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Thread: Hub ball layout

  1. #1
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    Hub ball layout

    hello every body i have a question about the placing & layout of balls in non ballbearing hubs !!!

    What are non ball bearing hubs called in English ?

    My question is that when you put all balls in place there is a gap between the balls that another ball can not fit in ...

    Hub ball layout-p4pb17151711.jpg

    Why is it so ?? and doesnt this gap make all the balls to be in a unsuitable position ? or isnt the weigh & force distributed unevenly in this situation ???

  2. #2
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    In "cup and cone" bearings the load is more or less distributed evenly around the circumference of the bearing races.
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    Quote Originally Posted by life behind bars View Post
    In "cup and cone" bearings the load is more or less distributed evenly around the circumference of the bearing races.
    Thanx a lot so their called cup & cone hubs........

  4. #4
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    The hub in the picture is called a cup and cone, or loose ball hub. The other type is called a cartridge bearing hub, but some call them sealed bearings. Cartridge bearing is correct though.

    The less loose balls you have in there, the less friction. I think they leave the gap to decrease friction and allow room for grease? Im sort of guessing though. On higher end loose ball hubs, they include plastic bearing spacers.

  5. #5
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    If there was no [slight] gap, the bearings would rub against each other, which is undesirable.

    Cartridges (and some "loose" bearing hubs) use a spacer to keep the balls from touching, and in the special full-compliment cartridge bearings, they have a small gap, as well.

  6. #6
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    As has been said, those are Cup & Cone hubs. There has to be space between the bearings to allow for grease and movement or else the balls would bind and not move/spin smoothly. In general you find this setup on lower end hubs or on all Shimano hubs. It's actually a pretty good system, but not as easy to service as just popping out cartridge bearings and replacing them, the adjustment isn't as easy and they generally require a bit more maintenance/service to keep them running smoothly.

    Bit of an FYI, if you're going to be servicing a hub, especially cup & cone, where there's a good deal of grease, best to remove the rotors from the hubs instead of risking getting grease on them and having to deal with that. Also take your time when adjusting them, you need to just take out any play, no tighter or they will start to bind. Shimano actually make a tool AFAIK to help with this, so if you're going to be working on a lot of them, might be worth looking into.
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  7. #7
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    Thanx to all for their help

    So by the things i understood from the posts even if there is enough space between the balls fora another ball to fit in but it causes the balls to rub against each other
    Its better to leave that empty space alone right ?



    Bit of an FYI, if you're going to be servicing a hub, especially cup & cone, where there's a good deal of grease, best to remove the rotors from the hubs instead of risking getting grease on them and having to deal with that.

    in the case of center lock rotors i do so but for 6 bolts..


    Noooo i prefer cleaning the rotor after wards with alcohol than to open up 6 bolts and installing them again specially that all of them often have locktite on them and opening & closing them all again is a pain in the ***


    you need to just take out any play, no tighter or they will start to bind.



    Shimano actually make a tool AFAIK to help with this, so if you're going to be working on a lot of them, might be worth looking into.
    what is that tool ?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iranian-Mechanic View Post
    ... but for 6 bolts..
    Use an electric drill/driver to turn the bolts in/out. I manually break them free and torque them only using the drill/driver to do all the turns in between.
    Do the math.

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