Need Advice for Skinny Rims- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Need Advice for Skinny Rims

    The rims on my Diamondback are Weinmann XTB-26. The rim width overall is 24.10. The inner bead width is 19.5mm. The rim is listed as 26X1.5/1.95. My bike has Kenda Klaw 2.10 tires on it. The rims look sort of skinny for the size tire on them.

    I just started mountain biking, so am inexperienced. I have noticed that the bike is pretty wobbly over roots and angled logs. I have been running 35 psi in front, and 40 psi in back. My goal is to make this bike work okay until December, when I build a new bike.

    I am wondering what to do to improve the lateral stability of this bike.
    1. Just pump the 2.10 tires up to 70 psi.
    2. Fit narrower tires.
    3. Go pound sand until I get a new bike.

    This is a 2007 Diamondback Response Sport that I got for $200 used. I don't want to rebuild the wheels with new rims, but do want to ride some challenging trails (for me at least) for the next few months.

    Ideas?

  2. #2
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    Those aren't that narrow. A 2.1 tire is fine. I don't know why you'd want 70 psi unless you're riding road, though. Stick with 35/40 unless you're getting lots of pinch flats. The wobble shouldn't be from the tires, unless you're a big guy. Is everything else tight? Axles, bb, cranks, etc.?

  3. #3
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    Those rims will easily handle 2.35 tires. Run no more than 35 psi for off-road use.
    '95 M2 StumpJumper FS
    '11 Cannondale RZ 120-two

  4. #4
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    Basically option 3. 19.5 mm internal is actually fairly generous. I mounted some 2.25" tires on a rim with an 18 mm internal width recently. Works great.

    As far as lateral stability - ride some asphalt with your normal tire pressure and try some hard corners. If your tires are rolling or wallowing, you'll feel it then. If you don't feel it, your lack of lateral stability is something else. Wobbly roots and angled logs don't sound like a particularly stable surface to be on, and it's hard to get good traction on a significant slope, especially if it's sideways to the direction you're traveling in.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  5. #5
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    Don't mean to hijack but I pretty much had a similiar question. I have black flag comps (24 mm OD, 19 mm ID), I'm guesing even a 2.35 Kenda Nevegal would be fine to run??

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by HrznRider View Post
    Don't mean to hijack but I pretty much had a similiar question. I have black flag comps (24 mm OD, 19 mm ID), I'm guesing even a 2.35 Kenda Nevegal would be fine to run??
    Hijack away, my friend. I have gotten good answers to my question.

    Thanks to all who responded.

  7. #7
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    No. 2.3" is fine but that extra twentieth of an inch blows it.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    No. 2.3" is fine but that extra twentieth of an inch blows it.
    Got it Just asking because the Nevegal 2.35 is so much bigger than any other 2.3. Thanks!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by HrznRider View Post
    Got it Just asking because the Nevegal 2.35 is so much bigger than any other 2.3. Thanks!!
    Bigger than some other 2.3" tires. Narrower than some other 2.2" tires.
    mtbtires.com
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  10. #10
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    hey all, great responses. i've been doing some research and it is apparent that the charts listing rim width and maximum tire width seem to suggest to go no more than 2x the tire width compared to the rim inner width. as you've above mentioned, you regularly go higher than that.

    i was checking out a bike store with a friend and did some investigation as to what the specialty bike shops have on display. i regularly saw mountain bikes with tire widths compared to the rim width as (Rim width * 2 + 14). For example, I saw many 622x20 rims with a tire mounted equivalent to 700x54. i found one bike with the same rim with as wide a tire as 700x56. there were of course many other similar rim sizes with a lesser tire width than 700x40.

    what do you all think about this finding? i've read that the thinner the inner rim width, the less you can push on the higher end of the tire width though. therefore, this doesn't seem to be a blanket statement, but around the 18-22 rim widths, it may be a close approximation. any more experienced riders care to chime in?

  11. #11
    Fat-tired Roadie
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    The charts you saw are oriented toward road bikes and road tires.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  12. #12
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    I run 2.35 WTB Weirwolfs on my 19mm internal width Stans' Arch wheels............no issues down to 30-32PSI.

  13. #13
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    interesting! the reason i investigated is because i have a hybrid mountain bike (i know, people don't like these bikes). it has front suspension and hard tail which is sufficient for any trails that i plan on riding.

    the rim is at 18mm which i believe would be ok to load on 50mm (~2.0 in) tires. i'll check it out slowly on some inclines without many rocks, as secondly mountain biking is new to me.

    on a second note, the rim is able to have 28mm and lesser tire widths on it, which is sufficient for road biking for me. therefore, i don't think hybrid bikes are as bad a deal as the market likes to make it out to be...but that's just an opinion from someone who isn't riding hard trails.

    thx for the info!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by thathi View Post
    interesting! the reason i investigated is because i have a hybrid mountain bike (i know, people don't like these bikes). it has front suspension and hard tail which is sufficient for any trails that i plan on riding.

    the rim is at 18mm which i believe would be ok to load on 50mm (~2.0 in) tires. i'll check it out slowly on some inclines without many rocks, as secondly mountain biking is new to me.

    on a second note, the rim is able to have 28mm and lesser tire widths on it, which is sufficient for road biking for me. therefore, i don't think hybrid bikes are as bad a deal as the market likes to make it out to be...but that's just an opinion from someone who isn't riding hard trails.

    thx for the info!
    Most tire widths will fit your rims, but the larger tires may not fit in the frame or fork. The construction and geometry of hybrid frames may not be up to mtb type riding, either.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

  15. #15
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    The 2.35 nev is a monster. I felt the 2.1 nev was about the widest id want to run on my 19mm (inner) rims.

    If you like big floppy tires slopping around on your rim, you might enjoy the 2.35's on a 19mm rim. They technically fit and its safe, it just gives a ride that I dont find confidence inspiring at all.

  16. #16
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    tried it

    well, at first i thought the whole world was playing one big joke on me as aligning the 29 x 2.0 inner tube and tire by the rim, there was a ton of slack/space between rim and tire. it just seemed like no way possible the expansion of the inner tube would make it work, but lo and behold it did. after a good workout for my thumbs of jamming the tire in to the rim while at a low psi, it seems to work. here's a photo of a 29 x 2.0 tire on a 622 x 18 (inner) rim. this translates to 700 x 50c tire. the bike shop had horrible hybrid tires, 700x45c serving no benefit for road nor mountain. though i have an untrained eye and i'm going off of forums, spec comparisons, and research...it looks like this would be fine. that being said, the 622x18 rim may safely fit 700x26 tires and 700x50 tires.

    i'll cross my fingers!
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by thathi View Post
    well, at first i thought the whole world was playing one big joke on me as aligning the 29 x 2.0 inner tube and tire by the rim, there was a ton of slack/space between rim and tire. it just seemed like no way possible the expansion of the inner tube would make it work, but lo and behold it did. after a good workout for my thumbs of jamming the tire in to the rim while at a low psi, it seems to work. here's a photo of a 29 x 2.0 tire on a 622 x 18 (inner) rim. this translates to 700 x 50c tire. the bike shop had horrible hybrid tires, 700x45c serving no benefit for road nor mountain. though i have an untrained eye and i'm going off of forums, spec comparisons, and research...it looks like this would be fine. that being said, the 622x18 rim may safely fit 700x26 tires and 700x50 tires.

    i'll cross my fingers!
    A 2.00" tire on a 18mm (inside) rim is perfectly normal. If you have a single wall rim the tire (any width) may be a bit floppy when mounting. Otherwise a 622 tire fits a 622 rim. Not a surprise.
    mtbtires.com
    The trouble with common sense is it is no longer common

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