What is the general rule for bike shops as far as tires/tubes if they fail?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    What is the general rule for bike shops as far as tires/tubes if they fail?

    Hi, I'm fairly new to biking (a little over 2 years), so I need to know what I can do about a situation with my rear tire and tube. Last week I went to my LBS for a new rear tire (old one was bald and had a slight rip in the rubber and was getting bigger by the week) anyway, I got a new tire ( I didn't ask for a new tube, but when I picked it up I was charged for one[ I usually put new tubes on every spring and they last me all season, and I wanted to avoid getting a new one until April, but oh well, it was 8 bucks]) I was riding down a pretty steep hill, slowed to a safe speed and I turned the corner onto a street, and I noticed the bike didn't feel/turn right. I looked down and my rear tire looked like it lost half of it's pressure, I didn't have anything to fix it (I know I'm unprepared) and walked the 2 miles home. If I bring it back to my LBS, do you think they'll charge me for the new tube? ( I didn't see anything wrong with the tire,no nails, or holes in the rubber). I clearly didn't run over anything, I seem to think is was installed wrong. What else could have caused this? I don't think I pinched it since I only used this bike on the road for the entire week since I had it fixed.

    Thanks for any insight,
    Steve

  2. #2
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    It sounds like you got a puncture. They happen all the time. How do you know you didn't run over something?

    If you were riding it for a week I doubt it's installation error as any problem should have shown up almost immediately. It is a good idea to learn how to repair a tube (much cheaper than getting the lbs to replace it) and take the tools with you on the ride. You can repair a tube many times over.

    If you have been riding for two years without a puncture you have been lucky.

    Wombat

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by jetfan2207
    Hi, I'm fairly new to biking (a little over 2 years), so I need to know what I can do about a situation with my rear tire and tube. Last week I went to my LBS for a new rear tire (old one was bald and had a slight rip in the rubber and was getting bigger by the week) anyway, I got a new tire ( I didn't ask for a new tube, but when I picked it up I was charged for one[ I usually put new tubes on every spring and they last me all season, and I wanted to avoid getting a new one until April, but oh well, it was 8 bucks]) I was riding down a pretty steep hill, slowed to a safe speed and I turned the corner onto a street, and I noticed the bike didn't feel/turn right. I looked down and my rear tire looked like it lost half of it's pressure, I didn't have anything to fix it (I know I'm unprepared) and walked the 2 miles home. If I bring it back to my LBS, do you think they'll charge me for the new tube? ( I didn't see anything wrong with the tire,no nails, or holes in the rubber). I clearly didn't run over anything, I seem to think is was installed wrong. What else could have caused this? I don't think I pinched it since I only used this bike on the road for the entire week since I had it fixed.

    Thanks for any insight,
    Steve
    Your LBS ripped you off - $8 for a tube is a joke. You likely got a pinch flat or rode over something. Also, there is absolutely no need to change your tubes every spring either - its not like they have a shelf life or anything. Ride them until you get a flat - then pull them out and patch the hole. It saves money and the environment.

  4. #4
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    Take the tube out noting it's position in relation to the tire. Find the hole, blow it up. Two little holes = snake bite. Low enough pressure that tube compressed against it's self. Sadly, more common when riding on the road. Hole on the side, possibly got pintched between the beed and the rim, LBS error but I'd give them the benefit of the doubt that it was done correctly. Single hole, puncture. Match up the tube from where you took the tire out and look for the culprit. Be sure to run you hand along the inside of the tire an look for foreign objects, sometimes feel is better than sight.... Also check the valve, both base where it mounts in the rubber and the tip.

    As far as being charged, the bitter pill is you should have gone back to the LBS as soon as you flatted. Better opportunity even if it was obviously your fault like a kid dropping his ice cream on the first lick. I'd charge you though a lot would have to depend on how you approach the situation. Accusatory, dick type behavior won't go to far.

    Always check you pressure before you ride & you'll reduce flats greatly. Remember the old man's saying, take care of your gear & it will take care of you. Beyond that, it's a matter of luck.

    And yes, I would say more often than not, in a situation where a tire has a hole exposing the tube even to a minor degree, the tube should be replaced. If you're going to do, do it right the first time.


    Good luck
    I figure the odds be fifty-fifty.

  5. #5
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    get yourself some pedro's tire levers (under $5), buy a few tubes (also under $5 each), and a patch kit ($2) then learn to change your own tires and tubes. changing tires and tubes is extremely easy, anybody can do it! i mean anybody!!

    you probably just ran something over and got a puncture, expect this to happen because it will happen. tubes/tires really dont have any type of warranty, these things wear out so i doubt the bike shop will be able to do anything for you, you'll just have to buy a new tube.

    http://www.jimlangley.net/wrench/wrench.html

  6. #6
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    It sounds like you punctured the tire. If it was shop error it probably would have went flat before you left the shop. If you bring it back to the shop they will change the tube and check the tire for thorns or other such nastiness. My advice would be to buy a patch kit and do it yourself. It would cost less than giving the shop 10 to 15 bucks to change the tube.
    Last of The Allaire Bastards

  7. #7
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    Thanks guys, the weird thing is that it seemed to only loose 1/2 the pressure, once I noticed it, the tire was still slightly supporting my weight, so it was still holding some air, so I stood up leaned over my handle bars (to take some weight off) and tried to ride as far as I could before I had to eventually walk, I rode like 100 more yards and by that time everytime I cranked the pedals I'd feel the rim hit the ground so I just walked it. I also check the pressure before a ride, and the tires were fine when I left.

    The reason I was thinking it was installed wrong was because the same guy put a new front tire on my road bike, it was fine for like 3 weeks, then when I was going down a hill I noticed a bulge coming out of the side wall, so I turned around and nursed it home, when I got home I took all the air out of the tire, set the tire on the rim again, and then pumped air into it, the tire held for like 5 mins, I put it away and then I heard a BANG and when I came back into the room, the bike was on it's side and the tire popped off the rim.

    I'm a little intimidated by working on my bike, I got 2 books from the library on how to do simple repairs and such, I tried to change my sis's tube over the summer and I ended up blowing up both the tube and tire, (not when she was riding, but when I was pumping it up with my bike pump). I'm afraid of another blowout/ruining my bike. I'm gonna see if I can take a tire off as well as the tube, and put it back on with one of my old bike.

    Anyway, thanks again guys

    Steve

  8. #8
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    sometimes you'll get a very small puncture in your tube and the air will escape very slowly. you might think your tube is holding air just fine but once you get on the bike and ride for a bit your tire will go flat. make sure you run proper tire pressure as well, not enough air in your tires will lead to a flat in no time.

    when i started riding i knew practically nothing about bikes and i was still able to change my tires and tubes without any help. there is really nothing to it, you'd have to try very hard to actually mess anything up.

  9. #9
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    I can't believe you could ride a bike this long without learning how to change a tire/tube! There are some techniques involved, so you might want to get some good instructions, try sheldonbrown.com and parktool.com for help in working on your bike. Sounds like you don't flat much or you would be much more frustrated by now...
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  10. #10
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    As a lbs mechanic, this comes up quite often. If they come in a couple days later and say "I was going on my second ride, and then it went flat." Sorry, sucks for you, you have to pay for it. If they say "I went home, and when I unloaded the car off the rack and it was flat." I'll take off the tire and have look. If it looks like a pinch flat, I'll replace it no problem. If there was a thorn, and I know I changed the tire, I would probably charge for just the tube, no labor.

    Basically, if you were riding you bike for a while (over a few miles) after having the lbs replace the tube, and it goes flat, expect to pay.

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