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  1. #1
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    Industry Nine hubs for a heavy rider?

    I've been contemplating getting a 29er wheelset for my 2018 SC Tallboy. I've only been into mountain biking for a little less than a year so I'm still learning.

    My LBS is suggesting Nextie with the i9 Hydra Boost 32h hubs.

    Currently I'm 6'6" 300lbs, down from 349. Long term my goal weight is 240 so there's that. Are these the right hubs for a big dude like me? I need to know because those things are spendy and the wife hasn't fully let go of the fact that I spent so much on a "bicycle".

    I'm not a super aggressive rider. No jumping or super technical or rocky trails. But I do put a lot of power down, so something stout is a must.

    I've read a little about DT 350 hubs. Are they comparable?

    What other options are out there? Are they cheaper, or all quality hubs pretty much the same price.

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    What hubs do you currently have and have they been reliable for you?

    I would get dt swiss 350 with an 18 or 36 tooth ratchet. They are pretty reliable for bigger guys. I know people who have had them for 15+ years. Generally speaking, ratchet hubs like dt swiss are more reliable than pawl hubs. The new industry 9 hubs have not been on the market for long enough to have much real world feedback. The older ones would pop on occasion when all 3 pawls were not synced up. Whatever you decide, avoid stans and formula hubs

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    Pricey but Chris Kings w steal driver are a great option. Maybe also consider Onyx. Donít know too much about Hydras as they are new but should be solid.


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    I vary from 240-260 so Iím a baby Clyde comparatively, but, Iíve had bearing issue after bearing issue. At first I kept blowing up outboard hub driver bearings on my Onyx hubs. Then I was blowing up front dt 240s hubs. Then I went with Chris King and Iíve been good, itís only been 6 months but I havenít gone that long without a hub bearing failure in the last 3 years since I started riding again.
    Ruling out jumps and drops, the other problem is just cranking up steep trails. That puts a ridiculous amount of stress on the rear wheel. For sure, a 32h 3x pattern minimum but a 36h rear hub and wheel would be even stronger and problem proof. If you go the 36h route, Iíd recommend White Industries hubs as CK doesnít make a 36h hub.
    For rims, sure, nothing wrong with Nextie. I use LB rims and theyíve been great.

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    Are your current wheels not holding up? That sounds like a hell of an upsell, especially for a newer rider.

    If you keep destroying every hub you have and you're tired of down time, go with Chris King hubs. If they're too expensive go with DT 350's.

    Most people don't fall in the hub destroyer category and can run basically anything out there above the low end.

    Nexties are good, but so are lots of rims.

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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post

    What other options are out there? Are they cheaper, or all quality hubs pretty much the same price.
    White Industries are reasonably priced and have a steel axle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Are your current wheels not holding up? That sounds like a hell of an upsell, especially for a newer rider.

    If you keep destroying every hub you have and you're tired of down time, go with Chris King hubs. If they're too expensive go with DT 350's.

    Most people don't fall in the hub destroyer category and can run basically anything out there above the low end.

    Nexties are good, but so are lots of rims.
    My current wheels are holding up fine, and I'm not destroying hubs. I just want to upgrade to 29ers. And my LBS recommended I try the Nexties since they have a lower price barrier for entry into carbon rims. And that's when the conversation about hubs came in. What I definitely want is better engagement, so he mentioned the i9s. But once I saw the price I figured there had to be something less expensive out there.

    So then for someone like me, what route would you go when building a new set of wheels?

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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    What hubs do you currently have and have they been reliable for you?
    I currently have Novatec D642 hubs. So far so good with about 700 miles on them. But what I definitely don't like is the engagement. Before I even knew anything about hubs and such, I didn't like the delay in my pedaling stroke. So now I'm glad to know I don't have to settle for this hub.

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    If you feel that i9s are too expensive, you could always go for Hope Pro 4, it was 44 points of engagement.


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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post

    So then for someone like me, what route would you go when building a new set of wheels?
    Dt 350s with 18t, or the new 101s if you don't want to drop the money for the Hydras. Nexties are great. 32h should be enough for you. 14/15 double butted spokes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    I've been contemplating getting a 29er wheelset for my 2018 SC Tallboy. I've only been into mountain biking for a little less than a year so I'm still learning.

    My LBS is suggesting Nextie with the i9 Hydra Boost 32h hubs.

    Currently I'm 6'6" 300lbs, down from 349. Long term my goal weight is 240 so there's that. Are these the right hubs for a big dude like me? I need to know because those things are spendy and the wife hasn't fully let go of the fact that I spent so much on a "bicycle".

    I'm not a super aggressive rider. No jumping or super technical or rocky trails. But I do put a lot of power down, so something stout is a must.

    I've read a little about DT 350 hubs. Are they comparable?

    What other options are out there? Are they cheaper, or all quality hubs pretty much the same price.
    i9 hubs and carbon rims for a 300lb dude that's been riding for a year sounds like a hell of an up-sell.

    You have wheels and so far they're working. You don't need new wheels. Weight savings is 103% meaningless when you weigh over ~220lbs, and we're beyond the days of 24 spokes on production wheels.

    Wanna throw money at your bike? Get a fat guy shock tune. Or 3 different sets of tires and experiment with pressure. Or some oversized grips. Those things will make a real difference. Better yet, go on a trip!




    They sound like nice wheels, but it's still an unproven hub... and you're not going to notice any difference beyond placebo effect. You can get totally solid 29er wheels for MUCH less. Even then i wouldn't get too hung up over it; at our size we can run a 1100g tire and get those damping/tracking benefits without paying the same drag penalty as the little guys, at least in relative terms.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    i9 hubs and carbon rims for a 300lb dude that's been riding for a year sounds like a hell of an up-sell.
    It wasn't so much an upsell as it was he was answering my questions. And me not being well-versed in bike tech didn't know what follow up questions to ask. So that's why I came here to the forum.

    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    They sound like nice wheels, but it's still an unproven hub... and you're not going to notice any difference beyond placebo effect. You can get totally solid 29er wheels for MUCH less.
    What I really want out of a hub is durability and more points of engagement. So if you can suggest a direction for me to go in for a 29er build that doesn't break the bank, then please share the intel. This is the sort of info I'm hoping for. I need details!

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    The DT 350 is strong with the 18t ratchet, but you'll need to spend another $100 to get the 36t which still isn't that much frankly and now you're in White Industries territory.

    Hope is priced about the same as DT 350, has 44 POE and comes in blingy colors. Great bang for your buck, but they are super loud. If that doesn't bother you then it's a good option. You also have the option to upgrade to the stainless steel freehub at no extra cost.

    Above those you have White Industries and Hadley. Both $300-330 for the rear hub. They have 48poe and 72poe respectively, are both made in the USA, and both have a Titanium freehub body. Both excellent hubs.

    You don't need to go with carbon rims if you don't want to, a good durable aluminum rim will be just fine. Something asymmetric and eyeleted would build a nice strong wheel.
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    I currently have Novatec D642 hubs. So far so good with about 700 miles on them. But what I definitely don't like is the engagement. Before I even knew anything about hubs and such, I didn't like the delay in my pedaling stroke. So now I'm glad to know I don't have to settle for this hub.
    Wait, if I'm not mistaken the D642 has 84POE and you are complaining about slow engagement?

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    I'm not as big as you, but have found LBS will suggest the same components to me as they would a 150lb rider. That seems like the case with the I9 hubs, they really aren't any different then cheap Chinese hubs with regards to how they transmit power.

    With that being said, if you never want to worry about your hubs again....Chris King is the hub to get. They are expensive, but I don't know if you will find more then a hand full of complaints EVER posted about their durability. DT350 is another popular choice too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    I currently have Novatec D642 hubs. So far so good with about 700 miles on them. But what I definitely don't like is the engagement. Before I even knew anything about hubs and such, I didn't like the delay in my pedaling stroke. So now I'm glad to know I don't have to settle for this hub.
    Ok, the dt 350s are probably not the best choice then because the engagement is not high. Keep in mind that as the number of points of engagement goes up the ratchet teeth get smaller. That means in theory they are less robust for bigger riders. Sprag designs like Onyx hubs take a different approach, so those are worth checking out.
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  17. #17
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    I9 had their new 600+ points of engagement hydra hubs at a race recently, I inspected their cut-away examples and I can't say I was impressed by the machining, they have tiny teeth to achieve the crazy POE, but the machining did not look clean. As you make things smaller, it's harder to keep tolerances. Would it affect anything? I don't know, their design is a variation of the basic pawl setup as far as function.

    As mentioned above, CK is a good choice, it's a similar mechanism to DT, but it's at an angle which causes continuous engagement, so it's even better at high torque/load and of course "POE" is nearly instant.
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    Ok, the dt 350s are probably not the best choice then because the engagement is not high. Keep in mind that as the number of points of engagement goes up the ratchet teeth get smaller. That means in theory they are less robust for bigger riders.
    I was wondering about this yesterday as I was watching videos about hubs. Thanks for saying this. Definitely puts things into a different perspective.

    Perhaps my expectations when it comes to engagement are misplaced due to me being new to all this. In the end, when I do get the 29er wheelset, it just want it to be something I'm happy with and won't have to worry too much about. I'd like to accomplish that without selling the farm.

    So, any recommendations on a good 29er wheelsset, alloy or carbon? And a good, strong hub that won't break the bank?

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    Quote Originally Posted by chowdapilot View Post
    Pricey but Chris Kings w steal driver are a great option. Maybe also consider Onyx. Donít know too much about Hydras as they are new but should be solid.
    6', currently 245lbs (highest weight in last 10ys was 330+lbs). I tried I9's, they died within 3 mo's. They were warrantieed and my 140lb wife has them on her race HT.

    That being said I have Kings on all of my bikes except my Fatboy. I don't believe King has a fat bike hub available.

    My spec on the hubs is a DH through axle and steel tandem freehub body. I clean/service the hubs on my primary bike (5" duallie trail bike) twice a year and once a year on my road bike. I ride a campy equipped road bike with King R45 hubs. In all I have Kings on my SS, my 5" trail bike, my HT, my road bike, my DH bike, and my son has them on his 4" trail bike. I love my Kings.

    Edited to add: 1/2 of my King hubs are second hand. I clean and refurb them myself and haven't experienced any performance difference.

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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    So, any recommendations on a good 29er wheelsset, alloy or carbon? And a good, strong hub that won't break the bank?
    For me... I'd get a shop or a custom wheelbuilder to lace up something just for you. It is not really more expensive than complete wheelsets and you can get exactly what you want. See https://lacemine29.com/index.html he is an active member here and will steer you in the right direction if you contact him thru his website.

    For rims i'd choose DT swiss EX series in a heartbeat. DT EX511 if you want 30mm internal width, DT EX471 if you want 25mm internal width.

    For hubs you could go with DT350 if points of engagement isn't the #1 factor for you, but price and reliability are. If POE is the #1 factor and budget is no concern, look at Onyx, Hydra, or Chris King. My opinion is that high POE hubs are very overrated. They are loud, draggy, expensive, and high maintenance. Lots of people love them though, so if you like 'em, go for it.

    I am 250#, been riding the DT350 and DT240 hubs with DT EX rims on my bikes for a while now and they have been basically flawless. I have broken some lighter weight rims in the past.
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    For me... I'd get a shop or a custom wheelbuilder to lace up something just for you. It is not really more expensive than complete wheelsets and you can get exactly what you want. See https://lacemine29.com/index.html he is an active member here and will steer you in the right direction if you contact him thru his website.

    For rims i'd choose DT swiss EX series in a heartbeat. DT EX511 if you want 30mm internal width, DT EX471 if you want 25mm internal width.

    For hubs you could go with DT350 if points of engagement isn't the #1 factor for you, but price and reliability are. If POE is the #1 factor and budget is no concern, look at Onyx, Hydra, or Chris King. My opinion is that high POE hubs are very overrated. They are loud, draggy, expensive, and high maintenance. Lots of people love them though, so if you like 'em, go for it.

    I am 250#, been riding the DT350 and DT240 hubs with DT EX rims on my bikes for a while now and they have been basically flawless. I have broken some lighter weight rims in the past.
    This is great help, thanks! Now how should I approach the internal width decision? My current wheels that came with the bike are 40mm. What are the performance attributes of internal width?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    It wasn't so much an upsell as it was he was answering my questions. And me not being well-versed in bike tech didn't know what follow up questions to ask. So that's why I came here to the forum.



    What I really want out of a hub is durability and more points of engagement. So if you can suggest a direction for me to go in for a 29er build that doesn't break the bank, then please share the intel. This is the sort of info I'm hoping for. I need details!
    Ah, that makes a lot more sense! Good to hear.


    I have a fair amount of experience here, being very very good at breaking hubs. I've also been a 300lb mtb'er, although back then i didn't break any hubs (aside from shimano freehubs). I wasn't any stronger back then than i am now, and now i'm pretty good at putting down peak power while the wheel is loaded weird and i'll jump and land in rock gardens or sideways. It's not just the size of the rider, but also how well their able to throw their size around.

    A 300lb rider definitely benefits from a steel or ti freehub if you're not using XD.


    A quality set of hubs is an investment. You spend the 160-400$, service them ~annually, and they last indefinitely. They tend to hold their resale value because they're worth building up as a different wheelset when the time comes. Carbon rims are a tough sell to me; they're nice for sure, but the price bump is usually significant and the benefits are relatively small.

    Super durable and instant engagement sounds like an onyx hub to me, although i'm partial to dt350s because they're cheaper (especially from bikediscount.de) and fast engagement isn't particularly valuable to me. (it was more valuable when i was out of shape, had to always ride in my granny, and couldn't stay on the gas. Back then i was more excited about potential performance improvements than i was reliability and durability). There's nothing inherently wrong with pawls, like what i9, novatec, and hope use, but the mechanisms where all the engagement points are cut from the same 2 chunks of metal tend to be more durable.

    There's so many good alloy rims it's weird to pick a specific one, but i'm partial to DT and WTB. I'd figure an appropriate alloy rim with have a ~30mm width, cost around 90$ msrp, and weigh a bit north of 500g.


    The new i9 hubs might be phenomenal, but i don't see a reason to get the new product when there's plenty of proven alternatives.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    This is great help, thanks! Now how should I approach the internal width decision? My current wheels that came with the bike are 40mm. What are the performance attributes of internal width?
    I'd first try to determine what tires you will want to use. If you want wide tires, you'll have to figure out what is the maximum tire width that your frame will allow. Most modern frames can fit 29x2.35 tires, but wider than that is sometimes questionable unless the manufacturer has designed for it. Either the frame manufacturer will have this information or people will have tried it out and posted about it on here. Check out the manufacturer-specific subforums on the bottom of the main page. You'll want enough clearance so that a muddy tire can pass by the seatstays and chainstays without rubbing off all the frame paint.

    For 29x2.35, you could go with either 25mm or 30mm. The 25mm will cause the tire to have a more rounded profile, the 30mm will give it a more flattened out profile and more air volume.

    For 29x2.4 up to 29x2.6, i'd go with the 30mm internal width. The Maxxis Wide Trail series of tires were designed around 30-35mm internal width rims, so if you want those tires i'd get the 30mm.

    People have different opinions on what rim widths work for what tires, but that is what has worked for me. Manufacturers other than DT swiss make other rim widths (such as 26mm, 27mm, 31mm, etc.) but I have not used them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    ... (it was more valuable when i was out of shape, had to always ride in my granny, and couldn't stay on the gas. Back then i was more excited about potential performance improvements than i was reliability and durability).
    This! I think that's what I'm going for. I just didn't know how to articulate it. I'm super focused on getting in better shape and am in the granny gear a lot in climbs right now. So maybe the delayed engagement is getting to me.

    It sounds like there are plenty of affordable options out there. Especially in the DT arena. I'll start looking into all of that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    This! I think that's what I'm going for. I just didn't know how to articulate it. I'm super focused on getting in better shape and am in the granny gear a lot in climbs right now. So maybe the delayed engagement is getting to me.
    To elaborate, the lower the gear you're in, the more it exaggerates the feeling of a slow hub. The gearing multiplies the effect. I remember doing all the technical climbs in my bottom gear because i didn't have enough power to push a taller gear. Now that my power:weight is pretty good, i find myself in a slightly higher than 1:1 ratio because that helps me time where my feet will be when i pass over obstacles. I've effectively doubled my POE through fitness.

    Also, since i have more gas in the tank, i can sprint at obstacles and clear them with momentum, or use my strength to crank over, rather than having to ratchet through. There are much fewer instances where i notice hub engagement at all.

    Fast engagement is more valuable when you're slow and out of shape. At least in my experience. That's not to say people who like fast hubs are all lardasses or anything!
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    One thing to consider, though Kings are pricey they last forever. Iíve been running different wheels with King hubs for over 20 years and hardly an issue. Occasionally they need to be opened, cleaned and greased but thatís it. Also Iíve never had the need to remove the ring drive (takes a special tool) with any of my CK hubs.


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    Quote Originally Posted by chowdapilot View Post
    One thing to consider, though Kings are pricey they last forever. Iíve been running different wheels with King hubs for over 20 years and hardly an issue. Occasionally they need to be opened, cleaned and greased but thatís it. Also Iíve never had the need to remove the ring drive (takes a special tool) with any of my CK hubs.


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    If I were to go with a King rear hub is it necessary that the front hub be a king as well? Or can I choose whatever I want for the front? This sounds like a silly question to me but I gotta ask.

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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    If I were to go with a King rear hub is it necessary that the front hub be a king as well? Or can I choose whatever I want for the front? This sounds like a silly question to me but I gotta ask.
    The rear hub doesn't know what the front hub is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    The rear hub doesn't know what the front hub is.
    Well that's that on that!

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    I would honestly put a $30 shimano XT front hub up against the best out there at any price. The only one that might very slightly edge it out is the XTR hub

    The rear hubs can be problematic, but not the fronts. The fronts have an absurdly high load rating and total butter smooth bearings.

    Front hubs are for vanity only.

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    Agree, front hubs don't matter that much so you can save some cost there. That said, per the We Are One Podcast, King makes the strongest front hub on the planet with Project321 being 2nd. Great podcast by the way.

  32. #32
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    300# and thousands of miles on Hope hubs. They are good to go a NOT that loud. Keep in mind the cost of specialty tools if you want to fully maintin a CK hub. I had one and IMO not worth the extra cost over a Hope.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    300# and thousands of miles on Hope hubs. They are good to go a NOT that loud. Keep in mind the cost of specialty tools if you want to fully maintin a CK hub. I had one and IMO not worth the extra cost over a Hope.
    You are a lucky man then!

    I have never needed to do anything to my king hubs other then the basic lube every other season. I don't ride wet and muddy trails often or submerge my hubs in water though.

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    So this is what I think I'll ask my LBS to build for me:

    DT 29er alloy rims - 30 or 35mm
    Chris King rear hub, boost, 6 bolt
    Front hub - maybe a DT 350

    Do you all think this could be had for a budget of about $750? If I'm not getting i9s then this is probably the amount I would want to spend.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    300# and thousands of miles on Hope hubs. They are good to go a NOT that loud. Keep in mind the cost of specialty tools if you want to fully maintin a CK hub. I had one and IMO not worth the extra cost over a Hope.
    My hope made it 2 months before blowing out the bearings.

    You're also the only person on the planet who doesn't think hopes are loud. I can hear you riding them from here, and we're probably not even in the same state.

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    If you ask nicely they might print you out a fake receipt that says you only paid $750 in order to show the wife
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    If you ask nicely they might print you out a fake receipt that says you only paid $750 in order to show the wife
    Haha! That's what the shop I bought my bike from did!! He said they do that sort of thing all the time.

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    Shop around as you can prob do CK front and rear for 850 if try hard enough. Look at places like Colorado Cyclist and Fanatik that usually have coupons once in the cart. Like I said, most front hubs will work fine but having a matching set of King bling is always appealing

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    So my LBS came in at 950 for the set up with the CK hub. And 850 with the i9 hub.

    I went on Fanatik and was able to spec a CK build for $770. I may still let my local guy build up my wheels. Just so I can have an in person contact when something goes wrong. Although, now I'm starting to think I may go the way of a cheaper build for now that does not include a CK hub. In the end, I just want to see how I would like my bike as a 29er.

    So if you had about $700 to spend on a 29er wheelset build, what direction would you go in. Remember, I'm a big dude.

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    Your LBS is giving a price of 850 with i9 hydra and Nextie rims? I'd do that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    Your LBS is giving a price of 850 with i9 hydra and Nextie rims? I'd do that.
    Sorry, no not with Nextie rims. With DT Alloy rims on both builds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    So if you had about $700 to spend on a 29er wheelset build, what direction would you go in. Remember, I'm a big dude.
    Still DT350 hubs and DT EX series rims
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    Still DT350 hubs and DT EX series rims
    I second this


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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    Still DT350 hubs and DT EX series rims
    With the 54t upgrade or as is?

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    Skip the DT 350s. Their engagement sucks. When you move up to the 54pt ratchets you lose their reliability benefit and you're back at square one. Also their aluminum hub shell isn't going to hold up.

    White industry is 48pt stock, strong as hell, absolutely stunning in appearance, butter smooth big bearings, a steel axle, and a titanium freehub.

    240/350s have their place, but if you're wheel shopping because you're let down on engagement, that's the opposite way to go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Skip the DT 350s. Their engagement sucks. When you move up to the 54pt ratchets you lose their reliability benefit and you're back at square one. Also their aluminum hub shell isn't going to hold up.

    White industry is 48pt stock, strong as hell, absolutely stunning in appearance, butter smooth big bearings, a steel axle, and a titanium freehub.

    240/350s have their place, but if you're wheel shopping because you're let down on engagement, that's the opposite way to go.
    So I'm not shopping to do away with an engagement issue. Basically what I want is to build a set of 29er wheels that aren't too expensive. In the end a high-end rear hub would be a "nice-to-have" not a must have.

    Plus, a few posts below I was sort of enlightened as to why I'm experiencing these engagement issues. So I don't think it's that big of a deal now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    With the 54t upgrade or as is?
    I would keep the 18 or 36t ratchets for a 300# rider. If you want high engagement, the DT hubs are not the answer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    I would keep the 18 or 36t ratchets for a 300# rider. If you want high engagement, the DT hubs are not the answer.
    I won't be 300# for long!

    Thanks for the help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    My opinion is that high POE hubs are very overrated. They are loud, draggy, expensive, and high maintenance. Lots of people love them though, so if you like 'em, go for it.
    I've got a DT350 54POE on one bike and I9 Torch 120POE on the other. Riding both bikes on the same trails, I swear the Torch hub 'feels' draggier.

    The bike with the DT350 has a 2.5WT HR2 up front/2.6 Purgatory rear. The bike with I9 Torch has a 2.4WT DHR2 front and a semi-slick rear.

    I9 Torch bike should roll faster, but I swear it 'feels' the opposite
    I like 'em long, low, slack and playful

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    With the 54t upgrade or as is?
    The 54T doesn't hold up well under heavy riders. Very small engagement teeth that tend to chip. Doesn't matter if you don't plan to be 300# for long...you are 300# now. And despite the best made plans shyte happens. I was 250 and didn't plan to have health issues and ballon back up to 300# but here I am. I'd go DT350 with the 36T or something else. I still stand by my recommendation for Hope Pro 4. 44 POE and for me ranging from 250 to 300....they've been bombproof and I don't even maintain them. I just ride. I have one set with several thousand miles on them and two other sets in the hundreds of miles. And if you aren't a pansy...they aren't that loud dispite what anyone tries to tell you. They definitely aren't silent but they won't make you go deaf or prevent you from having a conversation while riding like some people will have you beleive...probably people just regurgitating what they've read and with no actual experience.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    The 54T doesn't hold up well under heavy riders. Very small engagement teeth that tend to chip. Doesn't matter if you don't plan to be 300# for long...you are 300# now. And despite the best made plans shyte happens. I was 250 and didn't plan to have health issues and ballon back up to 300# but here I am. I'd go DT350 with the 36T or something else. I still stand by my recommendation for Hope Pro 4. 44 POE and for me ranging from 250 to 300....they've been bombproof and I don't even maintain them. I just ride. I have one set with several thousand miles on them and two other sets in the hundreds of miles. And if you aren't a pansy...they aren't that loud dispite what anyone tries to tell you. They definitely aren't silent but they won't make you go deaf or prevent you from having a conversation while riding like some people will have you beleive...probably people just regurgitating what they've read and with no actual experience.
    Trust me, I know the battle to keep weight off all too well. But I will never give up!

    I'll look into the Hope Pro 4 for sure!

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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    I won't be 300# for long!

    Thanks for the help.
    You can always upgrade it later. If you do try the 54t and they chip, it takes only about 2 mins and no special tools to swap the ratchets. The ratchets are about $125 though
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    You can always upgrade it later. If you do try the 54t and they chip, it takes only about 2 mins and no special tools to swap the ratchets. The ratchets are about $125 though
    If you want a durable a fairly inexpensive hub and engagement doesn't matter to you the DT 350 is an excellent choice. As soon as you bring high engagement or bling into the conversation it immediately gets ruled out for me.

    I really like the DT products and I think they have their place, but I have not spent my money on one and probably won't in the near future. I'd rather spend more money and get better engagement, or less noise, or more bling, or some combination of those.

    Front hub? Great option.
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  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by the_joe View Post
    You can always upgrade it later. If you do try the 54t and they chip, it takes only about 2 mins and no special tools to swap the ratchets. The ratchets are about $125 though
    That's the thing...they are expensive. That's a high cost to experiment with IMO and already a number of heavy riders in the clyde section have reported chipped teeth using the 54T. And if/when the 54T gets destroyed...it sure would suck having to drop from 54T down to 18T or pony up again for the 36T driving the total cost up to a point that you could have just started with a nicer hub in the first place.
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    You may want to look into bitex hubs (from bikehubstore). They have 54 PoE, cost around $140 and have a good reputation around here for no bling.

    I had looked into DT 350 some time and they don't cost much more from bike24.de. but the problem with DT is low engagement (18) or added cost and less reliability once you add 54 ratchets. But what actually turned me away from DT is they require expensive special tools for bearing replacement. I think you need two special tools, and they are not the same for all their hubs. the bitex (same with Hope) hubs you can service without special tools.

    Another budget option is a shimano SLX (32 PoE) or XT (36 PoE). They are cheap, and have Cup/cone bearings. They have the DS bearing all the way on drive side, which seems to be better. You also can buy a relatively cheap replacement freehub if ever needed and replace easily.
    So with 54T ratchet, and special tools
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    You may want to look into bitex hubs (from bikehubstore). They have 54 PoE, cost around $140 and have a good reputation around here for no bling.


    Another budget option is a shimano SLX (32 PoE) or XT (36 PoE). They are cheap, and have Cup/cone bearings. They have the DS bearing all the way on drive side, which seems to be better. You also can buy a relatively cheap replacement freehub if ever needed and replace easily.
    So with 54T ratchet, and special tools
    Clydes should NOT try the Bitex hubs. I went all in on those hubs for about a year building 4-5 wheelsets. I've broken more axles than I can remember or count. I've killed freehubs, exploded bearings, etc. They die hard.

    None lived more than a year and I have a bunch of bikes which means the ride time is spread around. Plus I live in the North and riding is seasonal. Plus I "only" weigh 205 lbs. I break a lot of stuff but Bitex hubs are NOT up to the task. (and Brandons customer service and product knowledge sucks...) Avoid these if you're a strong rider or a Clyde.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    I still stand by my recommendation for Hope Pro 4. 44 POE and for me ranging from 250 to 300....they've been bombproof and I don't even maintain them. I just ride. I have one set with several thousand miles on them and two other sets in the hundreds of miles. And if you aren't a pansy...they aren't that loud dispite what anyone tries to tell you.
    I've cracked one freehub, killed another one by chewing through it with a cog (running a steel FHB now and it's awesome), and had to replace several bearings. I like my hope hubs (despite being obnoxiously loud), but they exist in some weird space between the garbage hubs and the best ones. I'll credit that their pawls have been flawless for me.

    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    If you want a durable a fairly inexpensive hub and engagement doesn't matter to you the DT 350 is an excellent choice. As soon as you bring high engagement or bling into the conversation it immediately gets ruled out for me.

    I really like the DT products and I think they have their place, but I have not spent my money on one and probably won't in the near future. I'd rather spend more money and get better engagement, or less noise, or more bling, or some combination of those.

    Front hub? Great option.
    Agreed on all points. It's why they're the best.
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    I9 also has their new 101. Again, they are new so not much feedback available yet.
    Worth a mention though. The price is right and the engagement is pretty good. 90 POE and I've heard good things about their customer service. I usually don't buy brand new models of things but I took the plunge. I have a wheel set on order with these so I guess I'll find out if they're durable soon enough.
    I'm not a clyde but do ride hard.

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    I've asked my LBS to give me a quote on the wheelset with the DT350 rear and front. I told him I'll pass on the 54T upgrade. He mentioned he had a 34T in the store that he'll let me have for free. So we'll see where this leads. If it's a good price I'll likely pull the trigger on it.

    With all the stories here about broken hubs/bearings/axles, etc. I'm wondering what style of riding leads to these failures. I do mostly xc/long ride type trails with pretty tame downhills. Nothing punchy or sendy by any means. Is it the more aggressive approach to riding that sees these parts breaking? At 6'6" 300# and 43 years old with a family and a job, I can't afford aggressive riding. So would my parts likely last longer?

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    With all the stories here about broken hubs/bearings/axles, etc. I'm wondering what style of riding leads to these failures. I do mostly xc/long ride type trails with pretty tame downhills. Nothing punchy or sendy by any means. Is it the more aggressive approach to riding that sees these parts breaking? At 6'6" 300# and 43 years old with a family and a job, I can't afford aggressive riding. So would my parts likely last longer?
    Seems like its size * riding style = destructive capability

    You'll see huge guys that never have any trouble and 150lb'ers that do, but it's the guys who are over 200lbs, fit, and fearless that have the most problems.

    Unfortunately, anyone who has a strong opinion on hubs got it by being destructive, so there's bias. To my mind, if i can spend an extra 100$ and i avoid 1 significant hub problem then it was worth it. That's what a set of spokes costs, and not much more than a replacement freehub.

    The 34t is great. The 18t is too slow.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    Another budget option is a shimano SLX (32 PoE) or XT (36 PoE). They are cheap, and have Cup/cone bearings. They have the DS bearing all the way on drive side, which seems to be better. You also can buy a relatively cheap replacement freehub if ever needed and replace easily.
    Those are not clyde friendly options at all.
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    In my experience climbing has been the most destructive activity for my rear hub. It is simple physics. People always try to argue that "pros put down more power, you aren't stronger then a pro", but the fact of the matter is I still need to get my big ass up that hill, and I try to do it as fast as I can. That is exactly why Chris King's ring drive setup is so bomb proof (I am not familiar with how DT swiss engages, but I feel like it is similar). The mechanical pieces that physically transmit the power from the chain to the hub are so much more robust when compared to a traditional pawl system.

    Doesn't I9 market their hubs as embracing flex and using it to engage pawls? hahaha I bet a few guys from DT, CK, and Onyx got a pretty good chuckle out of that.

    I lol'd when someone suggested BHS hubs. What a clown. Hoping that post was a joke.

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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    Clydes should NOT try the Bitex hubs. I went all in on those hubs for about a year building 4-5 wheelsets. I've broken more axles than I can remember or count. I've killed freehubs, exploded bearings, etc. They die hard.

    None lived more than a year and I have a bunch of bikes which means the ride time is spread around. Plus I live in the North and riding is seasonal. Plus I "only" weigh 205 lbs. I break a lot of stuff but Bitex hubs are NOT up to the task. (and Brandons customer service and product knowledge sucks...) Avoid these if you're a strong rider or a Clyde.
    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    Those are not clyde friendly options at all.
    I agree with both of these. I broke 2 BHS axles in short order, so that was the end of that hub for me.

    I've also gone through countless Shimano freehubs over the years, though they tended to last longer than the BHS did.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    "pros put down more power, you aren't stronger then a pro",
    I know, that is such a silly statement. While a pro may be able to sustain a higher power output for a longer period of time. The hubs are breaking do to instantaneous load. A 250+ lbs dude putting all their weight on a pedal stroke is going to produce much more force than some 150lb pro (for a fraction of a second). That being said a "pro" is able to apply their power in a smoother controlled fashion that also minimizes hub damage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post

    Doesn't I9 market their hubs as embracing flex and using it to engage pawls? hahaha I bet a few guys from DT, CK, and Onyx got a pretty good chuckle out of that.
    I'd be surprised if they did. It's a really clever solution, its only downfall is that it's relatively untested.
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    With all the stories here about broken hubs/bearings/axles, etc. I'm wondering what style of riding leads to these failures. I do mostly xc/long ride type trails with pretty tame downhills. Nothing punchy or sendy by any means. Is it the more aggressive approach to riding that sees these parts breaking? At 6'6" 300# and 43 years old with a family and a job, I can't afford aggressive riding. So would my parts likely last longer?
    I'm 6'4", 290# and 42 years old with a family. I don't consider myself an aggressive rider, but I still break stuff. A lot. I ride mostly XC with some techy stuff. I don't shy away from some chunky downhills. I don't do any jumps or anything like that though.

    I just switched to a DT350 rear hub due to their reputation of being bomb proof. I was/am a little worried about the 18T ratchet, but durability is worth way to more to me than POE. I've only had one ride on it. So far it hasn't been an issue.

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    Given equal gearing, I'd wager a clyde standing on the crank during a slow climb puts out more torque at the rear wheel than a lighter pro.

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    I hear of some guys who I have 50lb on who destroy hubs all day long. I think they're blasting the pedals. I just don't ride like that anymore. Any time I need to put down all my power, I'm already pedaling and already engaged. I rarely go from coasting to full blast.

    I dont even break shimano hubs. No shock load. Thats the only thing I can come up with for the discrepancy of people breaking hubs. If you're 150lb and strong, you can destroy a pawl hub if you're hot out of the corners from coasting. Its a big shock load, its more than I'm applying gradually ramping up my RPM, even at 210lb, even though my peak power input is likely higher.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    I'd be surprised if they did. It's a really clever solution, its only downfall is that it's relatively untested.
    In the Hydra hubs, each pawl is phased independently, engaging in procession as the axle rotates. With 115 teeth on the drivering, this creates 690 points where a pawl is engaged for every rotation of the freehub. Industry Nine doesnít rely on only one pawl for engagement though, and as the axle flexes under load more pawls are pushed into engagementóIndustry Nine says the hub will engage four pawls at once sometimes.

    ďAs the axle flexes under load, it will cause the proceeding pawls to come into engagement. It will always be the proceeding pawls [that] engage in the same sequential order,Ē says Michael Dulken, lead engineer on Hydra. ďIf you were to look at it in its unloaded state, (x) is the length of an individual drive ring tooth. Pawl #1 will be engaged, pawl #2 will be 1/6th*(x) distance from engagement, pawl #3 will be 2/6th*(x) distance from engagement, pawl #4 will be 3/6th*(x) distance from engagement and so forth. Following this logic, pawl #2 will be the next to engage. If enough load is applied pawl #3 then #4 could become engagedĒ

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    Quote Originally Posted by bvibert View Post
    I'm 6'4", 290# and 42 years old with a family. I don't consider myself an aggressive rider, but I still break stuff. A lot. I ride mostly XC with some techy stuff. I don't shy away from some chunky downhills. I don't do any jumps or anything like that though.

    I just switched to a DT350 rear hub due to their reputation of being bomb proof. I was/am a little worried about the 18T ratchet, but durability is worth way to more to me than POE. I've only had one ride on it. So far it hasn't been an issue.
    Man! I wish I could find guys built like us in my area to ride with. Whenever I meet up for a group ride I'm the "big guy" 100% of the time and end up getting left behind even though the ride is listed as a no drop. All good though. I'm a loner by nature.

    That said, on long climbs my approach is to just take my time and keep spinning. If I feel myself mashing that's when I know it's time to start walking.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jonshonda View Post
    In the Hydra hubs, each pawl is phased independently, engaging in procession as the axle rotates. With 115 teeth on the drivering, this creates 690 points where a pawl is engaged for every rotation of the freehub. Industry Nine doesnít rely on only one pawl for engagement though, and as the axle flexes under load more pawls are pushed into engagementóIndustry Nine says the hub will engage four pawls at once sometimes.

    ďAs the axle flexes under load, it will cause the proceeding pawls to come into engagement. It will always be the proceeding pawls [that] engage in the same sequential order,Ē says Michael Dulken, lead engineer on Hydra. ďIf you were to look at it in its unloaded state, (x) is the length of an individual drive ring tooth. Pawl #1 will be engaged, pawl #2 will be 1/6th*(x) distance from engagement, pawl #3 will be 2/6th*(x) distance from engagement, pawl #4 will be 3/6th*(x) distance from engagement and so forth. Following this logic, pawl #2 will be the next to engage. If enough load is applied pawl #3 then #4 could become engagedĒ
    So what if I9 markets with the axle flex? Axle flex is happening on everybody else's hubs, too, and if they say it doesn't, they're lying. The operative question is what other hubs do about it? I9 is attempting to make use of the flex in the Hydra hub in a way that firms things up and reduces further flex.

    Will it make their hubs more durable for hub destroyer type riders? It's apparently been working for the riders who have been testing their hubs for quite some time before they were released to the public, but the serious hub destroyer types are going to have to ride them and see.

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I hear of some guys who I have 50lb on who destroy hubs all day long. I think they're blasting the pedals. I just don't ride like that anymore. Any time I need to put down all my power, I'm already pedaling and already engaged. I rarely go from coasting to full blast.

    I dont even break shimano hubs. No shock load. Thats the only thing I can come up with for the discrepancy of people breaking hubs. If you're 150lb and strong, you can destroy a pawl hub if you're hot out of the corners from coasting. Its a big shock load, its more than I'm applying gradually ramping up my RPM, even at 210lb, even though my peak power input is likely higher.
    I known when i've damaged a hub a couple times. Landing jumps crooked kills the inner freehub bearing. A proper good rim strike is a good way to damage an outer one. Every time i've known when i damaged a freehub it's been pressing my rear wheel in to the face of a ledge and using the impact to crank up it. You have a crazy amount of traction then, and can really torque the pedals.
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    Man! I wish I could find guys built like us in my area to ride with. Whenever I meet up for a group ride I'm the "big guy" 100% of the time and end up getting left behind even though the ride is listed as a no drop. All good though. I'm a loner by nature.
    Tell me about it! I was one of the group ride "leaders" last night, which usually means I'm the sweeper to make sure we don't lose anyone. I was pretty far off the pack in short order! I'm thinking that the 20 pounds I put on over the winter might have had something to do with that...

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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I hear of some guys who I have 50lb on who destroy hubs all day long. I think they're blasting the pedals. I just don't ride like that anymore. Any time I need to put down all my power, I'm already pedaling and already engaged. I rarely go from coasting to full blast.

    I dont even break shimano hubs. No shock load. Thats the only thing I can come up with for the discrepancy of people breaking hubs. If you're 150lb and strong, you can destroy a pawl hub if you're hot out of the corners from coasting. Its a big shock load, its more than I'm applying gradually ramping up my RPM, even at 210lb, even though my peak power input is likely higher.
    Excellent point. Shock loading achieves much more loading than even the strongest engaged crank.
    In light of that, I suppose the high engagement hubs would have less overall shock load potential. How does that play into it I wonder?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bvibert View Post
    I agree with both of these. I broke 2 BHS axles in short order, so that was the end of that hub for me.

    I've also gone through countless Shimano freehubs over the years, though they tended to last longer than the BHS did.
    Ok, maybe my advise wasn't that great. I'm no clyde, so no experience.

    My idea with Shimano was that most other hubs have the ratchet ring in the hub shell. So when that goes, the entire hub is dead. With Shimano you can replace the complete freehub that includes the ring. Yes it may not last as long, but cheap to replace and doesn't require lacing the wheel. And it is cheap to begin with. Sure, won't last like a King or DT hub, but better than a noname Novatec et al that cost more.

    I upgraded my fatbike to bitex from a failed Novatec and was under the impression it is well regarded. Fine so far with my 175#. I will see how it works out. But probably not aproppriate for OP....I concede.
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    Quote Originally Posted by HerrKaLeun View Post
    Ok, maybe my advise wasn't that great. I'm no clyde, so no experience.

    My idea with Shimano was that most other hubs have the ratchet ring in the hub shell. So when that goes, the entire hub is dead. With Shimano you can replace the complete freehub that includes the ring. Yes it may not last as long, but cheap to replace and doesn't require lacing the wheel. And it is cheap to begin with. Sure, won't last like a King or DT hub, but better than a noname Novatec et al that cost more.

    I upgraded my fatbike to bitex from a failed Novatec and was under the impression it is well regarded. Fine so far with my 175#. I will see how it works out. But probably not appropriate for OP....I concede.
    Yeahhh... the logic is sound, but it's terrible advice.

    Shimano freehubs are the worst freehub available from an otherwise reputable company, and they're obnoxious to replace. Also, it's extremely rare to damage the drive ring on a hub, so there's no benefit to having the mechanism contained in the freehub. Not knowing that stuff is a GOOD THING.
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  77. #77
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    Shimano is so weird about hubs. They need to get it together. Best bearing system out there with the worst freehubs. If they borrowed dt's drive rings they would have the craziest strong hubs out there.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I hear of some guys who I have 50lb on who destroy hubs all day long. I think they're blasting the pedals. I just don't ride like that anymore. Any time I need to put down all my power, I'm already pedaling and already engaged. I rarely go from coasting to full blast.

    I dont even break shimano hubs. No shock load. Thats the only thing I can come up with for the discrepancy of people breaking hubs.
    If you're 150lb and strong, you can destroy a pawl hub if you're hot out of the corners from coasting. Its a big shock load, its more than I'm applying gradually ramping up my RPM, even at 210lb, even though my peak power input is likely higher.
    I don't put any shock load into my hubs, I pedal the same way you do. Don't judge me bro.

    (I've also broken 3 drive side chainstays, two in the last 6 months. Not cool)
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post

    With all the stories here about broken hubs/bearings/axles, etc. I'm wondering what style of riding leads to these failures. I do mostly xc/long ride type trails with pretty tame downhills. Nothing punchy or sendy by any means. Is it the more aggressive approach to riding that sees these parts breaking? At 6'6" 300# and 43 years old with a family and a job, I can't afford aggressive riding. So would my parts likely last longer?
    For me, it's always been the same story:
    Climbing something steep and losing momentum and have to really mash on the pedals in a very low gear (usually the granny). I hear a "pop" and then my bike has been turned into a fixie.

    By the way, I've had great success with Hope Pro2 evo and DT350 (18T).
    I do notice the slow engagement of the 18T, but it's not like it keeps me from clearing anything.

    Mike at lacemine29.com built me a WTB Asym I29 with a DT350 a couple years ago and it's been flawless.
    Last edited by notso; 2 Weeks Ago at 06:36 AM. Reason: add info

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    Just got back from the bike chain store where I bought my bike to see if they had any recommendations on a wheelset. The mechanics manager told recommended the Roval Traverse alloy. It's a brand they carry. Anyone here familiar with it. A wheelset with the DT350s would come in around $650 without tires.

    I'm still waiting on my guy at the LBS to get back to me with the other build cost estimate.

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    Seems high. But I usually source my own parts and take them to my LBS to have built so I'm able to usually get decent deals on the parts.
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  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    recommended the Roval Traverse alloy. It's a brand they carry. Anyone here familiar with it.
    28 spoke with a 3 pawl freehub? lol.
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    Just got back from the bike chain store where I bought my bike to see if they had any recommendations on a wheelset. The mechanics manager told recommended the Roval Traverse alloy. It's a brand they carry. Anyone here familiar with it. A wheelset with the DT350s would come in around $650 without tires.

    I'm still waiting on my guy at the LBS to get back to me with the other build cost estimate.
    Yeah, itís Specializedís house brand for wheels. DT Swiss based internals. But the alloy versions are usually on pawl systems, itís mostly the carbon wheels that have the ratchets. And for some reason, Specialized loves keeping the spoke count to 28..


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  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    28 spoke with a 3 pawl freehub? lol.
    Yeah, for a heavy rider, no way would I be recommending anything less than 32 spoke wheels unless they were demonstrably smooth riders, light on parts, looking for a lighter wheel.

    I'm 100lbs lighter than OP, fully kitted up, and experienced wheel builders won't even recommend 28 spoke wheels to me.

    It you put a premium hub in the wheel build like a King, I9, Onyx, or whatever, I don't think you'll be getting out of it for less than $1,000. If building a whole new wheelset from scratch, I'm of the opinion that you might as well match the hubs. The front hub will be far less expensive than the rear, so you won't save THAT much money when you look at the total build costs. The only time I'd mismatch hubs would be if I already had a complete bike and had to replace one wheel because I broke something. I've done that before, but haven't broken a hub for many years.

    If you want a premium hub on a budget, IMO, you should be looking at the used market. I bet there are more than a few used Torch wheelsets up for sale right now.

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    So I'll be having my LBS build my wheels. DT350 front and back on DT EX rims. Cost came in at $730 before tires. So I'm probably looking at about $900 once I add the rubber.

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    Good luck with your new wheelset! Report back on your experience: good or bad.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    So I'll be having my LBS build my wheels. DT350 front and back on DT EX rims. Cost came in at $730 before tires. So I'm probably looking at about $900 once I add the rubber.
    Damn.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow4eva View Post
    If you feel that i9s are too expensive, you could always go for Hope Pro 4, it was 44 points of engagement.


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    Unless the Hope Pro 4 are better than the Hope Pro 2 EVO, I wouldn't recommend them for a heavy rider. I went through 8 sets of freehub bearings on mine, on 2 different freehub shells, in less than a year. I went I9 (torch) 3 years ago, and have only replaced the bearings once, and that was to solve a creaking issue.
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  89. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Good luck with your new wheelset! Report back on your experience: good or bad.
    The 350's are a well known quantity, no new information will be posted here. Frankly I'm curious how the Hydra's hold up under heavy stress or in the long run. I was hoping we had a test mule.
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    Test mule

    I'm @ 255 lbs and ride in very Sandy, dusty and Rocky conditions, running the I9 Hydra hubs on a 29" Enduro 305 wheel, so far, I'm loving the wheelset. Will report back on any issues.

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    Quote Originally Posted by *OneSpeed* View Post
    The 350's are a well known quantity, no new information will be posted here. Frankly I'm curious how the Hydra's hold up under heavy stress or in the long run. I was hoping we had a test mule.
    Ha! If a test mule is what you were after then you guys did a terrible job talking me into it!

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    Okay, maybe not $900. The tires he's telling me to get aren't as expensive as I thought. (DHF and Aggressor)

    I took the recommendations of the folks in this thread and tried to cobble together a shopping list of the parts myself. In the end, the savings wasn't that much over having my LBS do it. Fanatikbikes was maybe around $80 cheaper, but since I'm new to the game, having someone local build the set up was a better idea for me right now.

    As I get more into the hobby I could definitely see myself collecting the parts myself and just having someone build it up.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by SlowMTBer View Post
    Unless the Hope Pro 4 are better than the Hope Pro 2 EVO, I wouldn't recommend them for a heavy rider. I went through 8 sets of freehub bearings on mine, on 2 different freehub shells, in less than a year. I went I9 (torch) 3 years ago, and have only replaced the bearings once, and that was to solve a creaking issue.
    Not sure what you did to yours but mine have 1000's of miles with ZERO issues and I'm between 250 and 300. That's a Pro 2 EVO set on my single speed mountain bike and 2 sets of Pro 4 hubs...one on my single speed gravel bike and the other on my geared mountain bike. Had a Pro 2 hubset a while back with a lot of miles on it at over 250 pounds and never had a problem with it either.
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  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    Okay, maybe not $900. The tires he's telling me to get aren't as expensive as I thought. (DHF and Aggressor)

    I took the recommendations of the folks in this thread and tried to cobble together a shopping list of the parts myself. In the end, the savings wasn't that much over having my LBS do it. Fanatikbikes was maybe around $80 cheaper, but since I'm new to the game, having someone local build the set up was a better idea for me right now.

    As I get more into the hobby I could definitely see myself collecting the parts myself and just having someone build it up.
    $730 just seems really high. 350's are cheap hubs. Catch a sale on ebay and some other smart shopping and you can get that wheel set much cheaper. I paid a little less than $500 for my WTB Asym i35 wheels with Hope Pro 4 hubs and DT Swiss Comp spokes including $100 labor for the build. No way I'd pay $730 for a DT Swiss 350 build unless they were carbon hoops.
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    Buying lbs wheels adds 200-300 to the cost since bike shops are forced to use really bad 3rd party suppliers.

    My no deals full pop price for 350s on ex rims with 2.0/1.8 spokes is around $500. 100 bucks labor to put it together, their lbs markup is $130. That's about right.

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by levelseventysix View Post
    So I'll be having my LBS build my wheels. DT350 front and back on DT EX rims. Cost came in at $730 before tires. So I'm probably looking at about $900 once I add the rubber.
    Sounds very sensible. If anything goes wrong later on you and you need warranty help, or if they go out of true, or whatever, it's easy dealing with your LBS.

    Ignore anyone saying that 350's are cheap hubs, they're not, they're not even inexpensive. Dodgy no-name hubs from Asia are cheap. Name brand hubs from Asia are inexpensive (e.g. Bitex). 350's are good value.

  97. #97
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    When I say cheap it means not a lot of money. That's fact. A front/rear set for less than $200 is NOT expensive considering many hubs are more than that for just the rear.
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  98. #98
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    The I9's have been beefed up over the years and are pretty tough, but the 350's have been around longer and are sure to a good pick.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddleDuck View Post
    Sounds very sensible. If anything goes wrong later on you and you need warranty help, or if they go out of true, or whatever, it's easy dealing with your LBS.
    Yeah, this is why I'm going with my LBS. Besides, they have put up with a lot of my questions and sent me a handful of quotes with different options. So for the sake of good vibes I'm buying from them instead of going elsewhere just to save a few bucks.

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    Update:

    The wheels are on. I haven't had a chance to go on a real ride yet. Hoping to do that this week. Ended up with some slightly cheeper rims: E532.


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