Half a dozen punctures on front and same on back 5 month old tires...- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Half a dozen punctures on front and same on back 5 month old tires...

    Unfortunately I have half a dozen punctures for the front and rear tubeless tires. Seems when there was trail maintenance going on the weed eating left much to be desired as thorns ended up all over the trail resulting in the punctures. I cleaned it up but of course too late for me. Not losing a ton of air after a week. Couple of thorns in the front I just left in as they are flush and not losing air.

    How should I proceed? Tires are 5 month old Nobby Nics in 27.5 x 2.8. Soil here is clay based and can be really chunky in spots. I can ride when its damp but not wet as it destroys the trails. I weigh 200lbs kitted. Should I just replace the tires or patch? What is the best method or just get after it with bacon strips? If replacing, what would be a good grab for midwest rider\slick soil rooty and rocky? I ride in the fall and winter. Hoping to get things in order soon, have a trip planned for Bentonville next weekend and definitely don't want to worry about flats. Thanks everyone!

  2. #2
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    I presume you are not Tubeless?
    always mad and usually drunk......

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmg View Post
    I presume you are not Tubeless?
    Sorry, I edited. This is my first tubeless setup so I am not sure the direction. Thank you!!

  4. #4
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    Umm... not sure where to start.
    Veni vidi velo!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloborealis View Post
    Umm... not sure where to start.
    With punctures and not losing too much air after several days, don't worry about it?

    With so many punctures, replace tires?

    Pull tires and patch inside since a few thorns are flush or just bacon strip it?

    Feel free to add whatever I am missing or if you're trying to help, start with what you'd do. Thanks!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrandon View Post
    Sorry, I edited. This is my first tubeless setup so I am not sure the direction. Thank you!!
    That helps, a little.

    As long as you have an adequate amount of sealant in your tires you should be fine. How many miles on those tires (and their condition) will dictate whether they need replacing. I can wear out a set of tires in 5 months riding 50-100 miles a week.
    Veni vidi velo!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrandon View Post
    With punctures and not losing too much air after several days, don't worry about it?

    With so many punctures, replace tires?

    Pull tires and patch inside since a few thorns are flush or just bacon strip it?

    Feel free to add whatever I am missing or if you're trying to help, start with what you'd do. Thanks!
    Without looking at your tires, my best guess is don't worry about it. A few ounces of liquid sealant in each tire should be able to seal any thorn-sized holes. I commonly have to add air to my tires every other week or so. If I can get through a three hour ride without my tires getting soft, I don't worry about it. Don't forget to refresh your sealant every month or so if you live in a hot, dry climate.
    Veni vidi velo!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by veloborealis View Post
    Without looking at your tires, my best guess is don't worry about it. A few ounces of liquid sealant in each tire should be able to seal any thorn-sized holes. I commonly have to add air to my tires every other week or so. If I can get through a three hour ride without my tires getting soft, I don't worry about it. Don't forget to refresh your sealant every month or so if you live in a hot, dry climate.
    Tires look solid. I probably have 500-600 miles on them. Sounds like nothing to worry about for now since still holding quite well. Thank you for the help! I haven't added any sealant though the reason I saw so many punctures was due to the sealant I'd seen that was bubbled out if you will.

  9. #9
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    Sealant dries out and needs to be periodically refreshed. Depending on conditions, that might be every six months and maybe more often. At 5 months in, you're probably due to add a couple oz/tire.
    Do the math.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    Sealant dries out and needs to be periodically refreshed. Depending on conditions, that might be every six months and maybe more often. At 5 months in, you're probably due to add a couple oz/tire.
    Here in AZ definitely more often than every 5-6 months. With Stan's, at least. I also store my bike in the garage, which gets pretty hot in the summer.
    Veni vidi velo!

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrandon View Post
    Unfortunately I have half a dozen punctures for the front and rear tubeless tires. Seems when there was trail maintenance going on the weed eating left much to be desired as thorns ended up all over the trail resulting in the punctures.
    You can't exactly expect them to run a vacuum cleaner on the trail after trimming. As long as they cleared most of the big stuff off the trail, that's cool. There's a horseback rider group that does trail trimming in my area without ever getting off their horses. They trim right from horseback and they leave EVERYTHING they trim in the trail. Now that kind of thing isn't kosher.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheBrandon View Post
    How should I proceed? Tires are 5 month old Nobby Nics in 27.5 x 2.8. Soil here is clay based and can be really chunky in spots. I can ride when its damp but not wet as it destroys the trails. I weigh 200lbs kitted. Should I just replace the tires or patch? What is the best method or just get after it with bacon strips? If replacing, what would be a good grab for midwest rider\slick soil rooty and rocky? I ride in the fall and winter. Hoping to get things in order soon, have a trip planned for Bentonville next weekend and definitely don't want to worry about flats. Thanks everyone!
    As long as the tires hold air, keep riding them. I've got a tire still in service that has multiple punctures from sticks the size of fingers. One sealed right up with only sealant because the stick was sharp. Another needed an actual permanent tire patch because it was blunt and a piece of rubber went missing. The tires don't have a ton of miles, since I rotated them seasonally, but they still hold air just fine after years. Those same tires have probably a dozen or so smaller punctures from cactus spines on a couple trips I took out west, too.

    This is one of the beautiful things about tubeless tires and sealant. It takes a good deal to kill a tire. You don't even have to remove little thorns, though if you wind up needing to install a tube in a pinch, removing the thorns beforehand makes your field repair go more smoothly.

  12. #12
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    Thorns like tiny pin prick holes? Or big monster 1/4 inch spikes?

    The tiny thorns seal permanently with any decent sealant. It dries in the hole and lasts the life of the tire. The huge thorns need bacon strips, which often last the life of the tire too.

  13. #13
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    Hey, Brandon.
    I'm not trying to be pedantic, but it sounds like you need to replenish your sealant. It leaks out and dries out, and eventually you end up with insufficient sealant in your tires. Longevity is dependent on your riding conditions, punctures, and temperature. Checking sealant is something that should be done at least monthly.

  14. #14
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    I've had similar issues running my maxxis tires, although I had worse issues with some Hans dampfs if the past.

    Now I'm pretty sure the vast majority of my problems came from either 25mm ID rims, but obviously lower pressure than ideal to keep the tires off of the rims... Although I never felt any harsh strikes they obviously happened.

    Anyway, to a solution that worked for me.

    Being a cheapass rather than either getting new tires or dealing with constant sealant leaks ( yes, sealant doesn't always seal holes) I decided to take s different approach. Having used it before making gaskets on Jeeps I purchased a tube of permatex ultra black rtv. I marked the holes on the tire, pretty easy as they were all 1/4" above the bead. I removed the tire and liberally smeared rtv on the inside of the tire casing opposite from the seeping holes. Took a few weeks for the sealant to make it's way out of the casing but all is good now.

    So as an.alternative solution, mark seeps with marker, buy permatex ultra black rtv tube, apply to inside of tire. Let cure for 24 hrs. Reinstall. Wear gloves though.

  15. #15
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    I had a maxxis exo tire that had good tread but 8 small sidewall gashes in it. Here's what I did:

    Cover each cut up with super glue, use a toothpick or similar to make sure it penetrates the tire. Let it dry.

    Use tire patches over each superglued cut.

    Cover each tire patch with a piece of gorilla tape.

    Key to this process is making sure the tire is clean. I use rubbing alcohol to clean each area up to ensure good adhesion. I do this type of patch all the time with no issues. Ive been running this tire for 2 months since the patches with no issue. I go heavy on the sealant (orange seal) after to help fill in any gaps.

    Some people would say screw it and get a new tire, but I'd rather save $60

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