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  1. #1
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    Can I just put STANS sealant in a tube/tire

    I don't have tubeless tires/rims, and I've been reading about issues people have trying to get everything sealed. Rather than a conversion kit can I just put the sealant in the tube and go from there?

  2. #2
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    You aren't achieving the full benefit of tubeless because you would still have tubes. The sealant (Slime makes one for tubes and it does help for thorn-type punctures) may not help with pinch flats.

    The two major benefits from tubeless are the reduction in weight and rolling resistance, and the resistance to pinch flats. Pinch flats occur when running low pressure with tubes when the tube gets pinched between the tire and rim. No tube means no pinch flat. Pinch flats come in pairs and tend to be elongate holes rather than pinholes.

    When I say sealant in a tube may not help with pinch flats, I mean it will probably seal them, but most tubeless riders don't expect immediate sealing and some loss of air, possibly requiring reinflation, certainly if you get a couple of punctures in rapid succession. And recall that pinch flats involve two larger-than-normal holes. If you ride (rocky, fairly high impact) where pinch flats are a problem, a sealed tube may not solve the problem and you may be back to higher tire pressure.

    That said, going tubeless without either the rims or the tires can be fiddly to impossible. If you are having problems with flats, tube sealant is certainly worth a try. As mentioned, I can vouch that Slime for tubes works pretty well, at a couple ounce weight penalty.

  3. #3
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    The only time that I'd entertain the idea of sealant in a tube is with road tubular tires, since the tube is sewn into the tire carcass access is not possible hence the sealant.

  4. #4
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    As stated above, going tubeless does much more than just addressing flats and it's worth it if you are going 'all in' with tires/wheels that will work.

    But if you don't have tubeless compatible components and are just looking to eliminate the occasional thorn flat there are easier and cheaper options. I used Slime tubes and/or Slime tube protector strips for years before I finally went tubeless 3 years ago. You can get both at Walmart or other 'bigbox' stores. They worked and greatly reduced trailside tube replacements for me.

    But now that I'm committed to the full benefits of tubeless...I'm not going back.
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  5. #5
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    I got all pedantic (maybe that's what you wanted), but tube sealant isn't a bad way to go, its easy enough to get rid of if it doesn't work. This stuff is cheap and does the job: https://www.amazon.com/Slime-10003-T...SIN=B000ENOPPO

  6. #6
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    Go ghetto

    I realized this isn't what you asked, but I've been at the same place as you and have this unsolicited advice.

    I have 11 club bikes for my middle school MTB team. None have tubeless rims nor tires but I converted them all to tubeless with tape http://a.co/d/1OQzO7j , valve http://a.co/d/fx8sNYO and Stan's sealant. A year and a half later and I couldn't be happier. We have had one failure during that time from a "Problem Solver" valve (don't buy these).

    Two things made seating the bead reliable and repeatable; a high-pressure air compressor with a presta air-chuck and removing the core to seat the bead. I wouldn't suggest ghetto tubeless if you don't own a compressor, but I have no hesitation encouraging you to go ghetto if you have the compressor and know how to unscrew a core. Our ghetto tubes/tires have had fewer problems than the one bike we have that has factory standard "tubeless ready" rims and tires. Really! Both needed to have the valve replaced before they would hold air.

    I have tried Stan's inside a tube and it didn't work.

    Good luck.

  7. #7
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    Just an update, I went STANS conversion kit w/rim strip. Actually put gorilla tape and rim strip on front then realized that was too much but it worked, anyway so then just with rim strip on rear for comparison. Well, getting the bead to set wasn't too bad on either wheel but with some TLC I got it. I did a quick 10mi. test ride to test it out and wholly cow I couldn't believe the low rolling resistance. I felt like I was riding on "air" hahahaha! Got back and pulled out 3 goatheads, heard the hissing, saw some bubbling, then rotated tire and was all good. I'm now a tubeless fan, THANKS EVERYONE!!!

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shooter McGavin MTB View Post
    Just an update, I went STANS conversion kit w/rim strip. Actually put gorilla tape and rim strip on front then realized that was too much but it worked, anyway so then just with rim strip on rear for comparison. Well, getting the bead to set wasn't too bad on either wheel but with some TLC I got it. I did a quick 10mi. test ride to test it out and wholly cow I couldn't believe the low rolling resistance. I felt like I was riding on "air" hahahaha! Got back and pulled out 3 goatheads, heard the hissing, saw some bubbling, then rotated tire and was all good. I'm now a tubeless fan, THANKS EVERYONE!!!
    I am a little surprised you achieved a seal by taping over a rim strip. Good job.

    I had Gorilla tape on a tire for a long time and recently had to replace tires (slashed) and decided to ditch the Gorilla Tape. While it worked fantastic, it was a pain to remove the old glue. Maybe not an issue if you taped over a rim strip.

    Next time though I'd say to remove all other rim strips and just tape it.

    You may use sealant at a higher rate not having tubeless tires, so keep an eye on it. You can usually pick up the front, or the rear and shake the wheel and hear the sloshing. If not present, you should probably add a few ounces.

    Also, welcome to lower tire pressure!

  9. #9
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    On front I had original rim strip, it was a bontrager that I didn't remove, then went with gorilla tape, then I went with STANS rim strip. I dunno what I was thinking, but that I didn't want to have leaks anywhere. Anyway, I used sloppy soap everywhere, then got a bead, and everything sealed. It's a little bit overkill but I seem to Macgyver everything and it worked so I'm happy.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shooter McGavin MTB View Post
    On front I had original rim strip, it was a bontrager that I didn't remove, then went with gorilla tape, then I went with STANS rim strip. I dunno what I was thinking, but that I didn't want to have leaks anywhere. Anyway, I used sloppy soap everywhere, then got a bead, and everything sealed. It's a little bit overkill but I seem to Macgyver everything and it worked so I'm happy.
    What I meant by sealing up was you have a slippery rim strip that you slapped tape over. The tape is meant to glue itself to the rim so that air doesn't escape the spoke wells. In your case, it sounds like the sealant/air can work under the edge of the tape (the only thing where the glue is adhered) then make way under the existing non glued rim strip.
    In any event, you have a sealed wheel which is what you were after. If you develop a leak though, I'd revisit the tape over tape/strip scenario as a starting point to correct any leaks.

    Unless I am misunderstanding what you have done. If you tried one type of tape/strip, then removed it and tried another, then removed it -well that makes sense.
    To me it sounds like you put a rim strip on the rim than used Gorilla tape over top of that.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwiceHorn View Post
    You aren't achieving the full benefit of tubeless because you would still have tubes. The sealant (Slime makes one for tubes and it does help for thorn-type punctures) may not help with pinch flats.

    The two major benefits from tubeless are the reduction in weight and rolling resistance, and the resistance to pinch flats. Pinch flats occur when running low pressure with tubes when the tube gets pinched between the tire and rim. No tube means no pinch flat. Pinch flats come in pairs and tend to be elongate holes rather than pinholes.

    When I say sealant in a tube may not help with pinch flats, I mean it will probably seal them, but most tubeless riders don't expect immediate sealing and some loss of air, possibly requiring reinflation, certainly if you get a couple of punctures in rapid succession. And recall that pinch flats involve two larger-than-normal holes. If you ride (rocky, fairly high impact) where pinch flats are a problem, a sealed tube may not solve the problem and you may be back to higher tire pressure.

    That said, going tubeless without either the rims or the tires can be fiddly to impossible. If you are having problems with flats, tube sealant is certainly worth a try. As mentioned, I can vouch that Slime for tubes works pretty well, at a couple ounce weight penalty.

    I think we are the only two people on this entire forum that successfully use Slime sealant in tubes. A lot of people absolutely hate Slime tubes. Like 100 times more hate them as like them. Online away from MTBR it's about 2/3 like them 1/3 hate them.

    My first tubeless tire, courtesy of the LBS for $63, only lasted about two months; I had to put a tube in it because it developed a terrible wobble later. Still using it w/tube. I'm hoping it was more the type of tire than the tubeless method that screwed everything up. I will try tubeless again for sure but it's nice to always have a backup plan w/tubes.

    And yes I've put Slime in tubes that didn't have them. But those tubes were thin lightweight 5 oz ones and they still popped soon after. So I stick with the thicker tubes with the Slime they are 12-13 ounces each, a lot of extra weight on the tires but oh well. Front 16 psi 2.8, 20 psi 2.5, rear 25 psi 2.4, if you do it right there will be no flats for several hundred miles.

    BTW if you were wondering about the performance difference, yes, the feel is different with a tube but the downhill times were about the same, maybe 2-3% slower, within statistical error. Just seems like it's whatever someone feels better about on their wheel more than any real performance gain w/tubeless. Someone in a different forum did a calculation of the unsprung weight performance gain you'd have on paper with lighter wheels/tubeless tires, and then a real-world equation that showed no performance gain when you add the rider's weight to the equation. Not sure if you can mix unsprung weight apples and total rider plus bike plus wheel weight oranges.
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  12. #12
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    I used Slime tubes before I went tubless a number of years back. The Slime tubes worked well for me. I was riding in an area with tons of goat head thorns. I remember seeing wet spots all over my rear tire...but the tube never leaked air.

    As for Stan's in tubes...I use tubular tires on my road bike and I use Stan's in them. Just don't use the Stan's in latex tubes. The Stans were permeating through the tube and bulging the tire. My tire looked like it had hives.

  13. #13
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    I have used both the Specialized brand and Giant brand goop filled tubes with great results. The goop lasts forever and seals perfectly.
    They cost a bit more, but there is no hassle and no need to refill. Ideally you won't be replacing these for a while, unless the tub starts to leak at the seams.

    Not for any reasons, but my mountain bike was using Specialized tubes and my road bike had the Giant tubes.

  14. #14
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    Ok, I checked the tires tonite after a full 24hrs. since conversion, and they are still holding pressure, so I think i got it. I think I may add another 1-2oz. STANS, in a month or two just to make sure everything holding air tight. Until then, thanks!

  15. #15
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    Iíve put Stanís in inner tubes for my kids and other neighborhood kids for years.. no more thorn flats make my life easier, lol..

  16. #16
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    Ok, and just to be clear, I am tubeless, thanks!

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