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  1. #1
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    Michelin wild enduro 29 tires?

    Has any used the Michelin wild enduro tire?

    how well does it grip compare to Assegai tire?

  2. #2
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    Paste this in to google, hit enter, and goodness will flow

    site:forums.mtbr.com michelin wild enduro

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    There is no much information, on internet, about that tires.Compared to maxxis tyres. But mostly comments about them is surprisingly positive. (i wos read ALL what i can find)
    In the end i bought front magi-x. And for rear i pick dhr ll maxtera 2.3 (i would go on with wild enduro 2.4 gum-x rear but allready 2.3 is too tight for my rear end on old 100mm xc bike.)
    I can not say how good this combination is compared to similar tyers. Because tires before them was trailboss light fastgrip from WTB. 2.4f/2.25r (awesome improvement from classic xc-tyres. Nice balans gripp/speed)
    But this new combo gives me the feeling that driving on loose surface is changed to hardpack. :-) Huuuge improvement in grip.
    Ofcourse. We all expect that.
    But also it is slower in climbing. Dhr ll is a slow rolling tire. And by some reviews wild enduro rear has little better rolling resistance than Dhr ll.
    Your question is Assegai vs Wild enduro front i guess.
    Hm... i beleave that Assegai in MaxGrip DD/DH is level higher in terms of grip .
    Assegai in EXO is compareble but there only is maxtera compound and as i see by forums that this new assegai exo is not the best choice. Better to pick dhf exo instead.
    If you do not care about the weight; pick Assegai DD/DH.
    If you whant lighter tyre pick Wild enduro. (because it is looks AWESOME) :-))
    BTW. Wild enduro have best shape on 25mm rim. And work the best with that size .
    Assegai on 30-35mm.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Picard View Post
    Has any used the Michelin wild enduro tire?

    how well does it grip compare to Assegai tire?
    just came across this. Make sure you read the comments too

    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/review...uro-tires.html

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    I just got a pair of the GumX Fronts (to use Front and Rear). I never flat, so don't need the heavier casing of the Rear, plus the center tread on the Rear looks shallower.

    I did 1 short ride with them last night. Trail conditions were loose over hard. Most of the berms are blown out while the gnomes pray for rain. Grip felt just as locked in on corners descending as the Assegai. Overall braking felt better than Assegai / DHR. Climbing (through loose disturbed sand/silt on fire roads) felt a little bit better, with less spin outs.

    Some weights:
    Wild Enduro Front GumX: 1026g, 1056g
    Assegai EXO: 1158g
    DHRII WT EXO: 975g
    Magic Mary 2.35 SS: 895g, 980g

    Immediately after mounting on 30mm internal rims and airing up to 30psi, the Wild Enduro measured 2.3" at casing, 2.36" at knobs.

  6. #6
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    Bump!

    Just mounted these (Magi-X2 Front/Gum-X Rear) on DT XM481 29" with ARD inserts and am surprised how well they grip, like velcro and they even make a nice riiiiiiiip sound as they bite into the dirt. Grip on rock was excellent, both up and down.

    Too early to tell but maybe my new favorite tires! Grip seems to be better than anything I've ever used except Maxxis MaxxGrip DH rubber, much better vs MaxTerra and a little better vs Addix soft. All-around tread seems good on everything, including hardpack.

  7. #7
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    Big +1 for these, Iím on my second set.

    Superb grip, especially in wet conditions here in the PNW. I find whatever Michelin did with the rubber compound to be much better than Maxxis; grip on wet roots and rocks seems on par with Maxxisís MaxxGrip but the Michelins wear much much better. No tearing and undercutting of shoulder knobs like you get on Maxxis, the Michelins just gradually wear away.

    Because of how much I liked these, I also picked up a Wild AM and Force AM for lighter duty use. Really liking those as winter training tires on the XC bike. If you like the Wild Enduros but want a lighter and faster rolling version of the same tire, the Wild AM is basically that. Similar tread pattern with slightly lower tread and ~250g lighter, same great grip.

  8. #8
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    These intrigue me but the reports of poor wear in hardpack-like conditions (we have lots of decomposed granite in socal that is rough on tires) worries me. I get maybe 1.5 months out of maxxis 3C tires as rears down here...

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    Update on my set: had them about 2.5 months, still loving them. Once the rain started, I tried Hillbillys for 1 ride, and found them inferior. Then I tried my old Magic Marys for a couple rides and missed the overall better grip of the Wild Enduros and went back to them. They're like a grippier, more durable version of the MM. Or a lighter, faster rolling but barely less grippy version of the Assegai. They seem to shed mud decently too, better than Minions and Assegai, on par with the MM. I agree with DaveC... the ripping sound they make when leaned over in corners is something else.

    The only thing the Gum-X seems to lose grip on is wet roots.

  10. #10
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    More durable than a MM?

    Which version of the MM are you comparing it to? I know older schwalbe tires had problems with the knobs tearing off, but the more recent stuff (addix )has had pretty good durability reports. So just curious which one youíre saying the wild enduro is more durable than.

    Iíve been low key considering these for a while, mostly the wild enduro rear though.

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    I have the Soft/Orange Addix MM. My set of those has a similar amount of miles to my Enduros, but the inside edges of the side knobs are more worn, and the tops of the center knobs has shortened more. Due to the staggered arrangement of the side knobs on the MM, they take some of the braking force, so they get more wear than the Enduro.

  12. #12
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    Rode some pretty steep, rugged moon-dusty trail today and the Michelins were awesome. It was my 1st time on the trail so I wasn't pushing much, but it's steep enough you're totally committed in places... they were really predictable and I had more grip than I expected.

    2 rides in and there's noticeable wear front and rear, but at under $50/tire and with the performance to weight these offer, they can wear pretty darn fast and I'll still buy them. So far, the performance on both rock and loose moon-dust has been exceptional, very close to my Assguy Maxxgrip tires that weigh a ton and roll much slower.

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    Bumping this post, instead of creating a new thread on the same exact subject.

    I'm curious, anyone else with Michelin Wild enduro front vs Assegai experience?

    Last weekend I rode my buddies bike. He had recently upgraded to a EXO+ Assegai up front, and I liked how much traction it had (I've got a 2.6in WTB Vigilante), as well as how direct if felt (didn't feel squirmy/vauge at all). I just don't love how expensive they are, especially compared to the Michelin Wild Enduros.

    So since I'm always on the search for more grip, but also kind of cheap, I'm curious how they (Wild Enduro front/Assegai) compare.

    I did purchase/install a Wild Enduro rear about a month ago. I've only had it on 2 rides so far, but so far I've been pleased with it (way better rear tire than the DHF I had before) but its a different (smaller) tread pattern. So its hard to know how the beefier front compares with the Assegai.

    And... as my Vigilante is still pretty fresh, I'll keep fiddling with air pressure/etc before I change it out. Just curious what to try next is all.

  14. #14
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    I've got both, and used them fairly extensively here in NorCal. Last summer I ran Assegai / DHR, and switched to a double WEF setup (front & rear) for most of the winter. I'm currently running Assegai / Dissector, and have about 3 weeks on this setup. Local trails are steep, bermy, with a healthy dose of off-camber, and a few loose chutes.

    I'd say the WEF & Assegai feel very similar. The Assegai has taller side and center knobs, but a denser tread pattern. WEF profile is slightly more squared off, so it feels like it's got a bit more bite cornering / off-camber, especially in loose or dust. WEF is about 100g lighter than an Assegai (and about 75g heavier than a DHR), but my gut tells me Assegai rolls a tad faster (due to tighter spaced knobs and greater ramping). In wet conditions, the WEF sheds mud better (it's basically a Magic Mary that doesn't squirm), but the GumX version felt kind of treacherous over wet rocks and roots. In loose dry conditions, I'd give a slight edge to WEF... the wide tread and squared off profile really seems to burrow down and find what little grip can be had. In mixed/hardpack, the Assegai is probably a bit more versatile. I'd give the edge to Assegai braking as well.

    I have not tried the Wild Enduro Rear, or the Magi-X compound. I chose not to use the "Rear" in the rear because it was heavier and had shorter center tread. There's very few rocks on my local trails, so I haven't had any issues flatting, and happily run EXO casing without problems.

    Lately I've been thinking about making an early season trip to Downieville in May, and wondering which tire setup I'd run for that, since it has plenty of rocks, but also dust and speed. When I was there in October for hero dirt season, the Assegai / DHR were perfect. I'm fairly certain I'd stick with the Assegai up front (less squirm over rocks and a tad faster), but haven't decided if I want to risk keeping the Dissector out back (it's VERY light weight) or play it safe with an EXO+ DHR.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    I've got both, and used them fairly extensively here in NorCal. Last summer I ran Assegai / DHR, and switched to a double WEF setup (front & rear) for most of the winter. I'm currently running Assegai / Dissector, and have about 3 weeks on this setup. Local trails are steep, bermy, with a healthy dose of off-camber, and a few loose chutes.

    I'd say the WEF & Assegai feel very similar. The Assegai has taller side and center knobs, but a denser tread pattern. WEF profile is slightly more squared off, so it feels like it's got a bit more bite cornering / off-camber, especially in loose or dust. WEF is about 100g lighter than an Assegai (and about 75g heavier than a DHR), but my gut tells me Assegai rolls a tad faster (due to tighter spaced knobs and greater ramping). In wet conditions, the WEF sheds mud better (it's basically a Magic Mary that doesn't squirm), but the GumX version felt kind of treacherous over wet rocks and roots. In loose dry conditions, I'd give a slight edge to WEF... the wide tread and squared off profile really seems to burrow down and find what little grip can be had. In mixed/hardpack, the Assegai is probably a bit more versatile. I'd give the edge to Assegai braking as well.

    I have not tried the Wild Enduro Rear, or the Magi-X compound. I chose not to use the "Rear" in the rear because it was heavier and had shorter center tread. There's very few rocks on my local trails, so I haven't had any issues flatting, and happily run EXO casing without problems.

    Lately I've been thinking about making an early season trip to Downieville in May, and wondering which tire setup I'd run for that, since it has plenty of rocks, but also dust and speed. When I was there in October for hero dirt season, the Assegai / DHR were perfect. I'm fairly certain I'd stick with the Assegai up front (less squirm over rocks and a tad faster), but haven't decided if I want to risk keeping the Dissector out back (it's VERY light weight) or play it safe with an EXO+ DHR.
    I'm in the PNW, and most of my trails sound similar, just maybe a bit wetter on average, so I really appreciate your feedback. Which version of the Assegai did you use?

    I've ridden the old (26" hard/wire bead bikepark version) of the Magic Mary, so that comparison helps me some as well.

    The rear wild enduro only comes in GumX, so I have some experience with the compound. And at least compared to the dual compound DHF I had before... its miles better. I had my sloppiest ride I've ever had on the brand new Enduro Rear, and while wet roots were still... wet roots, I had way more control on them than I'd had before. Interesting to hear it was worse than the Assegai. But then again, you say the WEF setup was your winter setup, did you just have a lot more wet rocks and roots to compare against for the WEF?

    The MagicX... I hear is harder... yet slower rebounding, and that makes it better for "hard charging riders"? Not entirely sure what that means, and not sure where the line is between "slow" riders and "hard charging" riders. Because I'm a peasant/slow compared to any pro, or most people on here... but in the grand scheme of all riders (at least in trailforks data, on trails I ride regularly), I'm in top 30%ish. I'd assume then that GumX is still the best choice for me?

    Based on your feedback, I may try the WEF first. Its a bit cheaper to try, a bit better in the wet, and a bit squarer (my lean angles aren't great yet).

  16. #16
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    I'm running the EXO MaxxTerra version.

    You're probably correct about the wet conditions. I ran it all winter, so my data set for WEF is biased to that. A few other comments on wet: we have a lot of eucalyptus here, which are super oily. When their roots are exposed and wet, NOTHING will grip them. The one really bad experience I had on wet rocks was when it was raining on decomposing granite, and it just wasn't a great day period. There probably was a washed out sand on top of the rock making traction even worse.

    After I posted, I was thinking that for more consistently loamy conditions, the WEF would be money. I haven't ridden in the PNW since I was a kid on a BMX bike, but I'd guess it should do great there. Kazimer's Pinkbike review says as much also.

    Gum-X to me feels pretty similar to MaxxTerra. I hate the Maxxis DC rubber - but I'm not concerned about buying 1-2 more tires per year.

    I might grab a WER (Gum-X) to try this summer after I chew off the braking knobs on my Dissector, just to finish the comparison.

  17. #17
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    I rode a WEF GumX (on an i29mm rim) last July in Seattle, Vancouver, Squamish & Whistler and it did awesome. We saw hardpack, a little mud (not much) and some 'day after rain' soaked trails.

    @Andeh, curious your rims' inner width?

    My 'trail' wheelset is i32mm and I think it would make the WEF almost 'too square'. Glad to hear the Assegai EXO MT is comparable to the WEF GumX and that maybe the Assegai MT is a touch faster rolling than the WEF.

    For tacky mud, I think the WEF would perform better, for the reasons stated earlier in this thread.
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  18. #18
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    30mm internal. Here's a head to head photo comparison.

    Michelin wild enduro 29 tires?-img_20191104_204338.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    30mm internal. Here's a head to head photo comparison.

    OOOOO

    Thanks for the comparison photo, that helps a lot. Are they both mounted at the moment? Looks like the WEF is mounted on a rear (can barely see the cassette), but not sure about the Assegai.

    It looks like the Assegai is wider, but not by as much as you'd think? The profile of the WEF is a bit more square, which might help me actually (again, my lean angles aren't going to impress anyone).

    Also, the WEF is quite a bit more open in the tread. I can see how it would be more squirmy on big rock slabs.

    But, those side knobs look super supported. I'd assume they don't squirm when you're loaded up in a corner?

    I'm thinking that the "vagueness" I feel with my current Vigilante is because the side knobs are not well supported. So I'm thinking my next tire will be something a bit stiffer in that regard.

  20. #20
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    Yes, both mounted on identical rims (WAO Agents, one front, one rear), taken when I first mounted up the WEF. The Assegai is a smidge wider overall; its basically 2.5" and the WEF measured just over 2.4" at casing and just over 2.35" on knobs on my rims. I can measure the Assegai with calipers tonight. I didn't write down what it was before.

    You're correct that the shoulder knobs are very well supported, which is what gives them that fantastic bite in loam & loose. After riding them for a couple months, I put on an old set of Magic Marys for 1 ride, then immediately took them off because the side knobs felt like they just buckled in off-camber in comparison.

  21. #21
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    I'm in the PNW, have ridden both Assegai MaxTerra and WEF Magi-X extensively. The latter is way way better, in my opinion. It somehow both digs in better in the wet/loose/loam AND sticks much better to wet roots and rocks.

    Assegai is still my pick for rocky/desert riding as it has flatter tread; also preferable for park riding on very handpacked trails for the same reason. But I'll keep the Wild Enduros on my bike all year for riding natural trails, and it's the best I've tried in the wet. Note that Mike Kazimer on PB, who I think lives in B'ham and obviously has tried about everything, runs WEFs front/rear as his go-to in winter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DrewBird View Post
    I'm in the PNW, have ridden both Assegai MaxTerra and WEF Magi-X extensively. The latter is way way better, in my opinion. It somehow both digs in better in the wet/loose/loam AND sticks much better to wet roots and rocks.

    Assegai is still my pick for rocky/desert riding as it has flatter tread; also preferable for park riding on very handpacked trails for the same reason. But I'll keep the Wild Enduros on my bike all year for riding natural trails, and it's the best I've tried in the wet. Note that Mike Kazimer on PB, who I think lives in B'ham and obviously has tried about everything, runs WEFs front/rear as his go-to in winter.
    Thanks for the feedback, I really appreciate it (same area, and lots of time on both tires is great).

    Have you tried the Gum-X compound as well? I'm still not quite 100% clear on which one is better for my uses.

    Also, I was unaware that Kazimer ran Wild Enduros on his personal bikes. I just figured he used whatever came on his demo/press bikes.

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    Assegai measures 2.45" at the casing, 2.56" on the knobs, at 23 psi and well worn in.

    Sounds like Drew came to same conclusion I did. Assegai for dry / dusty / hardpack, Wild Enduro for loam / loose / wet. Norcal is basically desert from April -> October, and our winter is probably like your summer lol...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    Assegai measures 2.45" at the casing, 2.56" on the knobs, at 23 psi and well worn in.

    Sounds like Drew came to same conclusion I did. Assegai for dry / dusty / hardpack, Wild Enduro for loam / loose / wet. Norcal is basically desert from April -> October, and our winter is probably like your summer lol...
    Do you recall if the WEF stretched out at all after some use?

    I kind of wish they sold a 2.5Ē, but I should probably give the 2.4 a try before I make a blanket statement like that.

    Either way, it sounds like I might give the WEF a try when I wear my Vigilante out. But if I ever do an extended bike park trip to whistler or something, maybe Iíll snag an Assagai.

  25. #25
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    From Kazimerís IG feed:

    ďThis tire should have been called the Bacon Saver. Iíve been running a pair of Michelin Wild Enduro Fronts, and theyíve been perfect for cutting through the winter squishiness. And yes, itís perfectly fine to run two front tires - that hot patch is a suggestion, not a rule.Ē

    I agree with him, though Iím running the WE F/R combo. Rear is Gum-X, front Magi-X. I donít really know that I can comment on the difference in compound given obvious difference in tread and front vs. rear.

    I will say that so far all the Michelin rubber has worn better than Maxxis MaxTerra or MaxGrip. I find the Maxxis shoulder knobs tend to get undercut and pitted, losing chunks of rubber. Michelin wears differently, just kind of slowly but evenly loses its sharp edges.

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    Did anyone try 2.4 Wild Enduro's on i35mm rims? Wouldn't be a bit too narrow for such a wide rim? Thanks!

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    I currently have a set mounted in Ibis i35 carbon rims. They have worked great for me. Definitely give the tire a somewhat more square profile, but that really gets the shoulder knobs involved when cornering. This has been an awesome setup for the PNW.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Babas View Post
    Did anyone try 2.4 Wild Enduro's on i35mm rims? Wouldn't be a bit too narrow for such a wide rim? Thanks!
    This is my concern. See what was posted by Andeh, on an i30mm rim, the WEF casing is wider than the side knobs. Confirms my suspicion that the WEF (in it's current configuration) is better suited for 25-29mm internal width rims.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    the WEF measured just over 2.4" at casing and just over 2.35" on knobs on my rims.
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    I kind of wish they sold a 2.5Ē, but I should probably give the 2.4 a try before I make a blanket statement like that.
    Sidebar: a couple UK sites (Merlin, BikeInn, etc.) are showing a Michelin Wild AM 29 x 2.5 for sale on their website. Michelin doesn't have anything on their site, but a Wild AM 29 x 2.5 sounds awesome for rear trail-bike duties.
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    Sidebar: a couple UK sites (Merlin, BikeInn, etc.) are showing a Michelin Wild AM 29 x 2.5 for sale on their website. Michelin doesn't have anything on their site, but a Wild AM 29 x 2.5 sounds awesome for rear trail-bike duties.
    So, Michelin does actually make a 27.5" 2.6in version of the WEF (its called the "e wild", and its also available in a 2.8in version as well).

    They just don't make a 29" version.

    I'll probably try the WEF for my next tire. I've got i29 rims, and the square-ish profile fine to me. I don't know if I'd like them on i35's though, as they are on the small side for that wide of rim... but thats not really here or there, as I don't have i35's, nor I expect to have them in the future on this bike.

    Anyone have time on both the Magic-X and Gum-X Fronts? Most people seem to have experience with just one, and stick with it.

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    There is Michelin E-Wild Front 29x2.6. But it is not available on market jet.
    There some info: https://www.emtbforums.com/community...d-rubber.9056/

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    I'll probably try the WEF for my next tire. I've got i29 rims, and the square-ish profile fine to me.
    The 29 x 2.4 WEF on i29 is perfect. I've seen it in person and ridden it.

    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    Anyone have time on both the Magic-X and Gum-X Fronts? Most people seem to have experience with just one, and stick with it.
    GumX. It appears to be softer and more versatile (think MaxxTerra).
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  33. #33
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    Another update...

    These tires are awesome, I got a few more for backup 'cause who knows what's going to happen with the coronavirus... IDK about toilet paper, if I can't get a steady supply of bike tires that would be much more tragic...

    Ok, so I can think of some other tires that might be better for specific conditions but NOTHING is better than Wild Enduros across the board, from moon dust to mud to rock.

    We have some local trails that have a lot of rock and some steep/loose, they do great on both, and I really appreciate how predictably they perform on the steeper sections that require some sliding. I just rode through some slushy snow and mud today, they did great.

    I'd agree the front is similar to Magic Mary but without the squirm on hardpack and they don't throw as many rocks. Or Assegai with a more open tread pattern. Assegai dh casing Maxxgrip may be better in most dry conditions, imo, but at a massive weight penalty and it's one of the slowest rolling tires on top of being ~1400g.

    The rear, IDK... a much better Aggressor or a slightly better Hans Dampf super gravity/soft. It just works well all the time and doesn't do anything weird.

    Wear... better than I thought! The rear knobs will get chunked and torn but at an acceptable rate. I've probably put in something like 30,000 vert all on rough terrain in Colorado and the rear is maybe 1/2-2/3rd worn and the front 1/3-1/2 worn.

    I also just got a 2020 Enduro with a dhx coil, that bike + these tires is pretty amazing.

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    If only they made the Wild Enduro with stronger casing like Swhable's SuperGraity...

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113 View Post
    Another update...

    These tires are awesome, I got a few more for backup 'cause who knows what's going to happen with the coronavirus... IDK about toilet paper, if I can't get a steady supply of bike tires that would be much more tragic...

    Ok, so I can think of some other tires that might be better for specific conditions but NOTHING is better than Wild Enduros across the board, from moon dust to mud to rock.

    We have some local trails that have a lot of rock and some steep/loose, they do great on both, and I really appreciate how predictably they perform on the steeper sections that require some sliding. I just rode through some slushy snow and mud today, they did great.

    I'd agree the front is similar to Magic Mary but without the squirm on hardpack and they don't throw as many rocks. Or Assegai with a more open tread pattern. Assegai dh casing Maxxgrip may be better in most dry conditions, imo, but at a massive weight penalty and it's one of the slowest rolling tires on top of being ~1400g.

    The rear, IDK... a much better Aggressor or a slightly better Hans Dampf super gravity/soft. It just works well all the time and doesn't do anything weird.

    Wear... better than I thought! The rear knobs will get chunked and torn but at an acceptable rate. I've probably put in something like 30,000 vert all on rough terrain in Colorado and the rear is maybe 1/2-2/3rd worn and the front 1/3-1/2 worn.

    I also just got a 2020 Enduro with a dhx coil, that bike + these tires is pretty amazing.
    Thanks for the review!

    I believe I've found that I don't like squirmy feeling tires, so hearing (again) that they're similar to a Magic Mary, but less squirmy is great news. And good to know on the wear.

    I've only got the rear at the moment, but so far I've been very happy with it. It does seem to take a bit more effort to pedal than the DHF (the harder dual compound) my bike came with, but it also has a lot more braking traction, and cornering traction as well. Plus the casing is much tougher than the EXO DHF (which I punctured), so I've got a bit of extra peace of mind.

    I'll be curious to take it to the bike park once/if it opens this year.

    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy-Runs View Post
    If only they made the Wild Enduro with stronger casing like Swhable's SuperGraity...
    Have you had problems with the casing getting damaged? Or what are you basing that off of?

    I say that because they only offer the front in one casing, and the back in another, sturdier casing. And all the reviews I've read on them mention their casing is roughly the same as Maxxiss DD/Schwalbe Super Gravity (specifically, the front casing is a touch less durable than DD, and the rear is almost as tough as SG).

    https://enduro-mtb.com/en/michelin-m...-tires-review/


    About the front casing:

    "Pinch flat protection with Gravity Shield tires is better than Kendaís EMC casing, but not quite as good as MAXXISí DoubleDown or Schwalbeís Super Gravity casing, though they are a bit lighter."

    And for the rear casing, they say:

    "It performs significantly better than MAXXISí DoubleDown and is almost on the same level as Schwalbeís Super Gravity casing. "

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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    Have you had problems with the casing getting damaged? Or what are you basing that off of?
    Never tried them because of the casing. In the link you posted, based on their protection graph, Gravity Shield is 2.5, while SuperGravity is almost 5.

    Still im really tempted to try them for my next setup...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy-Runs View Post
    Never tried them because of the casing. In the link you posted, based on their protection graph, Gravity Shield is 2.5, while SuperGravity is almost 5.

    Still im really tempted to try them for my next setup...
    Got it.

    You're right, the front is the only one available in Gravity Shield. So if you're needing a heavier duty casing for the front, then the Wild Enduro likely isn't quite going to suit you.

    I guess in my mind the rear tire is the one that needs a sturdier casing the most. And looking at their charts, the rear only comes in Gravity Shield with pinch protection casing (which is different from the plain Gravity Shield casing the front uses). The rear tire specific casing rates about ~3.8 on their scale. And, as you mentioned, SG is about ~4.8, and DD is about ~3.5, as is the WTB Tough casing. So its pretty competitive with most "tough, but not downhill" casings IMO.

    But I came from EXO casing (~1.25 on the scale) DHF, so the rear is already quite a bit tougher than that. Maybe my opinion will change if I tear/puncture the rear wild enduro though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    Got it.

    You're right, the front is the only one available in Gravity Shield. So if you're needing a heavier duty casing for the front, then the Wild Enduro likely isn't quite going to suit you.

    I guess in my mind the rear tire is the one that needs a sturdier casing the most. And looking at their charts, the rear only comes in Gravity Shield with pinch protection casing (which is different from the plain Gravity Shield casing the front uses). The rear tire specific casing rates about ~3.8 on their scale. And, as you mentioned, SG is about ~4.8, and DD is about ~3.5, as is the WTB Tough casing. So its pretty competitive with most "tough, but not downhill" casings IMO.

    But I came from EXO casing (~1.25 on the scale) DHF, so the rear is already quite a bit tougher than that. Maybe my opinion will change if I tear/puncture the rear wild enduro though.
    Unfortunately the rear tire in 27.5/2.40 comes only with Gravity Shield without the pinch protection.

    I destroyed DHR2 Exo+ rear tire on the first day at the bikepark after couple of runs, as well as new Magic Mary with SnakeSkin casing at the front after half day of riding...

    Since im hearing good things about their grip, if i'll find them on sale i dont mind to try them... till then, my go to is Magic Mary SuperGravity front\rear.

    PS, if i'll get them in one point it will be two fronts...

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    The Michelin rear "Enduro" casing is quite robust. I agree with the DoubleDown comparisons. (Applies to Force Enduro Rear and Wild Enduro Rear. Can't remember if there are others)

    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    I guess in my mind the rear tire is the one that needs a sturdier casing the most.
    Seems Michelin agrees with you as well, as the WEF and WER have different casings, with the rear being sturdier (33TPI) and the front being more compliant (66TPI).
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

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    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy-Runs View Post
    Unfortunately the rear tire in 27.5/2.40 comes only with Gravity Shield without the pinch protection.

    I destroyed DHR2 Exo+ rear tire on the first day at the bikepark after couple of runs, as well as new Magic Mary with SnakeSkin casing at the front after half day of riding...

    Since im hearing good things about their grip, if i'll find them on sale i dont mind to try them... till then, my go to is Magic Mary SuperGravity front\rear.

    PS, if i'll get them in one point it will be two fronts...
    And, are you sure the rear isn't available with pinch protection in 27.5? I just checked their website out of curiosity, and it shows both using the pinch protection there. So I'm surprised to hear its not offered on the smaller wheel size.

    https://bike.michelin.com/en/product...ld-enduro-rear

    I wonder if its being labeled wrong at a retailer or something?

    Oh, yeah, if you're using the Front tire front and rear, then yeah, I could understand that . Especially if you're coming from SG MM's F/R.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    And, are you sure the rear isn't available with pinch protection in 27.5? I just checked their website out of curiosity, and it shows both using the pinch protection there. So I'm surprised to hear its not offered on the smaller wheel size.

    https://bike.michelin.com/en/product...ld-enduro-rear

    I wonder if its being labeled wrong at a retailer or something?

    Oh, yeah, if you're using the Front tire front and rear, then yeah, I could understand that . Especially if you're coming from SG MM's F/R.
    Possible its misleading from the retail store... will check this out.

    About the rear version, its reminds me the Hans Dampf, thats why i would prefer to use two fronts for maximum grip.

    If i'll decide to try something else in the future, the Wild Enduro will be the ones.

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    I'd try the rear, it's really good. The front side-knobs may be a bit tall for rear use, I'm not sure it would be as durable and may tear/chunk too much, but otoh it could have massive grip if the sideknobs hold well for your weight/conditions. Snowy, muddy and slippery conditions might work really well for 2 fronts...

    I'm running ARD inserts w 23/25 psi f/r on 30mm rims, weigh ~200 lbs. I like it better vs the Schwalbe SG tires w/o inserts, though the Michelin w/ inserts are probably a little heavier. With inserts, the reduced psi required, the way the internal pressure ramps up in the tire faster, snakebite prevention and being able to ride on a flat tire is worth it imo...

    Schwalbe SGs also really annoyed me... they would always peel up the edges of the rim tape because of the tight bead during install/removal, so it was likely the rim tape would need to be replaced when you change the tire. Rear soft compound Schwalbe don't last that long either, the Hans Dampf SG sideknobs don't last long enough. Michelin definitely lasts longer and performs better, and hopefully won't peel up my tape when I take it off!

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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113 View Post
    I'd try the rear, it's really good. The front side-knobs may be a bit tall for rear use, I'm not sure it would be as durable and may tear/chunk too much, but otoh it could have massive grip if the sideknobs hold well for your weight/conditions. Snowy, muddy and slippery conditions might work really well for 2 fronts...
    For steep-muddy-tech in the Alps, my go to tires are MM SG. I know many people complained the MM or HD soft compound not holding too long at the back, but i dont have that issue.

    That been said, lately im hearing more and more people who liked MM, says how good Wild Enduro are in comparison, thats why im curious to try them, im just worried their casing wont be as strong as Schwalbe's SG...

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    I picked up the Rear version to try (with my existing Front). The last couple months I've been running an Assegai up front, with first a Dissector in the rear and then for the last couple weeks a worn out DHR.

    I'll do my first ride of the Rear later today, but here's some measurements after mounting it yesterday. Weight (29) was 1,145g. Center knobs are about 4.4mm high, side knobs about 7mm at inside edge. By comparison, I measured the Fronts to be 4.6/8mm. The interesting thing is the knobs lack the slight ramping on the leading edge that the Front has. Normally "rear" tires are a bit more ramped for less rolling resistance than equivalent "front" tires. So I expect it to be a bit of work to pedal. On the other hand, the knobs are pretty small (maybe 25% smaller than the front), so maybe that makes up for it. Width immediately after airing up to 30 PSI on 30mm rims was 2.37" at casing, 2.2" at the knobs (so a bit narrower than the Front). The casing felt noticeably stiffer than both the Front (especially in the center/tread), and way stiffer than the Maxxis EXOs. I'll start out running the same pressure I was, but expect I can run a bit less due to the stiffness.

    Not to get off track, but I wasn't a fan of the Dissector for riding steep trails. Unsurprising in hindsight, but it doesn't brake very well. I had better times on my local steep trail (have ridden ~100 times) with a worn out DHR than the Dissector because I can use my brakes in controlled bursts rather than having to drag all the way down. I expect I'll like the WER for that reason.

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    I'm loving the WER. I've got about 10 rides on it so far. It rolls better than the Front (mounted in the rear), but still edges like it. We've got summer conditions starting here in NorCal, meaning dust on crust. The last few rides on my Assegai/DHR, my rear end was sliding around in the steep corners. With the Enduros, I have to really, really push the rear to make it break loose. I can lean over in off camber with no hesitation and know the side knobs will hold. I've set a couple downhill PRs after switching to the Wild Enduro setup. As I mentioned before, I find on these trails I have better times with grippier tires, because control = speed.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    I'm loving the WER. I've got about 10 rides on it so far. It rolls better than the Front (mounted in the rear), but still edges like it. We've got summer conditions starting here in NorCal, meaning dust on crust. The last few rides on my Assegai/DHR, my rear end was sliding around in the steep corners. With the Enduros, I have to really, really push the rear to make it break loose. I can lean over in off camber with no hesitation and know the side knobs will hold. I've set a couple downhill PRs after switching to the Wild Enduro setup. As I mentioned before, I find on these trails I have better times with grippier tires, because control = speed.
    Haha, yeah... I'm on my 2nd rear now. Some steep/loose corners I can go into much faster with the WER vs Aggressor or similar, it's actually hard to commit to entering with such speed but that's what it takes to get good rotation! I feel on some things a rear that slides a little more makes it easier, but it's certainly not as fast!

    I bought 2 sets of backups now, I'm committed to using them for this summer.

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    Have a set of WEF/WER 2,6. Overall it's a very good tyres (MM VS and Conti Der Baron/Der Kaiser are a little better for wet conditions), but 2,6 rear is a too wide and tall for my bike (Intense Tracer) and I bought 2,4.
    Want to ask you about front tire: will I get an improvement if I will take WEF 2,4 Magi-x instead 2,6 Gum-x?
    Riding extreme trails (Freeride-DH) with a lot of rocks, stones (loose over hard) and roots. Sometimes it's wet.
    Last edited by bemmer; 05-26-2020 at 02:21 AM.

  48. #48
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    I just wanted to update my post above to reflect a change in thought on tire wear. I'm on the 2nd front and 3rd rear, and they are about half worn. So they do wear pretty fast, but I'm not sure any other tire with comparable performance will be any better. The rear lasts longer than Maxxis MaxxGrip but wears faster vs MaxxTerra, the front is about the same as MaxxGrip to give some perspective. Some knobs may get torn before they wear out as well, and in the front all the side knobs were at least cracking at the base a little bit when I changed it out for a new one.

    I'm still very happy with them and have ordered a few more.

  49. #49
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    Just ordered the Front and Rear combo! Stoked to run these in Angelfire later this month.

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    I mounted a 29x2.4F, 2.4R last night. The front seemed to seal/seat immediately, the rear took a while (with some fiddling, etc.), all using a hand pump.

    This morning the front was flat. Took the wheel off and did a few rounds of the Stans shake. After a while, it seemed to seal.

    Being a bit cautious about how sealed they were, I put 25lbs in F and R (I have a 2019 YT Jeffsy CF Pro with internal 27mm rims). Very firm ride! Like, "rocks" firm.

    But they didn't seem to lose any pressure during my 2.5h ride.

    Hopefully I can lower the pressure significantly.

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    I mounted a 29x2.4F, 2.4R last night. The front seemed to seal/seat immediately, the rear took a while (with some fiddling, etc.), all using a hand pump.

    This morning the front was flat. Took the wheel off and did a few rounds of the Stans shake. After a while, it seemed to seal.

    Being a bit cautious about how sealed they were, I put 25lbs in F and R (I have a 2019 YT Jeffsy CF Pro with internal 27mm rims). Very firm ride! Like, "rocks" firm.

    But they didn't seem to lose any pressure during my 2.5h ride.

    Hopefully I can lower the pressure significantly.
    How heavy are you, and what casing tires are you coming from/comparing them to?

    I came exo casing DHFís, and the wild enduro rear is a much stiffer casing. So I do run lower pressures than the dhfís.

    I run 18-22psi in the wild enduro rear most of the time, depending on conditions. For drier weather I go up a bit more to 25ish, and then if Iím riding park Iím going up to 30psi or so. I weigh 185lbs, maybe close to 200lbs all kitted our with gear.

    I did manage to dent my rear rim with the tire at 25-28psi, but that was off a 4-5ft drop, and I must have landed on one of the rocks.

  52. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    How heavy are you, and what casing tires are you coming from/comparing them to?

    I came exo casing DHFís, and the wild enduro rear is a much stiffer casing. So I do run lower pressures than the dhfís.

    I run 18-22psi in the wild enduro rear most of the time, depending on conditions. For drier weather I go up a bit more to 25ish, and then if Iím riding park Iím going up to 30psi or so. I weigh 185lbs, maybe close to 200lbs all kitted our with gear.

    I did manage to dent my rear rim with the tire at 25-28psi, but that was off a 4-5ft drop, and I must have landed on one of the rocks.
    Good info, thanks! I'm actually also about 185lbs without gear, coming from DHF/DHR2 in 2.3 EXO. I was running 23psi front, 25psi rear on those. I ride in the CO Rockies and most of my trails are quite dry.

    I only ride trails and never do big drops (and generally try to stay on the ground at all times ).

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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    I mounted a 29x2.4F, 2.4R last night. The front seemed to seal/seat immediately, the rear took a while (with some fiddling, etc.), all using a hand pump.

    This morning the front was flat. Took the wheel off and did a few rounds of the Stans shake. After a while, it seemed to seal.

    Being a bit cautious about how sealed they were, I put 25lbs in F and R (I have a 2019 YT Jeffsy CF Pro with internal 27mm rims). Very firm ride! Like, "rocks" firm.

    But they didn't seem to lose any pressure during my 2.5h ride.

    Hopefully I can lower the pressure significantly.
    similar-ish experience here - I'm running a Wild AM 27.5x2.6" and needed a second dose of sealant to hold air for more than a day. Suprising the Wild Enduro is the same since it has a thicker casing.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by fsrxc View Post
    similar-ish experience here - I'm running a Wild AM 27.5x2.6" and needed a second dose of sealant to hold air for more than a day. Suprising the Wild Enduro is the same since it has a thicker casing.
    It's one reason I typically buy Maxxis tires. I can't speak to anyone else's experience but for me, they seal up every time the first time.

    But I wanted to try something different. Hopefully Michelins are now sealed up and I can get to optimizing the pressure.

  55. #55
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    Maxxis are some the most sealant weeping tires I ride.

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  56. #56
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    Took the pressure down to 21F/22R. Felt better, still too bouncy. But I pushed them slightly more (still a bit worried about them) and the do seem to have a ton of grip.

    Not sure I'll go too much lower in pressure, 18psi seems so low!

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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    Took the pressure down to 21F/22R. Felt better, still too bouncy. But I pushed them slightly more (still a bit worried about them) and the do seem to have a ton of grip.

    Not sure I'll go too much lower in pressure, 18psi seems so low!
    One day I went out riding when it was quite wet and slippery (PNW rider here). I didnít have my pressure gauge, but I know I started with about 22psi, but I was pinging and sliding on wet roots all over the place.

    I just blindly kept taking pressure out until it felt about right for the conditions that day. On the next lap I got the My fastest time, and the 27th fastest all time time on the trail (trailforks, not strava, so no idea how ďcompetitiveĒ it is). So I had at least decent speed that day.

    When I got home and checked I was surprised to find that I had 16psi in the rear (wild enduro). It had felt the slightest bit squirmy in the high pressure berms, but had otherwise been fine. That slight squirm though is why I say 18-24psi, instead of 16-24psi though.

    Of course, the trails I rode didnít have any high speed rock hits, so I could get away with less pressure. Just pointing out that depending on your speed and conditions, you can actually get away with pretty low pressure, even at our weight. Iíd try a bit lower, and see how it goes.

    I seem to remember I dropped about 5psi (Maybe?) compared to my EXO dhf, for about the same feel, if that helps at all.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    One day I went out riding when it was quite wet and slippery (PNW rider here). I didnít have my pressure gauge, but I know I started with about 22psi, but I was pinging and sliding on wet roots all over the place.

    I just blindly kept taking pressure out until it felt about right for the conditions that day. On the next lap I got the My fastest time, and the 27th fastest all time time on the trail (trailforks, not strava, so no idea how ďcompetitiveĒ it is). So I had at least decent speed that day.

    When I got home and checked I was surprised to find that I had 16psi in the rear (wild enduro). It had felt the slightest bit squirmy in the high pressure berms, but had otherwise been fine. That slight squirm though is why I say 18-24psi, instead of 16-24psi though.

    Of course, the trails I rode didnít have any high speed rock hits, so I could get away with less pressure. Just pointing out that depending on your speed and conditions, you can actually get away with pretty low pressure, even at our weight. Iíd try a bit lower, and see how it goes.

    I seem to remember I dropped about 5psi (Maybe?) compared to my EXO dhf, for about the same feel, if that helps at all.
    16! Wow, that's low.

    Yes, that helps a lot, thank you. We do sometimes have some high speed rocky trails, but I do tend to slow down on trails that just throw all the rocks at me. But it is sometimes rolling the dice there, Rocky Mountains after all. I'm also not all that fast, objectively speaking.

    I might try 18F/20R next ride.

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    Hey guys what do you think about kenda pinner pro atc on rear and WEF Magi x on front. What if they have different profil? Just want max grip on front when ride on soft/wet and predictable rear for hard pack. I think rear is more versatile and will manage in all conditions. Does it make sense?

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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    I might try 18F/20R next ride.
    This worked pretty well. Much less bouncy. I never noticed any squirm and certainly not any rim strikes. I even did some jumps (as little as possible) and no problem.

    Still liking the grip in most situations. Did have some mild slides in the front, but not at all sure my other tires would have done better.

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    Well here's the weight on my 2.4 Wild Enduro F/R tires. The heavier one is the rear.

    They are rock solid. I inflated them to 40psi and leaving them over night.

    Michelin wild enduro 29 tires?-whatsapp-image-2020-07-15-18.37.31-1-.jpgMichelin wild enduro 29 tires?-whatsapp-image-2020-07-15-18.37.31.jpg

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    They were easy to set up tubeless on my we are one agent rims. I used a floor pump and both inflated at first try. First impression: they feel beefy and look beefy as well. The front tire side knobs are spaced out farther apart compared to an assegai, dhr2 or other tires. I feel like I can abuse these suckers.

  63. #63
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    My tires were flat this morning after one day in between riding. Not confidence inspiring. I think I'll try more Stan's and see if that helps. Even more weight on these already heavy tires.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    My tires were flat this morning after one day in between riding. Not confidence inspiring. I think I'll try more Stan's and see if that helps. Even more weight on these already heavy tires.
    Been thru 4 sets, never had that happen. Maybe it's not the tires?

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    They just need a good initial coating, and probably a touch more sealant than I do with Maxxis (4 oz instead of 2-3 oz). After a couple rides to really coat the insides, they held pressure for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    My tires were flat this morning after one day in between riding. Not confidence inspiring. I think I'll try more Stan's and see if that helps. Even more weight on these already heavy tires.
    I've never had this issue either. Mine seated fine, don't lose any more air than any other tires I've used (which is to say, a couple PSI per week, give or take, as I ride mostly on the weekends, and have to pump up both the front and rear every time).

    As a data point, I'm on WTB STP i29 rims (don't bother looking them up, they are OEM only, and super low end), with their factory tape, and using Orance seal endurance sealant.

    Maybe its the stans? Or maybe its different rims/tapes? Not sure, just reporting that for me, it doesn't seem any different than any other tire.

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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    My tires were flat this morning after one day in between riding. Not confidence inspiring. I think I'll try more Stan's and see if that helps.
    Heavy? For what they are, they're actually light. The Assegai, now there's a boat anchor.

    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    Even more weight on these already heavy tires.
    Re-inflate your tire, fill your bathtub with several inches of water (enough that when you stand the wheel up in the tub, the water goes above where the spokes enter the rim) and slowly "roll" the wheel/tire through the water while looking for bubbles. For me, things like this are usually compromised tubeless rim tape or a leaky valve stem.
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113 View Post
    Been thru 4 sets, never had that happen. Maybe it's not the tires?
    You're right, gotta be the air. I'll add new air.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    They just need a good initial coating, and probably a touch more sealant than I do with Maxxis (4 oz instead of 2-3 oz). After a couple rides to really coat the insides, they held pressure for me.
    Added some more to each. Hopefully that'll help.

    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    I've never had this issue either. Mine seated fine, don't lose any more air than any other tires I've used (which is to say, a couple PSI per week, give or take, as I ride mostly on the weekends, and have to pump up both the front and rear every time).

    As a data point, I'm on WTB STP i29 rims (don't bother looking them up, they are OEM only, and super low end), with their factory tape, and using Orance seal endurance sealant.

    Maybe its the stans? Or maybe its different rims/tapes? Not sure, just reporting that for me, it doesn't seem any different than any other tire.
    The Stan's is new. Possible but seems unlikely. Did what @06HokieMTB suggested. They are only leaking air through the sidewalls. That's after adding more Stans. Alas. Hopefully eventually the Stan's will seal that up.


    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    Re-inflate your tire, fill your bathtub with several inches of water (enough that when you stand the wheel up in the tub, the water goes above where the spokes enter the rim) and slowly "roll" the wheel/tire through the water while looking for bubbles. For me, things like this are usually compromised tubeless rim tape or a leaky valve stem.
    Great idea. I actually did that with some old wheels. Seems like the sidewalls are the only issue. Gave the front another Stan's shake after verifying there aren't leaks anywhere else. Going to dip them in the water again in a while.

  69. #69
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    Set some PRs today on these tires. The result is a bit ... ahem ... muddied, so to speak, because we had rain last night and today the trails were relatively sticky. Still, with the loose over hard surfaces we have, I think some of the result can be attributed to the tires.

    Overall, I had a lot of confidence on some higher speed downs. The bike just felt in control. It was pretty nice.

    I haven't solved the issue with air leaking through the sidewalls of the tires. Going back to @ocnLogan, I do wonder if a different kind of sealant would be better. I have used Orange in the past and it definitely is a "coating" kind of sealant. More than Stan's in my experience. My Maxxis tires had no problem with the Stan's, of course, but idk.

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    Got my first set f/r wild enduros...

    How is NOBODY talking about wear? 5 rides in and at least a third of the rear cornering knobs are thrashed. I'm guessing this thing will be lifeless at 15 rides, max. Granted, I've wasted a rear tire in a week at Moab, but these are my home trails (Sac-tahoe).

    Impressed on all fronts except for the wear. And seems like they don't offer the rear in the harder compound? Wtf?
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  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryanxj View Post
    Got my first set f/r wild enduros...

    How is NOBODY talking about wear? 5 rides in and at least a third of the rear cornering knobs are thrashed. I'm guessing this thing will be lifeless at 15 rides, max. Granted, I've wasted a rear tire in a week at Moab, but these are my home trails (Sac-tahoe).

    Impressed on all fronts except for the wear. And seems like they don't offer the rear in the harder compound? Wtf?
    lol, that reminds me of old Michelin comp 24.1s, I could get a good 2-weekends out of em at Northstar before they were toast...
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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    Fast wear is a known issue and it's been talked about in past threads. The Wild Enduro is biased more towards softer & wetter trail conditions rather than hard & dry, it will still grip just fine in the latter but the wear rate goes up significantly. This should not be a surprise given the knob size & spacing on the tires.

    If most of your riding is in dry conditions, go with the Michelin Wild Rock'R2 Enduro instead. You lose some volume which is a bit of a bummer, but the tread design holds up a lot better on hardpack, loose over hard, or completely blown out moondust while having similar or better cornering grip.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryanxj View Post
    Got my first set f/r wild enduros...

    How is NOBODY talking about wear? 5 rides in and at least a third of the rear cornering knobs are thrashed. I'm guessing this thing will be lifeless at 15 rides, max. Granted, I've wasted a rear tire in a week at Moab, but these are my home trails (Sac-tahoe).

    Impressed on all fronts except for the wear. And seems like they don't offer the rear in the harder compound? Wtf?
    I've had my Wild Enduro Rear tire on since the end of Jan. Trailforks tells me that I've done 96 miles, and ~15k feet of descending since then, and I know I forgot to record at least 1-2 rides in there somewhere. So not huge mileage, but they aren't new anymore.

    My rear tire is showing some wear, but nothing at all like you're describing. I've got a couple corner knobs with some undercutting starting, and the leading edge of a handfull of center knobs have some little chunks missing.

    I'm in the PNW, and didn't really notice any wear until I went on vacation and did some riding in the mountain west area (Utah). The loose over hard/rockier soil seemed to eat them up a bit faster. And from what I've read about them around the internet, that seems to be a common theme.

    So I'd say they are probably will last longer for people that live where the soil is more "sloppy wet to hero dirt" levels of moisture, rather than "dryish to kitty litter over concrete".

    But, some of it is rider as well. I typically don't do any drifting/intentional skidding, and while I'm not super slow, I've never had a KOM on any popular trails (some of my local spots I'm in the top 10-25, but most other things I'm more in the top 10-25%, nothing special). So I could easily be straight up slower/easier on tires than you. Hard to tell.

    But like you, when I was riding dry stuff, I was still super happy with the grip they provided. But it is a bit surprising they don't offer the rear in a bit harder compound. It would be kind of similar to a DD Aggressor in DC, which could make sense for lots of people.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryanxj View Post
    Got my first set f/r wild enduros...

    How is NOBODY talking about wear? 5 rides in and at least a third of the rear cornering knobs are thrashed. I'm guessing this thing will be lifeless at 15 rides, max. Granted, I've wasted a rear tire in a week at Moab, but these are my home trails (Sac-tahoe).

    Impressed on all fronts except for the wear. And seems like they don't offer the rear in the harder compound? Wtf?
    Yeah, rocky trails do wear them really quickly. I'm on my 4th rear this year. IME they are somewhere in between Maxxis MaxxGrip and MaxxTerra.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    My tires were flat this morning after one day in between riding. Not confidence inspiring. I think I'll try more Stan's and see if that helps. Even more weight on these already heavy tires.
    I've done some experiments with taping recently and am convinced this is the main issue as far as losing air. I have not seen any sealant on the sidewall of the tires.

    I use tape (Orange Seal and Kaptan) that's very thin and about 24mm wide, so it doesn't quite cover a 30mm ID rim. I used to put 2 layers down the middle but recently switched to covering from bead to bead with 2 layers, one on the left, one on the right with the layers overlapping in the middle, where it's needed to cover the spoke holes. Also, I'm pushing down hard on the valve stem from the inside while torquing the nut that holds the valve stem to the rim to get a bit more force on the valve stem seal.

    My theory is with the tape in the middle the seal quality depends on how much the tire moves the tape around while installing and with the bead-to-bead coverage the tire will actually seal against the tape and it doesn't seem like it moves or peels up like it does when there's a gap between the bead and the center the tape doesn't fully cover. In any case, the result is I don't lose air anymore, it's been weeks and not one psi has leaked out!!! I normally lose a few psi per week.

    I also use Orange Seal Endurance sealant and cush core inserts.

    In any case, it's definitely not the tires. Good luck!

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113 View Post
    In any case, it's definitely not the tires. Good luck!
    For me, I've proven, it's 100% the tires. There's air loss through the sidewalls and no where else.

  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    For me...
    Hey, just because the orange goblin living in the white house defines his own "facts" doesn't mean it's reality or that he's setting a good example!

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    Quote Originally Posted by davec113 View Post
    Hey, just because the orange goblin living in the white house defines his own "facts" doesn't mean it's reality or that he's setting a good example!
    What? I've actually watched it come through. See my posts above.

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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    What? I've actually watched it come through. See my posts above.
    Me too. My previous tire (Magic Mary Snakeskin) held air with no sealant, so I know the rim/tape was airtight, but after mounting the Wild AM, it lost most of its pressure overnight, so I submerged it in the bathtub and could see small bubbles constantly appearing and rising from the sidewalls. After the second dose of Orange seal it's losing air slower, a few PSI a day, but there's still no sealant visible on the outside.

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by fsrxc View Post
    Me too. My previous tire (Magic Mary Snakeskin) held air with no sealant, so I know the rim/tape was airtight, but after mounting the Wild AM, it lost most of its pressure overnight, so I submerged it in the bathtub and could see small bubbles constantly appearing and rising from the sidewalls. After the second dose of Orange seal it's losing air slower, a few PSI a day, but there's still no sealant visible on the outside.
    Careful reporting actual observations, you might trigger someone.

    I was thinking of trying Orange to see if it sealed up my tires better than Stan's, but maybe I won't bother.

  81. #81
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    Wanted to come back and say that the tires no longer lose all pressure overnight or between rides. Maybe 2-3 psi in 48 hrs. I can live with that.

    My impression is that they're a step up in grip from my DHF/DHR2 tires. I'm using 18F/20R psi as @ocnLogan suggested.

    So far they're wearing really well.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    Wanted to come back and say that the tires no longer lose all pressure overnight or between rides. Maybe 2-3 psi in 48 hrs. I can live with that.

    My impression is that they're a step up in grip from my DHF/DHR2 tires. I'm using 18F/20R psi as @ocnLogan suggested.

    So far they're wearing really well.
    Glad the sealant finally got things sorted out.

    Was that just more Stans? Or did you switch to Orange seal? Just curious at this point.

    As for wear, here is a close up picture of the condition of my Wild Enduro Rear, after ~150 miles or so, under a ~200lb (with gear) intermediateish rider.

    Michelin wild enduro 29 tires?-wildendurorear.jpg

    You can see some of the undercutting on the braking surfaces. I've also got a few corner lugs starting to undercut/"fleck" off, that aren't in this photo. This was the "worst" of it though.

    Again, I've had the tire on since January. So it was used in the wet/soft soil of the PNW. Then I took it to Utah on a trip, and did about 30-40 miles in their loose over hard/dry rocky stuff, then the rest of it is summer time PNW riding.

    I guess at ~150 miles maybe a touch more, as I know I've not used Trailforks to track some of the rides I've done. And Trailforks shows 120 miles for the year.

    I figure I'm 1/3 - 1/2 way worn out? Which would mean I could get about a year out of it as a rear tire with my weekend warrior status. But if "you" ride a lot, I can see how these would wear down really fast, and possibly be an issue.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    Glad the sealant finally got things sorted out.

    Was that just more Stans? Or did you switch to Orange seal? Just curious at this point.
    I didn't add any more sealant after the supplemental Stans I referenced ... somewhere above. Maybe the right sized particles just eventually found there way to most of the sidewall leaks.

    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    I figure I'm 1/3 - 1/2 way worn out? Which would mean I could get about a year out of it as a rear tire with my weekend warrior status. But if "you" ride a lot, I can see how these would wear down really fast, and possibly be an issue.
    Yeah look at least half to me but not sure I have good criteria for judging wear.

    I ride often but not a lot. Maybe four times a week. (Had to abort my ride today as I installed a new chain and it appears that my chain ring is worn out, bad noise under load!). But each ride is only like 15-20 miles. But lots of hard climbing and braking, some sections of sharp rocks, etc, so that might wear them differently (I ride in the CO Rockies).

    We'll see. If they just last the end of the summer, that's enough for me.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    I didn't add any more sealant after the supplemental Stans I referenced ... somewhere above. Maybe the right sized particles just eventually found there way to most of the sidewall leaks.

    Yeah look at least half to me but not sure I have good criteria for judging wear.

    I ride often but not a lot. Maybe four times a week. (Had to abort my ride today as I installed a new chain and it appears that my chain ring is worn out, bad noise under load!). But each ride is only like 15-20 miles. But lots of hard climbing and braking, some sections of sharp rocks, etc, so that might wear them differently (I ride in the CO Rockies).

    We'll see. If they just last the end of the summer, that's enough for me.
    Good to know on the sealant.

    Yeah, you're doing way more riding than I am. If I'm lucky, I get out twice a week, and most rides are between 6-12 miles (combination of ridinb buddies being in worse shape, and all of us having little kids at home).

    Again, the photo is of the "worst" part of the tire. Most of the rest of the center knobs look something like the ones just out of focus in the foreground of the photo. I think I'll be able to get most of the rest of the year out of it without problem. I'll update the thread when it wears out/gets replaced though.

    Oh, I've also done ~20k ft of vertical descending this year (no shuttles or lifts). If that helps gauge wear/use at all.

  85. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    Wanted to come back and say that the tires no longer lose all pressure overnight or between rides. Maybe 2-3 psi in 48 hrs. I can live with that.

    My impression is that they're a step up in grip from my DHF/DHR2 tires. I'm using 18F/20R psi as @ocnLogan suggested.

    So far they're wearing really well.
    18/20 psi is an extremely low pressure for my opinion.
    What is your rim inner width? Do you use any tyre inserts?
    When i tried 22 psi in my rear wheel with ProCore, i bent my rim in rock garden during first descent. I'm 175 lbs equipped.

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by ocnLogan View Post
    Oh, I've also done ~20k ft of vertical descending this year (no shuttles or lifts). If that helps gauge wear/use at all.
    Cool, good info.

    I'm not a strong climber or terribly fast descender (slower than all my buddies in the former, faster in the latter), but I did about 25k feet just in July (completed the Strava July Cycling Climbing Challenge). Just the nature of where I ride.

    Quote Originally Posted by bemmer View Post
    18/20 psi is an extremely low pressure for my opinion.
    What is your rim inner width? Do you use any tyre inserts?
    When i tried 22 psi in my rear wheel with ProCore, i bent my rim in rock garden during first descent. I'm 175 lbs equipped.
    Same tires?

    My rims are i27mm.

    But I was a bit uncertain in lowering the pressures to that level, see my previous posts. But it's worked out for me.

    We all ride differently, in different places. I know my trails pretty well, so maybe I naturally avoid big hits or have just been lucky. IDK. But the tires feel good if still a bit more bouncy than my Maxxis tires. No squirming, burps, etc.

    I'm no expert in any of this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by objectuser View Post
    Same tires?

    My rims are i27mm.

    But I was a bit uncertain in lowering the pressures to that level, see my previous posts. But it's worked out for me.

    We all ride differently, in different places. I know my trails pretty well, so maybe I naturally avoid big hits or have just been lucky. IDK. But the tires feel good if still a bit more bouncy than my Maxxis tires. No squirming, burps, etc.

    I'm no expert in any of this.
    It was Conti Der Kaiser. But it didn't affect of rim damage.
    I rode WEF/WER 2,6 with Huck Norris/ProCore front/rear in big mountains last autumn and it was impossible to use such low pressure.
    I'm also not an expert, but pushing as fast as I can, do not consider to bike damage.
    Past spring i had to go to big mountains on WEF Magi-X/WER 2,4 with CushCore F/R, but pandemic rejected my plans.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy-Runs View Post
    Possible its misleading from the retail store... will check this out.

    About the rear version, its reminds me the Hans Dampf, thats why i would prefer to use two fronts for maximum grip.

    If i'll decide to try something else in the future, the Wild Enduro will be the ones.
    I went from WE f/r to MM/HD and I can tell you with 100% certainty that the WER is much more grippy than HD in all conditions, the only place where HD is grippier is on tarmac.
    It's much closer to MM than HD in performance and feel.

  89. #89
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    Threw on a 29 x 2.4 GumX WEF/WER setup on my Ibis Ripmo AF late summer.

    These tires grip so damn hard.

    Ridden them in Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona & Utah. They do not hold up to dry/dusty/rocky Southwest riding. Really fast wear.

    Did I mention that these tires grip so damn hard? For the price, might have to just get another pair and accept that I'll go through tires faster than I'd like.

    Rode these tires at Angel Fire bike park yesterday. Typical fall conditions... Dry, rocky, dusty/blown out.

    Seriously though, did I mention that these tires grip so damn hard?
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by 06HokieMTB View Post
    Seriously though, did I mention that these tires grip so damn hard?
    I was really impressed with the grip. I ride in CO and the wear for me was OK, definitely acceptable.

    I had a lot of issues with them not holding air (leaked through the sidewalls). Maybe I just got a bad set. Because I think I currently like them more, in terms of grip and predictability, than my Maxxis tires (which I liked a lot).

    So I'm not sure I'll buy another set instead of another DHF/DHR2 combo, but it's tempting.

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    Iím still using my Wild enduro rear tire, and Iím sitting at ~35k of climbing from 230miles of riding. Still quite like it.

    Itís worn, but really not in much different condition than the photo I shared previously, from about 100miles ago.

    Iím thinking my next rear tire will either be another Wild enduro, or a DHR II (Iíve never tried one of those before). For the front Iím thinking Wild enduro front, or WTB Verdict. Havenít quite decided yet.

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