Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Wiggum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    69

    Reuse spokes between 28h and 32h possible?

    Hello,
    I am looking to order a new rim (DT Swiss EX 511, 27.5) for my rear wheel. My 2017 YT Jeffsy came with 28h wheels, however, I am thinking I want to upgrade to 32h, yet reuse my spokes to save a few bucks. I ride fairly aggressive over some rough terrain, mostly in Utah. I banged up my rim to the point of it not being tubeless-able anymore but haven't actually warped it. I'm just thinking of making it more bomb proof. Both the 28h and 32h rims are the same price.

    Will the wheel builder I take it to (probably REI) be able to just add 4 more spokes to my existing hub and spokes? Is it a different more time consuming rebuild process?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: glader60's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    227
    no and no, you need new hub, rim and spokes

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Wiggum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    69
    Needing a new hub is a definite deal breaker. (I've never needed a new wheel before so am pretty clueless.) Thanks, man!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,426
    how would you expect to put 32 spokes in a hub that has 28 holes? think about that. the holes in the hub are drilled evenly around the hub flange and they don't drill extra holes.

    unless you have a fancy hub of some sort that would be worth reusing, it's probably cheaper and easier to buy a complete wheel anyways. if the wheel didn't warp after you banged it up badly enough that it does not hold a tubeless tire anymore, 28 spoke wheels are probably strong enough for you. it sounds like the rim sidewall failed from impact but the rim stayed true. I am weary of low-spoke count wheels, but rims have gotten pretty darn strong in recent years. I would err on the side of caution and pay the "weight penalty of a few additional spokes.

    a note about wheelbuilding- it's possible that a good wheelbuilder can re-lace your wheel with a new rim with your old spokes. some people swear that using old spokes is absolutely not allowed, and others do it all the time. chances are, a Barnett's-trained REI tech will not rebuild your wheel with old spokes anyways. However, if you want to build a wheel with old spokes, the new rim has to have the exact same ERD as the old rim. rim and hub dimensions and vary widely, which is why spokes come in such an enormous array of lengths and thicknesses. to build a wheel correctly, you need to calculate the spoke length based on those dimensions and use the correct length spokes within a < two-millimeter margin of error.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Wiggum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    69
    Thanks for the info, mack_turtle. I decided on the DT Swiss rim from a fellow Jeffsy owner online. I'm assuming it'll work (as far as retaining spokes, rim/hub dimensions) but I'll double check. It occurred to me writing my first post that I could just count the holes in the hub to see if possible, but I'm not at home now.

    I bottomed out on some rock edges and pinch flatted a couple times, damaging the rim. I'm probably going to get Cushcore or similar for my next wheel.

    Getting a new hub seems wasteful. And buying a complete wheel does as well. If I needed a whole new wheel set I'd definitely do that, but I'm trying to save some money (and not be wasteful).

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Posts
    126
    32H rim is not compatible with 28H hub. if you have new 32H rim, you need other 32H hub. And also new spokes, because current one are 99% not the right length. New spokes are the cheapest part compared to rim/hub price, so no use to save money there, most money can be saved at hub price IMO.
    My suggestion would be - go for the new quality wheelset (i.e. EX 511 rims + DT 350 hubs), it will last forever. And sell your current wheelset, this way you will pay only the difference in price between new and current wheelset.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    23,399
    Either my calendar is wonky, but AFAIK it ain't April 1st yet, is it
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mack_turtle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    8,426
    Quote Originally Posted by Wiggum View Post
    Thanks for the info, mack_turtle. I decided on the DT Swiss rim from a fellow Jeffsy owner online. I'm assuming it'll work (as far as retaining spokes, rim/hub dimensions) but I'll double check.
    look up the effective rim diameter-ERD-of your old and new rims. if they are within one millimeter of each other, the old spokes might be reusable. however, sometimes rim manufacturers measure their rims differently than others. I know this from personal when I built a wheel based on the manufacturer's listed ERD and the spokes I bought ended up being 2mm too short. you never find out for certain if your spokes are within that margin of error until you've been lacing, tensioning, truing, tensioning again and again, for an hour. if it's off, you have to take the whole thing apart and start all over.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    12,284
    But get new brass nipples.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,814
    or alloy
    I brake for stinkbugs

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    595
    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    or alloy
    Brass is an alloy!

    I swear, this word needs to be banned from all bicycling discussions. I think I know what you intended, yet the word does not communicate the idea you likely intended. Steel, brass, and aluminum (at least as it's used) are all alloys.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    10,814
    Quote Originally Posted by twodownzero View Post
    Brass is an alloy!

    I swear, this word needs to be banned from all bicycling discussions. I think I know what you intended, yet the word does not communicate the idea you likely intended. Steel, brass, and aluminum (at least as it's used) are all alloys.


    You're right, from now on I'll use the correct term. Aluminium. That said I'm pretty sure everyone knew what I meant.

    And now someone can tell me that I spelled aluminium wrong
    I brake for stinkbugs

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    4,697
    Technically, It's pretty rare to use a pure elemental metal. Colloquially, alloy almost always means some alloy of aluminum.
    Do the math.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Wiggum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    69
    Thanks for the tips. If I need new spokes, I'll get brass nipples, too.

Similar Threads

  1. 20" wheel build - sun cr18 28H/32h with sun/ringle hubs singlespeed
    By stinkytevas in forum Families and Riding with Kids
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-30-2016, 10:03 AM
  2. 28h or 32h spoke count for a rider +220lbs?
    By yeti575inCA in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 09-16-2015, 05:16 AM
  3. 28h straight pull vs 32h j-bend 29" wheel build
    By Magua in forum 29er Components
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 11-01-2014, 12:34 PM
  4. rear wheel strength: 32h cassette hub vs 28h SS hub
    By sdwhitey in forum Weight Weenies
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-21-2013, 07:46 PM
  5. Crest wheelset: 32h Revolution or 28h mixed lacing?
    By two-one in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-07-2011, 07:19 AM

Members who have read this thread: 46

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2018 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.