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  1. #1
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    PSI recommendation for 225lbs 29er

    Just getting into riding tubeless 29er. Currently DHF/DHR 2.3 on 30mm internal width rims. I weigh 225lbs geared. Live in socal so climbing is always there. Descending is mix of loose, dry, with varied amounts of chunk. I will definitely experiment. Just wanting any recommendations from anyone with similar setup on PSI. Thanks

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    Probably 35 would be a good starting point. Could go a bit higher or lower depending on how hard you ride. Lots of people run pressure that is ok for 99% of riding, but when you hit that 1%, you bust a rim, but some people never ride stuff that is that hard or abusive, so it always depends. The 35 might be a bit conservative, but it's best to start out that way rather than too low IME.
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    I'm pretty sure when I was 225 and riding 2.3 inch tires on 30mm rims, I ran 30-31 psi with tubes and was able to drop to 28 psi tubeless but this was a while ago as I've been only on fat and plus for the last six years.
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    After you try those pressures take a gauge and a frame pump out with you and experiment. You don't want to get rim hits in the rockiest part of your ride. But you can test pressures lower and lower until you get hits.
    You have wide enough rims not to worry about sidewall foldover as you try lower pressures. I would try 20 front and 25 rear with your tires.
    I run higher volume more rounded tires on that width rim with rocky/rooty hard with loose terrain at 14-15 front and 18-19 rear. I don't need your tires for my terrain. Sidewalls are less flexible and the knobs are too large and high.
    I need more footprint.

    If you can't get lower pressures without having those tires square off you could get more performance out of those rims with a different tire.
    Last edited by eb1888; 2 Weeks Ago at 07:38 PM.

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    PSI recommendation for 225lbs 29er

    That 2.3 is on a pretty wide base there. Iíd recommend around 25/28 f/r and adjust from there. I weigh 240lbs, use 2.35 Ikons on i28 on a hardtail in SoCal and run 25-26 up front and 28-30 out back depending on the trail.

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    I'm 10 lbs less than you (OP) and have a similar tire/wheel setup. On my hardtail with a 2.4 DHR2 up front and a 2.3 Aggressor on the rear on 30mm rim (29er), I run 24F/27R psi. That's my absolute minimum. On my full suspension AM/enduro bike I have to run a bit higher pressure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy3220 View Post
    I'm 10 lbs less than you (OP) and have a similar tire/wheel setup. On my hardtail with a 2.4 DHR2 up front and a 2.3 Aggressor on the rear on 30mm rim (29er), I run 24F/27R psi. That's my absolute minimum. On my full suspension AM/enduro bike I have to run a bit higher pressure.
    Yep, about the same pressures I used with that setup when I was at that weight.

  8. #8
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    235 pounder...

    Run 24-25 psi front & 29-30 rear.

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  9. #9
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    Im 210, I ran 30/32 before cushcore or I'd smake my rims on rocks, at 225 I'd run 32/34.

    FYI 2.3 as a front tire on 30i rims isnt the best option 2.4 /2.5 is better. Its easy to lean over the knobs and was out IMHO
    The rear doesn't seem to be an issue for me.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    After you try those pressures take a gauge and a frame pump out with you and experiment. You don't want to get rim hits in the rockiest part of your ride. But you can test pressures lower and lower until you get hits.
    You have wide enough rims not to worry about sidewall foldover as you try lower pressures. I would try 20 front and 25 rear with your tires.
    I run higher volume more rounded tires on that width rim with rocky/rooty hard with loose terrain at 14-15 front and 18-19 rear. I don't need your tires for my terrain. Sidewalls are less flexible and the knobs are too large and high.
    I need more footprint.

    If you can't get lower pressures without having those tires square off you could get more performance out of those rims with a different tire.
    In my own biased opinion you tend to give unusual tire advice, but here it should be completely thrown out. It's not even in the ballpark. Your terrain is so different from socal riding it's hilarious.


    35psi in the rear isn't an absurd place to start without any more information than OP provided.

    If OP specified his age, intentions, riding style, capabilities... a window could be narrowed down a bit more. Jeremy3220's 24/27 minimum seems like a good guideline. It's what i'd run in 'socal' with DH tires, and i'm 225lbs too.
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    OK, let's through throw some oil in this...

    PSI is so subjective ^^

    It's more about what 'you' can get away with...

    I run 2.35+ tires only...

    Out front, depending on tire/rim combo 22 psi is not out of the realm of possibility.

    Outback I've run 32 psi on narrower tires i.e. 2.3 Minion DHR II.

    On a higher volume tyre, I can get away with 27 psi.

    Majority of my trails are not overly rocky... So, lower is better.

    Experiment & see what works for you...

    If you're a floater, you'll run lower... if you're a plougher, you'll run higher.

    o/c depending on tires & rims ^^

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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    OK, let's through throw some oil in this...

    PSI is so subjective ^^
    It's not thaaaaat subjective.


    20psi in the front is definitely wrong.

    35psi in the rear is definitely wrong.


    You want to start with pressures a bit on the high side. Your advice falls within those bounds, and is therefore good advice. No oil spilled.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    It's not thaaaaat subjective.


    20psi in the front is definitely wrong.

    35psi in the rear is definitely wrong.


    You want to start with pressures a bit on the high side. Your advice falls within those bounds, and is therefore good advice. No oil spilled.
    Yeah...

    I deleted what I was actually gonna post ^^

    Something to do w/ no talent hacks running 35 psi in the rear >.<

    I forgot to del the preamble o_0

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    Yeah...

    I deleted what I was actually gonna post ^^

    Something to do w/ no talent hacks running 35 psi in the rear >.<

    I forgot to del the preamble o_0

    'Born to ride!'
    Depending on where you are riding in socal and what tires you're using, 35psi in the rear isn't unrealistic, especially as offered as advice to a noob. Suggesting excessively low pressures is much crueler- it's harder to identify problems caused by low pressure, and having to rediscover you need to bump pressure up can be expensive.
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    Riding racing motos on and off road and riding road and mtbs, for me it's always been a process of starting at a reasonably high pressure and working downward to find the optimum traction/handling/ride. On the mtb, the limit is usually starting to get rim strikes or the tire rolling sideways.
    Do the math.

  16. #16
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    Going to have to agree with those recommending on the higher side, always best to start high and work your way SLOWLY down until you start to feel tyre squirm/roll and/or hit the rim, whichever comes first, in other words where you cross the line of diminishing returns. FYI, run the same wheel/tyre setup as you, but only weigh about 180lbs kitted to ride in general and I stick to about 19-20 F/23-25 R, so the suggestion to start about 25 F/30 R is probably a good starting point and if too soft, should be easy to feel almost immediately. Expect if you have faster, more bermed type trails, you'll like evn higher pressures than someone on more chunky, technical trails with not as much high speed leaning.
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  17. #17
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    235lbs here. Nobby Nic 29x2.35 tubeless on 30mm iw rims. Running 28 psi rear and 23-25 front on a full squish frame. Only get rim strikes if if I hit square edges at excessive speed.
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  18. #18
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    I'm a little lighter and run 20/30 but with a slightly larger tire (2.45ish actual) on a 27.5. Thats my normal trail riding psi, which doesn't work too great on really fast berms or fast rocks. I always liked the bigger front to rear difference, I think I float the front and smash my rear rim into stuff.

    I think it's funny when people talk about their micro adjust 0.1psi pressure gauge on 2.3 tires. It's not that big of a deal. 25/30 isn't a bad start point, you won't be ruining your wheels at that, and you'll have plenty of traction. If it squirms too much, add some pressure next ride.

    I have a friend who's probably 150lb and he runs 40 psi front and rear. I think it's way too much, but it's not like high pressure is going to kill you.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Riding racing motos on and off road and riding road and mtbs, for me it's always been a process of starting at a reasonably high pressure and working downward to find the optimum traction/handling/ride. On the mtb, the limit is usually starting to get rim strikes or the tire rolling sideways.
    Good advice.

    Iím 210 with gear and ride 24/26 front/rear on my 29r FS. But, I started at 28/30 and went down from there.


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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by inonjoey View Post
    Good advice.

    Iím 210 with gear and ride 24/26 front/rear on my 29r FS. But, I started at 28/30 and went down from there.


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    And thatís according to my pressure gauge.


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  21. #21
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    A pressure gauge is a nice tool to have, but basically find the pressure reading on your pump that feels best to you and just use that as your baseline. I like my tires soft enough to get maximum traction while still preventing rim strikes. I like my rear tire at a pressure where I may get a rim kiss every once in a while over ledges at speed.
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    After you try those pressures take a gauge and a frame pump out with you and experiment. You don't want to get rim hits in the rockiest part of your ride. But you can test pressures lower and lower until you get hits.
    And then what? Get a new rim?

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    Starting point... Same pressures you are currently running. OP what are your current pressures and what are the factors that had you settle @ those amounts?

  24. #24
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    Im a little lighter than you and run about 32-35 in back and depending on what im riding between 25-30 up front. So basically i leave the rear tire somewhat firm so i have good rolling resistance climbing and adjust the front for traction. These numbers will vary based on soil type/composure but in So Cal i used this method and it worked well...YMMV

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    Quote Originally Posted by cadoretteboat View Post
    And then what? Get a new rim?
    As you have a gauge and a pump with you on trail you use your senses to evaluate your bikes handling as you ride it. Kinda like when you were in lab at school focused on an experiment. You notice stuff and use the info to make small changes. You can do this without destroying things. You can hop ledges instead of bashing into them. Ride light in the roughest segments to get better traction in more of your ride. Or not and need more pressure. You experiment and decide.
    The tires to do this might have to change to those that work better at lower pressures on the rims the OP has. His Maxxis are old school higher pressure from the time of skinnier rims. Going with more footprint with lower pressure lower smaller knob tires gets you an important handling benefit. You slide out more slowly and progressively with more time to make a line change and regain control without crashing.
    Choices are available for how you want to ride.
    Nothing mandatory.

  26. #26
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    If you don't have enough traction with minions at 30 psi, it's you. Not the rim, or pressure, it's just you.

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    Sure. But add in the rolling weight and itís effect on acceleration. And the rolling resistance is another that goes into tire choice.

  28. #28
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    I might be wrong but I think fast experienced riders are likely to have more trouble with squirm/burping than rim strikes. Lower pressure to increase grip in that case is a nonstarter.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by eb1888 View Post
    As you have a gauge and a pump with you on trail you use your senses to evaluate your bikes handling as you ride it. Kinda like when you were in lab at school focused on an experiment. You notice stuff and use the info to make small changes. You can do this without destroying things. You can hop ledges instead of bashing into them. Ride light in the roughest segments to get better traction in more of your ride. Or not and need more pressure. You experiment and decide.
    The tires to do this might have to change to those that work better at lower pressures on the rims the OP has. His Maxxis are old school higher pressure from the time of skinnier rims. Going with more footprint with lower pressure lower smaller knob tires gets you an important handling benefit. You slide out more slowly and progressively with more time to make a line change and regain control without crashing.
    Choices are available for how you want to ride.
    Nothing mandatory.
    This is hugely a riding location specific thing. It's very easy to bust a rim here (and many places) after not bottoming for weeks cuz you smashed into an errant rock. Or burp a tire because it rained 3 days ago and now you have 2x the grip. Maxxis high pressure isn't 'old school,' it's something that works well almost anywhere, and is often the best anyway. Granted, not ideal for everywhere.

    Your preferences work for you, but they're unusual, and location dependent. It's like someone came on saying 'yall are stupid for running tires, paddles are superior' because they're a paddleboat enthusiast. I don't doubt you've found some personal nirvana.

    Running pressures REALLY LOW and then slowly discovering why they're too low as conditions/riding location/skills/mistakes/equipment dictates would probably be considered stupid by most people. Why suffer over and over when you can just get used to potentially sub-optimal performance, and then optimize it?
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    This is hugely a riding location specific thing. It's very easy to bust a rim here (and many places) after not bottoming for weeks cuz you smashed into an errant rock. Or burp a tire because it rained 3 days ago and now you have 2x the grip. Maxxis high pressure isn't 'old school,' it's something that works well almost anywhere, and is often the best anyway. Granted, not ideal for everywhere.

    Your preferences work for you, but they're unusual, and location dependent. It's like someone came on saying 'yall are stupid for running tires, paddles are superior' because they're a paddleboat enthusiast. I don't doubt you've found some personal nirvana.

    Running pressures REALLY LOW and then slowly discovering why they're too low as conditions/riding location/skills/mistakes/equipment dictates would probably be considered stupid by most people. Why suffer over and over when you can just get used to potentially sub-optimal performance, and then optimize it?
    I 100% agrree with you. Once speed is up, burping tires, bashing rims and sid knob folding gets to be a concern.

    Low pressure is good for low speeds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    I 100% agrree with you. Once speed is up, burping tires, bashing rims and sid knob folding gets to be a concern.

    Low pressure is good for low speeds.
    Thanks. It's a struggle responding to eb1888. He's figured out exactly what works for his terrain, but seemingly hasn't figured out that most of us don't live in the midwest. Sophomoric.... imo.
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  32. #32
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    Speed specific and technique specific is true.
    My idea may not work as a high probability choice. Or a choice for every condition and rider.
    When someone asks for pressure recommendations I figure he isn't getting what he wants at the 'ordinary' settings.
    He's probably tried those already.
    My response can be looked at as a tuning experiment to determine some limits and think about other options.
    The OP hasn't listed a long travel bike, only 130mm travel, so he may not be riding mainly park terrain and speeds. Nothing requires those tires for every trail.
    It has worked for me around Phoenix granite dust other than South Mountain with adjustments for rim hits.

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