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  1. #1
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    Will the sealant come out if I open the valve?

    Hi,
    I just set up my MTB as tubeless for the first time. To make sure the beads sat really well, I pumped the tires up to 60 PSI after putting in the sealant.

    Now it occurred to me, then I don't want to ride at 60 PSI, but at around 25 PSI.

    I'm worried that when I open the valve to let the air out, I will be showered with a metric ton of sealant.

    Is this a legitimate worry? Is there a trick that I should use to let the air out and not get splashed with sealant?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by jonesy_; 2 Weeks Ago at 06:56 AM. Reason: Typo

  2. #2
    turtles make me hot
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    Nope. Let the wheels sit a while so the sealant pools at the bottom. When you crack the valve, a tiny bit that has settled in the the valve will come out but that's it.
    I like turtles

  3. #3
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    Thanks! Should I simply let the air out by pushing on the valve as normal, or is it better to unscrew the valve's head so the air comes out more quickly?

  4. #4
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    Let your wheels sit with the valves on the bottom, so the sealant doesn't pool in them.

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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jonesy_ View Post
    Thanks! Should I simply let the air out by pushing on the valve as normal, or is it better to unscrew the valve's head so the air comes out more quickly?

    Just push the valve normally. 60 psi is overkill and depending on the tire width potentially dangerous.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  6. #6
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    Thanks everybody, did as suggested and nothing at all leaked out.

  7. #7
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    The manufacturer for my rims says not to exceed 45 psi. If you use some soapy water at the tire bead, you shouldn't need so much pressure to get the bead to seat.

  8. #8
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    You can actually break many carbon wheels with that high of a psi

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  9. #9
    All fat, all the time.
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    Yeah, as everyone mentioned, that is way too high psi, even for setting the bead. You are lucky it didn't blow off and damage the tire/rim.

  10. #10
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    I exploded a tube once while seating a bead without a gauge. Meaning the tire bead came off, which ruptured the tube. Tire survived somehow. Luckily I had gone into the other room to find my gauge (since I figured I was approaching 60-70psi or so without a full seat), and I heard the kaboom from there.

    Works just the same with tubeless. I wouldn't want to be right next to it, for sure. But, otherwise? Meh. I'd do 60-70 if I have a clip-on chuck with a hose that lets me get away from the tire. Some tires just fit REALLY tight and even soaped up, do not want to seat. I had to take a DH tire to 70 after coating it with a bottle of mini-shampoo in my hotel room. 70-80 range is probably like the LD50 or better for bike tires. I'm a little more confident in DH casings at those pressures, though.

    I'm a little desensitized to this stuff from working on cars. Tires always say 'don't exceed 40psi to seat bead' or some such. 50-60 is common, even with more-than-adequate lube. Occasionally you nudge something up near the ~100 range. Generally it's very heavy, very short sidewall performance tires. It's like, bro, if you think this Pilot Supersport runflat is going to explode at 90psi, you're ****ing nuts.

    I'll sit on a 19.5 (little brother of the semi 22.5) truck tire while inflating it to 80-100psi. Non-split rim, of course. The sidewall is an inch thick. LOL.

    Anyhow, my thoughts wandered. All I really meant to say: This kills carbon rims? Um, hey, carbon rims...what the ****? I can't imagine my AL rims being damaged by even the most violent de-beading. The forces they take during a ride are so much more substantial.

    Seems like, on the surface, everyone wants to tell you to have carbon-everything, because 'it's just better.' Then, the more you read people's experiences and even general advice and opinions (from people using carbon parts), the less desirable they sound. Carbon rims are super strong! Until they're not! Carbon bars give a 5% reduction in felt vibration! Also if you tighten your cockpit too aggressively, they break! Also, they might break anyway! Carbon cranks? Also great! Slightly lighter than almost-literally-bulletproof AL cranks! Try not to wreck too hard if one of them snaps on a bad jump landing!

    Why does anyone bother.

  11. #11
    Magically Delicious
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    Quote Originally Posted by phuchmileif View Post

    Why does anyone bother.
    Because we can.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shark View Post
    Yeah, as everyone mentioned, that is way too high psi, even for setting the bead. You are lucky it didn't blow off and damage the tire/rim.
    And ear drums. I switched some maxis ignitors from one wheelset to another one and blew them both off the rim with a floor pump. My neighbor came over because he thought I got shot. I was covered in a bukakke of Stan's. It was hard to explain.

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    Last edited by drwx; 2 Weeks Ago at 08:13 PM.
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  13. #13
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    60 psi tubeless seems risky to me. It isn't a pressure you will ride with and risk is tire blows off rim.

    I have had tubeless at 35 psi blow off rim. Luckily for me I was riding around the house.

    If you transport this bike inside your vehicle then consider putting a cover over the wheel.

    Finally, put valve at 6 o'clock position to minimize fluid loss.

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