Crank Brothers Synthesis Wheelset Review- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Crank Brothers Synthesis Wheelset Review

    Disclaimer: I am not an ambassador for CB. I spent my hard-earned money on these wheels. That being said, I did purchase them at heavily discounted rates due to being a member of a specific mountain biking organization and the use of a 'professional sales' website.

    I was in the market for high end carbon wheels for my bike(s) with a lifetime warranty. I narrowed it down to We Are One or SC Reserves. But after some reading, I came across the seemingly forgotten Crank Brothers Synthesis Wheelset. Reviews only had great things to say about them. Compliant front end. Stiff rear end. People have been doing this for years! But they're from pubs and were from the initial release last October. Very few recent reviews. Which meant that buying these is taking a HUGE chance with my money. I'm glad I took the chance.

    Synthesis E11s. 1880g with XD driver, tubeless tape, and valves.

    The enduro wheelset. With I9 Hydra hubs. I don't need to say much about Hydra. They're awesome and a worthy successor to the Torch. Everyone wanting high end hubs will have them soon enough. The E11s went on my Slash. To replace a set of Bontrager Line Pro 30 carbon wheels, now out of its 2 year warranty period(seriously Trek? get with the times). Now you may think, 'Oh you're going from carbon to carbon? Blah blah blah, all carbon is the same, all made in Taiwan, aLuMiNuMz f0r tEH wINz!', but you couldn't be more wrong. The Bontrager carbon wheels are a great wheelset. They were lightweight, stiff, and pretty damn sturdy! Why the hell would I even 'upgrade'? And why would I take a weight penalty of 150g? The Line Pros weighed 1700-ish grams with normal tubeless tape and valves.

    Because the Synthesis wheels are that good. I've used the same exact tires and same exact tire pressures between the 2 wheelsets. 2.5 WTB Vigs front and rear, 24f/27r pressures. No stupid tire inserts. Absolutely no changes to suspension were made. First thing I noticed on the trail was how 'quiet' they were. I'm not talking about the sound of the hubs. It's hard to explain. The Line Pros were really 'chattery' I guess? Maybe vibrated more? The E11s felt... more peaceful to ride. Anyway, the rear wheel of the E11 has 32 spokes. It's pretty stiff. Stiffer than the Line Pros. The front E11 has 28 holes, and not as stiff as the Line Pros. Just pedaling along, you're not going to notice much difference. They are wheels after all. But cornering is where the E11s shine.

    See, with the combination for the compliant front, and stiff rear, I was able to take flat and off camber corners faster and more confidently. The front end digs in while the rear tracks. At the limit of grip, the rear gives out first, which initiates a controllable, mellow drift and the front stays tracking in its original line. It's engineered oversteer, which can take a little getting used to. The front end doesn't get knocked off line by bumps mid corner. It somehow absorbs these bumps and keeps me tracking where I want to go. The rear end feels like it's constantly gripping and losing said grip, but in a manner that is mostly unnoticeable and works together with the front end to keep the intended line. It's 'floating' so to speak.

    With the Line Pro 30s, I had a tendency to run wide. The stiff front offered incredibly quick steering. But it's easily knocked off line by a bump mid corner forcing me to adjust or run wider than intended.

    In berms or supported corners, the E11s were superb. I initially thought there wasn't going to be much difference in berms because you're generally not exclusively on your cornering knobs while taking berms. Again, the front end digs in, while the rear wheel tracks. It's a very similar feeling to flat cornering except that the rear is planted just like the front. Again, it's hard to explain the feeling. I can only make a comparison. The Line Pros likes to run high on berms so I have to make mid corner corrections if I don't want to launch off of the side of the hill. The E11s maintain its line the entire way through a berm. Braking bumps aren't nearly as noticeable on the E11s. They go through them as if they weren't even there.

    I can't comment on durability yet as I haven't had them for a long time. But they have a lifetime warranty, so that has to mean something. Aesthetically, I think they look great. No stupid 'look at me' logos. Just nice, understated branding. Very classy design we've come to love/hate from CB.


    So I liked these so much that I bought a second set for my SB100.

    The XCT11s. XD, Hydra, and 1590g with tape and valves.

    My SB100 came with the DT Swiss XM1501 25mm IW. Already a phenomenal aluminum wheelset. Probably some of the best completes you can get out there. But retails for almost as much as I got the XCT 11s for. I shaved about 150g by going to the XCTs. Definitely a nice bit of weight saved. Again, tires, air pressures, and suspension setup was identical as when I had on the DTs.

    Now going from aluminum to these carbon wheels specifically had the biggest difference. The traits were identical as the E11s. So I'm not going to re-iterate what was said already. I will say that the jump from aluminum wheels to the XCT11s transformed an already phenomenal bike in to a perfect(to me) lightweight trail bike. The XCT11s are stiffer than the DTs front and rear. And I definitely notice it. It's much more willing and quicker to turn than the DTs. But it's not overly stiff that it's uncomfortable. Pair that with the 'wheelset tuning' and I have the same cornering traits as the E11s, in a lighter weight package.

    My SB100 is now a rip-roaring cornering machine, but still maintains the comfort I had with the aluminum DT wheels. It's frickin fast. Crank Brothers literally 'downsized' the E11s in to an XC/trail package. A lot of XC carbon wheelsets are usually just stiffened up, lighter versions of the enduro version. Or the enduro version is a beefier version of the XC wheelset. With different ride characteristics even from the same brand. Like say the enduro wheelset may be more compliant. While the XC version is stiff as a board. The Synthesis wheels feels the same from each category, so long as you use the wheels for its specific purpose.

    Overall, I'm very, very impressed. I spent a lot of money on these 2 wheelsets. But not as much as buying one CK ENVE wheelset brand new for retail. I got each Synthesis wheelset for less than a WAO or SC Reserve with the I9 Hydra hubs at retail. There will always be naysayers and armchair engineers that will say, 'There's no difference! It's all in your head!', having never ridden these wheels. And that's fine. Live in your cave for all I care. But with first experience with these wheels, I think I'm qualified to say that Crank Brothers' claims certainly hold true. Can you make a 'tuned' wheelset of your own? Abso-****ing-lutely! People have been doing it for years. Aluminum front, carbon rear. 28h front, 32h rear. Or any combination thereof. I suggest you do it too if you don't want to spend money on these. But for those with a bit of money to spare, and want a lifetime warranty, and one of the best wheels money can buy, I highly recommend these.
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

  2. #2
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    I believe you bought the best product out there and I don't fully understand why these are not phenomenally popular.

    I'm trying to build a set of wheels using braid for spokes cause I'm a WW, however my performance goals are really to match the performance of the Synthesis wheels and they really are my target.

    There are so many components that go in to wheel compliance, and since I'm starting with a totally different depth of wheel which greatly effects compliance, I'm just guessing trying to obtain similar performance. That said I'm going to weigh .9# less than Synthesis using a DH rear rim so that counts for something.

    What I'm spending on my wheels, well it's going to cost just as much as what I see Synthesis for sale online for and I won't have the warranty.

  3. #3
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    I can see many people's reluctance to pay so much for these wheels. The '11' series are $2400. And the standard ones are $1700. MSRP. Very, very expensive to say the least. And Crank Brothers doesn't exactly have the best reputation for wheels in the past. Hopefully once the long term reviews from publications come out, people will be more willing to spend the money. Or at least entertain the idea of building a more compliant front and stiffer rear wheelset. These type of 'tuned' wheels don't turn the MTB world upside down, but it definitely makes a positive change in the right direction.
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

  4. #4
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    Nice review.

    I've had this wheel set for two weeks now and am too extremely impressed.

    27.5, Hydra hubs, XD driver. With tape & valves: 1810 gm

    These replaced a set of e-13 carbon rims on e-13 hubs. I also own, or owned, Enve and Light bike carbon hoops.

    Finish is impeccable, as you say. The muted graphics under the clear coat, combined with the bladed spoke, molded spoke holes and black hydra hubs are dead sexy.

    These wheels are definitely not all about the hype. It's hard to describe the unique feel of these wheels (although you do a very good job). Through bumps, it's almost like I gained a bit of suspension compliance. And I also notice the bit of understeer, and have learned to adjust accordingly. My prior wheel sets felt stiffer and handled a bit sharper, but was harsher in the corners and through off camber rocks. Whereas the Synthesis wheels more compliant and less jarring.

    Again, it's hard to explain. I read all available reviews prior to purchasing, and all seem to agree that there's definitely a tangible performance benefit to these wheels.


    At 170 lbs geared, I'm running a 2.5 Assegai WT front at 20 psi, and a 2.4 Bontrager SE4 at 20 in the rear (with a stupid Vittoria airliner insert which I really like).

    Crank Brothers Synthesis Wheelset Review-img_2269.jpg

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    Any updates about your wheels?

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    Still loving mine.

    Broke and replaced a spoke (stick to RD, RD into spoke), and had to do a minor true one other time, otherwise no issues to report

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Squeaky Wheel View Post
    Still loving mine.

    Broke and replaced a spoke (stick to RD, RD into spoke), and had to do a minor true one other time, otherwise no issues to report
    I ride a ton of roots and rock gardens here in the east. You?

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogeydog View Post
    I ride a ton of roots and rock gardens here in the east. You?

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
    In Colorado, chunky rocks galore
    Roots, not so much.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogeydog View Post
    Any updates about your wheels?

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
    Absolutely no issues with the wheels. My XCT11 set on my SB100 has seen 3 days of bike park, and my E11 set on my Slash has seen about a week of bike park. Both wheelsets have been through practically all kinds of terrain. Still true and no signs of potentially catastrophic damage.

    I've been flirting with getting a set for my Chameleon C hardtail, but a carbon hardtail with carbon wheels is pretty unforgiving. Theoretically, the rear of a hardtail is already significantly stiffer than the front end because of the solid connection. So I don't believe that the Synthesis wheelset would provide much of a difference compared to the XM1501 wheels I have on now. Except of course, a much harsher and unforgiving ride.
    I no longer like to party. But I like the idea of it.

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    I have ridden a pair of XTC11s on my new SC Blur for the summer. I agree 100%. These wheels are amazing.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rocky Mountain Racer View Post
    I have ridden a pair of XTC11s on my new SC Blur for the summer. I agree 100%. These wheels are amazing.
    Tell us more.

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  12. #12
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    How are the project 321 hubs? I plan one building up a bike and using this wheel set but Iím not a fan of loud hubs. I have onyx hubs on my current bike.

  13. #13
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    I've had 2 sets of P321s and they are fantastic. My earlier set had a few hiccups but my newer set clearly has the bugs worked out of them. They roll super fast, noise is subtle, nearly instant engagement, light, etc.
    I'm a fan and with all the reported Vesper issues and the still high weight, I'm very glad I didn't choose that path.

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  14. #14
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    I just ordered a set with hydra hubs. Is there anything I should be aware of or are they as advertised?

  15. #15
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    I cannot decide!!!! Weight weenie Vs. Awesomeness

    Quote Originally Posted by jdcatnau View Post
    I just ordered a set with hydra hubs. Is there anything I should be aware of or are they as advertised?
    I have only three days left to decide to buy these wheels at an insider pro deal program, otherwise the price is forever out of range.

    I guess the reason these arenít catching on has to be because of the weight, in comparison to my other option the giant XC are zero come in around 1350 and have DT internal 240 pretty sweet set of wheels to for even a little less for giant insiders...

    The big question... is the extra 1/2 Lb worth the reported awesomeness of these wheels???

    I race expert in the Midwest and seconds count!!! But I also ride a lot of trail for fun on the same bike... Giant Anthem advanced pro at 21 lbs when Iím on race tires... RoRo/Thunderburt

    Help!!!! I feel like Iím going to miss out but also have a local wheel builder using nextie/i9/sapim putting cheap wheels together sub 1400grams...

  16. #16
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    CB wheels are the only ready made wheels I'd consider, however they are more of an enduro/ trail set of wheels than a XC set of wheels.

    In a XC race, weight is nearly king. My suggestion? Buy the CBs at the great price and mount your trail tires on them. Then build an uber lightweight set of XC race rims with your race tires on them for race days. If you are getting a great deal then you won't lose anything anyways cause you can always sell the CBs.

    As far as the race wheels go, DT 180s, CarbonFan XC layup up front, AM layup in the rear, with some Berds will get you a reliable XC 1100 grams wheelset weight. That's your race set up.

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    Whoa! I like the idea but I don't live in a dream world like that. One wheelset to fit the bill the rest is on the legs. Wife and kiddos notice when spare wheels are hanging around for fun.

    I'm wondering if anyone has XC raced on these and maybe sacrificed the grams for speeeeeeed :-) as mentioned above in rave reviews they have some sort of wizardry technology enabling one to ride faster through the tough stuff.

    Racing is good and gets the competitive bug out - but I'm not gonna be earning any of my spending back on a podium... nobody does in the midwest and basically in the US for that matter.

  18. #18
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    I've been on a million wheels, and from what I've seen if your front wheel feels not compliant, your fork needs serious attention. If you have a good fork, the wheel either tracks well or it doesnt.

    Theres no wizardry there. Just an astronomically priced set of hoops. Since lifetime warranties are common now, id buy anything else with a warranty from any brand thats not CB. If you really, truly do feel "harshness" from your front wheel, its your fork. Even on an XC bike, you have 4 to 5 inches of fork travel versus a millimeter of wheel flex.

    Id run screaming from anything CB puts out!

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I've been on a million wheels, and from what I've seen if your front wheel feels not compliant, your fork needs serious attention. If you have a good fork, the wheel either tracks well or it doesnt.

    Theres no wizardry there. Just an astronomically priced set of hoops. Since lifetime warranties are common now, id buy anything else with a warranty from any brand thats not CB. If you really, truly do feel "harshness" from your front wheel, its your fork. Even on an XC bike, you have 4 to 5 inches of fork travel versus a millimeter of wheel flex.

    Id run screaming from anything CB puts out!
    No, there's no wizardry. But there is good engineering.
    My front suspension is uber dialed - PUSH ACS3/HC97 Pike - but I can definitely appreciate the feel of the CB front wheel compared to other carbon hoops.

    It's not a massive game changing sensation, but there's definitely something to it.

    I just had to warranty a rear rim I cracked and the experience with CB was seamless and quick. I've cracked other carbon rims before - Enve, Light bikes, e-13 - and so don't anything negative to say about CB.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew.c.urban View Post
    Whoa! I like the idea but I don't live in a dream world like that. One wheelset to fit the bill the rest is on the legs. Wife and kiddos notice when spare wheels are hanging around for fun.

    I'm wondering if anyone has XC raced on these and maybe sacrificed the grams for speeeeeeed :-) as mentioned above in rave reviews they have some sort of wizardry technology enabling one to ride faster through the tough stuff.

    Racing is good and gets the competitive bug out - but I'm not gonna be earning any of my spending back on a podium... nobody does in the midwest and basically in the US for that matter.
    If the wheels are to be utilized for trail riding and that's the priority, then CB builds the best ready made wheel set imo and I've seen them on sale for $1500, which is totally reasonable.
    Good luck.

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  21. #21
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    thanks all awesome thoughts -
    I'm still on the fence now researching nextie, carbonfan, light bikes... But the offer I have on the Crank Bro's is still cheaper than carbonfan even.
    Its really the quality of wheel in a race setting paired with durability and trail riding performance (I do like singletrack strava KOM hunting, I'll admit).
    So, yet - no replies on anyone who has raced XC on these?
    Looking through carbon fan I can't seem to find an actual comparable set that are that much lighter by google search for reviews... anyone have specs/weight (like all of them, its a little confusing) from carbon fan order?

  22. #22
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    I pieced together my own wheels and researched all of the available consumer direct wheel brands.
    Ended up choosing CarbonFan because they offer multiple different widths, and layups, with other options as well. So you have the option of doing what CB does, and select a width, thickness, and spoke count based on the wheel location. My front is wider with a lighter layup and less spokes. And my rear is more narrow but with a full DH layup and more spokes. But I chose that.
    If you choose the XC layup, their rims are as light yet as strong as anything built.
    There is no downside to Berd spokes. They do everything perfectly. Light, strong, reliable, maintenance free, and great service.
    Then pick your favorite hubs. Make certain your hub spoke count matches the rim spoke count you order. Not every hub has every spoke count available.
    If you go through the Berd spoke thread, I have weights, pictures, etc of my wheel build.


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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by almazing View Post
    Disclaimer: I am not an ambassador for CB. I spent my hard-earned money on these wheels. That being said, I did purchase them at heavily discounted rates due to being a member of a specific mountain biking organization and the use of a 'professional sales' website.

    I was in the market for high end carbon wheels for my bike(s) with a lifetime warranty. I narrowed it down to We Are One or SC Reserves. But after some reading, I came across the seemingly forgotten Crank Brothers Synthesis Wheelset. Reviews only had great things to say about them. Compliant front end. Stiff rear end. People have been doing this for years! But they're from pubs and were from the initial release last October. Very few recent reviews. Which meant that buying these is taking a HUGE chance with my money. I'm glad I took the chance.

    Synthesis E11s. 1880g with XD driver, tubeless tape, and valves.

    The enduro wheelset. With I9 Hydra hubs. I don't need to say much about Hydra. They're awesome and a worthy successor to the Torch. Everyone wanting high end hubs will have them soon enough. The E11s went on my Slash. To replace a set of Bontrager Line Pro 30 carbon wheels, now out of its 2 year warranty period(seriously Trek? get with the times). Now you may think, 'Oh you're going from carbon to carbon? Blah blah blah, all carbon is the same, all made in Taiwan, aLuMiNuMz f0r tEH wINz!', but you couldn't be more wrong. The Bontrager carbon wheels are a great wheelset. They were lightweight, stiff, and pretty damn sturdy! Why the hell would I even 'upgrade'? And why would I take a weight penalty of 150g? The Line Pros weighed 1700-ish grams with normal tubeless tape and valves.

    Because the Synthesis wheels are that good. I've used the same exact tires and same exact tire pressures between the 2 wheelsets. 2.5 WTB Vigs front and rear, 24f/27r pressures. No stupid tire inserts. Absolutely no changes to suspension were made. First thing I noticed on the trail was how 'quiet' they were. I'm not talking about the sound of the hubs. It's hard to explain. The Line Pros were really 'chattery' I guess? Maybe vibrated more? The E11s felt... more peaceful to ride. Anyway, the rear wheel of the E11 has 32 spokes. It's pretty stiff. Stiffer than the Line Pros. The front E11 has 28 holes, and not as stiff as the Line Pros. Just pedaling along, you're not going to notice much difference. They are wheels after all. But cornering is where the E11s shine.

    See, with the combination for the compliant front, and stiff rear, I was able to take flat and off camber corners faster and more confidently. The front end digs in while the rear tracks. At the limit of grip, the rear gives out first, which initiates a controllable, mellow drift and the front stays tracking in its original line. It's engineered oversteer, which can take a little getting used to. The front end doesn't get knocked off line by bumps mid corner. It somehow absorbs these bumps and keeps me tracking where I want to go. The rear end feels like it's constantly gripping and losing said grip, but in a manner that is mostly unnoticeable and works together with the front end to keep the intended line. It's 'floating' so to speak.

    With the Line Pro 30s, I had a tendency to run wide. The stiff front offered incredibly quick steering. But it's easily knocked off line by a bump mid corner forcing me to adjust or run wider than intended.

    In berms or supported corners, the E11s were superb. I initially thought there wasn't going to be much difference in berms because you're generally not exclusively on your cornering knobs while taking berms. Again, the front end digs in, while the rear wheel tracks. It's a very similar feeling to flat cornering except that the rear is planted just like the front. Again, it's hard to explain the feeling. I can only make a comparison. The Line Pros likes to run high on berms so I have to make mid corner corrections if I don't want to launch off of the side of the hill. The E11s maintain its line the entire way through a berm. Braking bumps aren't nearly as noticeable on the E11s. They go through them as if they weren't even there.

    I can't comment on durability yet as I haven't had them for a long time. But they have a lifetime warranty, so that has to mean something. Aesthetically, I think they look great. No stupid 'look at me' logos. Just nice, understated branding. Very classy design we've come to love/hate from CB.


    So I liked these so much that I bought a second set for my SB100.

    The XCT11s. XD, Hydra, and 1590g with tape and valves.

    My SB100 came with the DT Swiss XM1501 25mm IW. Already a phenomenal aluminum wheelset. Probably some of the best completes you can get out there. But retails for almost as much as I got the XCT 11s for. I shaved about 150g by going to the XCTs. Definitely a nice bit of weight saved. Again, tires, air pressures, and suspension setup was identical as when I had on the DTs.

    Now going from aluminum to these carbon wheels specifically had the biggest difference. The traits were identical as the E11s. So I'm not going to re-iterate what was said already. I will say that the jump from aluminum wheels to the XCT11s transformed an already phenomenal bike in to a perfect(to me) lightweight trail bike. The XCT11s are stiffer than the DTs front and rear. And I definitely notice it. It's much more willing and quicker to turn than the DTs. But it's not overly stiff that it's uncomfortable. Pair that with the 'wheelset tuning' and I have the same cornering traits as the E11s, in a lighter weight package.

    My SB100 is now a rip-roaring cornering machine, but still maintains the comfort I had with the aluminum DT wheels. It's frickin fast. Crank Brothers literally 'downsized' the E11s in to an XC/trail package. A lot of XC carbon wheelsets are usually just stiffened up, lighter versions of the enduro version. Or the enduro version is a beefier version of the XC wheelset. With different ride characteristics even from the same brand. Like say the enduro wheelset may be more compliant. While the XC version is stiff as a board. The Synthesis wheels feels the same from each category, so long as you use the wheels for its specific purpose.

    Overall, I'm very, very impressed. I spent a lot of money on these 2 wheelsets. But not as much as buying one CK ENVE wheelset brand new for retail. I got each Synthesis wheelset for less than a WAO or SC Reserve with the I9 Hydra hubs at retail. There will always be naysayers and armchair engineers that will say, 'There's no difference! It's all in your head!', having never ridden these wheels. And that's fine. Live in your cave for all I care. But with first experience with these wheels, I think I'm qualified to say that Crank Brothers' claims certainly hold true. Can you make a 'tuned' wheelset of your own? Abso-****ing-lutely! People have been doing it for years. Aluminum front, carbon rear. 28h front, 32h rear. Or any combination thereof. I suggest you do it too if you don't want to spend money on these. But for those with a bit of money to spare, and want a lifetime warranty, and one of the best wheels money can buy, I highly recommend these.
    Nice! Just ordered some E11's. What tire sizes are you running?

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  24. #24
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    Just received my Synthesis XCTs with Hydra hubs. Weight came in at 1535g with tape and valves. Picking up new rotors tomorrow, coming from centerlock and my XCTs are 6 bolt. I've been running Light Bicycle carbon rims with 24mm id and DT 240 hubs for the past 2 years. I've been pretty happy with the LB rims but as the OP I was able to get the XCTs with a pro deal too good to turn down. Curious if I'll notice any difference as I don't really have any complaints with the LB wheelset and they've taken serious abuse.

    I've been running Mezcal 2.35 f/r for the past 1.5 years so I think I'll stick with those or possibly switch to a 2.25 Mezcal in the rear. The thinking is that the 2.25 tire with a smaller id rim (24.5mm) in the rear could roll faster.
    ďIf youíre not first youíre last"- Ricky Bobby

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    Quote Originally Posted by MI-XC View Post
    Just received my Synthesis XCTs with Hydra hubs. Weight came in at 1535g with tape and valves. Picking up new rotors tomorrow, coming from centerlock and my XCTs are 6 bolt. I've been running Light Bicycle carbon rims with 24mm id and DT 240 hubs for the past 2 years. I've been pretty happy with the LB rims but as the OP I was able to get the XCTs with a pro deal too good to turn down. Curious if I'll notice any difference as I don't really have any complaints with the LB wheelset and they've taken serious abuse.

    I've been running Mezcal 2.35 f/r for the past 1.5 years so I think I'll stick with those or possibly switch to a 2.25 Mezcal in the rear. The thinking is that the 2.25 tire with a smaller id rim (24.5mm) in the rear could roll faster.
    Curious if you got the expercicity deal? That's where I ordered mine 55% off

    Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by MI-XC View Post
    Just received my Synthesis XCTs with Hydra hubs. Weight came in at 1535g with tape and valves. Picking up new rotors tomorrow, coming from centerlock and my XCTs are 6 bolt. I've been running Light Bicycle carbon rims with 24mm id and DT 240 hubs for the past 2 years. I've been pretty happy with the LB rims but as the OP I was able to get the XCTs with a pro deal too good to turn down. Curious if I'll notice any difference as I don't really have any complaints with the LB wheelset and they've taken serious abuse.
    Light Bicycle Wheelset:
    1495g (tape/stems), 1749g (tape/stems/rotors-centerlock)

    Synthesis XCT 11
    1533g (tape/stems), 1770g (tape/stems/rotors-6 bolt)

    So I added 21g total to the wheelset coming from my LB wheels. Interesting to me at least, was that the 6 bolt rotors (231g total) were lighter than the centerlock (254g). I would have thought the opposite to be true (same Sram rotors 180/160 f/r).

    Went on my first trial ride with the Synthesis XCTs today on my local singletrack that I've ridden 40+ times. It's your typical midwest dense forest twisty trail with plenty of roots, punchy steep but short climbs and flat, loose, sandy and blind corners. I did 2 laps that take 30 mins each at all out race pace. My initial impressions are as follows:

    The weight difference between the two wheelsets was negligible and I didn't notice anything different rolling on flat or smooth climbs. I also couldn't tell any difference in performance between the DT 240s (54t) and the I9 Hydra hubs, though I do prefer the sound of the Hydra's. I didn't concentrate or really put to test the hubs so maybe the difference will show over time. Also, I was taken back by the handling performance of the XCTs so I never even thought about the hubs.

    Regarding the performance of the two wheelsets though, I gotta agree with the OP. The XCTs definitely felt different in the corners! Exactly how the OP described it. On a trail I know and race so well I was able to take and keep lines I had never been able to do. The more I rode I began to trust these wheels and I was rewarded with plenty of grip. They just felt better in general and I'm not exactly sure why. Still plenty of riding to do but I'm pretty impressed so far and I agree with the OP. I can't wait to really put this wheelset to the test over the upcoming months.
    ďIf youíre not first youíre last"- Ricky Bobby

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