Specialized Tire styles?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Specialized Tire styles?

    This may be a dumb question, but looking into new tires and there a few different styles I don't understand.

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/sh...family:Butcher

    There is the 2Bliss ready, the Control, and the Grid. What is the difference between the 3 styles aside from about $20

  2. #2
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    It refers to the casing of the tire, in terms of puncture protection.

    From least to most, it goes 2Bliss, Control, Grid.
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  3. #3
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    2Bliss Ready gets you a specially formed bead that creates a better airtight seal for tubeless setups. It can be found as an option on the casings styles below.

    Control is a performance casing (60 tpi) with folding bead intended for mountain biking on groomed trails. Should be the lightest and least expensive.

    Pro is a performance casing (60 tpi) with folding bead and a puncture resistant layer under the tread intended for all-road.

    GRID adds an extra slash-resistant layer on the sidewalls of a Control casing, for more raw and rugged terrain where edges of sharp rocks can slash a tire (e.g. jagged rocks lining the sides of a rut). Small upcharge and weight increase.

    BLK DMND adds extra sidewall reinforcement on top of the GRID. Another upcharge and weight increase. People generally pick this if they find they impact things hard enough that the tire itself gets "pinched" between the rim and ground and flats. Generally for enduro bikes that give confidence to ride extra hard.

    DH is a very reinforced tire intended for downhill. You probably care more about not flatting and the best grip possible than rolling resistance and weight if you're considering this.

    S-Works is a more supple (120 tpi) casing, that conforms better to rocks for extra control/grip and comfort and lower rolling resistance, but is more fragile, intended for racing.

    There's also other things to consider, like GRIPTON rubber compound or basic durometer compounds. GRIPTON is an advanced formula that has a good balance of speed, grip, and wear resistance. The lower a durometer compound is (e.g. 60a/42a vs 70a), the stickier it is, the slower it is, and the faster it wears.

    Spec is giving the option to optimize your setup, so you aren't running overkill tires, such as running less reinforcement for the front. I guess people are sensitive to dragging extra/needless features along and want to make the most of what power their body can produce.
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  4. #4
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    Tire mfgís

    Quote Originally Posted by CrashDummy31 View Post
    This may be a dumb question, but looking into new tires and there a few different styles I don't understand.

    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/sh...family:Butcher

    There is the 2Bliss ready, the Control, and the Grid. What is the difference between the 3 styles aside from about $20
    I would suggest not buying a specialized branded tire. Itís not their core business and there are some very good tire manufacturers out there. I ride a specialized carbon Camber and replaced the Branded rubber on the new bike almost immediately and found improvement.

    Little wider in the front and narrower in the rear is always a good formula depending which part of the country and terrain you have.

  5. #5
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    It's been one of their feature products since the original ground control tire which I used in the early 90's

    They've been refining and improving tires for the last 30+ years, and the first thing they released to the market was a tire!

    1976: Specializes produces and sells their first self-made product, a tire designed for the touring market.
    1981: Specialized introduces the StumpJumper, the first mountain bike sold to the general public.

    They even partnered with a Japanese tire manufacturer and helped design a factory that exclusively produces Specialized tires.
    https://www.specialized.com/us/en/stories/tire-factory


    The Grid Trail tires are a really good combination of durability and weight,
    although I'm using Maxxis tires right now, some of my favorites include the Butcher, Eliminator, Ground Control, and the discontinued Captain.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlx john View Post
    The Grid Trail tires are a really good combination of durability and weight,
    although I'm using Maxxis tires right now, some of my favorites include the Butcher, Eliminator, Ground Control, and the discontinued Captain.
    I was running a Grid style 2.6 Eliminator on the rear of my 650b Enduro mule.

    Everything was all fine when riding around my local trails, which tend to be tight & twisty.

    Less than a handful of rides in, my riding buds and I ventured to the bike park for a days shreddage.

    2-3 runs in, the Eliminator started losing air.

    As this was a reasonably new tire I suspected the tubeless valve may have been causing the issue.

    So I checked it was all tight and the core was tight and done up correctly.

    I reinflated tire to my preferred psi and went down another run.

    Still losing air!?

    So, I rechecked valve etc and pumped up again and then went for a blat on the skills section.

    Air was still escaping. I resigned myself to installing the tube I had in my backpack.

    Thinking things would be better now, we continued with the stokeage.

    On the final run, you head from the top of the mountain all the way down to a pub at the bottom.

    Being a long run meant several stops to allow hands to recover and brake pads to cool.

    About 1/3 of way down I noticed my inner tube poking out from a 3-4cm tear at bead height.

    Mates were like 'don't touch it!'

    Just as I was going in for a closer look 'BANG!!' The tube exploded.

    I had to hitch a ride to the bottom via the dirt road.

    So, Eliminator Grid tires cannot survive one day at a bike park.

    'Well!! You should've been running Black Diamond!!'

    But, my mates who were running EXO Maxxis tires had no issue!!

    Five other riders running EXO rear tires and I'm the one that ended up walking.

    I was starting to enjoy the Eliminator too, until it spilt/tore 🤯

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  7. #7
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    Thanks for the input and education everyone. I ended up going with the Maxxis Minion / Aggressor, both in 2.3

  8. #8
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    Do tires usually have a break in period? The Minion has soooooo much more grip than the Specialized Ground Control that I was coming from. I got thrown off a few times last night because where I was expecting the tires to skid they gripped

  9. #9
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    Their break-in period tends to be the time when are throwing sand in the air, until they get coated with chalky stuff, stop throwing sand, and seemingly roll a bit faster.

    The good brands seem to not lose grip after going through this period. The bad brands rely on the stickiness for grip, and tend to be market as "all-weather", which I interpret as best meant for moist hero dirt and will suck in the dry. Maxxis is a brand that does extremely well in the dry, but doesn't compromise in the wet as one might expect for their dry condition performance.
    "The challenge is not in developing new ideas, but in escaping old ideas."

  10. #10
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    My friend said the minions were overkill for what we ride. Yesterday was pretty rough, not used to getting thrown as much this year. Hopefully I just have to get used to them. I'm still somewhat new to biking, so pardon the stupidity with some of my questions

    Shot a few years ago, but this is mostly the trail type I ride
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=803kgLeGmeE

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Precab View Post
    I would suggest not buying a specialized branded tire. Itís not their core business and there are some very good tire manufacturers out there. I ride a specialized carbon Camber and replaced the Branded rubber on the new bike almost immediately and found improvement.

    Little wider in the front and narrower in the rear is always a good formula depending which part of the country and terrain you have.
    I have a Butcher Grid Trail 2.6 and a Purgatory Trail 2.6 on my AM bike and itís a good combo.


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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashDummy31 View Post
    Do tires usually have a break in period? The Minion has soooooo much more grip than the Specialized Ground Control that I was coming from. I got thrown off a few times last night because where I was expecting the tires to skid they gripped
    You understand that one of them is a DH tire and the other is a Trail/XC tire, right?
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    You understand that one of them is a DH tire and the other is a Trail/XC tire, right?
    The tread of an exo minion prioritizes downhill performance, but it's definitely not a "DH tire".

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlx john View Post
    and the discontinued Captain.
    I'ts interesting how some people continued to like the Captain out of habit. The Ground Control rolls faster and has more grip. This made the Captain obsolete, hence the discontinued status.

    From Specialized:
    "Specialized claims the Ground Control has more grip than a Captain and has about 20% less rolling resistance thanks to the more advanced casing and tread design."
    https://www.singletracks.com/mtb-gea...e-tire-review/

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by GT87 View Post
    The tread of an exo minion prioritizes downhill performance, but it's definitely not a "DH tire".

    Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk
    Nonetheless, minion DHF and Ground Control have very different purposes. Doesn't make much sense to compare.

    FYI, I'm currently running DHF on front and Ground Control in rear (less rolling resistance; earlier breakaway).

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by kevin_sbay View Post
    Nonetheless, minion DHF and Ground Control have very different purposes. Doesn't make much sense to compare.

    FYI, I'm currently running DHF on front and Ground Control in rear (less rolling resistance; earlier breakaway).
    I've also used the GC grid 2.3 in the rear with a magic Mary up front.

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  17. #17
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    I love the Aggressor in the back. But the ground controls were stock on the bike and when I had asked a few bike reps they said the Minion/Aggressor combo was somewhat the standard of what trail riders use. Thats why i went for those

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashDummy31 View Post
    I love the Aggressor in the back. But the ground controls were stock on the bike and when I had asked a few bike reps they said the Minion/Aggressor combo was somewhat the standard of what trail riders use. Thats why i went for those
    It depends where you ride. I think the aggressor is a go-to rear tire for dry/rocky/hardpack conditions. I've ridden one in 2.5 in Moab for a day and it did well, but back home with loam/wet/mud i think the knobs are too small and tightly spaced to perform. The GC grid works well enough in those conditions for a fast rolling rear trail tire though.

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  19. #19
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    Specialized Tire styles?

    Quote Originally Posted by GT87 View Post
    It depends where you ride. I think the aggressor is a go-to rear tire for dry/rocky/hardpack conditions. I've ridden one in 2.5 in Moab for a day and it did well, but back home with loam/wet/mud i think the knobs are too small and tightly spaced to perform. The GC grid works well enough in those conditions for a fast rolling rear trail tire though.

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    I guess it depends how you ride. Thatís way too slow of a tire for me for Moab. You can be in the top couple % on any climb or descent in Moab on Rekon Race 2.35s F/R if they suit your riding style.


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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Le Duke View Post
    I guess it depends how you ride. Thatís way too slow of a tire for me for Moab. You can be in the top couple % on any climb or descent in Moab on Rekon Race 2.35s F/R if they suit your riding style.


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    Maybe you can, but I'm not playing the Strava game. Aggressor seemed like an appropriate rear tire for a fun day riding whole enchilada. Obviously xc race tires are the preferred choice for a skilled rider that's racing up and down (Strava or otherwise) but definitely wouldn't have been as fun for me that day. And, on that day in autumn, with a dusting of melting snow over loose powder, there's no way that a pair of rekon races would be anywhere near the fastest choice for the segment descending from the pass.

    I don't even see what your point was, aside from bragging that you're fast on Strava using xc tires.
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