.jpg
    With the tire in this form (grey tire) the beads will fit into the narrowest part of the rim leaving a large gap for air to escape during inflation. The expanded tire forces the bead against the rim at its natural diameter to create a seal strong enough to fill the tire. This is a critical step. Without creating this seal you will be lucky to get the tire to inflate regardless of what "tricks" you use.

    Expanding the tire. With the tire off of the rim insert an inner-tube into it. Inflate the inner-tube until it is pushing the sidewall and bead of the tire outward. Place it in the sun for 20 minutes on each side (more or less time depending on weather).
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    Once the inner-tube is removed the beads should rest wide apart.
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    Now the beads will press outward into the rim creating a seal! If it does not then repeat the process or you can use method #2 as long as you have removable valve stems.

    Method #2. This method has a high success rate but has a significant list of limitations. I have used this method when time was short and I did not have time to allow the tire to expand or it was too cold for the tire to adequately expand.

    Pros:
    • More reliable for the right application
    • Faster

    Cons:

    • Can only be used if you have tubeless ready rims
    • Can only be used with removable valve stems
    • More labor intensive


    *I have seen this method demonstrated/described by others (
    wschruba). This write-up includes tips based on my experience and diagrams to demonstrate the important steps.*

    Seating the bead with an inner tube. Remove the valve stem and place an inner tube inside the tire and inflate until the bead has been fully seated.
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    Carefully unseat the bead off of one side of the rim and remove the inner tube. Now one side of the bead is seated and the other is floating in the center of the rim allowing a gap for air to escape. While the bead is off replace the valve stem.
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    The trick to making this work is finding some sort of frame or box which will press up on the seated side of the tire. This will shift the tire on the rim and press the opposite bead into its respective side creating a seal which will allow for inflation. I have used a plastic tote which was the correct size to press against the tire with enough contact points to create a seal around the whole rim. Use adequate pressure on the rim so that the opposing pressure on the tire creates an adequate seal and inflate.
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    Other rim styles. Not all rims have a true bead. This is especially true for non-tubeless rims. In these styles the bead more or less just presses into the outer edge of the rim. These rims rely on tire pressure to hold the bead in place. The same concepts apply while mounting on these styles of rims. 1) The bead should fit snuggly/tightly around the outer most part of the rim bed. 2) The bead must press outward against the rim to create a seal during inflation.
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    The first inflation. The first inflation has different purposes depending on what style of rim you are using. If the rim has a true seat the the purpose of the first inflation is to 1) check the fit and 2) seat the bead. Once the bead has been seated it should remain in place even if the tire is deflated. If you are using a rim without a true bead then the first inflation is to check for fit. Once the tire is deflated the bead will fall out of the seat.


    Use plenty of soapy suds(extra soapy) around the bead and seat. The suds will 1) lubricate the rim to allow for the bead to slip onto the seat; 2) show where air is leaking; 3) May help create the seal if the gaps between the tire and rim are small enough. At this point any air leaks should be minor otherwise you need to reassess that the previous instructions have been adequately completed. There may be minor leaks that are small but still big enough to prevent inflation. If you are using a compressor you may try bumping the or slightly pressing the tire where the suds indicate that air is escaping. If that does not work then place a strap of some kind around the circumference of the tire. Tighten it slightly. If the tire begins to deform that is too much pressure. This should press the tire against the rim just enough to allow the tire to fill. One the tire begins to fill the bead will press outward against the rim harder (increasing the strength of the seal) until it pops onto the bead.

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    Air compressor vs floor pump. The amount of airflow you need in order to inflate the tires depends entirely on the temporary seal between the tire and the rim. More flow can overcome a sloppy seal. Removing the valve core can help increase the flow rate. However removing the valve core should only be done to seat the bead on a rim with a true bead.

    Inflators. I have had the most success with the two inflators shown below. For presta valves I use this inflator (can be bought for 7-10 USD) with the hose cut and a hose clamp which slips snugly over a presta stem. For schrader I use a standard schrader inflator.
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    Valves. I have used both homemade and premade tubeless valves. If done right a homemade tubeless valve can be a perfectly reliable but does have some down sides. They are made by salvaging a valve stem from a used inner tube and there is lots of info available. First, if you are going to use a homemade valve make sure you use valve with a removable core. Most schrader valves have removable cores while most presta do not. Removable core allows faster air flow during inflation and refilling sealant without unseating the bead. Whatever valve is used make sure to secure it with either the provided stem nut or a zip tie as shown here.

    Gorilla tape tip. If you are using gorilla tape be conservative with the amount of wraps that you do. As I stated before only use enough to create snug/tight seat. If that is only one wrap then that may be all you need. In order to get a good seal with gorilla tape you can use a heat gun or blow dryer to melt the glue once the tape is in place. Don't let it get too hot because the tape can melt.


    Good luck!


    If there is anything wrong with the information in this thread, there is something missing, or it just needs to be taken down please say so.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails A word about seating the bead.-20160311_134146.jpg  

    A word about seating the bead.-rim.jpg  

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    Last edited by dbatomf; 11-01-2016 at 09:01 PM. Reason: Revision; included props to wschruba for describing method #2

  2. #2
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    In case this helps anyone...

    At the bike shop I work at, we've had a lot of issues in the past getting Kenda tires to keep a good seal. They would bead up fine, but kept leaking down all through the sidewalls despite stans bubbling out all over it. We figured out that many of their tires are left with a film inside from the mold release agent. This stuff seemed to fight with the Stans. We started washing/scrubbing out the inside of them and the problem was solved!

  3. #3
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    I am having this problem right now with my Kenda Nevegals on my Bontrager AT-650 wheels. The wheels are UST, and brand new, so the beads are closer together, it feels kinda of loose when i put the tire around the wheel.

    Ive tried soapy water and an air compressor to seat the bead to see if it is even possible before I add any Stans sealant, and so far, I haven't been able to get the tire close to seating. No matter what I try to do, the air won't stay inside the tire to start pressing out the beads

  4. #4
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    You could use a tube to inflate and seat the bead, release the pressure, break just one side loose, remove the tube, and try reinflating it. That way you start from the halfway point instead of from scratch.

    You pulled the Presta valve core, right?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ACoolName View Post
    You could use a tube to inflate and seat the bead, release the pressure, break just one side loose, remove the tube, and try reinflating it. That way you start from the halfway point instead of from scratch.

    You pulled the Presta valve core, right?
    I will be buying a tube tomorrow and trying this way. Hopefully theres light at the end of the tunnel for me

    No i do not have the removal tool, and no stores around me have one, just for regular schrader valves. I had to borrow the adaptor from a friend to be able to use an air compressor for my presto valves

  6. #6
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    This is very dependent on the tire.

    I had Kenda Honey Badger Pro XC tires mounted on Frequency i23 rims just like the OP has. I also had a tough time getting this tire to seat and went through a lot of sealant, even with the help of a compressor. I see a lot of other people have had issues also with getting Kenda tires set up for tubeless, I think the issue is that Kenda tires just sits too loose on the rim.

    In contrast, it was extremely easy to get WTB Weirwolf TCS tires installed on the new EC70 rims I got, rims which are not even supposed to be true UST compatible or even tubeless compatible. But mine came pre-taped and both front and rear tires mounted up on the first try.

    One big difference I saw is that the Weirwolf was very tight getting onto the rim and needed to be pumped up to about 60psi for the bead to ride up the ramps to meet the bead seat. It was a very big "ah ha, this is how it's supposed to work" moment for me.

  7. #7
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    The adapter and valve core is significantly slowing down the air flow. If you have one of the round, multi size spoke wrenches, one of them works. I've even used a small Cresent wrench. Just need to get it started. Then use a blow gun tip to inflate it. Once it beads, put your finger over the valve, then reinstall the core.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DanesCollection View Post
    I am having this problem right now with my Kenda Nevegals on my Bontrager AT-650 wheels. The wheels are UST, and brand new, so the beads are closer together, it feels kinda of loose when i put the tire around the wheel.

    Ive tried soapy water and an air compressor to seat the bead to see if it is even possible before I add any Stans sealant, and so far, I haven't been able to get the tire close to seating. No matter what I try to do, the air won't stay inside the tire to start pressing out the beads
    Some thoughts:

    It sounds like you are going to try bead it with a tube; that is a good first step. Deflate the tube, and break one bead on the tire. Gently lever it off the one side, and remove the tube. Install the tubeless valve. Rather than trying to create slack by pushing the unmounted bead towards the center of the rim, get as much over as possible without pushing any sections towards the center (the idea is, move just enough bead towards the channel in the rim to get all of it over the wall).

    If all goes well, after slipping the last section of bead over, it will be more or less airtight, and you should be able to bead the tire.

    As a final thought, unless something has changed, the AT-650 rim is not tubeless ready or UST certified (though the tires you have may be). If this is the case, the rim will have no features that will make beading the tire easy or recommended. If you try to proceed anyway, you will need some way of dumping a large amount of air into the tire quickly--many blow-gun attachments rob quite a bit of flow from the storage tank of any compressor, but you are ultimately limited by the valve body in the wheel.

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    From everything I could find and every diagram I have been able to look at, it seems like they would be. But again, Im not 100% sure. I just ordered some true tubeless valves and HOPEFULLY they'll be here tomorrow, with these valves I should be able to remove the core and blast lots of air in.

    If these wheels won't work as tubeless, Ill just have to run tubes until I can afford a UST wheel set. As I said in my other thread, these aren't the strongest or lightest wheels to begin with.

    Do you have any recommendations for a 29er wheel set? Again, just something middle of the road. Not doing downhill competitions or big jumps, just a weekend rider. I want to buy them once and not have to worry with them for quite sometime unless something drastic happens obviously

  10. #10
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    When I have problems getting a tire to bead and inflate I take a heat gun to the tire. I spin the wheel either on the bike or on my truing stand for about 5min alternating between heating both sides and the center of the tire so the tire is equally heated. This expands the tire enough(same concept as putting tire in the sun but faster) so that it fits tighter and beads-up and inflates.

    Latest challenge was with trying to mount a Kenda Negval on my 29" carbon rim. Hit the tire with the heat gun and success, works every time!

  11. #11
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    Updated!
    In the future I may stand... corrected.

  12. #12
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    A bump, or an update?

    What's been updated?
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    A bump, or an update?

    What's been updated?
    The part that was clearly labeled "update" and demarcated by blue text.
    In the future I may stand... corrected.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    Some thoughts:

    It sounds like you are going to try bead it with a tube; that is a good first step. Deflate the tube, and break one bead on the tire. Gently lever it off the one side, and remove the tube. Install the tubeless valve. Rather than trying to create slack by pushing the unmounted bead towards the center of the rim, get as much over as possible without pushing any sections towards the center (the idea is, move just enough bead towards the channel in the rim to get all of it over the wall).

    If all goes well, after slipping the last section of bead over, it will be more or less airtight, and you should be able to bead the tire.

    As a final thought, unless something has changed, the AT-650 rim is not tubeless ready or UST certified (though the tires you have may be). If this is the case, the rim will have no features that will make beading the tire easy or recommended. If you try to proceed anyway, you will need some way of dumping a large amount of air into the tire quickly--many blow-gun attachments rob quite a bit of flow from the storage tank of any compressor, but you are ultimately limited by the valve body in the wheel.
    The update describes this method with diagrams, pros/cons, and tips, also it includes information about valve choices and some options for inflators.
    In the future I may stand... corrected.

  15. #15
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    UPDATE...I see...back up to your original post.
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    Can appreciate the time you spent in this well thought out post.

    BUT, with current tubeless tires + rims, I rarely have an issue with a floor pump.

    If you get Stans tape tight enough, typically a couple wraps, it can flex enough to let the tire get on the rim well, but also expands or flexes back to fill in the gap between tire and rim to aid in airing up.

    My rule of thumb is if I don't have to use a compressor, I usually don't have to worry about burping. If I need to pull out the punches, use a compressor, screw around with the tire and other tricks of the trade, burping is highly likely. With that said, I typically run 18-20 psi @ 175 rider weight.

    YMMV

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ArizRider View Post
    My rule of thumb is if I don't have to use a compressor, I usually don't have to worry about burping. If I need to pull out the punches, use a compressor, screw around with the tire and other tricks of the trade, burping is highly likely.
    I have used a floor pump for seating tires, but I definitely prefer the aid of a compressor. I do not use a presta to schrader adapter nor do I use a tire chuck at to do this. I only use a blow nozzle with the valve removed to seat the tire to the rim. A quick blast to perform an initial seat is all I use the compressor for. Then, with residual air remaining, I place the valve back in and complete the inflation by floor pump.

    Your reference to burping while use of a compressor...Are you talking about over-inflation to the point of popping the tire off of the rim? If that's what you're referring to, fortunately, I've never done that before. However, I'm always concerned about that happening.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    I have used a floor pump for seating tires, but I definitely prefer the aid of a compressor. I do not use a presta to schrader adapter nor do I use a tire chuck at to do this. I only use a blow nozzle with the valve removed to seat the tire to the rim. A quick blast to perform an initial seat is all I use the compressor for. Then, with residual air remaining, I place the valve back in and complete the inflation by floor pump.

    Your reference to burping while use of a compressor...Are you talking about over-inflation to the point of popping the tire off of the rim? If that's what you're referring to, fortunately, I've never done that before. However, I'm always concerned about that happening.
    If you stack up the tape you will eventually increase the diameter of the center of the rim so that even if the tire is not expanded it will still sit snugly with a nice seal. Thus fillable by for pump. Then imagine that when this bead actually seats it will be extremely tight around the rim considering the increased diameter due to the extra layers of tape.

    Furthermore if you don't press the tape down into the center of the rim it will in essence create a bridge or hammock from the sides of the rim. This minimizes the need for too many extra layers of tape.

    Questions are: With that many layers is the bead "lock", or the little lip around the bead seat, still prominent enough to keep the bead in place? Does the tape stay stuck to the center of the rim after deflation or does it lift off the rim as it was during the original installation?

    For reference I ride 22-30 front to back, weigh 210, and ride xc aggressively.
    In the future I may stand... corrected.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by clhnsn55 View Post
    If you stack up the tape you will eventually increase the diameter of the center of the rim so that even if the tire is not expanded it will still sit snugly with a nice seal. Thus fillable by for pump. Then imagine that when this bead actually seats it will be extremely tight around the rim considering the increased diameter due to the extra layers of tape.

    Furthermore if you don't press the tape down into the center of the rim it will in essence create a bridge or hammock from the sides of the rim. This minimizes the need for too many extra layers of tape.

    Questions are: With that many layers is the bead "lock", or the little lip around the bead seat, still prominent enough to keep the bead in place? Does the tape stay stuck to the center of the rim after deflation or does it lift off the rim as it was during the original installation?

    For reference I ride 22-30 front to back, weigh 210, and ride xc aggressively.
    My logic, flawed or not, is that no matter how "tight" a tire is on a bead, its going to pop off when you have full body weight coming down at an angle.

    So in my mind bead deformation is a given is some circumstances, weather it burps or not is highly depending on how the tires seals when deformed or pushed in from the edge of the rim. This is where, again in my head, a tire that pumps up well seems to show that it is sealed well OFF of the lip.

    If a tire is loose in the center and you need a comperessor to fill, when it does pushed in from the bead, I think it's going to leak.

    Armchair engineering at its best....

  20. #20
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    Perhaps a bit off topic, but talking rim tape...I do not 'stack' the rim tape. One lap around with a 6" or so overlap. Additionally, once I have taped a rim, I have rarely have to re-tape it before moving on to something new. I have multiple wheel sets that are 5 or 6 years old with the original tape job still working as intended.

    Frequently when my tape has been compromised such as the necessity to replace a broken spoke, I simple razor blade an X over the spoke hole. Then remove and reinstall a new spoke and run a piece of packaging tape or whatever acceptable tape I have available over the cut spoke hole and go from there. Interestingly, this rim tape patch job has managed to work for years at a time.

    A year or so ago, a broken spoke was replaced and I had no tape near by, but I did have some Shoe Goo. I didn't expect this to work, but I covered the 'X' cut over the replaced spoke hole with ample Shoe Goo allowed to dry overnight and it's still holding great today.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Perhaps a bit off topic, but talking rim tape...I do not 'stack' the rim tape. One lap around with a 6" or so overlap. Additionally, once I have taped a rim, I have rarely have to re-tape it before moving on to something new. I have multiple wheel sets that are 5 or 6 years old with the original tape job still working as intended.

    Frequently when my tape has been compromised such as the necessity to replace a broken spoke, I simple razor blade an X over the spoke hole. Then remove and reinstall a new spoke and run a piece of packaging tape or whatever acceptable tape I have available over the cut spoke hole and go from there. Interestingly, this rim tape patch job has managed to work for years at a time.

    A year or so ago, a broken spoke was replaced and I had no tape near by, but I did have some Shoe Goo. I didn't expect this to work, but I covered the 'X' cut over the replaced spoke hole with ample Shoe Goo allowed to dry overnight and it's still holding great today.
    I find if I remove tires often, tape does get buggered up and requires replacement. While I haven't had it fail per-se, the last thing I want is a slow leak or failure out on the trail. I'm cautious like that though, I'll replace tires every 6-8 mo even if they have life left just to have a bit more confidence. I find that once they start to go, flat here or there, they come fast and often after.

  22. #22
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    Just one piece of advice from a pro : stop wasting your time playing with soapy water or dishwasher liquid. Except making bubbles when it rains, it does not nothing but almost.

    What you need is some tire mounting paste. It's super cheap -cost price is around $10 for a kg- and it does the job well. I always knew its existence, but until I had to play with some Bontrager tires, I never used it on push bikes.

    Good thing it pissed me off so much one day. Since I'm using the proper product, I never ever had an issue again.

  23. #23
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    Tire paste...tire lube. I remember seeing that used to mount truck tires.

    I've never needed anything to mount bike tires, but have heard some complaints from those mounting Bontrager's.
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    Other than Bontrager tires, tire paste helps to seat to beads at a much lower pressure. Which is always nice with mountain bike rims made out of carbon.

  25. #25
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    I love ingenuity, but having the right tools is always best. I'm going to pick up some tire paste.

    Quote Originally Posted by euskafreez View Post
    Other than Bontrager tires, tire paste helps to seat to beads at a much lower pressure. Which is always nice with mountain bike rims made out of carbon.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkMass View Post
    I love ingenuity, but having the right tools is always best. I'm going to pick up some tire paste.
    Tire paste does not remedy the issues discussed in this thread.
    In the future I may stand... corrected.

  27. #27
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    Garbage bag trick should be added to the list.

  28. #28
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    I will add two things:

    1. any tire and rim combination that requires tons of drama to get it to seal and stay sealed is probably not a good idea to ride. ideally, the tire should pop onto the rim and seal up with relative ease, maybe a little extra force from an air compressor and some soapy water. if that does not happen, you need a better seal using more tape, a different tire, or a different rim, or all three.

    for example, I have some Schwalbe and Maxxis tubeless tires in my collection. they all seat very easily on Stan's and WTB rims and stay sealed for several days without putting sealant in them. I had some non-tubeless Maxxs tires for a while that worked OK but the drama of keeping them sealed was not worth the troule after a while.

    2. I have had great luck with my DIY inflator, which I made thusly: How to make a tubeless inflator - BikeRadar USA
    I used a 2L Coke bottle, two valves with removeable cores donated from punctured tubes, and a hose from a worn-out floor pump. remove the core from the rim you are inflating, pump up bottle to about 65 psi, blast air into tire, then re-install core at your leisure after the tire is seated. not as easy as a compressor, but much cheaper and takes up less room.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by syl3 View Post
    Garbage bag trick should be added to the list.
    What is that?

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    Quote Originally Posted by ac1000 View Post
    What is that?
    You put a bag over the rim before installing valve and tire, pretty much any tire/rim combo mounts instantly

    A word about seating the bead.-vlqptre.jpg
    Last edited by syl3; 01-11-2017 at 04:10 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by syl3 View Post
    You put a bag over the rim before installing valve and tire, pretty much any tire/rim combo mounts instantly
    Is the bag meant to work in place of a rim strip or is it just to get things in place?
    I guess the question is if the bag needs to be heavy duty or just strong enough to get things going.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ac1000 View Post
    Is the bag meant to work in place of a rim strip or is it just to get things in place?
    I guess the question is if the bag needs to be heavy duty or just strong enough to get things going.
    for rim tape i use Tesa tape (same one Notubes rebrands), and use a thin garbage bag just to help things seat. For low pressure applications you can use a heavy duty bag as rim tape, actually that's what they were describing where i stole the picture from (iirc it was the fatbike tubeless thread)

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    tube needed

    Quote Originally Posted by syl3 View Post
    for rim tape i use Tesa tape (same one Notubes rebrands), and use a thin garbage bag just to help things seat. For low pressure applications you can use a heavy duty bag as rim tape, actually that's what they were describing where i stole the picture from (iirc it was the fatbike tubeless thread)
    Garbage bag only works with tubes.

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    A word about seating the bead.-img_4399.jpg

    This method works for me with 3" Chupacabras and 50mm Mulefut rims.
    Put in a tube and air it up to seat the bead - I'm using a compressor for this.
    Deflate the tire and break the seal on one side and pull out the tube.
    Place the wheel, broken seal side up, on an old tire that is the same size as your tire. I would think a tube would work for this as well.
    Press down on the wheel as you air it up.
    The tire on the bottom forces the bead of the tire on the rim up so it makes contact with rim to create enough of a seal to hold air.

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    ITT: How to over-complicate things.

    Lube bead. Hook air chuck to valve core (because you're using a compressor or at least an air tank). Inflate. If it won't seal, spin the tire on the rim while you're inflating it.

    I have had some wheel/tire combos that were complete ****s, and that has always done the trick. Don't need to play with tubes, don't need to stretch the tire, squish the tire, build up layers of duct tape, or any of that horse shit.

    Just make sure the valve stem is between the beads, and spin the damn thing back and forth a little bit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by phuchmileif View Post
    ITT: How to over-complicate things.

    Lube bead. Hook air chuck to valve core (because you're using a compressor or at least an air tank). Inflate. If it won't seal, spin the tire on the rim while you're inflating it.

    I have had some wheel/tire combos that were complete ****s, and that has always done the trick. Don't need to play with tubes, don't need to stretch the tire, squish the tire, build up layers of duct tape, or any of that horse shit.

    Just make sure the valve stem is between the beads, and spin the damn thing back and forth a little bit.

    Written like someone with very little experience.

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    LOL, okay. There are probably about twenty tires in my current 'tried it' pile in the garage, used on 5 or 6 different wheelsets.

    Yeah, I must have just accidentally have had perfect fits every time. That, or I just don't have mechanically-inept dickfingers...

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    Quote Originally Posted by phuchmileif View Post
    ITT: How to over-complicate things.

    Lube bead. Hook air chuck to valve core (because you're using a compressor or at least an air tank). Inflate. If it won't seal, spin the tire on the rim while you're inflating it.

    I have had some wheel/tire combos that were complete ****s, and that has always done the trick. Don't need to play with tubes, don't need to stretch the tire, squish the tire, build up layers of duct tape, or any of that horse shit.

    Just make sure the valve stem is between the beads, and spin the damn thing back and forth a little bit.
    Gotta admit, this method works. Chupacabra popped right on - didn't even have to pull the valve core.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huanyao View Post
    Gotta admit, this method works. Chupacabra popped right on - didn't even have to pull the valve core.

    Sure -- if you use a TLR tire on a TLR rim this is going to be the case more often than not. We're lucky nowadays with the way evolution has brought tire/rim fit so close together.

    The OP shared a means for helping people that might be using only one or the other TLR component, or possibly neither. In which case his step by step process will work on most any combo available, and anything less than that process might result in nothing more than frustration and repeated failure.

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