142 mm Rear Hub recommendation for Clyde- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    142 mm Rear Hub recommendation for Clyde

    I have a C29 sitting at about 28 lbs with Enve wheels. Its my do everything bike and I do a lot of steep climbing. I have now worn out the pauls in two separate DT Swiss hubs. Looking for a high end, durable and relatively quiet hub recommendation. I donít understand peopleís desire for the loudest hub possible. Whacha guys recommend?


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  2. #2
    Downcountry AF
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    More details are needed here. What DT Swiss hubs did you wear out the pawls on? Was it the 350/240 hubs with the ratchet or one of the OE hubs with pawls? How many miles or seasons did you get out of the hubs before they needed service? What do you weigh?

    Wearing things out (assuming it's a quality product like a DT hub) just means you're riding a lot and using your bike. Replacing parts is just basic maintenance and doesn't necessarily mean the equipment is poor quality.

    The fact that you're a Clyde is unrelated to wearing out pawls. If you're not breaking axles or blowing out bearings there isn't a problem with the functionality of the hub. All hubs require maintenance.

    Hub recommendations- White Industries, Hadley, i9, Onyx.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by boots View Post
    I have a C29 sitting at about 28 lbs with Enve wheels. Its my do everything bike and I do a lot of steep climbing. I have now worn out the pauls in two separate DT Swiss hubs. Looking for a high end, durable and relatively quiet hub recommendation. I donít understand peopleís desire for the loudest hub possible. Whacha guys recommend?


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    First, are you talking a DT ratchet hub, or pawl hub? Their low-end hubs use pawls, their high end uses ratchets. The ratchets are great under torque, especially at the lower tooth counts.

    DT ratchet hub would be my cost-effective suggestion for a clyde hub. The ratchets are relatively inexpensive if you strip them and easy to replace/service.

    From there, CK still makes a good drive mechanism that can stand up to immense torque, it's similar to the DT one, but at an angle which effectively gives it continuous engagement while distributing the load.

    Going even further, Onyx makes a sprag-clutch hub that should be able to deal with even more torque, the more that is applied, the more it "locks" into drive mode.

    I wouldn't waste time with any traditional pawl hub if you are concerned about being a clyde and not taking chances.
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  4. #4
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    Shimano Saint if you are on a budget or Chris King, if money is of not objection. Almost anything else is a cleverly disguised freewheel hub, with two inches of unsupported axle sticking out of it. I'd also recommend early Industry Nine hubs, but they don't make them anymore.

    EDIT: Onyx hubs also get a pass

  5. #5
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    Chris King is the most durable hub on the market, and has been for many years. They spare no expense, no cheap Chinese bearings, no junk pot metal.

  6. #6
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    If you don't like noise, Onyx is the best choice. I'm not sure it is possible to wear out or break the sprag drive mechanism and they come with smooth high quality bearings. They are very free-spinning hubs in both drive and coast modes. I love the sublime quality of Kings and they are certainly stout but they are known for their distinctive noise, and after riding Onyx for a while now anything less than a silent hub is a non-starter for me. Both would require occasional basic maintenance for extended reliability, Onyx is simpler to service. Onyx will have faster engagement but softer take-up, most people seem to prefer this, myself included, but it seems like it bothers some people. Onyx will also be the heaviest choice and Kings are not particularly light either.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for all your responses. The hubs I have are DT 240 and came with the Enve M60 forty wheels I bought in 2014 but i dont know whether they are pawls or ratchet type (assume pawls because they are fairly quiet). My weight is 210lbs. I Probably have about 2,000 miles on this hub and lots of elevation. To *OneSpeed*ís point, maybe this is just a maintenance item so I think for the time being, I will just rebuild the internals. Thanks again guys


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  8. #8
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    Been riding Hopes as a clyde and super clyde (300+) for years. Not one second of problems in 1000's of miles of riding. Not exactly quiet but I also don't find them overly loud. Or maybe I'm just not a delicate snowflake with sensitive ears that gets triggered by the buzz of a mountain bike hub. When I'm on the trail I'm too busy riding anyways to pay attention to the noise my hub makes.

    210 you're barely a clyde. Just ride whatever tickles your fancy.

    Also...if you don't even know what's inside your hub...how do you know you wore out the pawls? If you have a DT Swiss 240...it has the 18 tooth ratchet. If you aren't doing proper maintenance then yeah...you probably wrecked them.
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  9. #9
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    DT 240's don't use pawls they use Star Ratchets like linked below:

    https://www.dtswiss.com/en/technolog...em-technology/

    As a clyde I would recommend 18t or 36t Star Ratchets. Make sure the hub bearings are ok as worn bearing can cause uneven loads on the drive mechanism.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by boots View Post
    Thanks for all your responses. The hubs I have are DT 240 and came with the Enve M60 forty wheels I bought in 2014 but i dont know whether they are pawls or ratchet type (assume pawls because they are fairly quiet). My weight is 210lbs. I Probably have about 2,000 miles on this hub and lots of elevation. To *OneSpeed*ís point, maybe this is just a maintenance item so I think for the time being, I will just rebuild the internals. Thanks again guys


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    Duuuuude. Pulling apart a dt240/350 to clean and lube is like a 3 minute process. There is not a more user-friendly hub to service. Why get blangy shiz if you're not going to do even the basic-est of service? 3 minutes every 1000 miles. I bet they're not worn out, just neglected. Give the cassette a tug and you're in.
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  11. #11
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    Since the DT 240 hub has a ratchet system that is very durable is it possible that you mean you tore through the splines on the freehub with your cassette? If you had a bike shop fix your wheel they would have replaced the freehub and likely re-used the ratchets in the hub - because they are quite durable, the 18 tooth is the most durable ratchet. If they had to replace the freehub AND the ratchet this likely would have cost you at least $200 based on the price of a freehub and new ratchets. If they only replaced the 18 tooth ratchet it would have been closer to $100 parts and labor.

    If it was just the freehub that your cassette tore through, then I recommend getting a steel DT Swiss freehub to replace the aluminum one that comes standard on the 240.
    Last edited by changingleaf; 1 Week Ago at 04:26 AM. Reason: ADDED INFO

  12. #12
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    At 210 you could ride about any hub trouble free but, if your concerned about it because of the steep terrain Iíll recommend Chris King. Extremely strong and dependable, best bearings in the business.

  13. #13
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    OP should be temp banned for wasting everyone's time by not maintaining his hubs.

  14. #14
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    +1 for DT Swiss 350...

    245lb's ready to ride & I've been destroying hubs/freehubs for 3 years o_0

    Running the 350 for several months now & there's barely any pitting on the freehub ^^

    Plus it preforms how a hub should i.e. it just works w/ no dramas.

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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    +1 for DT Swiss 350...

    245lb's ready to ride & I've been destroying hubs/freehubs for 3 years o_0

    Running the 350 for several months now & there's barely any pitting on the freehub ^^

    Plus it preforms how a hub should i.e. it just works w/ no dramas.

    'Born to ride!'
    You recommend the budget version of the hub he already has? Ain't no sense in that.

    Actually... what's a clyde mtb hub that will go a long while w/ 0 maintenance, then you replace? A 350 might be a good candidate.


    This thread is stupid.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    You recommend the budget version of the hub he already has? Ain't no sense in that.

    Actually... what's a clyde mtb hub that will go a long while w/ 0 maintenance, then you replace? A 350 might be a good candidate.


    This thread is stupid.
    Thought his had pawls...

    Mine has ratchet system...

    Much better ;-)

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  17. #17
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    Why is the 18 tooth ratchet more durable than the 54 tooth?

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by targnik View Post
    +1 for DT Swiss 350...

    245lb's ready to ride & I've been destroying hubs/freehubs for 3 years o_0

    Running the 350 for several months now & there's barely any pitting on the freehub ^^

    Plus it preforms how a hub should i.e. it just works w/ no dramas.

    'Born to ride!'
    How many teeth on your ratchet?

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    How many teeth on your ratchet?
    Only the 18 =(

    But...

    Apparently it's more durable ;-)

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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    Why is the 18 tooth ratchet more durable than the 54 tooth?
    tolerance stack, and more contact area if only 1 tooth engages for whatever reason.
    Or so i think?

    The more teeth, the smaller they get. The durability trend is well documented. 18t is beefcake, 36t is good for anyone who isn't a lazy monster, 54t is a compromise that few people will experience. These hubs have been around for decades and that's how long it took for them to become popular... which speaks to their function > fashion.


    240/350 are excellent hubs. Competitively priced, stupid easy to service, POE can be traded for durability, and no significant faults. They're not the only excellent hub on the market, so your priorities might lead you to a dozen other vendors. Those hubs will require a modest service schedule too.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by scottzg View Post
    tolerance stack, and more contact area if only 1 tooth engages for whatever reason.
    Or so i think?

    The more teeth, the smaller they get. The durability trend is well documented. 18t is beefcake, 36t is good for anyone who isn't a lazy monster, 54t is a compromise that few people will experience. These hubs have been around for decades and that's how long it took for them to become popular... which speaks to their function > fashion.


    240/350 are excellent hubs. Competitively priced, stupid easy to service, POE can be traded for durability, and no significant faults. They're not the only excellent hub on the market, so your priorities might lead you to a dozen other vendors. Those hubs will require a modest service schedule too.
    Hubs and axles do flex, under power, etc., so I think that has some merit.
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  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    Hubs and axles do flex, under power, etc., so I think that has some merit.
    In regards to I9's new Hydra hubs (690 points of engagement), the way I understand them to work is when you initially push on the pedals only one pawl engages with the drive ring, but as you apply more torque to the pedal the system flexes slightly which is enough to cause a second pawl to engage with the drive ring, and if even more torque is applied additional flex will cause a third pawl to engage the drive ring. In other words, i9 is using the inherent flex in the system to cause more pawls to engage with the drive ring.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyriding View Post
    In regards to I9's new Hydra hubs (690 points of engagement), the way I understand them to work is when you initially push on the pedals only one pawl engages with the drive ring, but as you apply more torque to the pedal the system flexes slightly which is enough to cause a second pawl to engage with the drive ring, and if even more torque is applied additional flex will cause a third pawl to engage the drive ring. In other words, i9 is using the inherent flex in the system to cause more pawls to engage with the drive ring.
    Correct. They even downsized the axle from 17mm to 15mm, I'm assuming to get the desired twist and engage up to 4 pawls. Supposed to be 20% stronger too. Pretty sweet design.
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