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  1. #1
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    confirm that this is a very stupid idea?

    For reasons not worth getting into (basically, I'm an idiot), I've got a non-boost frame, have become convinced that boost is the way of the future, and, having poked around on the forums here a bit, conceived a Very Stupid Idea. As follows:

    So the frame is a Lynskey Sequel (titanium, hardtail). While I've read you shouldn't try to cold set titanium like you can with steel, it's flexible stuff. So why not get a boost axle (compatible with the dropouts, of course--probably just use Lynseky's own 148mm axle that fits their Pro29) and cram it in there? The frame will easily flex 6mm wider.

    My main reason for so doing wouldn't be to get bigger tires in there (I assume that couldn't happen since it's not like the tubes will magically get longer) or the purported benefits of boost wheels, but mostly future compatibility and the comparative ease of getting a good deal on a wheelset that's boost in both front and back rather than only in front.

    Other than all manner of voiding warranty, what would that achieve? Misaligned brake calipers and derailleur? An undue amount of stress on the hub bearings?

    I'm on the fence between going for it and just admitting that boost really isn't a big deal and I shouldn't screw around with the frame like that. If anybody can convince me that this is indeed Very Stupid (or, alternatively, Totally Doable and Kind of Awesome), that would be much appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Boost may be a big deal, but so is you frame. Iím sure you can get very nice hubs to work as intended. If worried for the future, maybe just pick up a couple of hubs to save for the future...


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  3. #3
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    I would (and did) buy a new hub when you buy a new frame.

  4. #4
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    It is indeed a bad idea. A non-boost frame may spread enough to wedge a boost wheel in, but the dropout faces will not be parallel which will stress things in ways we can't predict. Including hub bearings (possibly), stressing/bending the axle and increasing focused stress points on the frame itself, nearest the dropout weld points at chain & seatstays, I imagine.

    If the frame can't be coldset properly by a framebuilder, personally I'd steer clear of such a mismatch.
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  5. #5
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    {QUOTE} . My main reason for so doing wouldn't be to get bigger tires in there (I assume that couldn't happen since it's not like the tubes will magically get longer)

    6mm wider @ the hub and proportionally less as you reach tire. Doesn't sound like you will gain much @ all.

  6. #6
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    With 435mm stays It will be .3 degrees deflection but I've been doing it with a carbon hard tail for 9 months with no problems at all. Syntace, DT, and White Ind hubs. I haven't calculated the von Mises stress at the surface of the stays but spreading the dropouts takes barely any effort so I can't imagine it would be significant.

    Other than all manner of voiding warranty, what would that achieve? Misaligned brake calipers and derailleur? An undue amount of stress on the hub bearings?
    Neither

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schulze View Post
    With 435mm stays It will be .3 degrees deflection but I've been doing it with a carbon hard tail for 9 months with no problems at all. Syntace, DT, and White Ind hubs. I haven't calculated the von Mises stress at the surface of the stays but spreading the dropouts takes barely any effort so I can't imagine it would be significant.



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  8. #8
    EAT MORE GRIME
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    run a ti frame out of spec

    expect it to crack at any time

    so, there's that
    "Put your seatbelt back on or get out and sit in the middle of that circle of death." - Johnny Scoot

  9. #9
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    I have chopped fat hubs down to make a 190mm hub a single speed 170mm hub, but they end up 5mm too long. They fit but the axle threads will bind on top of everything else that was mentioned. I had to grind my drive side endcap down a good bit to make it work.

    In your case, this is not worth trying, in my opinion.

  10. #10
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    Jesus, why? Just use some good ole 142 hubs, there's nothing wrong with them. Were you busting hubs or something to make you think you had to go to boost? There's nothing that boost is solving for the majority of us that want to run normal (not plus) tires, and if you want to run plus tires, you need a frame that has the tire clearance anyway.

    I got a warranty replacement frame last year and it's boost, so I simply put some spacers in my two wheelsets and I'll run those for years to come. The centerlock one was a bit tricky, but I even figured that out.

    Wanting to spread apart your Ti frame? For what purpose? Just to fit a boost hub? That's ridiculous.
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  11. #11
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    OK, I'm convinced. Bad Idea. Will go with spec.

    Thanks, everybody! Sometimes I just need to hear it from others before I do something dumb.

  12. #12
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    Lets not forget why some think (Boost) is better. The idea is that boost hubs have flanges that are farther from the center of the hub creating a wide base to the triangle. This is not always true. Some hub mfg's have just added wider end caps to there non boost hubs (flange spacing the same as non boost). If your frame is 142mm spacing you will be better off with a quality 142mm hub, spokes and rims built by a quality wheel builder than just going (Boost). Boost/148mm pacing is a small part of the entire formula. Being a Ti frame you may find the frame's flex may out way any benefit boost would provide even with boost spacing and a quality wheel build.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumbotron View Post
    OK, I'm convinced. Bad Idea. Will go with spec.

    Thanks, everybody! Sometimes I just need to hear it from others before I do something dumb.
    Good call. I have Boost and non-Boost bikes, and I've not noticed a difference. You can get plenty of nice non-boost wheels these days, especially if you go with a custom builder. On that note, I'm currently looking into a new wheelset with an even more "outdated" QR 135mm rear hub for my '11 Ridgeline. I also can't tell a difference between that and Boost, other than the QR 135 is a little easier to install and remove. So, basically, don't worry about it.

    For reference, I ran a 130mm rear wheel in an old 135mm Ti (rim brake) frame for a while with no issues.

  14. #14
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    You give up too easily. At east get a boost wheel at the bike shop and see if it fits.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jumbotron View Post
    For reasons not worth getting into (basically, I'm an idiot), I've got a non-boost frame, have become convinced that boost is the way of the future, and, having poked around on the forums here a bit, conceived a Very Stupid Idea. As follows:

    So the frame is a Lynskey Sequel (titanium, hardtail). While I've read you shouldn't try to cold set titanium like you can with steel, it's flexible stuff. So why not get a boost axle (compatible with the dropouts, of course--probably just use Lynseky's own 148mm axle that fits their Pro29) and cram it in there? The frame will easily flex 6mm wider.

    My main reason for so doing wouldn't be to get bigger tires in there (I assume that couldn't happen since it's not like the tubes will magically get longer) or the purported benefits of boost wheels, but mostly future compatibility and the comparative ease of getting a good deal on a wheelset that's boost in both front and back rather than only in front.

    Other than all manner of voiding warranty, what would that achieve? Misaligned brake calipers and derailleur? An undue amount of stress on the hub bearings?

    I'm on the fence between going for it and just admitting that boost really isn't a big deal and I shouldn't screw around with the frame like that. If anybody can convince me that this is indeed Very Stupid (or, alternatively, Totally Doable and Kind of Awesome), that would be much appreciated.
    Lots of non-boost stuff out there that you can (probably) get a better deal on. Don't touch the frame. Boost vs non is not a deal breaker (at all)....or shouldn't be. Parts will be around a LONG time for non-boost stuff as it's still the standard for CX/Gravel stuff.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pisgah2000 View Post
    Good call. I have Boost and non-Boost bikes, and I've not noticed a difference. You can get plenty of nice non-boost wheels these days, especially if you go with a custom builder. On that note, I'm currently looking into a new wheelset with an even more "outdated" QR 135mm rear hub for my '11 Ridgeline. I also can't tell a difference between that and Boost, other than the QR 135 is a little easier to install and remove. So, basically, don't worry about it.

    For reference, I ran a 130mm rear wheel in an old 135mm Ti (rim brake) frame for a while with no issues.
    Rigeline a 29r? I have 2 sets of wheels with qr/135 and 15x100/12x142 end caps. Pm if interested.
    Wait whuuut, who did he tell you that!?!?....

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