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  1. #1
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    Tubeless woes: Am I cursed

    For the record, Iíve been running tubeless on several bikes over several years, so Iím very well versed in how things work, what works and such. However that being said Iíve never experienced or heard of anyone else experiencing this issue before so Iím reaching out. Maybe people have figured it out quicker than I, who knows but I find it hard to believe Iím alone. My issue..

    This is a rear wheel issue only. I have a Race Face Arc 30 rim, currently using a WTB Judge 2.4 Tritec, Tough/High Grip tire. I currently weigh about 280lbs (working on that), Iíve been running my tires at 25-27psi. My problem has been after a few weeks of running my tires like this my rear only starts to develop an air leak, when I pull the tire to see what the issue maybe, if always find that the tape has been pushed into the center of the rim cavity, the result of my air leak. Now could this be a result of running too low a pressure?? I was hoping a beefier tire, the WTB, would help. My previous tire was a Maxxis Minion DHR2 WT, EXO, TLR, folding so not very beefy. I actually tore the bead on that one after a few months of riding, again just thought it was a result of a not so robust tire. But this is the 4th time Iíve had to retape my rim and Iím getting frustrated. Iím going to pump the tires up to 30psi and see how that goes, but Iím really hoping to not have to retape it again. So anyone with any insight or suggestions? Am I on the right track with pressure being the issue?
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  2. #2
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    First of all, yes your pressure is low for your weight. There's no way you should be running in the 20s, even if you are on relatively easy stuff IME, you are going to wear the hell out of the sidewalls at least and maybe your tires are squirming around in there. This is probably one reason why you are tearing up tires. I'd probably start out at around 35-40psi minimum. More may be needed. If you feel like you absolutely cannot live without lower pressure, you are going to need a much bigger tire, like a 2.8 or something.

    Did you set the rim-tape by inserting a tube at 40psi at least overnight before installing the tire tubeless? Ideally, you'd go on a ride or two like this first, then install the tubeless tire.
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    Tape proper width? Are you scraping or pushing it when you install the beads with a tire lever?

    Try this: Retape, then install a tube and carefully mount the tire. Pump the tube up to 40 or so and let it sit overnight. Then pull it and seal tubeless as normal.
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    Ha. Jayem hit it while I was typing. I agree as well that pressure is too low for your weight.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    First of all, yes your pressure is low for your weight. There's no way you should be running in the 20s, even if you are on relatively easy stuff IME, you are going to wear the hell out of the sidewalls at least and maybe your tires are squirming around in there. This is probably one reason why you are tearing up tires. I'd probably start out at around 35-40psi minimum. More may be needed. If you feel like you absolutely cannot live without lower pressure, you are going to need a much bigger tire, like a 2.8 or something.

    Did you set the rim-tape by inserting a tube at 40psi at least overnight before installing the tire tubeless? Ideally, you'd go on a ride or two like this first, then install the tubeless tire.
    Bummer, but that was what I had suspected, just wanted a confirmation from others.

    As to setup, yeah I usually leave a tube in for a least 3-4 days if not longer, sometimes I will remove the night before I ride and put in sealant. The tires holds air fine and seals well, until I've ridden a few weeks at those low pressures then it starts to leak.

    I figure over time the tire is squirming, pushing the tape further into the channel until finally it reaches the nipple hole and then air starts leaking.

    I will give 35 a try and see how things progress. Sadly my current bike can't fit larger than a 2.4 tire.

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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blatant View Post
    Tape proper width? Are you scraping or pushing it when you install the beads with a tire lever?

    Try this: Retape, then install a tube and carefully mount the tire. Pump the tube up to 40 or so and let it sit overnight. Then pull it and seal tubeless as normal.
    Yeah tape is filling the full 30mm channel, I usually apply 2-3 wraps. No issues with levers, I install/remove the tires by hand so no trouble there.

    I agree with you and Jayem, definitely seems to be pressure issue, bummer but that's how it is being a bigger rider. Maybe it will help motivate me to get back to weight. Thanks for the help and insight.
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    Ok, good luck with it. Iíve never known anyone to need multiple tape wraps. I generally start a couple inches on one side of the valve hole and end a couple inches on the other side.

    Sounds like youíre doing everything right, which leaves tire squirm.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    First of all, yes your pressure is low for your weight. There's no way you should be running in the 20s, even if you are on relatively easy stuff IME, you are going to wear the hell out of the sidewalls at least and maybe your tires are squirming around in there. This is probably one reason why you are tearing up tires. I'd probably start out at around 35-40psi minimum. More may be needed. If you feel like you absolutely cannot live without lower pressure, you are going to need a much bigger tire, like a 2.8 or something.

    Did you set the rim-tape by inserting a tube at 40psi at least overnight before installing the tire tubeless? Ideally, you'd go on a ride or two like this first, then install the tubeless tire.

    40+ psi for tubeless???

    I didn't know that a rider's weight had so much to do with the psi, wow.

    I'm running 22-24 psi back WITH a tube and no flats, 14-18 psi front, again with a tube. 150 lbs, 190 with bike, pack, and water. So if my and the bike's weight were doubled, then the psi needed is almost doubled?

    Would it help or hurt if he put in a thick tube with sealant, instead of trying to fit in a plus tire? In other words if he can't fit a plus in back then would a tube w/sealant and maybe 35-40 psi be an alternative?
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    Everyone has there own experiences, but even at 280, 35+ sounds a little high pressure wise. I've never really run over about 32 (maybe 35 for gravel rides) on 2.1 and 2.2 tires tubeless ( was 285 now 255ish). I don't know if I could get away with 25 though. My tape usually lasts years.

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    I can't see where pressure matters here -- at all.

    I'd try a different tape, and do a *really* good job of cleaning the rim surface before applying.

  11. #11
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    Pressure is creating the casing tension that holds the bead to the side of the rim. I agree he should be at 35 psi minimum.

  12. #12
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    I'm open to suggestions for tape. Tapes I've tried thus far - Stans, Sun Ringle, Slime, Gorilla Tape (Clear (cut to size) and the Black.

    Just to give a bit more info. I've tried single ply wrap, double and triple. I've tried running a thinner width tape single wrap down the center of the rim to "protect" the spoke holes and put a wider tape over that in single ply, hoping that even if the wider layer moves, the under layer will stick, didn't work sadly.

    I've cleaned the rims very well, even tried letting them sit overnight and putting a heat gun to them to make sure everything was dry and clean off well.

    Typically - remove all gunk with Acetone, then go over with alcohol, then take a heat gun, let sit overnight, then alcohol again to be sure, then apply tape. I let sit for 2-5 days with tube at 40 psi, then evening before ride remove the tube and inject sealant. Like mentioned previously the whole things usually will last a few rides and then after about 6-8 rides air starts leaking, then I pull off tire and tape has moved to center channel.
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  13. #13
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    You might be cursed.

    The only thing I'd do differently is to get the rim super warm when applying tape, then let it cool before installing tire and tube.

    I usually do this (on problem rims) by spraying alcohol on the spoke bed, spinning it slowly, then hitting it with a lighter so that the alcohol ignites. Only takes 6 or 8 seconds of flame to heat the whole rim up, and the tape really wants to stick to that.

  14. #14
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    Yeah the only other thing I can think to try besides higher pressure is maybe installing a tire insert like CushCore. But I'm not sure the added weight is worth the penalty vs added pressure.

    I've sent an email to all the major insert companies to get their feedback and see what they think. I'm sure most will reply with some positive feedback on how their insert will help, no guarantees of course. LOL
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  15. #15
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    This is odd. I would also have thought that improper tape/taping would have been the culprit, but sounds like you are doing it right. Not sure I agree with the tire pressure theory, but do agree that for your weight pressure should be higher.

    Maybe I missed it, but what type of sealant are your running? Something different that before. Is it possible the type of sealant is messing with your tape or not sealing around the valve stem? The sealant could be weakening the adhesion of the tape and when you unseat the bead while taking off the tire at that point you may be pushing the into the channel. I'd also think that a large area of tape pushed into the channel, exposing the nipple holes, would result in relatively rapid air loss. On the other hand, slow dehiscence of the tape could let air leak out more slowly.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miker J View Post
    This is odd. I would also have thought that improper tape/taping would have been the culprit, but sounds like you are doing it right. Not sure I agree with the tire pressure theory, but do agree that for your weight pressure should be higher.

    Maybe I missed it, but what type of sealant are your running? Something different that before. Is it possible the type of sealant is messing with your tape or not sealing around the valve stem? The sealant could be weakening the adhesion of the tape and when you unseat the bead while taking off the tire at that point you may be pushing the into the channel. I'd also think that a large area of tape pushed into the channel, exposing the nipple holes, would result in relatively rapid air loss. On the other hand, slow dehiscence of the tape could let air leak out more slowly.
    I used Stans the first time around, then moved to Slime SRS sealant. I know Stans can cause issues, that was why I moved to Slime it has no ammonia from my understanding.

    The tape doesn't suddenly slip, it seems to be a progression over time, as it's moving it wrinkles and the air seems to slowly leak. I begin noticing it because over time the tires loses more air between rides, till eventually it wont hold air for more than 20-30 mins of riding, esp with my fat buttocks sitting on it.
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    I was going to suggest Gorilla Tape -but I read you have already used it.

    Is the clear the same material as the black?

    My first time setup was done using 1" wide black Gorilla Tape. I ended up double wrapping it as my rims are marginally too narrow for a single wrap. Probably would have been okay, however I had never set up a tubeless tire before this day to know how much sealing the tape needed to do.

    I agree the tire pressure sounds low but to be honest, I am not the one to be offering a tire pressure aside from "probably more than you are using".
    One of my riding friends is probably 250? I don't know, I'd suck if I worked as a "guess my weight" person. I don't think he runs much more than 30 though. We talked once about air pressure but I don't recall what he said he runs -but I don't think it was as much as 40.

    You could try the Gorilla tape if the material is different from what you had already used. Hopefully it will fail as quickly, if it fails at all. That stuff was a pain to remove from the rim 2 years later. Maybe removal is easier 3 weeks after the fact.

  18. #18
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    I've messed up the tape before, for multiple reasons, and the old specialized rim strips I had were pretty bad and wouldn't stay in place, but at this point the only other thing I can think of that could be messing the tape up, besides not enough pressure, would be when you install the tire and the bead "scraping" the tape at that time. I've had it happen, but it's usually pretty easy to detect and diagnose, so that's why I left that out.

    In general, I think we've gone a little bat **** crazy with low pressures in the last 5-10 years. Back when we rode 2.35 (more like 2.5") Tioga DHs on relatively wide rims, we couldn't run lower than 30, I never could and no one else that I knew could. I had to run closer to 40 than 30, maybe because I bashed the heck out of my bike, I don't know. Ran 2.5" tires for many years after and this always held true, couldn't run less than 35 or risked pinches. And I learned this the hard way, because it was rim strikes that caused me to settle on the right pressure. Even though my primary is a 27.5" (which should mean I can lower the pressure a bit), I can't go out with less than 32-33 in the rear for aggressive riding, like where I might hit a sharp edged bump at the DH park or on a DH run. Still using about the same size tires. I'm not heavy, 170lbs or so. On my 29er I can sometimes get around 30 or a bit below, but again for pretty smooth terrain. Otherwise, I get rim strikes. I also find that below a certain PSI, the tires get "floppy", this may seem to ride very supple in many conditions, but when pushed, it's a myriad of problems. The "tubeless effect" of a supple casing can feel real good at low PSI, but that's all for naught if your tire is not staying in place, you can't steer or you'll be striking the rim.

    In any case, closer to 40psi might seem high, but you are heavier and you'll need more PSI. It doesn't seem "crazy high" to me, just to people that have been running 22 psi for the last few years.

    Are you burping sealant at all?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy.Ford View Post

    I figure over time the tire is squirming, pushing the tape further into the channel until finally it reaches the nipple hole and then air starts leaking.
    IMO this is a plausible answer. The tape isn't migrating down under it's own accord. Lots of good advice here on how to get a solid tape job but I'd for sure bump up your pressure. Perhaps the bead on the tire is stretched out exacerbating the issue.
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  20. #20
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    What tape are you using now? Regarding width all you really need to do is cover the holes in the rim. My suggestion would be to clean the rim up with rubbing alcohol. Then apply a single wrap of Stanís tape as tight as possible using a width that does NOT sit on the bead shelf (overlap the valve hole a couple holes). Do the tube tire thing overnight and the heated screwdriver thing for the valve hole and away you go. Using this method Iíve never had a failure and several of these were setup in 2013... This is with Stans sealant as well.

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    @Forest Rider no the clear tape is not the same. It's much more pliable, sits lower and yet has the Gorilla tape grip. It does share the pita clean up of residue that the black tape has.

    @Jayem I've not noticed any sealant burping.

    @geraldooka currently I'm using Sun Ringle tape, custom cut to 30mm width to fill the channel.

    @WHALENARD Agreed definitely going to try higher pressure, starting with 40 and see how things go, bump down if I need but we'll see. Definitely won't be going below 35 at any rate.

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  22. #22
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    I always recommend running wider tape that goes up the sidewall a little. Then it is less likely to get hooked by the tire bead when you slide the tire bead into the center of the rim to remove it. You can also pre-set the tape with a tube first to get it nice and flat.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy.Ford View Post
    @geraldooka currently I'm using Sun Ringle tape, custom cut to 30mm width to fill the channel.
    How much tension do you put on the tape when laying it down? You should be pulling it tight and stretching the tape pretty hard. There should be a lot of tension on it as you apply it.

    Also (obviously) surface prep on the rim is very important. Clean all old residue and dirt/grime from the rim before taping. Give it a final wipe down with ISO alcohol before taping too.

    Just trying to cover the basics.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy.Ford View Post
    .

    @geraldooka currently I'm using Sun Ringle tape, custom cut to 30mm width to fill the channel.

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    Well if you are willing to experiment I would try the narrower tape as per my recommendation I canít promise it will fix it but if you havenít done it this way before itís worth a try. As for the tape I couldnít confirm the quality of that particular brand as Iíve never used it. I did have a brief experiment with Gorilla or should I say Horrorilla... Iíll not be doing that again. The Stans has just never failed when installed as I described.

    Depending on the design of your bead shelf the tape may not be able to conform around the shelf as needed.

    Regarding pushing the tape into the centre channel during tire swaps this can be mitigated with a little care during removal.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by geraldooka View Post
    Well if you are willing to experiment I would try the narrower tape as per my recommendation I canít promise it will fix it but if you havenít done it this way before itís worth a try. As for the tape I couldnít confirm the quality of that particular brand as Iíve never used it. I did have a brief experiment with Gorilla or should I say Horrorilla... Iíll not be doing that again. The Stans has just never failed when installed as I described.

    Depending on the design of your bead shelf the tape may not be able to conform around the shelf as needed.

    Regarding pushing the tape into the centre channel during tire swaps this can be mitigated with a little care during removal.
    Just to confirm the tape isnt being pushed into the centre duing tire swaps, its happening during riding, apparently from cornering hard with too low a pressure.

    Thank you for all the insight about tape, at this point I've literally tried, wider, narrower, double layers, single layer,etc, I don't think it's the tape or taping method. FWIW, the clear gorilla tape has been my favorite thus far, it's pliability made it super easy to install.

    I'm honestly going to have to concede and say its a pressure issue. It's the only thing that makes logical sense. Another thing about this I find weird, I'm actually surprised nobody else has had this issue
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    How much tension do you put on the tape when laying it down? You should be pulling it tight and stretching the tape pretty hard. There should be a lot of tension on it as you apply it.

    Also (obviously) surface prep on the rim is very important. Clean all old residue and dirt/grime from the rim before taping. Give it a final wipe down with ISO alcohol before taping too.

    Just trying to cover the basics.
    Definitely got all that covered, if you see my previous post, I describe my usual prep process. Thanks
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    I supposed you could ride less aggressively.

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    I was getting slow air loss and the local shop replaced the tape and noticed an issue with the valve stem too and that fixed it.

    Maybe you are burping it a bit with your weight and this happening on rear tire only. I notice if you do a real thorough "stan's shake" when installing sealant in a new tire you get a much better coating on the bead and no air loss.

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    Quote Originally Posted by newking View Post
    I was getting slow air loss and the local shop replaced the tape and noticed an issue with the valve stem too and that fixed it.

    Maybe you are burping it a bit with your weight and this happening on rear tire only. I notice if you do a real thorough "stan's shake" when installing sealant in a new tire you get a much better coating on the bead and no air loss.
    Yeah this is definitely not a valve or sealant issue. It's definitely a low pressure issue.

    This is basically what my tire looks like after a month or so of riding (not my pics, but this is the general idea). Basically it would seem because of the low pressure, the tire bead is being pushed into the rim when I corner, moving the tape over time and eventually causing the leakage of air.

    Tubeless woes: Am I cursed-tubeless-conversion-6-bad-tape.jpgTubeless woes: Am I cursed-tape-bunching.jpg
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  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    I supposed you could ride less aggressively.
    Tubeless woes: Am I cursed-what-you-talkin-bout-willis-quote-1.jpg
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forest Rider View Post
    I supposed you could ride less aggressively.
    Easiest way to test is to simply run more pressure.
    Im a flyweight at 135lb and the pressures you run is what i run! I come from old school where 1.95 tires on road width rims was the thing tho, so running less than 30 feels weird to me. Ill drop into the low 20ís if its going to be rowdy and rough, but typically ride near 30 and even crank it near 40 if its going to be mostly smooth xc. Typically i dont need to do anything to tire until i change it once a year, sometimes ill rotate front to rear once.
    The rear sees more weight and typically more off side landings. Front off sides are more dramatic and if you dont crash its usually more obvious something is off, burp, junk ingested in the bead, etc. My vote is air pressure.
    Uou might want to post over in the Clyde forum and see if others have similar experiences.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy.Ford View Post
    Yeah this is definitely not a valve or sealant issue. It's definitely a low pressure issue.

    This is basically what my tire looks like after a month or so of riding (not my pics, but this is the general idea). Basically it would seem because of the low pressure, the tire bead is being pushed into the rim when I corner, moving the tape over time and eventually causing the leakage of air.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here's something I've noticed over the years too:

    While there are many aluminum rims that are "tubeless", the extent varies significantly and the extruded-channel just doesn't compete with a good carbon rim. The chinese rims that I've bought Nextie, Light Bicycle, Oxive, have a much more gradual transition and channel and seem to be a match-made-in-heaven for tubeless. I've had my rim strip do what you pictured before on aluminum rims, it was just more of a one-off and possibly not due to the same issue, but moving to the better-shaped carbon rims, it seems to make a difference.

    I'm not saying go out and spend a bunch of money, experiment with more pressure, but for a future upgrade, I've had more success and consistency with these carbon rim profiles, they seem to be made in shapes that are a better match for tubeless, as compared to aluminum extrusions.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Here's something I've noticed over the years too:

    While there are many aluminum rims that are "tubeless", the extent varies significantly and the extruded-channel just doesn't compete with a good carbon rim. The chinese rims that I've bought Nextie, Light Bicycle, Oxive, have a much more gradual transition and channel and seem to be a match-made-in-heaven for tubeless. I've had my rim strip do what you pictured before on aluminum rims, it was just more of a one-off and possibly not due to the same issue, but moving to the better-shaped carbon rims, it seems to make a difference.

    I'm not saying go out and spend a bunch of money, experiment with more pressure, but for a future upgrade, I've had more success and consistency with these carbon rim profiles, they seem to be made in shapes that are a better match for tubeless, as compared to aluminum extrusions.
    Might be an option if my weight loss goals come true, sadly at my current weight Carbon rims are not an option, from the ones I've looked at as some/most have a weight limit.

    Yeah that is another weird thing, the bead of my tires seems to be pretty well stuck to the rim, it takes some force to break them free by hand. But I guess with the weight of my fat arse pushing through the corners on a pretty small area of the tire/rim it, doesn't really matter how good it seems when not under such stress.
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  34. #34
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    Tubeless woes: Am I cursed

    Mark the tire at the valve stem to see if the tire is rotating on the rim. I had that problem running tubes at too low a pressure on the rear and my valve stem was crooked after a ride.


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    Last edited by MikeDee; 1 Week Ago at 05:04 PM.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy.Ford View Post
    Yeah this is definitely not a valve or sealant issue. It's definitely a low pressure issue.

    This is basically what my tire looks like after a month or so of riding (not my pics, but this is the general idea). Basically it would seem because of the low pressure, the tire bead is being pushed into the rim when I corner, moving the tape over time and eventually causing the leakage of air.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    If your tire was moving that far over from hard cornering you'd be burping a *lot* of air out -- maybe all but a few psi, along with some sealant, when it happened.

    In other words, it wouldn't happen slowly. You'd know the instant it had happened because you'd be banging your rim on the ground. You'd also be able to see where sealant had sprayed out.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    If your tire was moving that far over from hard cornering you'd be burping a *lot* of air out -- maybe all but a few psi, along with some sealant, when it happened.

    In other words, it wouldn't happen slowly. You'd know the instant it had happened because you'd be banging your rim on the ground. You'd also be able to see where sealant had sprayed out.
    I've taken tires off to find rim strips that look like above, sometimes they slowly leaked, sometimes not at all and it wasn't obvious, I think it depends on where it's happening, if it opens up a spoke-hole, how much sealant is there, etc. I think a straight burp is easier to see, but that's usually from a pinch-type event, his event seems to be more from the lateral loads and squirm during cornering?
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    If your tire was moving that far over from hard cornering you'd be burping a *lot* of air out -- maybe all but a few psi, along with some sealant, when it happened.

    In other words, it wouldn't happen slowly. You'd know the instant it had happened because you'd be banging your rim on the ground. You'd also be able to see where sealant had sprayed out.
    I don't think the tire is moving that much the first time I hit a corner, I think the tire is getting resistance from the tape and tight bead connection, but over time the tire is pushing further as the tape is weakening and eventually I get a leak that will not hold air. I've had to pump up my tires every time I ride as they always seem to lose air between rides.

    I definitely hear something at times, epspecially when pushing hard, but I never stop to see if there is sealant leaking other than maybe the first few times it happened. By now I've grown used the sounds and just accept it as part of the riding experience with running such low pressure.
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  38. #38
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    So I've gotten a follow up from 2 of the emails sent to the 3 more robust tire insert makers.

    Cushcore - Yes, CushCore will help keep the beads in place and should solve your problem.

    Vittoria - Said they couldn't say for sure it would help as their insert rides above the bead. However they said my best bet if I wanted to give it a go would be to size up on the insert (so for my 2.4 tire, normally I'd use a 2.5 insert, they recommend a 2.7) and also install the insert as tight as possible as it will stretch a bit over time.

    Fat Tire Deferder - haven't replied back as of yet.

    As it stands, I'm thinking I might give the Cushcore a try in the future. For now I'm just going to plod along with higher pressure, who knows maybe I won't hate it and the tires won't feel like deadened wood.

    Thank you all who have replied for your insight, thoughts and ideas, I've found it very helpful and informative, even if the result was the same as the conclusion I'd already drawn myself - raise the pressure. I can't say I wasn't a bit more hopeful for some feedback from users of tire inserts, I guess maybe I have a unique set of circumstances with regards to my wants/needs for how I like my tires. Maybe most riders outside of maybe professionals aren't pushing the air pressure boundaries quite as much. Who knows? Like all things bike related, its one of those "personal preference" areas.

    Lastly, I know I can be a hard assed prick about a lot of things and kind of judgmental. So please don't take my comments above as being disingenuous they are not meant to be, I truly do appreciate all the feedback, help and insight.

    Happy Holidays!
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    Not to derail the thread, but I had experienced this once to the point it pinched the valve and I couldn't get air in or out of the valve. Had to cut the valve off. Obviously a tubed tire.
    2015 Santa Cruz 5010 C

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guy.Ford View Post
    Bummer, but that was what I had suspected, just wanted a confirmation from others.

    As to setup, yeah I usually leave a tube in for a least 3-4 days if not longer, sometimes I will remove the night before I ride and put in sealant. The tires holds air fine and seals well, until I've ridden a few weeks at those low pressures then it starts to leak.

    I figure over time the tire is squirming, pushing the tape further into the channel until finally it reaches the nipple hole and then air starts leaking.

    I will give 35 a try and see how things progress. Sadly my current bike can't fit larger than a 2.4 tire.

    Thanks
    My experience with this has always been because of a tube...I'd try the tape job w/out inserting a tube (never found this to be neccesary). I don't think you have a pressure issue, ( are you experiencing rim strikes?)
    not that a rim strike is going to move the tape...good luck.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElwoodT View Post
    My experience with this has always been because of a tube...I'd try the tape job w/out inserting a tube (never found this to be neccesary). I don't think you have a pressure issue, ( are you experiencing rim strikes?)
    not that a rim strike is going to move the tape...good luck.
    I've never ridden the bike with the tube installed, usually just let it sit for a few days/week, then remove and install sealant. Thanks
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    I recommend you raise your pressure by 5 psi for a month and see if it happens again. I bet it doesn't.

    And use Orange Seal, but that's just a general tip and unrelated to your complaint.

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