Has anyone ridden the Zipp 3zero Motos yet?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Has anyone ridden the Zipp 3zero Motos yet?

    My original wheel builder fell through (donít ask) and Iím now looking at other options.

    The shop building up my bike is getting a set of the 29Ē Zipp 3zero Motos on Thursday and they are mine if I want them.

    Ive seen the videos, and read the comments from the armchair engineers, but what Id really like to hear form people who have actually ridden them.

    Any experience out there?

  2. #2
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    Well, looks like Iím one of the first. My bike isnít complete yet as we are still waiting on a dropper post. But the Zipp 3zero Motos came in and they look pretty cool.

    The rims ďfeelĒ very similar weights to the Enves they had on for mock up while building the bike.

    The profiles are so very different. Visually the difference is instantly apparent. The Zips look sort of like an aluminum rim done in carbon.

    The felt plenty stiff in my hands, but that is meaningless. Iím hoping to get out and ride them this weekend.

    The hubs are on the noisy side, but not obnoxious, just not quiet.

    I personally really like the unique carbon weave. While not up to supercar standards, it looks to be well done.

    Has anyone ridden the Zipp 3zero Motos yet?-10adc058-208e-4857-b306-6f5a2f0033e4.jpg

    Has anyone ridden the Zipp 3zero Motos yet?-92b5bac6-0446-4066-8049-20d4dcca0ed9.jpg

    Has anyone ridden the Zipp 3zero Motos yet?-3b393a19-5a94-4aad-bf02-60049274c097.jpg

  3. #3
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    are you a roadie? I am curious what drew you to these. previous experience with Zipp on a road bike is my first guess. that appearance is unique, but I'm sure it is a veneer; top layer only, if you prefer.

    I have not researched them extensively but one look at the weight and price made me look elsewhere. there are many wheels and rims either lighter or cheaper, and some that are both.

  4. #4
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    Never been a roadie.

    Iím not sold on the weight issue at these tiny differences. Hereís a great quote from Bike Radar:

    ďFor a system weight (bike and rider) of 100kg, youíd need at least a 500g difference in combined rim weight to make a 1 percent difference to accelerationĒ

    Similarly priced carbon rims from premier name brands (some cost a little less, some cost much more):

    Enve (1789 gm)
    Ibis (1690-1748 gm)
    SC Reserve (1811 gm)
    We_Are_One Agent (1803)

    In real world riding most of these come close enough to the Zipp 3zero Moto rims (1910 gm). The difference in weights in your tire choice are often higher. Especially if you want durability and compliance.

    Running double down casings and cushcore to stop pinch flats likely adds as much or more weight than the difference in the wheels.

    Most of the above mentioned rims would be over the Zipp weight if you had to include Cushcore (260 gm) to get the protection and dampening (compliance) offered by rims like the Zipp 3zero Moto (1910 gm) and the Crank Bros Synthesis (1829 gm) offer.

    The Crank Bros Synthesis were also a rim I was interested in, but they were even more expensive.

    Iíve done the super rigid carbons before. My last bike (Ibis HD3) had a an aluminum rim on it (Ibis 738), and I frankly loved the way those felt. Iím hoping the Zips feel like more like the aluminum rims but have the strength of the carbon hoops.

    Hey, if no one tries the new ideas, there will be no new ideas.

    If I find I prefer the ride and carry a few hundred grams, Iím happy.
    If I find I donít have to run inserts and or double down casings there might not even be a weight penalty

    Ride report when I get some miles on them

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ColinL View Post
    there are many wheels and rims either lighter or cheaper, and some that are both.

    You write that as if weight and cost are the most important metrics to consider with wheels.

    They are 2 of the top 5, but not the top 2.

    I'd love to try these Zipp's. Eventually I will.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    You write that as if weight and cost are the most important metrics to consider with wheels.

    They are 2 of the top 5, but not the top 2.

    I'd love to try these Zipp's. Eventually I will.
    I agree 100% with your comment.

    On my most recent build I went SRAM AXS XX1 to save the weight. I felt that made sense and for my riding there was no downside having the weight removed there.

    For the wheels, I really wanted more feel and compliance. Especially since I was moving from an aluminum wheeled 27.5 to my first 29er.

    Iím interested in this idea of the tire, wheel, fork being considered a holistic suspension and dampening system.

    I personally think there will be a lot of new developments in this ďsystemĒ over the next few years.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee View Post
    You write that as if weight and cost are the most important metrics to consider with wheels.

    They are 2 of the top 5, but not the top 2.

    I'd love to try these Zipp's. Eventually I will.
    Sure. Another one is durability which we can't ever truly know except for a) user feedback and we know some riders are harsher than others, and some riders don't put much air in their tires, and

    b) warranty.

    These do have a lifetime warranty. AFAIK Santa Cruz was first to market with that (June 2017) and I'm thrilled other brands are following suit. And I say this as a person who has never broken a rim of any kind.

  8. #8
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    Correct, itís hard to measure the durability without a really large sample base. The anecdotal evidence of a few riders isnít going to give a lot of insight because there are so many variables.

    The fact these have already podiumed with top riders is a good sign. Top tier riders likely put more stress on a wheel in one run than I might in a whole season

    Plus they are heavily warrantied and my local bike shop carries them. So Iím hoping if I have an issue, it can be taken care of.

    Iíll let you guys know what I think once I get a few miles on them.

  9. #9
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    Looking forward to your feedback.

    I like your thinking re: "Iím interested in this idea of the tire, wheel, fork being considered a holistic suspension and dampening system.

    I personally think there will be a lot of new developments in this ďsystemĒ over the next few years."


    I'd expand this to include the frame itself - I remember that when Dave Turner released his first carbon frame (Czar 29er XC bike), he spend a lot of time getting the stiffness he wanted in the direction he wanted (i think it was front-back).

    Members on another site (whose name starts with P) often state that they're happier with traditional carbon rims on alu frames than carbon frames.

    I'm excited buy the current trends re: carbon rims

  10. #10
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    Yeah these guys are looking at the whole bike as a suspension system, by integrating the front and rear suspensions as an integral part of the frame design, not a bolt on.

    Very curious to see how they ride.

    https://structure.bike/

    Quote Originally Posted by PuddleDuck View Post
    Looking forward to your feedback.

    I like your thinking re: "Iím interested in this idea of the tire, wheel, fork being considered a holistic suspension and dampening system.

    I personally think there will be a lot of new developments in this ďsystemĒ over the next few years."


    I'd expand this to include the frame itself - I remember that when Dave Turner released his first carbon frame (Czar 29er XC bike), he spend a lot of time getting the stiffness he wanted in the direction he wanted (i think it was front-back).

    Members on another site (whose name starts with P) often state that they're happier with traditional carbon rims on alu frames than carbon frames.

    I'm excited buy the current trends re: carbon rims

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