• 01-16-2020
    Staktup
    Running rear tires in reverse
    I have 2 different sets of 45NRTH fat tires (Van Helga and Dillinger), and they both show arrows indicating 2 opposite directions for the front and rear tires. The treads appear directional, so I presume reversing the rear would make you roll slower but hook up better.

    I recently bought a used bike and the seller was running the rear HR2 in reverse, but I didn't notice this until after we parted ways.

    Who else runs rear tires in reverse, and are there certain models that you feel work better that way?
  • 01-16-2020
    NYrr496
    A long time ago, I used to run two of the same tires on a bike and run the rear one in reverse. Now, I choose a front tire and a rear tire and run them in whatever direction they're designed to run in. Never had a problem either way.
    I run Bud and Lou on my fat bike. I run them both in Propulsion. I figure they're grippier than any other tire I've ever ridden so why make it harder on myself and run them in Traction.
    I think the thing that changed my mind about running a rear tire with the tread reversed was reading somewhere that the rear tire tracks through turns better in the forward facing direction. Makes sense to me.
    I'm running a Bontrager XR2 on the rear of my Krampus and I don't really ever feel that tire break loose in turns.
    If it were me, I'd run Dillinger and Van Helga facing forward.
  • 01-17-2020
    Timothy G. Parrish
    I once mounted my rear tire backwards. It was tubeless and I said f-it, because I didn't want to deal with it. I rode it that way for a few months before I put it back on the right way. Most tires aren't designed for use in reverse. Even ones that are, such as the Michelin Wild Grip'r, sucked at it, and I ran it like the front. Much better everywhere.
  • 01-17-2020
    wishiwasbiking
    A lot of tires have a ramped edge at the front of the knob to reduce rolling resistance and a square edge at the end of the knob for braking. Now if you reverse such a tire for the rear you may have more traction climbing as it will use the square edge of the knob for traction, but the side effect is the ramped side now becomes your braking edge, not something I would want.
  • 01-23-2020
    ColinL
    Quote:

    Originally Posted by wishiwasbiking View Post
    A lot of tires have a ramped edge at the front of the knob to reduce rolling resistance and a square edge at the end of the knob for braking. Now if you reverse such a tire for the rear you may have more traction climbing as it will use the square edge of the knob for traction, but the side effect is the ramped side now becomes your braking edge, not something I would want.

    this ^^

    old school tires before there were ramped knobs commonly did have a direction for traction the opposite for speed. or front / rear.

    but it isn't done today because there are sooooo many tires on the market that everyone specializes.
  • 01-24-2020
    escaner
    My Canyon Spectral had its back Mountain King mounted in reverse from factory, although the arrow only had one direction. I also have a friend who still mounts his rear Ardent in reverse for better traction.

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