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  1. #1
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    Tube mountain bike tire won't seat properly in rim. Help needed.

    This tire is a large 26 3.00" knobby duro razorback wired tire, which I use a tube.

    I can't get it to seat 100% in the rim. It gets about 85% in when filling up to 70PSI to try to get it to seat.

    Both sides at the same location don't seat in properly.

    You can see in the pictures of how it doesn't seat on the rim lip. The tires have a grove on the side that is supposed to sit on that.


    Tires say max 40 PSI so now sure how much higher I can go to try and seat them.

    Any tips or ideas on what I can try? Thanks.

    EDIT: Just wanted to point out that I checked my worn out 26 x 2.6 same tire on another identical rim and that tire wasn't seated properly either and I never noticed.
    I am wondering if it is even possible to now get this tire to seat 100% properly.

    Can I just live with it like this?



    Tire half seated and half not seated
    L]

    Tire not seated here


    Tire seated correctly here

  2. #2
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    I assume you are using plenty of soapy water? I mount automotive tires as part of my occupation and can tell you there are much better lubricants available than soapy water. I have had tire not bead correctly and have rotated the tire then reinflated. I have also semi inflated the tire and physically man handled the tire on the bead. Some tire will seat on the bead if ridden @ an elevated pressure.

  3. #3
    West Chester, PA
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    Soap. Pump up to 40 and leave it overnight. The tire should stretch. Also helpful to put it out in the sun sometimes.

  4. #4
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    Soap, high pressure (I'd stop at 50 or so) and tire pliers should do the trick.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  5. #5
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    A friend told me to try Armor All instead of soapy water. I haven't tried it yet, but soapy water didn't work.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Soap, high pressure (I'd stop at 50 or so) and tire pliers should do the trick.
    If I put on ear muffs and wear safety goggles. Is there anything unsafe about going as high as 100 PSI to see if I can pop it onto the rim? The rim is the toughest downhill rims you can buy, the MTX 39.

    Will a wire bead tire really stretch anyway? These tires are really tough tires, they weigh 3.5 lbs each and have really reinforced side walls. They use moto cross technology in them, that is what Duro told me.

    Will the Park tools tire pliers really work with such a wide 3" tire?

    This guy in the video needed 75 PSI for his tire to seat. But he is using tubeless

    I filled my tire at 60 PSI and going to leave it sit overnight to see if it does anything.


  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speeder500 View Post
    If I put on ear muffs and wear safety goggles. Is there anything unsafe about going as high as 100 PSI to see if I can pop it onto the rim? The rim is the toughest downhill rims you can buy, the MTX 39.

    Will the Park tools tire pliers really work with such a wide 3" tire?
    Too much pressure can sometimes break the casing and permanently deform the tire. I haven't worked in a shop for awhile so I can't recall if the pliers would fit that tire but they might, that tool is definitely the ticket for seating stubborn tires IME though.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    I've had both warped-casing tires and ones that no matter how much soapy water and PSI was used, would not go on straight. I did not try heating the tire with a heat gun (be careful) or blow-dryer, while cooling the rim, but there's another possible method to do it.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  9. #9
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    For years I've used a solution of dawn dish soap and water. Lube the rim and tire just before pumping it up. A compressor helps. And like others have said, wear ear plugs (muffs) and eye protection.

  10. #10
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    The tire pliers will fit tires that wide, but you'll need two hands to clamp them...so, you'll need a helper.

    Over-pressurizing the tire is not a good idea from a couple of standpoints: one is the tire itself not being able to take the pressure, as mentioned, but also the rim. Pressure is an exponential function; I've watched someone literally bow a rim inward at the seam from inflating the tire too much (120psi in a 2" wide tire).

    It was quite loud.

  11. #11
    mtbpete
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    Switching to a narrower and thinner rim strip may help.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the tips everyone. I actually finally got it! And thankfully so because I stocked up on 9 of these tires.

    This is what I did, I was trying a lot of things. But what seemed to work was simply inflating that tire to probably between 80-100PSI. My gauge on my compressor only goes to 60 and then stops at the 0 mark which is about 80. So I have no idea how much air I put in. Could have been over 100PSI.

    I just put my safety goggles on and my ear muffs, and hoped for the best here.

    I also used vaseline to lube the sides as the soapy water just seemed to dry up fast. Not sure how much that helped.

    I also put the tire in the dryer but it cools down really fast so not sure how much that helped.

    But what did it was just filling it up with PSI, waiting a bit, filling some more and finally I looked and the tire was seated correctly.

    I don't know if filling it as high as I did which could have been more than 100 PSI is safe or not, but I am using the toughest and heaviest downhill rims on the market, and also the strongest knobby downhill tires on the market. These tires and rims should be able to handle much higher PSI compared to a typical rim or tire.

    Rim weighs 760 grams, and tires weigh about 3.5 lbs each. As heavy as you can get.

    Either way I had no choice because I was set on getting these tires mounted correctly.

    Is there a possibility that I damaged my rim? Should I retrue it?

  13. #13
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    If it looks to run true still then it's probably fine.

    Anywhere near 100psi seems crazy. I think the problem is that soapy water is relied upon by so many however it's simply insufficient and dries up too quickly. I've slipped a little bit of motor oil onto the bead once to help bead a tubeless tyre, it beaded up extremely easily, yet soapy water was achieving nothing.

    I believe the auto tyre industry uses dedicated tyre lube, yet for some reason we MTBers persist using soapy water.

  14. #14
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    Is Vaseline a decent way to lube the tire instead of oil or soapy water?

    Will Vaseline work almost as good as oil? You see I don't want to make a mess of oil and have it potentially unglue my rim tape. Vaseline seems like a better idea.

    Whith my tire finally mounted and seated corrently now and spun on the fork, I don't see any hops anymore so I assume it is all good. Not sure about the side to side true.

  15. #15
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    I'd never use oil or crazy pressures to seat a tire because both those methods could damage or destroy it.

    Tube mountain bike tire won't seat properly in rim. Help needed.-pts-1_002.jpg
    I brake for stinkbugs

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I'd never use oil or crazy pressures to seat a tire because both those methods could damage or destroy it.
    Oil would destroy what exactly? The wheel maybe from corrosion, I don't know enough about the chemistry and what oil could do to alu or brass etc however it's run through engines so I can only assume that it's designed to be friendly to it. The tyre? Well it only has to last the life of the tread and so far it has for me, and they come off still looking perfect. Keeping in mind that I'm talking about a tiny little bit applied using my finger along the bead.

    Interesting tool, I didn't know it existed. That makes sense for the OPs situation, however I'm not sure it'd be much use trying to get a tyre to "slip" into place for tubeless inflation.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    I'd never use oil or crazy pressures to seat a tire because both those methods could damage or destroy it.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I don't really get how this tool would work, I mean wouldn't it push one side of the tire in and cause it to fall off the lip of the rim.

    If this was certain to work I'd buy it, but I can't see it actually working.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speeder500 View Post
    I don't really get how this tool would work, I mean wouldn't it push one side of the tire in and cause it to fall off the lip of the rim.

    If this was certain to work I'd buy it, but I can't see it actually working.

    You grab the tire with it and pull the low spot up, you can't make it fall off the rim. As mentioned I haven't used it with a 3.0 but if you're handy with a welder you could make a custom pair out of bigger channel locks. Check out your lbs.

    I can't count how many times I've used that tool, probably at least a dozen times a day for years. Believe me it works.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  19. #19
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    Thanks, maybe I will try this out for next time.

    How many PSI should be in the tire before using the tool?

  20. #20
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    Just need your advice again. The tire has sat in the rim fine even at the 18 PSI I use them at. I assume since I was able to get them mounted and seated properly that the rim and tire are fine and not out of spec.

    My question is, should I really consider that tool? Or should I just fill the tire up to 100 PSI again. These are the most heavy duty downhill rims you can buy so I assume 100 PSI should be no big deal, the tire is also the most heavy wire bead duty tire you can buy also. I also got the last one on fine with no issues at 100PSI, so the rim and tire seem to take it.

    What would you guys do? Just fill it up again to 100 PSI, or buy the $50 dollar tool?

    I worry the tool will not work as these tires are so stiff weighing in at 3.5 lbs. If I knew the tool would work 100% I would consider paying the $50 dollars.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Speeder500 View Post
    Just need your advice again. The tire has sat in the rim fine even at the 18 PSI I use them at. I assume since I was able to get them mounted and seated properly that the rim and tire are fine and not out of spec.

    My question is, should I really consider that tool? Or should I just fill the tire up to 100 PSI again. These are the most heavy duty downhill rims you can buy so I assume 100 PSI should be no big deal, the tire is also the most heavy wire bead duty tire you can buy also. I also got the last one on fine with no issues at 100PSI, so the rim and tire seem to take it.

    What would you guys do? Just fill it up again to 100 PSI, or buy the $50 dollar tool?

    I worry the tool will not work as these tires are so stiff weighing in at 3.5 lbs. If I knew the tool would work 100% I would consider paying the $50 dollars.

    My eyes, teeth, face, walls, and windows are worth at least $50. 100psi isn't repeatably safe with such light rims and tires, no matter how you rationalize it to yourself.

    If I can't seat a tire by ~30psi, I'm doing something wrong and I need to stop and figure out what. The tool works, but there are other things you need to do along the way to allow it to do it's job. Like using the correct width of rim strip, ensuring that it's not impeding the bead getting into the channel, ensuring the beads have no kinks or folds, and using pure dish soap (not soapy water) to lube the beads.

    I don't use a compressor, but sometimes that quick hit of pressure is all you need to seat a bead quickly, and at relatively low pressure. Using a floor pump will often require much more pressure because it increases so slowly.

  22. #22
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    Abundant soap water + 70 psi worked with my maxxis re-fuse 650b, it popped in place around 60.

  23. #23
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    Force inside a tire is relative to the tire size. 100psi in a 3.0 tire is insanely higher than 100psi in a 23c road bike tire.

    You got lucky that time. If you keep using pressure like that, you'll blow the rim apart.

  24. #24
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    Got a 12" Schwalbe tire for my child's bike that won't seat properly on the rim. Lots of soap, high pressure, low pressure, chicken grease (why not, right?) and even the tire pliers won't get it seated. The stock Spesh 203 ERD tire sits perfectly fine, as does an aftermarket tire that came with the bike. Schwalbe 203 - no go.

    Looking for even more suggestions. Wondering about trying to stretch the steel bead before remounting it, wondering if anyone has suggestions on how to do so.

  25. #25
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    I usually try to “pre-seat” the tire by pulling thr side walls outwards all around the wheel. Then put pressure on it.

  26. #26
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    I'd try dry teflon spray lube (only for tubed tires). The stuff without oil in it that dries out white. No chicken grease, because ew. No high pressure, because ow!

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    A friend told me to try Armor All instead of soapy water. I haven't tried it yet, but soapy water didn't work.
    I now use Armor All whenever I have trouble seating a tire, I've confirmed that it works for me!
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  28. #28
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    Damn I wish I would have read this post earlier. I'm pretty sure what the problem was. I run tubes as well. Usually this happens with skinny tires and not wider ones. You see how the tire bead is outside the rim next to the Schrader valve? Tube valves have a thick rubber patch around them to prevent leaks. This can inhibit the tire bead from slipping into the rim at that spot. Usually on both sides. There were times on a skinny rim/tire that I would have to push up the valve almost through the rim so that the tire bead would slip around the rubber patch that surrounded the valve. Then pull the valve back out after the tire bead is finally inside and around the rubber seal. This can happen too with wider tires but not nearly as bad. I'm guessing you pumped up to a certain psi without seeing this seating problem. You have to deflate and push the valve up to get the tire around the rubber valve seal. Another strike against using tubes I suppose.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    You have to deflate and push the valve up to get the tire around the rubber valve seal. Another strike against using tubes I suppose.

    That is a common issue but only one of many reasons why a tire won't seat and it doesn't seem to be the case here.

    I recommend lubricant (soap/armorall) tire pliers and a bit of over-inflation. If that doesn't work I recommend new tires.
    I brake for stinkbugs

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