Mynesweeper Tire Insert- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Mynesweeper Tire Insert

    No schilling here. Review based on my personal experience (1mo of riding/4+ times a week of hard riding)

    Mynesweeper tire insert is much more reasonable price alternative to cushcore.

    Definitely has cut down on the chatter through some of the rough stuff. Take plenty of big hits and haven't damaged any wheels Didn't notice any significant difference to cornering, but that just might be the rider...Did not experience any tire burp either. Only complaint is that you should expect to purchase valve stems whose air comes in from the side. Amazon has cheaper alternative than cushcore brand. The tire insert does have vent hole to prevent the different valve stem, but the insert moved in my tire casing, causing a unidirectional valve (which required extra effort in filling up). Only way to deflate would be to remove valve core and put allen key down valve stem to push insert to be able to remove air.

    Have 2.4" front and 2.5' rear.
    Downhill casing.
    Opted in for 2.2"-2.4" option from store.


    Will try and post some pictures of next install. Install wasn't that bad for first time and working with downhill casing. Definitely would recommend tire irons.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by flylow23 View Post
    No schilling here. Review based on my personal experience (1mo of riding/4+ times a week of hard riding)

    Mynesweeper tire insert is much more reasonable price alternative to cushcore.

    Definitely has cut down on the chatter through some of the rough stuff. Take plenty of big hits and haven't damaged any wheels Didn't notice any significant difference to cornering, but that just might be the rider...Did not experience any tire burp either. Only complaint is that you should expect to purchase valve stems whose air comes in from the side. Amazon has cheaper alternative than cushcore brand. The tire insert does have vent hole to prevent the different valve stem, but the insert moved in my tire casing, causing a unidirectional valve (which required extra effort in filling up). Only way to deflate would be to remove valve core and put allen key down valve stem to push insert to be able to remove air.

    Have 2.4" front and 2.5' rear.
    Downhill casing.
    Opted in for 2.2"-2.4" option from store.


    Will try and post some pictures of next install. Install wasn't that bad for first time and working with downhill casing. Definitely would recommend tire irons.
    The price is nice but the website doesn't have much in means of specs to help with comparing to other products. Any idea how much yours weighs? Out of curiosity, how tight is the fit to the rim? I'm using Pepi's Tire Noodles (red ones) and they had a pretty snug fit - installation was not fun and I am not looking forward to the day I have to deal with removing the rear tire. But I haven't had a flat since I put them in so I am not complaining at this point. Biggest problem is that they are hard to get in this country - could be good to have another option in the same price range.

  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Bump.

    So few reviews on these.

    They are 120g each, so 240g total.

    I'm going to try the 2.2-2.4 size in my 2.4-2.6 tires. See if Brian can't send me maybe one of each (a smaller diameter and a larger diameter to see if there is any difference in sidewall support).

    Many folks and some of my friends got the RimPact original and Rimpact Pros. The general consensus was the original Rimpacts just aren't firm enough to adequately protect rims, especially for bigger riders. Rimpact's triangular shape does add some tire support.

    The Rimpact Pros are generally regarded as a great Cush Core replacement. 160g per wheel.

    Rimpact Original are $60 shipped.
    Rimpact Pro are $90 shipped.

    Then I checked out Pepi and TuboLights, and I noticed the Tubolight started producing a heavier, firmer version of their inserts, with a weight now around 80g per wheel. These are 46mm ML versions for 2.3-2.5 tires. R2-Bike sells the Tubolight 46mm inserts for $80 shipped to the USA. The increase in weight and density kinda proved to me that a higher density product like the Mynesweepers is probably a good thing.

    Pepis (PTN) are around the same price, about $100 shipped. They have a new R-Evolution model that is shaped for better lower sidewall support and firmer than previous softer/round versions. Here again, firmer is better.

    Lastly is the DIY method using 2" closed-cell backer rod cut down the center (or pipe insulation). While I think this would probably offer the most amount of tire support (similar to CushCore in shape) at the lightest weight and cheapest price, the problem is that of sourcing and shipping backer rod. Backer Rod is completely solid - it's not pipe insulation. You can get pipe insulation at Home Depot for a few bucks a stick, but it's generally regarded as being softer than backer rod. Backer Rod is cheap to buy, expensive to ship, and I found that in order to get enough to make two 29" inserts (6'6"' circumference), you'd need two sticks, cut in half (24' total/6'6"=3.6). That'd be $7+$22=$29 shipping for three inserts.

    If you went with pipe insulation, you could get two inserts for $6 if you cut them down the center, but again, I'm unsure if even 3/4" wall pipe insulation has a density high enough to really work. I'll experiment with this in the future.

    I have a feeling that Mynesweepers are just backer rod - but I see them as the same general concept as the Tubolight ML 46mm inserts, at a $30 savings.

    Likewise, an insert that is too soft (like Pepi originally was, or Rimpact originals) isn't really worth the money. MyneSweepers must be pretty dense for their original application - ride-out-ability on a flat.

    Lastly, there isn't anything saying you couldn't get a set of MyneSweepers (sized up), cut them in half, and get a 80g, fairly dense, $25 for a set of inserts - with a backup set!
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