carbon for rim abusers- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: monkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    592

    carbon for rim abusers

    Sorry for another carbon wheel post, but before dropping some serious cash I wanted to get a grasp of the type of riders who choose carbon vs aluminum. I've read so much about converts, but I saw a thread on here from an EWS rider who basically said nobody at that level rides carbon (sure, they can't deal with an explosion). A vid by WorldWide cycles made a comment about avoiding if you're a known rim dinger. But then you see vids of great riders riding on carbon (like Skills with Phil).

    From my friends who ride carbon, I have those that are not that fast or hit any jumps, so I don't want to take their word. Then a few (very few) who are dh riders who hit big jumps but I don't know how often they have had issues (only 1 mentioned an exploded rim when landing a jump) but I know they like spending $$$ on bikes.

    So maybe thoughts on a rider that comes in on Strava top 10-20% on west coast/norcal terrain, and known to ding a few aluminum rims (but never break them) that have required about 3 wheel rebuilds over the course of several years. I don't know about 'line choice' when things are hairy nor think about it...if I have to plow through something that suprised me I just let it go. I keep my bikes for a while (i.e. not a new bike a year guy). I also weigh about 150lbs.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,361
    I weigh 170 and have never broken a carbon rim. I used to go through a ton of alloy rims. I think that carbon rims are more resistant to Taco-ing from excessive side loads like landing sideways or understeering really, really bad. People claim that they are less resistant to direct impact but that has not been my experience and I run anywhere from 18 to 28PSI depending on the course conditions and tire/size. I've got a set of the original LightBike rims at 420g (so pretty lite) that survived 4,800 miles on a Specialized Enduro 29.

  3. #3
    Keep on Rockin...
    Reputation: Miker J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    6,442
    Well not sure if this will help but...

    On my DH rig I run aluminum rims. I was only getting one season out of a dt EX471 but seem to be doing a bit better on the FR570 (now 560). Using Flat Tire Defender inserts as I do get a lot of rim dings and that's why I've been running inserts the last 2 years. Weigh about 170 without gear. Wouldn't run carbon on a DH or lift assist bike. I do ride the DH bike very hard, and I like to run the chunkiest trails and hardest lines as fast as I can. Usually I get more of a physical workout downhilling than trail riding and I like it that way.

    On my 2 trail bikes I run carbon rims. No inserts. One set I've had for years. I get a few soft rim hits here and there. But I do ride as nimbly as possible on my trail bikes - very different from my DH rig. Our trails are more slow speed tech than high speed hits. Do I think the carbon rims are more fragile than the aluminum ones, probably not. They are probably stronger. But if they break I'm out a lot more cash.


    So, to me it comes down to riding style.

  4. #4
    Just a flesh wound
    Reputation: Prophet Julio's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    2,367
    I went through a couple of alu rims on my Prophet before I switched to LB 38mm external carbon hoops. Put about 5,000 miles on those and I still have them on that bike. Never any problems, ever. Now I have 1,000 miles on my Ripmo with Ibis Carbon hoops and they too are still perfect. I can only say that you should not go for super light rims if you want carbon. My 27.5 LB rims were 420 grams each or maybe a bit more. I don't know the weight of my Ibis rims, but my experience with the straight line, unflappable manner of the carbon rims made my decision to get them again. That's my take.
    My name is Chris and I ride a Ripmo now.

  5. #5
    This place needs an enema
    Reputation: mikesee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    15,068
    Not all carbon rims are created equally. There are XC, AM, and DH layups offered in most widths by most manufacturers.

    Discuss it in detail with your wheelbuilder. They should be able to take all of your info (past wheels and how they held up, mode of failure, height/weight/riding style/terrain, bike setup, etc...) and create a package that works for you.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mfa81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    2,249
    right now there is a plethora of lifetime no questions asked rim replacement warranty from SC, Enve and others, so I wouldnít be too worried and you have nothing to lose not even riding time if you keep your current set as backup!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: monkies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    592
    One thing I'm actually more afraid of is injury in case of a cathostrophic failure. But this helps. Miker J brought up one of my questions... What you riding and how fast/brutally. I'm not the fastest but ride at a good clip through rough terrain... My technique may not be as advanced (those fast guys that also have it all and can manual for 50 ft into a drop) hence "bad lines" may be more frequent along with crashes. I just don't want to end up in the hospital (again) due to wheels.

  8. #8
    The Fastest of Bananas
    Reputation: FastBanana's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    1,792
    Quote Originally Posted by monkies View Post
    One thing I'm actually more afraid of is injury in case of a cathostrophic failure. But this helps. Miker J brought up one of my questions... What you riding and how fast/brutally. I'm not the fastest but ride at a good clip through rough terrain... My technique may not be as advanced (those fast guys that also have it all and can manual for 50 ft into a drop) hence "bad lines" may be more frequent along with crashes. I just don't want to end up in the hospital (again) due to wheels.
    For PROS, I really think it just depends on anecdotal experience with carbon or aluminum. This isnt a science.

    I've busted both. Seen lots of Enves fail. I've killed about a dozen alloy rims. Sometimes, the alloy rims hold air when they get dinged, sometimes they dont. But I can always put a tube in and get through the ride. Not always the case when carbon fractures, however, I've never busted one so bad that I couldnt get down the mtn.

    Carbon holds up better, for me. We Are One is the best in the game right now, a buddy of mine, who crushed serveral Enves, cant seem to hurt these.

    Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Dirty Old Man
    Reputation: scatterbrained's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,035
    I've broken spoke nipples on my carbon wheels, and I've actually got a scrape on the rear wheel that leaks air when the tape gets screwed up, but otherwise the wheels have held up well to blitzing rock gardens here in SoCal. I can see why EWS guys won't run them, as you can beat an aluminum wheel back into shape if need be and it's better than taking the time penalty. Of course the question has to be asked, would the carbon wheel have bent in the first place?
    . . . . . . . .

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Lone Rager's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Posts
    9,449
    What, me worry?

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jeremy3220's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    2,908
    There are a some EWS riders on carbon wheels. I'm not sure if they've had more or less issues than riders on alloy wheels though.

    I feel like these days if you're running the appropriate setup (wheels, tires, and pressures) for the terrain carbon vs alloy shouldn't be an issue. Now if you're plowing through black diamond rock gardens with light duty carbon rims and EXO casing tires at 18 psi then yeah you might have some problems.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    147
    Light Bicycle builds a tough rim. I've bent alloy rims and had several come out of true. Conversely, my LB AM740s and AM933s have never needed any maintenance whatsoever. Thousands of miles go by, and I check spoke tension and they're all good. I'm 180 rtr and I plow through rocks and get some air on every ride. So far so good!

  13. #13
    I'm with stupid
    Reputation: hitechredneck's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    5,908
    I have been on carbon wheels for years, I have broken a few. I also killed some alloy. I have taken to running inserts ( cushcore) along with Double down tires in my carbon wheels and it seems to do the trick. They are stiff and do not explode. I didn't save any weight, but that was not my goal, I like the stifness of carbon not the weight savings.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    1,365

    carbon for rim abusers

    Iím more XC type riding but at 215 lbs I push my wheels pretty hard for an old dude. I like to smash rock gardens and occasionally race putting in around 2200 miles or so a year. I have never had a Carbon wheel fail or even go out of true but I have broken a couple spokes.

    Aluminum I have had far more issues with needing to true them up. Obviously when Carbon does fail it can be more catastrophic but after having multiple sets of Carbon wheels I would not run anything else if given a choice. Currently I have the Roval Traverse SL 30 ID DT 240 spec and they seem super solid even under my substantial mass.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  15. #15
    change is good
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    3,010
    Iím anywhere from 215-230 and love carbon 29er. I could never get my rear wheel to stay true with alloy The front is noticeably stiffer. . I ride chunk, but no air. Iím not crushing the double black.

    If you do a search, EWS riders have mixed feelings regarding carbon. Yes, there are a few that say youíll explode into a fireball if you ride carbon. However if you look at the field, many are on carbon

    I do feel that lighter riders, especially on 27.5, there are no significant benefits.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

  16. #16
    No Clue Crew
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    6,954
    180 pounds, generally a top 10% descender on black and double black rocky Southwest trails. I run aluminum rims. I don't see an upside for riding really rocky/pointy terrain.
    Just like a raindrop, I was born to fall.

  17. #17
    mtbpete
    Reputation: changingleaf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,303
    Some carbon rims have a low profile and are designed to flex vertically when they hit a sharp object so they are less likely to fail catastrophically unless they are continuously ridden with cracks in them. Stan's and Zipp 3zero rims are in this category.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 83
    Last Post: 03-14-2017, 07:32 AM
  2. Replies: 109
    Last Post: 12-25-2013, 06:05 PM
  3. Eye 9 abusers.....
    By Aquaholic in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 09-05-2007, 11:31 AM
  4. disc rim vs. rim brake rim
    By henrypennry in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 03-02-2007, 10:59 AM
  5. 36VAN abusers-Change your oil now!
    By Jell-O in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 01-06-2007, 11:40 PM

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.