Tires for the snow...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Tires for the snow...

    with winter rolling around here in maryland, im going to be looking for tires. we dont get much now here but the ground does get cold and hard. i knwo about studded tires and they are to much for my taste. so im wondering whats a good tire with longer knobs to help me in the snow when it does snow and a tire for the cold hard trails? thanks all

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by mroneeyedboh
    with winter rolling around here in maryland, im going to be looking for tires. we dont get much now here but the ground does get cold and hard. i knwo about studded tires and they are to much for my taste. so im wondering whats a good tire with longer knobs to help me in the snow when it does snow and a tire for the cold hard trails? thanks all
    I do a fair amount of snow riding (NE) and here is what I have found. In fresh un-tracked snow a narrow tire with widely spaced and spiky knobs (like the trail raker) Traction (from soft sticky compounds) is not as important as a narrow aggressive tire that clears well (NOT sticky compounds)
    On on semi tracked or well tracked/packed trails (or sun hardened snow) the opposite becomes true, a wide high volume sticky tire at low inflation works best for best float and traction. (spikes never hurt)
    Last edited by Grumpy; 10-12-2006 at 04:43 AM.

  3. #3
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    so a spiked tire like swampthing? or is there something with deep lugs ? Thanks grump

  4. #4

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    Only tire that I could think of that would be good in the snow but is not studded would be a Maxxis Swampthing.

  5. #5
    Double-metric mtb man
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    I had good luck runing Panaracer Fire XC Pros in the snow last year here in Edmonton, Alberta. In fact, that's what our local police use for bike patrolling the infamous Whyte Ave, even in the winter.
    As if four times wasn't enough-> Psycho Mike's 2013 Ride to Conquer Cancer Page

    Moran? Let your opinion be free -> F88me

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mroneeyedboh
    so a spiked tire like swampthing? or is there something with deep lugs ? Thanks grump
    No, I meant spikes as in studded like the Nokian's, Schwalbe's or the Innova's. But yes a deep open tread like the swampthing is what you are looking for

    While I was googling for some pics of studded tires I came across this site,

    http://www.icebike.org/Equipment/tires.htm

    Not very current but seems like good info (re: the most open tread you can find)

    Here are some (more) pics of spiked tires

    http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/studdedtires.asp
    http://www.universalcycles.com/shopp...p?category=405
    http://biketiresdirect.com/search_re...FQKWHgod_naglQ

    Spikes (studs) aren't mandatory though, IMHO they are only really useful in really hard conditions or on ice. Just get the most open aggressive square edged tread you can find. I continue to use my all-round winter tire (Hutch Spider) in light snow and even in packed, moderately icy conditions. (it has the advantage of rolling fast and easy on the well cleared trails)

    One word of advice many I ride with have tried the homemade studded tire (screws through the tire) and the results have ALWAYS been less than satisfactory. If you want a studded tire just buy a set (the can be found on sale relatively cheaply) they last for years and years.

  7. #7
    local trails rider
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    Right, studs will bite into ice and very hard packed snow.

    On anything softer, an "open aggressive square edged tread" (as Grumpy said) will work perfectly. I think my Continental Gravity/Diesel combo will be fine unless it gets too worn before the snow arrives.

  8. #8
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    In general mud tires work well in snow since they are designed to clear well. As others have said in fresh snow less than say 4-6" deep, narrow tires work well. Once the snow is packed and gets deeper, you want the biggest tire you can find and fit on your bike.

    I have had great luck with homemade studded tires. They hook up much better than any store-bought but cannot be used on the roads like a store-bought can. My tire of choice for making homemades are WTB Timberwolf Race. These also work well in the snow without studs.

  9. #9
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    I had pretty good results last winter running:
    Gazza Jr 2.6 front
    Swampthing 2.5 rear

    I wouldn't run the Swampthing on the front because it has fairly short corner knobs, so on anything loose will just let go. The Gazz is great in loose stuff, and clears mud and snow well enough.

    The swampthing on the rear is about the right size, clears well, and mine is the sticky compound so is ok on roots etc too.

  10. #10
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    I run the studs, but some of the things above make very good sense.

    Snow is more variable than any other surface and can change quickly.

    Most of the studded tires are also set up very good for snow and mud riding. Good clearing etc.

    The studs save your ass when you really need it.

    I have used studs on many surfaces and they provide excellent traction, with the exception of smooth rock and roots. Even asphalt and road concrete work well.

    For the price uplift maybe $20,00 per tire, I would sure consider them.

  11. #11
    Formerly NattyBoh74...
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    yeah i found a website i forget where its as like 206 studded tire for like 40. not too bad.

  12. #12
    local trails rider
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeffscott
    Even asphalt and road concrete work well.
    I recall some complaints that riding on asphalt ripped the studs off of somebody's tyres.

  13. #13
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    just incase you want some cheap studded tires or want to throw a few studs in to help in the snow, check out www.busted spoke.com , on there front page they have a how to winter project making studded tires. havent made a pair yet but plan to real soon, snows tough, ice sucks

  14. #14
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    so what is the recommended 29er snow tire?

  15. #15
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    hey husky thanks for the info. i think i may try to make some..

    hers the link
    http://www.bustedspoke.com/RSD/greasy_wrench_2.php

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mroneeyedboh
    hey husky thanks for the info. i think i may try to make some..

    hers the link
    http://www.bustedspoke.com/RSD/greasy_wrench_2.php
    I didn't go into detail on why all of my buds were disappointed with their home made studded tire projects. So here is the list (again we do a fair amount of riding in the snow and have for years)

    They wear quickly and soon become smooth-ish (real studs are carbide not steel)
    Because the studs are waaay to long, they are squirmy and unpredictable on hard surfaces (like ice and ICE is the only place you really have to have studs)

    Because of the lenght the screws the front tire becomes very "hooky" and unpredictable in corners on firm snow and can dump you over the front in a heartbeat. (and isn't breaking a collarbone what you are trying to avoid?)

    They are really heavy and tend to puncture tubes easily (trust me, changing tires in the snow is a nightmare) Heavy tubes and tuffy liners are highly recommended, adding to the weight

    Most home made projects are attempted on worn tires (you don't want to ruin a good tire do you) which are nearly useless in the snow.

    The ultra-long screw studs tear up the semi-packed tracks and even stir up leaves and dirt if the cover is thin (which it often is if the trail gets sun) raising the ire of both fellow bikes and all other trail users as well.

    Falling against a spinning tire with sharp screws sticking out of it can seriously injure you (one of my buds was fairly seriously injured) Real studs are barely more dangerous than a regular tire.

    Real studded tires can be found on sale for $40-$50 (sometimes even less) if your time is worth 25 an hour you will be loosing money.

    My 2 (for what it is worth) is use a nice aggressive tire to find out if you like snow riding (it is not for everyone) If you like it, and your local conditions even warrant the use of studs (in a lot of conditions studs add little or nothing) invest in a set of studded winter tires.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by perttime
    I recall some complaints that riding on asphalt ripped the studs off of somebody's tyres.
    I lost one carbide off the rear on a 60 km/h downhill, I rode about 2000 km on the studs Off/on road.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mroneeyedboh
    with winter rolling around here in maryland, im going to be looking for tires. we dont get much now here but the ground does get cold and hard. i knwo about studded tires and they are to much for my taste. so im wondering whats a good tire with longer knobs to help me in the snow when it does snow and a tire for the cold hard trails? thanks all
    I think you also have to remember that the snow here in maryland tends to be extremely heavy in the moisture department and will pack like crazy, unlike powder out west. I would think this is a consideration when picking tread patterns.
    -jon

  19. #19
    Formerly NattyBoh74...
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    do you have a recc. for snow tires? since it seems as if your from maryland, lang? thanks

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