Maxxis DHF 29 MaxxGrip vs Assegai 29 MaxxGrip- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Maxxis DHF 29 MaxxGrip vs Assegai 29 MaxxGrip

    Has anyone tried both tires? Comparison? What's the better tire for grip in all conditions? (Loose over hard and wet roots/rock, but not much mud where I ride).
    I'm leaning towards the Assegai MaxxGrip but it only comes in DD or DH and I think I saw the DHF MaxxGrip comes in an EXO+. This will be a front tire for my Enduro 29er, so climbing is involved and I don't want a super heavy tire in the front if I can help it.

  2. #2
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    I've been running the DHF MaxxGrip for a couple of years now and switched to the Assegai over the summer. If I'm being completely honest, I'm finding the Assegai to be disappointing in the conditions I ride. It holds really well in softer conditions, wet or dry but on harder surfaces, the cornering hold isn't what I was expecting and I've lost my front end a few times, adding new layers of elbow scarring. Personally, I find the DHF to be much more predictable and on an Enduro bike, it's nice to offset the weight of CushCore a little bit with the available EXO+ casing.
    Sean Chaney :: Owner/Builder :: Vertigo Cycles

  3. #3
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    Was the Assegai a Maxxgrip as well? I've read complaints about riders having troubles in the corners with the Assegai Maxxterra, but not with the Maxxgrip.

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    I am also making this decision.

    I have had great results, even with wet roots, with 2.6 MaxxTerra DHF EXO+. I have a Assegai MaxxGrip DD on order. All of the reviews said that it cornered even better than the DHF because it had some knobs to fill in the gap on the DHF. Ourdoor Gear Lab, who's reviews read like they know what they are talking about, rated Assegai MaxxGrip the best at cornering.

    https://www.outdoorgearlab.com/topic...ain-bike-tires

    But now I am super confused because the Maxxis chart says that it doesn't corner as well as the DHF. Why would that be the case?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Maxxis DHF 29 MaxxGrip vs Assegai 29 MaxxGrip-screen-shot-2019-10-07-11.44.35-pm.jpg  


  5. #5
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    Assegai should corner better on hardpack and dusty because it has more edges with the transition knobs. But the DHF has higher lug stiffness so in softer stuff it should hold a little better.

    If you look at that chart long enough, certain discrepancies stand out. Such as the DHF having the same rolling efficiency as the Aspen an Ikon. har har.

    But really silvers, aren't you going to put serious tires like the Schwalbe Eddy Current on your ebike?

  6. #6
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    Just want to point out that the chart seems to be complete horsecrap that you can not really use to make comparisons between products.

    I wish manufacturers published real info like rolling resistance (in watts) for every single model and version of their tires.

  7. #7
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    Yes. And at 20 psi. Not 40 or 60 psi.

  8. #8
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    Maxxis isn't going to do that. They're the epitome of bro science. Most of their tire designs are some guy doodling on a napkin, "Yeah that one looks rad, send it to production!"

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    I,ve been running a Dhf maxterra for a year and switched to a assegai maxxgrip, all i can say is that in general it has alot more grip, especially offcamber, roots etc. Cornering is more precise, maybe in hardpack it has a bit less edge grip. Braking is better too. I put the DHF the rear and actually like it very much there, rolls pretty good and had alot more grip than the agressor i had before. Ideal winter combination!

  11. #11
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    I think this question comes down to casing as the OP hinted at in his post. I go back and forth between an EXO+ assegai and an EXO+ DHF on the front of my enduro bike. I have an extra front wheel and rotor so I can chose what I'm running on a given day based on the intended riding. I tend to use the DHF when I'm going to be doing more pedaling or a just a generally more balanced ride that day, then just all downhill charging (which is where the assegai comes into play).

    I haven't ridden the maxxgrip assegai yet, but I have spent time on a maxxgrip DHF. To me, the max grip tires are a bit overkill in our socal loose over hard conditions. I can definitely feel the additional grip, but the rolling resistance hit and the longevity of the maxx grip tires usually push me away save for racing where I know the tires will only last for 2-3 days of riding. Even at bike parks, I find that with a maxxgrip front and back, I have to play with my "trail speed" entry into jumps and features where the 3c tires seem to just be a flow with the trail proposition.

    To circle back, If you are a DD or DH casing rider, then go with the maxxgrip assegai. I find that the assegai is a bit more of an intuitive tire to ride and isn't quite so sensitive to lean angle. Unlike @Smudge, I find that the assegai is more forgiving and provides more grip, but the caveat to that is that applies in my dusty socal conditions. The other caveat is that I have nearly a decade of experience riding the DHF, so I am so comfortable in how much weight it wants in the bars as I lean it over, what lean angle it wants and what the ultimate grip breakaway point feels like. There are absolutely situations where that familiarity trumps ultimate performance for me.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigmo View Post
    I,ve been running a Dhf maxterra for a year and switched to a assegai maxxgrip, all i can say is that in general it has alot more grip, especially offcamber, roots etc. Cornering is more precise, maybe in hardpack it has a bit less edge grip. Braking is better too. I put the DHF the rear and actually like it very much there, rolls pretty good and had alot more grip than the agressor i had before. Ideal winter combination!
    This is my experience. The DHF is better on hardback when you can commit to learning the bike. The Assegai tend to squirm on hardpack. But on roots and rocks its better than a DHF

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graveltattoo View Post
    Was the Assegai a Maxxgrip as well? I've read complaints about riders having troubles in the corners with the Assegai Maxxterra, but not with the Maxxgrip.
    Since you were asking only about MaxxGrip DHF and Assegai, that's what I was referencing. I live in the Pacific Northwest and in the summer our conditions get really dry and dusty. The hard spots get almost as hard as concrete with a dust layer, and as you would imagine, all the rocks get a layer of dust as well. When it's not summer, the trails tend to soften up but some sections stay hard (burms mostly) and wet.

    In my experience, the Assegai is better than the DHF in both soft loamy corners and in corners where A LOT of dust has formed (a lot being several inches). However, IMO, the DHF better in hard pan corners, slabby rocks, roots in general and is more predictable in a wider variety of conditions. For the record, my experience is the same on 27.5 and 29" formats.

    I haven't narrowed it down to any particular aspect of the Assegai, but I suspect the loose tracking in hard pan turns is because the knobs are so tall. Since I don't love the tires, I'm going to experiment with cutting them a bit to see if I can make improvements.

    BTW, I bought a pair of Assegai's in the MaxTerra compound this summer on my 27.5 bike. At home they were a horror show but I went down near Santa Cruz to ride for a couple of weeks and have no complaints in the conditions they had down there. Got back home and back to the horror show. I've since swapped the front back to a DHF MaxxGrip (and then to an Assegai MG)and left the rear Assegai MaxxTerra setup and while it's nice to trust the front end again, the back end steps out in corners and slides off roots and rocks constantly, making things interesting at speed. Previously, I had an Aggressor MT on the rear with no complaints. I found it to be a perfectly adequate rear tire that rolls better than a DHR.
    Sean Chaney :: Owner/Builder :: Vertigo Cycles

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsilvers View Post
    This one thing the emotos are good at, testing tires. Nice test.

    "So how could I find out which tires rolled the best? In general, when reviews say a tire “rolled well” or “did not roll well,” I don’t trust that they even can tell."

    I can tell. I knew the Morsa was fast for years before I saw the German rr test on it. It's very fast. Of course the human can only sense larger differences.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsilvers View Post
    Plain and simply, Schwalbe tires roll better than competitors at any particular traction level.
    Shame they don't offer more fronts.
    It's mind blowing that the rolling resistance guy doesn't think we care about RR. It's so important in our application.

    Sent from my SM-G892A using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by smudge View Post
    Since you were asking only about MaxxGrip DHF and Assegai, that's what I was referencing. I live in the Pacific Northwest and in the summer our conditions get really dry and dusty. The hard spots get almost as hard as concrete with a dust layer, and as you would imagine, all the rocks get a layer of dust as well. When it's not summer, the trails tend to soften up but some sections stay hard (burms mostly) and wet.

    In my experience, the Assegai is better than the DHF in both soft loamy corners and in corners where A LOT of dust has formed (a lot being several inches). However, IMO, the DHF better in hard pan corners, slabby rocks, roots in general and is more predictable in a wider variety of conditions. For the record, my experience is the same on 27.5 and 29" formats.

    I haven't narrowed it down to any particular aspect of the Assegai, but I suspect the loose tracking in hard pan turns is because the knobs are so tall. Since I don't love the tires, I'm going to experiment with cutting them a bit to see if I can make improvements.

    BTW, I bought a pair of Assegai's in the MaxTerra compound this summer on my 27.5 bike. At home they were a horror show but I went down near Santa Cruz to ride for a couple of weeks and have no complaints in the conditions they had down there. Got back home and back to the horror show. I've since swapped the front back to a DHF MaxxGrip (and then to an Assegai MG)and left the rear Assegai MaxxTerra setup and while it's nice to trust the front end again, the back end steps out in corners and slides off roots and rocks constantly, making things interesting at speed. Previously, I had an Aggressor MT on the rear with no complaints. I found it to be a perfectly adequate rear tire that rolls better than a DHR.
    Thanks for clarifying!

    I live and ride on the Northshore, I would think conditions would be similar? I have zero issues with the DHF when it moist/wet conditions. My DHF should last the winter, but I'll need to replace it in the spring. I've had my front tire washout unexpectedly 3 times in loose over hard corners. Sounds like a DHF Maxxgrip would be my best option.

    I'll take grip over rolling resistance, can't bike if I'm injured!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    It's mind blowing that the rolling resistance guy doesn't think we care about RR. It's so important in our application.
    He tracks it. People were just not going to his site and comparing aggressive MTB and fat bike tires. I used his site when I picked out Jumbo Jim fat bike tires, and I used it to verify that my Kenda fat bike tires were horrible. But I was like the only one.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graveltattoo View Post
    Thanks for clarifying!

    I live and ride on the Northshore, I would think conditions would be similar? I have zero issues with the DHF when it moist/wet conditions. My DHF should last the winter, but I'll need to replace it in the spring. I've had my front tire washout unexpectedly 3 times in loose over hard corners. Sounds like a DHF Maxxgrip would be my best option.

    I'll take grip over rolling resistance, can't bike if I'm injured!
    I imagine so. My riding buddy is up that way right now. He rode Squamish over the weekend and was at Fromme today. I convinced him to go with the MaxxGrip DHF and I think he put an Assegai DD MaxxGrip on the rear. Got a text from him yesterday that said he was so glad he switched over. The last time he went north, the MaxxTerra's were skittering all over the slabby rocks.
    Sean Chaney :: Owner/Builder :: Vertigo Cycles

  19. #19
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    I am very picky about slipping on wet roots and rocks and thought the MaxxTerra was fine.

    That being said, might as well get MaxxGrip. More grip is always better since eMTB can tolerate more rolling resistance.

  20. #20
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    How is the DHF\Assegai with MaxxGrip compound compared to MagicMary SG UltraSoft?

    Between DHF MaxxTerra (EXO+) and MM Soft (SuperGravity) that i had so far as front tires, i preferred the MM for mixed riding conditions.
    While the DHF had nice grip on dusty-loose over hardpack-bike park style rides, as soon as it become wet, muddy with slippery rocks n' roots i didnt had much grip compared to the MM..

  21. #21
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    Wow. So Magic Mary is better on wet roots and rocks than Assegai with MaxxGrip?

    I wish there was a machine that would test that objectively to know for sure.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsilvers View Post
    Wow. So Magic Mary is better on wet roots and rocks than Assegai with MaxxGrip?

    I wish there was a machine that would test that objectively to know for sure.
    Soft MM and Maxxgripp Assegai are very comparable. The MM is lighter and rolls better but I personally can't get 100miles on one before ripping side knobs. The Assegai I can get 300 miles on before it shows warm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    Soft MM and Maxxgripp Assegai are very comparable. The MM is lighter and rolls better but I personally can't get 100miles on one before ripping side knobs. The Assegai I can get 300 miles on before it shows warm
    I thought the MaxxTerra is more close to Schwalbe's Soft compound and MaxxGrip to UltraSoft...

    As for the ripping knobs, did you had this problem with the old version or the new Addix?
    Im running MM SG Soft front n' rear the last two month, around 550km so far, with many DH days at the bike park, and im quite surprised how well they holding, specially the rear tire.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy-Runs View Post
    I thought the MaxxTerra is more close to Schwalbe's Soft compound and MaxxGrip to UltraSoft...

    As for the ripping knobs, did you had this problem with the old version or the new Addix?
    Im running MM SG Soft front n' rear the last two month, around 550km so far, with many DH days at the bike park, and im quite surprised how well they holding, specially the rear tire.
    I haven't tried the newest versions, how rocky of an area do you ride?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsilvers View Post
    That being said, might as well get MaxxGrip. More grip is always better since eMTB can tolerate more rolling resistance.
    With grip definitely come a durability tradeoff. I'd guess that an E would rip the center/outer sipes off after a few weeks of hard use on hard pack.

    I'd venture to guess many people are riding these tires not even knowing the siped knobs are just barely hanging on as visually they look fine. Found that out the hard way a few times when the front mysteriously let go and I'm picking gravel out of my forearms.

    YMMV in good dirt (you PNW guys have it good...)

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    Keep in mine a lot of people buy these soft tires for racing and use them a few times. They are not even more expensive than a lift ticket to go skiing once. So if you want more general use and durability, they that is what Addix or MaxxTerra is for.

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    You might be good with it, but I'm not ok with paying $70 for a tire that only lasts a few weeks.

    On the front no less...

  28. #28
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    For me, if it doesn't last at least 500 miles I will look for a harder compound. My Nobby Nic Addix is at 462 miles and looks about 1/3 done.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cerberus75 View Post
    I haven't tried the newest versions, how rocky of an area do you ride?
    Im riding in the Austrian alps if its helps.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by smudge View Post
    I imagine so. My riding buddy is up that way right now. He rode Squamish over the weekend and was at Fromme today. I convinced him to go with the MaxxGrip DHF and I think he put an Assegai DD MaxxGrip on the rear. Got a text from him yesterday that said he was so glad he switched over. The last time he went north, the MaxxTerra's were skittering all over the slabby rocks.
    I'm currently riding the DHF Maxxterra Exo which weighs 1005g and I see the DHF Maxxgrip Exo weighs 1295g. Do you notice a big difference riding (RR) between the two?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Graveltattoo View Post
    I'm currently riding the DHF Maxxterra Exo which weighs 1005g and I see the DHF Maxxgrip Exo weighs 1295g. Do you notice a big difference riding (RR) between the two?
    Depends on conditions. If it's dry and I'm mostly riding at my home trails the biggest difference is how they hook up (or don't) on roots and baby heads. The MaxxGrip is happy to stay where I point it the majority of the time even if I'm riding over the shoulder of rocks or angled roots whereas the MaxxTerra slides off. when the MT breaks free off or a rock or root, it makes a specific sound, almost like when the bead seats under pressure. The MG compound just doesn't do that nearly as often and tracks much better on rocks, roots, and dusty hardpan and when it's wet, there's no comparison. I'm not likely to buy another MaxxTerra ever.
    Sean Chaney :: Owner/Builder :: Vertigo Cycles

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    I friend of mine has been riding the maxxgrip (HR2) for only four rides now (enduro). You can already see wear on all nobs. I dont think this willl last him more than a month. I guess its a trade off for more grip. Personnaly I cant afford a tire that will not last me a full summer.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suns_PSD View Post
    Plain and simply, Schwalbe tires roll better than competitors at any particular traction level.
    Shame they don't offer more fronts.
    So true. I only have experience with Schwalbe's Snakeskin casing, but I've also noticed that Schwalbe tires seem to roll faster and feel better when rolling than when using competitor tires with comparable EXO, GRID, Protection, TCS Tough casings.

    I'm running a DH-F front with a Nobby Nic rear tire. From my perception, the rear tire contributes far more to overall rolling resistance. This also provides a better ride feel than running a Maxxis rear tire.
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