Tiny tear wont seal- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Tiny tear wont seal

    Ive thrown in a lot of sealant but it will no seal, i have a tire insert in there if that helps. I've bunny hopped for around 5 minutes up and down my lane but it still has not sealed. It's a new wheel build and it holds air no problem except that tear even though it might seem small It'll take all of the air out in around 10 minutes. Any ways of fixing this? I am considering throwing some super glue on to seal it at this point.
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  2. #2
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    Sealant never works at the bead. When the casing flexes, the seal breaks. Remove the tire, clean the area, and use a traditional tube patch.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimat99 View Post
    Sealant never works at the bead. When the casing flexes, the seal breaks. Remove the tire, clean the area, and use a traditional tube patch.
    It's an absolute pita to get on and off and it's right at the bead so I don't know how to stick it on, would super glue work? As you can see the hole is tiny

  4. #4
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    Patch from the inside with a traditional tube patch. Traditional patches don't use super glue, it uses a vulcanizing rubber cement.

    2nd option is if you don't want to remove the tire from the rim is to use a plug, but that would mean you have the make the hole bigger for the plug.

  5. #5
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    If you want a reliable fix you'll need to patch it from the inside. Another much easier option would be to plug it. Plugs work pretty well at the bead because pressure helps keep it tighter than top casing plugs. It's also unlikely to be ripped out while ridding. I wouldn't trust superglue. If the tire is a pita to deal with in the garage, think of dealing with it in the field when the glue fails. Fix it right so you don't have to deal with it again.

  6. #6
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    as other said, remove tire clean up the inside where that hole is scuff with sandpaper and then apply old school vulcanizing tube patch,

    clean/scuff/thin layer of glue, let that dry, then apply patch press down hard hold it for 30 secs...let cure for 10 minutes if done right will be permanent repair

    you just have to make sure to clean off the inside of the tire from any silicones or release compounds (tires usually have more factory 'release goo' than tubes do) and scuff it well so the patch really melts and becomes one with the tire.
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  7. #7
    change is good
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    Everything previously mentioned is spot on, but bead repairs, are difficult, time consuming and often fail. If you have time and are short of cash, Id say go for it.

    Typically, I use a trimmed auto tire patch, and use the glue that comes with the kit. I also stitch with HD twine. Then I coat the patch and stitching again.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDon View Post
    Everything previously mentioned is spot on, but bead repairs, are difficult, time consuming and often fail. If you have time and are short of cash, Id say go for it.

    Typically, I use a trimmed auto tire patch, and use the glue that comes with the kit. I also stitch with HD twine. Then I coat the patch and stitching again.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
    I finally fixed it with a little bit of tec 7 it works fine and is pretty flexible so it won't crack the tire

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDon View Post
    Everything previously mentioned is spot on, but bead repairs, are difficult, time consuming and often fail. If you have time and are short of cash, Id say go for it.

    Typically, I use a trimmed auto tire patch, and use the glue that comes with the kit. I also stitch with HD twine. Then I coat the patch and stitching again.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
    I used some tec 7 to fix it in the end, it works and flexes and sealed no problem

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    as other said, remove tire clean up the inside where that hole is scuff with sandpaper and then apply old school vulcanizing tube patch,

    clean/scuff/thin layer of glue, let that dry, then apply patch press down hard hold it for 30 secs...let cure for 10 minutes if done right will be permanent repair

    you just have to make sure to clean off the inside of the tire from any silicones or release compounds (tires usually have more factory 'release goo' than tubes do) and scuff it well so the patch really melts and becomes one with the tire.
    I tried to use super glue but that didn't work (my mistake) I used some tec 7 and it sealed perfectly fine

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by slimat99 View Post
    If you want a reliable fix you'll need to patch it from the inside. Another much easier option would be to plug it. Plugs work pretty well at the bead because pressure helps keep it tighter than top casing plugs. It's also unlikely to be ripped out while ridding. I wouldn't trust superglue. If the tire is a pita to deal with in the garage, think of dealing with it in the field when the glue fails. Fix it right so you don't have to deal with it again.
    I unfortunately didn't have any plugs so I used some tec 7 and that worked fine

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by the-one1 View Post
    Patch from the inside with a traditional tube patch. Traditional patches don't use super glue, it uses a vulcanizing rubber cement.

    2nd option is if you don't want to remove the tire from the rim is to use a plug, but that would mean you have the make the hole bigger for the plug.
    I used tec 7 in the end to fix it and that worked fine : )

  13. #13
    LMN
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    Next time just jam a tire plug in there. I have had great success fixing pinches at the bead that way.
    "The best pace is suicide pace, and today is a good day to die." Steve Prefontaine

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by LMN View Post
    Next time just jam a tire plug in there. I have had great success fixing pinches at the bead that way.
    I'm one for one.

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