Bigger tire...should I increase tire pressure?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Bigger tire...should I increase tire pressure?

    I was running a Specialized Captain Control 2.0 on the rear of my bike, and it was getting pretty bare. So, I put a Captain Control 2.2 on the rear. I figured there would be an increase in rolling resistance due to the larger tire, but the 2.2 seems to be have incredibly more resistance than the 2.0. Both tires were run tubeless at about 25 PSI.

    Would it makes sense to increase pressure to maybe 30-35 PSI to decrease the resistance? I weigh about 140, so do my pressures seem about right?

    Not looking for a scientific discussion, just looking to compare notes

  2. #2
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    Reputation: Saul Lumikko's Avatar
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    Generally larger tires roll more easily.

    For someone who weighs 140 lbs, 25 psi should be enough but 30 psi doesn't sound bad either with a 2.2" tire in the rear.

    I weigh around 160 lbs and use 25'ish psi in the rear, but the tires are 2.35".

  3. #3
    turtles make me hot
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    I weigh about 250. My 29er has a 2.2 in the rear and a 2.35 up front. I think I run 30 rear and 28 front.
    I like turtles

  4. #4
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    usually you use lower pressure as tire volume goes up, but why not try higher pressure and see if you like it. For me the main limiting factor for high rear pressure is climbing traction.

  5. #5
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    At 235-240lbs pre-gear, I run 25ish psi rear on a 29x2.3 Ground Control.

    More volume usually means you can get away with LESS pressure. Part of the reason road bike tires go to 100+ psi regularly.

  6. #6
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    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
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    It seems kind of pointless to go with a bigger tire and then up the pressure, it would be better to just stick with the 2.0. One of the main advantage of bigger volume tires is their ability to be used with less pressure.

  7. #7
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    Well, you replaced a worn down tire with a new one. So of course the new one will have more rolling resistance. (Taller knobs) If you ride on smooth surfaces, then higher pressure will help the tire roll more easily.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by beanbag View Post
    Well, you replaced a worn down tire with a new one. So of course the new one will have more rolling resistance. (Taller knobs) If you ride on smooth surfaces, then higher pressure will help the tire roll more easily.
    I was thinking about this also. Maybe my increased rolling resistance is due to the fact that the tire is new while the old tire was very worn. I find it hard to believe that a 2.2 rolls that much worse than a 2.0 with everything else equal. But, the condition of the tire is not equal.

  9. #9
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    25 is way more than enough tubeless at your weight. Feeling more rolling resistance doesn't mean it's really there, but there could be a couple reasons for it.
    1. The old rear tire was worn smooth, which rolls faster.
    2. The bigger tire is a little heavier so may accelerate a little slower, but this would not be make a lot of difference.

    Lower pressure allows the tire to absorb obstacles instead of bouncing upward and slowing forward momentum. I hope this isn't considered scientific.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by changingleaf View Post
    25 is way more than enough tubeless at your weight. Feeling more rolling resistance doesn't mean it's really there, but there could be a couple reasons for it.
    1. The old rear tire was worn smooth, which rolls faster.
    2. The bigger tire is a little heavier so may accelerate a little slower, but this would not be make a lot of difference.

    Lower pressure allows the tire to absorb obstacles instead of bouncing upward and slowing forward momentum. I hope this isn't considered scientific.
    All of this makes sense to me. I'm going to keep playing around with pressures until it feels right. Or the tread will wear down and roll a little better overtime. At some point I may try a different tread, but I hate changing tires. And no, I don't consider your response scientific. There's No place here for science!

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