Which valve stems are you running- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Which valve stems are you running

    Which tubeless valve stems are you running?
    I know its not a huge component choice but wondering what is everyone's favorite if you have one.
    I'm coming out with my own and would like to have all the bases covered.
    EXODUX Jeff

  2. #2
    psycho cyclo addict
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    Mostly Stan's and a few Bontrager ones...
    【ツ】 eDub 【ツ】

  3. #3
    The Punk Hucker
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    I'm using the ones that I bought with my Rimpact inserts. I think they are teh same as the CushCore valves. The air exit ports are on the side, works very well with inserts.
    Beware the hucking bear!

  4. #4
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    I recently moved from Stan's to Peaty's....... Very happy all-around.
    The Tape, Sealant & Stems are top-notch!
    "There's two kinds of people in this world - Walkers and Talkers." Which one are you?

  5. #5
    EDR
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    Favorite valve stem?

    Life's too short.

  6. #6
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    i mostly haven't cared, but I put the e13 high flow ones on my hardtail and they are nice. I notice the high flow part when I remove the cores to seat tubeless tires. plus, the 2 piece construction holds them very securely on the rim. the stans ones always wobbled and loosen over time for me.

  7. #7
    Always in the wrong gear
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    Which valve stems are you running

    I second the e-thirteen high volume ones.

    I had them on my plus wheels and I *really* liked them. 100% would use again.


    Unfortunately they didnít play well with the Spank rims I laced due to the center channel being convex not concave, so I opted for some plain ones from Amazon.
    I like the cap has a core removal tool.




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  8. #8
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    Truckerco.

    And I like Problem Solvers P-Nuts and Super P-Nuts.
    I like turtles

  9. #9
    CEO Product Failure
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    I did not realize this until recently, valve stems are specifically designed for specific rims. While you may not have compatibility issues, you may have better luck getting them to seal.

    Just found this out when replacing the stem on my Stan's rims. The Stans valves sealed much quicker than the valve I used prior. The LBS informed me of this revelation.

  10. #10
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    Stanís (brass) valves have never let me down. Theyíre boring but durable and reliable. Hated the older Bonty ones because they clogged a lot and seemed to twist out of channel alignment. I personally stay away from threaded aluminum valves. In my experience the aluminum shaft is weaker than the brass and can crack or break with a hand pump.
    Please donate to IMBA or your local IMBA chapter. It's trail karma.

  11. #11
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    My stems don't run, so I'm not 'running' any.

    I do have Stans installed in one wheel. I think they are stans...maybe they are just basic univeral branded from the bulk bin at the shop.

    Other bike has whatever came in the WTB rims.

    Both allow air in. Both allow air to pass through in both directions.

  12. #12
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    I had old american classic valves which used an oring to seal the ring, on an awkward huge flange. they physically wouldnt bottom out and seal on most rims. Terrible design.

    I think the tapered cone design is a better setup. Makes more sense, round plug in a round hole.

  13. #13
    Hitching a ride
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    Mostly stems from discarded road tubes. I buy the Contis 20 at a time for under $3 a tube, so I'll cut up a tube before buying an overpriced "tubeless" valve stem.

  14. #14
    psycho cyclo addict
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBeing View Post
    Stanís (brass) valves have never let me down. Theyíre boring but durable and reliable. Hated the older Bonty ones because they clogged a lot and seemed to twist out of channel alignment. I personally stay away from threaded aluminum valves. In my experience the aluminum shaft is weaker than the brass and can crack or break with a hand pump.
    Oddly enough, I've had a few clogs with Stan's valves (they were more than 10 years old I'm guessing haha). The few Bonty's I run haven't had issues.
    【ツ】 eDub 【ツ】

  15. #15
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    I haven't experienced any clogged valves.
    I do have a valve that doesn't take air very well. However that is because the o-ring is tearing apart and isn't properly seated. It's scary to open the presta and close it back for fear of finally destroying the seal. LOL I should replace it before the next race. Pretty sketching airing it up this morning, lost too much air twisting the valve closed after. oops

  16. #16
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    Anybody have a surefire way to clean valve cores of dried sealant? Soak in vinegar and blow out with a compressor maybe?
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  17. #17
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    Use a stiff wire (I use landscape marking flags) and alcohol. It seems alcohol destroys sealant.

  18. #18
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    Congealed sealant is latex, which has excellent resistance to isopropanol. When wet with isopropanol, the isopropanol will prevent it from sticking to itself or other surfaces making it easier to remove mechanically.
    Do the math.

  19. #19
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    To clarify I'm speaking to the core specifically and not the stem. I have no problem cleaning the stems. I do have a bunch of cores I've set off the side because they're all gunked up inside & have not attempted to clean the little buggers.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  20. #20
    Always in the wrong gear
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    To clarify I'm speaking to the core specifically and not the stem. I have no problem cleaning the stems. I do have a bunch of cores I've set off the side because they're all gunked up inside & have not attempted to clean the little buggers.
    20 valve cores are $9 on Amazon. Prime same-day delivery.

    A bag lasts me about a year between the three tubeless-wheeled bikes at my house.


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  21. #21
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    Twist the tip off, pull the shaft out, pick the boogers off, then put it back together....

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Twist the tip off, pull the shaft out, pick the boogers off, then put it back together....
    I've actually not tried that but definitely makes the most sense. You've successfully threaded the tips off then I assume? I see the threaded piece is flared out at the tip to prevent it from unthreading but I'll give that a try. Bonus if you ever ended up all gunked up on a trailside repair without a spare core, being able to unthread and clean could be advantageous.
    It is no measure of health to be well adjusted to a profoundly sick society.

  23. #23
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    These are great stems, even if you don't run inserts.

    https://www.amazon.com/VeloTubes-FR-...ef_=ast_bbp_dp

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Impetus View Post
    20 valve cores are $9 on Amazon. Prime same-day delivery.
    Or if you don't mind waiting a month or so they're a little less on fleabay from China. I think I got 10 for $3 shipped.

    I keep one in my bag in an old box from a patch kit along with the core removal tool, bacon and a few other useful doodads.
    Last edited by noapathy; 2 Weeks Ago at 11:46 AM.
    :nono: :thumbsup:

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by WHALENARD View Post
    I've actually not tried that but definitely makes the most sense. You've successfully threaded the tips off then I assume? I see the threaded piece is flared out at the tip to prevent it from unthreading but I'll give that a try. Bonus if you ever ended up all gunked up on a trailside repair without a spare core, being able to unthread and clean could be advantageous.
    Yes, you can use a pair of pliers and twist it off. But when you put it back on you can either re-stake the tip of the shaft so it won't twist off again or take care to not unscrew it during normal use.

  26. #26
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    Recently started using muc off stems. Really like the 3 different rubber grommets. Two are the same shape just different sizes. The 3rd is a different shape. I needed larger rubber grommets for a new set of spank 395+ rims I built for my fatty. The lock nut is easy to tighten, and one cap is core remover too.

  27. #27
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Not really impressed by the muc-off stems. The one thing that these need to do is flow more air than a standard presta, and they don't. Shop that suggested them used to carry the E13 and recommended these, so I bought one as a test. Won't be getting anymore, still want to test the E13, as they seem to make an actual improvement on the presta design.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  28. #28
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    Doesn't matter much, but I really like the design of the American Classic ones. Great design with o-rings that can't be ripped off by over-tightening and come in a bunch of fun colors.

  29. #29
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    Prototype stems.

    Here are some pictures of the prototype valve stems, nuts and tool.
    We are using a 3D printed, nylon like material, nut with a brass threaded insert. The valves are of a high air flow design., 40mm length and black anodized.

    We've been running these for a few months now on mtb's, road and cross/ gravel bikes.
    The tool tightens/ loosens the nut and a core remover.
    The nuts will be available in 5 colors shown with more on the way. We will also offer the stems in 60mm and 80mm lengths in the future.

    Available next month and should retail around $20-24 for a set of two valves and tool.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Which valve stems are you running-img_1025.jpg  

    Which valve stems are you running-img_0996.jpg  

    Which valve stems are you running-img_e1007.jpg  

    Which valve stems are you running-img_e1043.jpg  

    EXODUX Jeff

  30. #30
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    IMO, no wrench or pliers should ever be necessary. Push the valve base firmly into the rim with one thumb and finger tighten the nut. To remove, push the base firmly with thumb and loosen the nut with your fingers.
    Do the math.

  31. #31
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    Hey LR, thanks for your input and totally understand what your saying, however, the nut does not have to be tightened with the tool and in some cases, can be tightened and loosed with your fingers.
    These valve stems/ nuts/ tool were born from a instance I had earlier in the year where I flatted ( sealant was dry) and had to put a tube in. I had a heck of a time removing the nut ( Speed Evolution valve stems) which were so tight I could not turn them, even when pressing down from the top. I did get creative with my chain tool to finally get them to loosen. Since, I've heard similar issues from other riders.
    I thought of my idea shortly after and designed and printed them in my shop. At first I was going to make them from aluminum, but after using the 3D printed versions, with a brass threaded insert, I was impressed of how well they held up, even while using PLA, which is not a very strong material. The production versions will be made with PETG, which is ozone resistant and is much stronger than the PLA prototypes.
    Not that I designed them to be, or even care, but they are lighter than the aluminum counterparts.
    EXODUX Jeff

  32. #32
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    I like the pre-curved ones that come on DT Swiss rims, which contour to the shape of the rim channel. I find that it has the best air tight-ness compared to the cone shaped ones such as Stan's. But I can't seem to find them on their own. I formerly used eThirteen's valve stems, but I found that screw on tips from CO2 or pumps are incompatible since they screw on to the valve body threads instead of the valve core. I also used Bontrager ones but only for that TLR system. I haven't got any rims that have a flat channel for which the Bontrager stems can used.

    So now, I just use Stan's or similar with the concentric rubber. I also have valve stem caps that double as valve stem removal tools.

    https://www.amazon.com/Granite-Juicy...9889926&sr=8-4

    A little pricey, but damn it has saved a me and random strangers a few times. I swear by these and I have one of these caps on the front wheel of all 3 of my bikes.
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

  33. #33
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    Ive been running stems cut from old tubes for years and years. Just upgraded to some bling anodized stems from aliexpress for $5. I've never had much trouble from any valve stem, so I never saw the need to spend 20 bucks on a pair.

  34. #34
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    American Classic stems. Been on the same ones for a few years now. I just replace the cores once they get clogged...which isn't very often.

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