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  1. #1
    Coffee Drinker
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    Slime tubeless sealant.

    Does anyone have any experience with the Slime Tubeless sealant?
    https://shop.slime.com/products/tube...nt=45264630536

    I did not have a positive experience today using this. Anyone else?

  2. #2
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    Slime tubeless sealant.

    It’s very slimey, I wish I did not ever use it. Looking to get Orange when my current Stan’s runs out.


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  3. #3
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    I used it once and it was not a positive experience either, couldn't get it to seal a small puncture.
    I brake for stinkbugs

  4. #4
    Oaktown Honkey on Strava
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    I logged on to see if Slime had improved. I used a bottle of it for almost a year, and I found that it did not work that great either. That was about 2014. Been on Stans ever since, as it was better for goat heads. I still use the slime bottle to inject Stans. They had a really great shaped bottle for injecting into valve.

  5. #5
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    A friend of mine has used Slime in his tubes for years. He's had more punctures than anyone else I ride with but still raves about how great Slime is!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    A friend of mine has used Slime in his tubes for years. He's had more punctures than anyone else I ride with but still raves about how great Slime is!
    The level of brainwashing done to him is superb!


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  7. #7
    mtbr member
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    People often see what they want to see.

  8. #8
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    I'm not sure if everyone is talking about the specific stuff you have linked to. Slime STR Tubeless.

    Slime STR is not slimy in any way.
    Slime STR has only been available for maybe a year now (it is fairly new).
    Slime STR is not designed for tubes, it is a tubeless tire sealant.

    I've been using Slime STR for a little while now. It sealed the tires good. Seems to be good with thorns. I don't think it really lasts longer that other sealants. It seems you can reconstitute the dried up stuff with water. It has a very different consistency than other sealants. It washes off easily, but leaves a sticky residue. It almost reminds me of Elmer's glue. It does not seem to be compatible with other sealants, in fact I think it dissolved the residual latex in the tires I put it in.

    I can't say a whole lot about it because I haven't been using it very long, but I'd say it's worth a try if you find a good deal on some. I'm just don't think it stands out as the ultimate sealant.

    What experiences did you have with it??

  9. #9
    B.Ike
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    I bought a gallon this winter for a great price, or so I thought....threw it away after realizing it couldn´t handle a small puncture....bought a bottle of bontrager after this debacle, and won´t be buying a second bottle.....going back to tried and true homebrew recepies when the bontrager is gone.

  10. #10
    tire to rim ratio tester
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    A friend of mine has used Slime in his tubes for years. He's had more punctures than anyone else I ride with but still raves about how great Slime is!

    I resemble that remark.

    Now...when you say punctures I assume you mean a tube that went flat and could not be pumped up again.


    There are a few subtle things that I've learned in the two years I've been using them:

    1. Never put a smaller-sized tube in a tire, for example a 26" tube in a 27.5" tire. The resulting friction will pop the tube, especially going fast on pavement. Dirt Junkie has suggested putting baby powder inside the tire to help prevent these friction flats and I'll try that later. I just put in a 27.5 tube into a 26+ tire to see if the reverse, adding a larger tube to a smaller tire, will help or not. Crossing my fingers that it doesn't do the opposite --- a pinch flat. So far so good, and believe it or not I LIKE the tube in there more than tubeless.

    2. The front tire can go down to a decent pressure, but the back tire must be 25 psi or more, even if it's a 2.35 or a bit wider (not sure what PSI a rear plus tire with a tube would require). In reality, I 'note' the PSI on the floor pump but I just pump up the front to where I can squeeze both sides about a centimeter, and pump up the back to where I can barely squeeze it at all. 90% of my flats have been on the back tube. That doesn't happen much at all if 1 and 2 are followed.

    3. A knobby tire can prevent a tube flat a lot more than a smoother hybrid or high roller tire. Another reason to choose Maxxis. If the knobs are tall they can help as a first-line defense against thorns or sharp rocks. Smoother tires only have the tread and tube as the defense.

    4. One or more small (less than 1/8 inch) holes can be plugged by Slime. Something larger cannot. You can either patch the tube or just put on another $10 tube. There are tubes I've had that have the tire showing dozens of small green pinpoints, and the tube lasted several months before crapping out. They can and do work to prevent flats, but the three issues above hurt their chances of stopping a flat.


    Now...you may say, why go through all the fuss above if you can just go over to tubeless. The answer to the question is: search for all of the different problems people have had with tubeless on here. Maybe YOU have not had a problem with tubeless but a lot of others have had problems. A lot. If you don't believe it, look it up with the search function. If you have a tube flat, you have ONE problem, and you replace the tube in 10-15 minutes and fix that problem, then move on. If you have a tubeless problem, you could have one of a dozen different problems, some of which are chronic/incurable. Some people love to work on their bike problems. I don't.
    "A $1700 bike is not fit to be hucked from a curb"
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  11. #11
    Yeah, I'm that a$$hole.
    Reputation: Guy.Ford's Avatar
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    I use the Slime STR, can't say much about it other than I haven't had any flats yet, it seals tires well on the rim, cleans up nicely, doesn't seem to dry out like Stans and no boogers.
    #THELEGENDMTB
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  12. #12
    mtbr member
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    Now...when you say punctures I assume you mean a tube that went flat and could not be pumped up again.
    LINK

  13. #13
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    I had a positive initial impression of STR. Less so now.

    The pump on my gallon container doesn't work. Never has. Always had to set it aside and use the Stan's syringe to get sealant. Messy, but whatever. I'd ignore this if the sealant itself was up to snuff.

    When fresh, as above, it's the consistency of white glue. Very tacky, not pleasant to get on your fingers because it's hard to wash. Water turns it a blueish color and seems to make it set, particularly on concrete. My shop floor is dotted with gray splashes from attempts to clean it. Alcohol doesn't touch it. When it dries completely on a rim, it's very hard to remove. I'd use a pressure washer.

    Pulling a tire after a month shows it coats the inside well. It doesn't gum up valve stems too badly, but does make them extremely difficult to unscrew if it was coating the inner threads when you installed them. I had to use a vice and a wrench on a stem a moment ago.

    Does it seal? I guess. It does for people on Youtube. I rarely get punctures, the most recent was a 3/4cm cut near the bead wall of my Bontrager. I didn't notice it for a week because the air leak was slow. That counts for something. An incomplete seal is better than none.

    The real problem with STR is that it turns into sludge within a month or two. It pools when the bike sits and flows like molasses. Too slow to keep up with the wheel, so it throws the wheel out of balance and probably wouldn't seal anything that wasn't in the pool. The balance issues aren't that noticeable riding, but the road bike in particular with low-mass tires nearly shakes off my stand. The Slime people claim adding water will keep this happening, but this is not my experience.

    So far, the score is 0/2 for inexpensive sealants (TruckerCo was also a bust). Back to Orange Seal when this stuff runs out. Maybe before then since I've got about 60oz of STR left.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by richj8990 View Post
    I resemble that remark.

    Now...when you say punctures I assume you mean a tube that went flat and could not be pumped up again.


    There are a few subtle things that I've learned in the two years I've been using them:

    1. Never put a smaller-sized tube in a tire, for example a 26" tube in a 27.5" tire. The resulting friction will pop the tube, especially going fast on pavement. Dirt Junkie has suggested putting baby powder inside the tire to help prevent these friction flats and I'll try that later. I just put in a 27.5 tube into a 26+ tire to see if the reverse, adding a larger tube to a smaller tire, will help or not. Crossing my fingers that it doesn't do the opposite --- a pinch flat. So far so good, and believe it or not I LIKE the tube in there more than tubeless.

    2. The front tire can go down to a decent pressure, but the back tire must be 25 psi or more, even if it's a 2.35 or a bit wider (not sure what PSI a rear plus tire with a tube would require). In reality, I 'note' the PSI on the floor pump but I just pump up the front to where I can squeeze both sides about a centimeter, and pump up the back to where I can barely squeeze it at all. 90% of my flats have been on the back tube. That doesn't happen much at all if 1 and 2 are followed.

    3. A knobby tire can prevent a tube flat a lot more than a smoother hybrid or high roller tire. Another reason to choose Maxxis. If the knobs are tall they can help as a first-line defense against thorns or sharp rocks. Smoother tires only have the tread and tube as the defense.

    4. One or more small (less than 1/8 inch) holes can be plugged by Slime. Something larger cannot. You can either patch the tube or just put on another $10 tube. There are tubes I've had that have the tire showing dozens of small green pinpoints, and the tube lasted several months before crapping out. They can and do work to prevent flats, but the three issues above hurt their chances of stopping a flat.


    Now...you may say, why go through all the fuss above if you can just go over to tubeless. The answer to the question is: search for all of the different problems people have had with tubeless on here. Maybe YOU have not had a problem with tubeless but a lot of others have had problems. A lot. If you don't believe it, look it up with the search function. If you have a tube flat, you have ONE problem, and you replace the tube in 10-15 minutes and fix that problem, then move on. If you have a tubeless problem, you could have one of a dozen different problems, some of which are chronic/incurable. Some people love to work on their bike problems. I don't.
    I assumed this thread was about sealant for tubeless. All your points about tubes are great points, but I didn't think very many MTBrs use tubes anymore. For those who have trouble with tubeless, I'd say it's probably operator error or rim/tire mismatch. With today's tires/rims being tubeless ready, I don't see why people would have problems. I've been using tubeless for 15 years and have never had an issue. I do carry a spare tube just in case I ever needed one, which I have not (knocking on wood)...

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