Spoke tension for old Mavic 220 (and 217) rims- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Spoke tension for old Mavic 220 (and 217) rims

    Hi,

    I have a 23 year old Mavic wheelset with shimano hubs. The label on the rims says "Mavic 220 559x17-6106 UB Control". They have 32 1.5mm butted spokes. It's a 26" wheelset.

    Over the years I have on occasion done minor adjustments to keep the wheels true, but I never measured the spoke tension since I didn't have a tensometer. I got one a short while back and today gave the wheelset a look over, starting with the rear wheel (haven't gotten to the front yet).

    There were a few spokes with very low tension. In fact two measured 0 on the Park Tools tensometer! I adjusted the low outliers up to be on par with the other spokes and then got it true again. After I was done the average on the drive side is about 80kgf and the non-drive side about 55kgf. This seemed to be on the low side to me. Should I be targeting 100kgf on the drive side, and adjust the non-drive side up accordingly to keep it dished properly?

    BTW, this wheelset gets very light use. Since I got a new MTB this year, my old ones are just used on paved roads for training when the trails are too muddy. I'd rather error on the low tension side than high tension side.

    Also, I have a second similar wheelset (interchangeable with the Mavic 220 set). It's a Mavic 217 559x17-6106. Also 32 1.5mm double butted spokes, but DT Hugi '95 hubs. I still need to take a closer look at it, but I assume it would need the same tension as the 220 wheelset. However, I was wondering if anyone knows the difference between the 217 and 220 rims.

    thanks

  2. #2
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    Are you sure about the 1.5mm measurement? That's sort of an unusual size and would throw off your readings.

    Anyway, assuming it's right 100kgf (drive side) is a pretty good number for just about any wheel, 80kgf is definitely a bit low but if you've been rolling it for years lower than that I wouldn't worry much.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    Are you sure about the 1.5mm measurement? That's sort of an unusual size and would throw off your readings.
    Yes, I measured with the spoke gauge that comes with the Park tensometer and also with a digital caliper. They are 1.8/1.5/1.8 double butted.

    Anyway, assuming it's right 100kgf (drive side) is a pretty good number for just about any wheel, 80kgf is definitely a bit low but if you've been rolling it for years lower than that I wouldn't worry much.
    Ok. Thanks.

  4. #4
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    I heard back from Mavic, and they said for the front 80kgf +/- 10kgf and for the rear drive side 90kgf +/- 10kgf. Given the age of these wheelsets I'll probably target about 10kgf below these numbers since I don't want to start popping spokes and nipples. That's about where the rear wheel I was already playing around with is at the moment. Still need to look at the front and also the other wheelset. I might adjust my targets based on how tight or loose the spokes currently are.

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