Whistler first-time solo.. where to start?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    Yasmine A.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    148

    Whistler first-time solo.. where to start?

    Hello there
    So I have finally decided to go to MTB Mecca..I mean whistler with visits to Squamish and Pemberton. I am planning to stay a minimum of 10 days probably extending it to 15 days to ride like a mad girl and try out all the technical trails I can do with my skills set (no major jumps or air time).

    I am travelling alone and I am hoping to go during July/August with the EWS so that I get to meet people. I am wondering how to plan my rides... should I just take my bike and try out trails or do you recommend going with a guide. Which guide companies would u recommend?

    I read about the Summer Gravity Camps but they are quite expensive. Are there other equally fun options?

    Any tips would be greatly appreciated

  2. #2
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,524
    Just be aware that in August you'll run into Crankworx (August 7-16/2015) and the place will be packed, with trail closures for races and events. Summer in Whistler is always busy, but during Crankworx it is bananas.

    If you want to step your skills up a notch or two, the camps are a good idea, a friend of mine is an instructor at Camp of Champs and she and all her students have a blast. It's a good way to meet people at your skill level that you can ride with, and it's a good way to get to know the mountain and the trails.

    A guide company can provide guide services matching trails to your skill level and even a bike suitable for different riding styles (XC/AM/DH)

    Welcome to Bear Back Biking

    If you don't already live in an alpine area with critters, having a guide that knows how to deal with wildlife is important, as there are bears and cougars in the mountains in Squamish, Whistler and Pemberton.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kevin267's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    449

  4. #4
    Yasmine A.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    148
    Thank you guys.. looks like having an intro tour of the park for a day + a few days coaching would be the most affordable option :-)

    Will check again for what other riders usually do when they are at Whistler

    Cheers and happy MTB times everyone

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    860
    Went this September for a week with a few friends. Great fun, stayed in Whistler but spent a day in Squamish. Next time we might plan for more time in Squamish, its pretty good there!
    The trails are well marked, pick up the excellent Squamish SORCA trail map. Pop into local shop for tips on which trails to check out. Maybe find a group whos willing to let you tag along. I'd be little reluctant to ride alone. The Lost Lakes area in Whistler should be no prob alone, we used that as warm up area and easy days off riding area. But if you venture further out I'd really want to ride with at least one other person.
    We're more XC/AM so never hit the park. We did do Top of the World one day, which I think was worth it. But we hit Kyber Pass instead of going down through the park. That was a pretty epic ride, but Kyber is definitely NOT a solo ride.
    If you care to check it out, our pics from out trip:
    The Whistler Experience - Friday, 22 August 2014 to Sunday, 31 August 2014

  6. #6
    Yasmine A.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    148
    Pics look awesome! thanks for sharing and for the useful tips.. I have a feeling if you go during the busy months it would be easy to meet ppl and tag along other riders. But yeah for the more technical trails like Kyber I will check if I can go with a guide.

    I will be reading more into the Whistler website which has all the maps of trails according to technical level and will get in touch if I have questions :-)

    Thanks

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Legbacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,566
    I've heard that Squamish has a trail app. Should make it pretty easy to navigate.
    Formerly Travis Bickle

    Team Robot. "modulation is code for “I suck at brake control.” Here’s a free tip: get better."

  8. #8
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,524
    The Squamish trail map app is up to date as well. Worth it for sure.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  9. #9
    Yasmine A.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    148
    whats it called?

  10. #10
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,524
    Here's the iTunes link

    https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/trai...373524366?mt=8

    and they do issue constant updates as new trails are developed.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kevin267's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    449
    There's good ones for whistler and pemberton by the same developers as well.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    860
    Just remember to not put all your eggs in one basket. Technology is cool and all, but be prepared and able to go without. Never know when battery dies, device gets dropped, you're out of signal range, etc.
    Friend used bikepirate.com to get info on trails that sounded like we might like to check out, it worked out pretty well.

  13. #13
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,524
    The Squamish trail map and SORCA trail pass would be $25, it's a good investment.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    685
    my advice would be If you don't know how, learn how to jump your bike BEFORE you go to Whistler. Visit bike parks, free ride parks, anywhere that has jumps. Start small and work your way up...if you can clear 10-20 foot tables you will do yourself a huge favor and benefit greatly.

    If you don't have one, get a DH bike. Ride some steep technical DH trails BEFORE you go to Whistler.

    Don't go to Whistler and get caught with your pants down. DO NOT wait till you get to Whistler to start practicing your skills or take some dumb class, talk about a waste of time and money... Practice your skills or take a class BEFORE you go and it will make your experience that much better. Trust me.

    Now that you got the skills you can dive right in and start cranking out some laps in the park...warm up on some blue runs like B-line, ninja cougar, karate monkey, blue velvet, and crank it up.

    if you've done your homework and are confident in your jumping abilities its time to step it up to the black diamond classic lines like A-line, Freight train, dirt merchant, original sin.

    Don't worry too much about trails with jumps, everything it a tabletop so its super user friendly you can roll over them or if your jumping and come up short its not a huge deal. Just take it slow, learn the lines and speed and get stuff dialed. By the end of your trip you'll have each trail memorized from so many laps.

    p.s. learn to jump your bike...do it!!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    261
    Quote Originally Posted by dmar123 View Post
    my advice would be If you don't know how, learn how to jump your bike BEFORE you go to Whistler. Visit bike parks, free ride parks, anywhere that has jumps. Start small and work your way up...if you can clear 10-20 foot tables you will do yourself a huge favor and benefit greatly.

    If you don't have one, get a DH bike. Ride some steep technical DH trails BEFORE you go to Whistler.

    Don't go to Whistler and get caught with your pants down. DO NOT wait till you get to Whistler to start practicing your skills or take some dumb class, talk about a waste of time and money... Practice your skills or take a class BEFORE you go and it will make your experience that much better. Trust me.

    Now that you got the skills you can dive right in and start cranking out some laps in the park...warm up on some blue runs like B-line, ninja cougar, karate monkey, blue velvet, and crank it up.

    if you've done your homework and are confident in your jumping abilities its time to step it up to the black diamond classic lines like A-line, Freight train, dirt merchant, original sin.

    Don't worry too much about trails with jumps, everything it a tabletop so its super user friendly you can roll over them or if your jumping and come up short its not a huge deal. Just take it slow, learn the lines and speed and get stuff dialed. By the end of your trip you'll have each trail memorized from so many laps.

    p.s. learn to jump your bike...do it!!
    Got say I totally disagree with this advice. Of course any skills you have before getting to Whistler will only enhance you experience. But there's great fun to be had while learning.

    In July 2013 we went with our hardtails, expecting to push our skills above the green level. We weren't planning on riding the bike park, in fact, we'd never given DH much thought. On a whim we rented full kits and did the Max 4 instructor session. We had an absolute blast! We did all the "warm ups" dmar123 mentioned.

    That experience totally changed our perspective on mtn biking. Since then we've been to several other bike parks, routinely ride techie trails and started traveling to destination mtn biking areas.

    Go with skills you have and build on it.

    The Max 4 wasn't dumb. The instructor demonstrated basic positions, braking and turning. We picked it up quickly, so he said "let's ride". Took us on a rapid progress of trails with increasing speed and confidence. Life has never been the same...

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    238
    Talk to Jaclyn at Ozmosis Training - Home. She lives up there in the summers and can do coaching and guiding. I've ridden with her a ton and she knows the whole area (Whistler, Pemberton, Squamish) pretty well. If you're looking for technical, she can find them.

    Also, don't worry about the jumping thing. Unless you're in the bike park, it's not really a big deal.

  17. #17
    Dirtmistress
    Reputation: dirtmistress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    526
    I'm so glad I saw this. I'll be up there 7/5 to 7/11 and have wanted to find a guide.


    Quote Originally Posted by jaclynj View Post
    Talk to Jaclyn at Ozmosis Training - Home. She lives up there in the summers and can do coaching and guiding. I've ridden with her a ton and she knows the whole area (Whistler, Pemberton, Squamish) pretty well. If you're looking for technical, she can find them.

    Also, don't worry about the jumping thing. Unless you're in the bike park, it's not really a big deal.
    WWXD.
    What would Xena do?
    She used to clean the whole trail.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dyg2001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    298
    Excuse me for piggybacking on this thread. I'm going to Whistler for a family vacation the week of August 2. It will be my first visit to Whistler and I'm psyched.

    I have 20+ years experience riding XC but have never been on a DH bike. I spent a week at Mammoth bike park about 5-6 years ago and could ride all the single diamond trails on my mediocre medium-travel FS rental bike. My technical skills are OK for an XC rider weaned on hardtails but I am still chicken when it comes to big jumps and drops, etc.

    My tentative plan is to ride DH in the bike park for 3 days and then ride trails the next 3 days. I'll be renting bikes. I have already reserved a Santa Cruz V10 (!!!) for the bike park and plan on taking some individual or group DH lessons.

    For riding trails in the area, what kind of bike should I rent? According to the internet, rental options from local bike shops like Summit, Evolution, and Fanatyk include the Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt 790 BC Edition (120mm rear travel), Norco Sight (140mm), and Transition Patrol 3 (155mm). Which bike would you recommend for Whistler trails? The RM Thunderbolt sounds closest to my personal bike which is a Pivot Mach 4C which has a measly 115mm rear travel and a Pike 130mm.

    I understand there is an app that is useful for finding local trails?

    Are there any regular weekly group trail rides that meet at a bike shop that welcome visitors?

    Any other advice would be appreciated for maximizing bike fun for a week in Whistler.

    Thanks,

    David in San Diego

  19. #19
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,524
    A Thunderbolt BC Edition would be ideal for the Blue trails outside of the Park, if you were going to ride Black diamond trails outside the park, a Rocky Altitude (150mm travel) would be just the ticket.

    Whistler is a very compact and social riding environment, especially this time of year, it would be almost be impossible to arrive at a trailhead and not find other riders there, or even people kitted up to ride at the coffee shop in the morning. Certainly the people teaching you how to DH in the Park will have the 411 on regular social rides.

    If you want to get hooked up with trails that match your skills and interests (alpine and lots of elevation, techy AM, lots of wood work, relentless up and down like Comfortably Numb, etc.) spending the money for a day of guided mountain bike touring will give you a good idea of what the various natural trail ratings are like in Whistler ('cause BC is not like any place else).

    WORCA does rides on Monday night, but you'd need to buy a membership.

    Monday Night Rides | Whistler Off Road Cycling Association


    Whistler trail map app

    https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/trai...443895725?mt=8
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dyg2001's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    298
    Thanks a lot for the info, rockyuphill.

    I'm flying Alaska Air and apparently they don't charge a bike fee, so I may just bring my Pivot instead of renting a trail bike.

    Will consider getting a WORCA membership to join the Monday night and Thursday rides and to support the local scene.

    Will also consider hiring a guide for a day of trail riding. Any recommendations for a good guide?

    Thanks!

  21. #21
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,524
    There's a couple of guide companies

    Whistler Bike Guide

    Welcome to Bear Back Biking
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kevin267's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    449

  23. #23
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,524
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

Similar Threads

  1. 1st day of Whistler...with the wife out front and solo
    By SHIVER ME TIMBERS in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 08-08-2014, 11:55 AM
  2. Whistler first time advice
    By stalks in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 06-14-2013, 05:46 AM
  3. First Time to Whistler!!
    By B-Mac in forum Downhill - Freeride
    Replies: 148
    Last Post: 01-17-2013, 11:48 AM
  4. 4 days in CO, End of August, Start/Finish Denver, Solo. Advice Needed
    By taranehneh in forum Colorado - Front Range
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 06-12-2012, 02:20 PM
  5. Time to start again!
    By Liljeepz in forum XC Racing and Training
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-08-2011, 12:41 PM

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.