Vintage Bikes / Riders in Edmonton- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    ravingbikefiend
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    Vintage Bikes / Riders in Edmonton

    What an excellent day... the Oilers just defeated the Sharks and are going to the Western Final which I like to refer to as a duck hunt.

    That just capped off a really great day as I also found my Raleigh Superbe complete with a working dynahub and a pair of keys for the locking forks ! I was really hoping to find a '65 model but this '78 will make me more than happy.

    Besides being a little scruffy and in need of some TLC and new tyres everything seems solid and after putting on the new rubber I should be taking the new ride out tomorrow to work out any bugs.

    So now I'm wondering how many other folks in Edmonton are into these classic and vintage cruisers as I don't see many on the road. I visited the vintage forum here and most people's concept of vintage seems to be bikes from the mid eighties.

    Did I mention that the bike is alo in my favourite colour ?

    Did I mention I saved her from becoming a lump of scrap metal ?



    I'll have to post some before and after pictures too.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  2. #2
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    Sixty Fiver, I think the Vintage thread is MTB specific. That limits things to the 80's.

    I have 90 Norco Katmandu and a 96 Specialized Ground Control that are taking up space in my garage. That and a couple of 80's 10 speeds, and a 97 GT Outpost. I'm always on the lookout for vintage bikes, but only have a very crowded single garage. I either need a bigger garage, or get rid of some bikes.

    I have fond memories of riding one of those Raleighs when I visited my Grandmother in Manitoba during the 70's. I think I know someone that has one in their shed. I'll look into it this weekend.

    I recently came across a garage where the city has been storing a room full of 80's mountain bikes. Most of them are just department store bikes by the looks of it, but I couldn't help but wonder what else is out there.

    Last christmas I found a couple of Raleigh 20 folding bikes at Goodwill, converted them to a more trail friendly variety with BMX tires. I was inspired by Sheldon Brown's Raleigh 20 site. I sold them to a friend who was going to buy some cheap Wallmart folding bikes and he seems pretty happy with them.

    I'm currently parting out a late 60's Torpado touring bike I found at the police auction. If you want a heavy, but pretty italian lugged frame (around 55cm I think) let me know.

  3. #3
    ravingbikefiend
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    ribald - That is a very generous offer that I probably can't resist since I'm looking for a road / touring bike but if you think that's heavy you'll have to see my new favourite bike.

    I picked her up over by Rexall place, drove downtown and then went all the way to Millwoods via the ravine and then home... I didn't try and see how she handled the singletrack but everywhere else I went the ride was as superb as the Raleigh Superbe is.

    Although the bike must weigh at least 40 pounds, I managed some good cruising speeds and will have to hook up a speedo to see what she's capable of.

    I replaced the tires and tubes and gave her a thorough check up, cleaning, and oiling before I went anywhere. It was mostly a case of removing dust and cobwebs.



    The rear Dunlop is so old is just says "fill until hard" and I'll be swapping it as it really is a vintage tire and should be saved for a much older bike... I do like the all black tire treatment though.


    She has all her original Raleigh parts... even the uncomfortable 1978 seat.


    The electrical tape served no useful purpose so it has been removed...


    The dyna hub and lights all work and didn't need a thing...


    I swapped seats when I got home cause after 50 km my butt was killing me... I had a spare Italian seat (circa 1979) that will do until I find a nice Brooks.

    She's now parked in the garage with the rest of the old girls and I've added a jingly bell (to stay legal), and a rear view mirror.

    I'll have to swap the SA gear lever and cable as it's pretty worn... would you believe I got an NOS lever and cable assemly today too ?
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  4. #4

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    I'd love to buy an old school cruiser or low rider or something. But between school, and keepin the newer MTB up and runnin, I just dont have the funds. Maybe in a few years I will.

  5. #5
    ravingbikefiend
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    The thing I like about my old "girls" is that they were made to withstand a great deal of use and abuse and from a maintainence standpoint it's a sitation of making sure the oil is topped up and things are kept lubricated.

    The Superbe cost me $40.00 Cdn and aside from installing some better brake pads (which I had) and the need for some new tires (which are $10.00 each) she hasn't cost me another dime. Those old SA hubs are made to last and the bikes themselves were designed to work for far longer than we will.

    I have a Raleigh Super Grand Prix (road bike) that I also snagged for $40.00... I have since installed a Sugino triple up front and replaced the Suntour 5 in the rear for a Shimano 6. I salvaged the triple chainring and 6 speed and swapped in some Shimano 600 series brakes from a Raleigh Citerium I just picked up fro $20.00.

    All in all, I have 4 decent bikes here now (the Criterium is going to be a single speed) and aside from the Trek they have cost me... let me count on my fingers... $110.00.

    The SGP is a wonderful road / touring bike and I've already logged nearly 400 km on her with nary a problem... it's a fairly light bike that idles at 20 kmh and cruises easily at 40 kmh.

    The Criterium is a lighter and more nimble bike than the SGP so I figured it would be a good candidate to become an SS. Methinks that will cost me a few beans as I'll have to build up a new rear wheel although keeping the factory Weinman's would be nice.

    So basically... it doesn't have to cost one a great deal of $$$ to get a solid and dependable vintage bike but it does help to have some skills and a well equipped shop so you don;t have top pay someone else to do the little bits of work that might be needed.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  6. #6

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    Its really that cheap??? I dunno why, but I was under the impression that it would be costing upwards of 400-500 bucks per bike, not including any work thatd have to be done. Guess I was way off.

  7. #7
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    I've also been bitten by the vintage road bike bug. Lately I've been riding a Kuwahara Club Sport with Ishiwata tubing and full Shimano 600 components. It weighs in at just over 20 lbs.

    clubsport.jpg

    I also picked up a slightly heavier Apollo which is still a nice road bike. I need to get rid of at least one of them. Either that or I need to build a bigger garage... I put my limit at 10 bikes, and I'm currently at 13. Two of those I ride regularly. They range from a 1948 CCM cruiser to my Jamis Dakar XC Comp.

    As for the cost of vintage bikes, the Kuwahara was cheaper than a case of beer.

    Any idea where I can find replacement brake hoods locally?

  8. #8
    ravingbikefiend
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    That Kuwahara is one beautiful bike and at 20 pounds and a few ounces it's lighter than the Jamis Nova I was ogling at the Hardcore and about $1580.00 less money.

    I just rolled in after spending some time down on Whyte, I was out road testing the new "Critter" which has undergone a little conversion work to make it into a 3 speed urban commuter.

    I was going to make a single speed out of her but then I thought that I might try installing the SA hub and wheel I had sitting in the shop.

    She's not very pretty (yet) but I am planning on stripping her down and painting her in a nice shade of copper orange.



    This is what the new driveline looks like... the ring up front is a 40, the chainguard was fabricated from the old 52 tooth chainring, and there's a 20 cog in the rear. That gives me gear ratios of 40, 52, and 74 gear inches if my math is correct.


    Another shot of the chaingurad which I am quite pleased with...
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  9. #9
    ravingbikefiend
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    Ribald...

    I might be able to score you some free brake hoods... I'll let you know if I come across any.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  10. #10
    ravingbikefiend
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    I just visited Sheldon Brown's website for the umpteenth time and found his online calculator for specs on all manner of hubs giving gain ratios, gear inch measurements, and speeds at various rpms.

    Now I won't need a speedo to see how fast the Critter is running out at...

    With the 40 up front and 20 in the rear I get gear inch measurements of 39, 52, and 70 (I was a little off) and when I have been pedalling along (quite easily) at 120 rpm I've been doing 25 mph or about 40 kmh.

    Methinks the old girl has some real potential and if anyone wants to hit the road for a spin this weekend, I am more than up for that.

    I am also going to take a little time to get out on the trails and would love company.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  11. #11
    ravingbikefiend
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    So the question is ... who's up for a little vintage road riding this weekend providing the rain lets up ?

    I also have plans to hit the trails and get seriously dirty.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  12. #12
    dreaming of bottlerockets
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    I'm up for some vintage road riding, or any riding, period.

    My old Norco 10-speed touring bike is up for the challenge. Man, can that thing take a beating. It's about 27lbs, but I love it .

    We need to have an MTBR ride soon.
    if it ain't broke you ain't ridin' hard enough
    http://www.outdoorsclub.ca - I'm the webmaster and I help run trips!

  13. #13
    ravingbikefiend
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    Mike and I hooked up tonight for some serious mud bogging and single track riding (22 km worth) and I am just as up for taking the old girls out for a spin on the road as I am for more mud bogging and single track / trail riding.

    The Critter is pretty much road ready as I swapped in an 18 tooth Shimano rear cog (the new gearing is perfect) and replaced that sad 3 speed chain and I'd like to take her out for one really good ride before I strip her down and get the paint done and the new rear wheel built.

    But then again... the SGP has been neglected a little and should get some road time too and I am sure she's more than ready to meet a few other old bikes.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  14. #14
    ravingbikefiend
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    Here's the latest pic of the Critter... she's all ready for her ride into work today and hey ma... I have some rear brakes after fishing some old Shimano Tourney's (self adjusting no less) out of the parts bin.



    It's been a fun project building my "speed triple".
    Last edited by Sixty Fiver; 06-19-2006 at 08:30 AM.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  15. #15
    ravingbikefiend
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    Today was a good day as I spent the morning and the good part of the afternoon turning wrenches and building up a rather sweet bike for some lucky kid.

    Besides that, I rescued an early seventies Sekine "Black Panther" (10 speed) from obliviion which would make one think it was some kind of killer racing bike with a name designed to inspire fear.

    My greatest fear would be that the bike fell on me as it weighs a ton.

    The thing must curb out at 45 pounds as it's certainly heavier than my Raleigh Superbe (41 pounds) with most of that weight sitting in the rear of the bike... the tubing in this thing must almost be solid steel. It is stamped "Sekine Industrial and Bicycle Co." and has a head badge and side badge telling you it's a Black Panther.

    It came equipped with drop bars and fenders, an original Sekine front "racing" wheel, a rather cool Simplex front deraileur that works very smoothly (it's a screw drive) and some really straight steel wheels that cleaned up nicely, The bike itself seems to be very well built and all the running gear except for the front deraileur was Shimano "333".

    I swapped the drop bars for some extra cruiser bars and hand brakes I had and after replacing all the old rusted cables with fresh ones and lubing everything up took her out for a spin. I was actually pretty amazed at how nice a ride the bike is as it devoured bumps, wasn't inordinately hard to keep moving, and with the sprung seat I installed the ride was as plush as my much beloved Superbe.

    After a little more spit and polish she'll be a really good looking bike and touching up the flat black factory paint shouldn't be difficult at all.

    In other news, we had a pre war "Sunshine" ladies single speed come into the shop today and it made the Sekine look like a lightweight. These were made in Waterloo, Ontario by a farm equipment manufacturer and one look could tell you that the guys building these applied a tractor standard. The steel in the fenders was so thick you'd have trouble denting them with a hammer.

    I keep seeing more and more vintage bikes on the streets of Edmonton... there was a nice looking English Mercury ladies model parked out from of MEC and the Second Cup when I stopped for my usual evening cup o' joe and I know one of the staff at the Cup rides a late seventies Raleigh Sports 3 speed.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

  16. #16
    ravingbikefiend
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    Making converts...

    Although the boys and I usually get out and hit the single track on the mountain bikes we opted to go vintage tonight and take a spin down to the coffee shop and then for a tour down to Whyte Ave via the high level bridge.

    My 13 year old son saddled up the Sekine which he had been riding all day (I think he's in love with it) and my 17 year old nephew hopped on the the Critter while I rode the newly refitted Superbe which has gotten new Kenda slicks and a lovely Brooks saddle.

    The Superbe really lives up to it's name as it has to be one of the smoothest and most comfortable bikes I have ever ridden and it was virtually silent in it's running. The complete overhaul and service I did to it certainly helped improve an already great ride.

    Affter a few blocks my nephew pulls up beside me at the lights and tells me he has to get a bike like this (the Critter)... with the current wheel set up it isn't as fast as it's going to be but it's still pretty quick and rather plush for a road bike as it's still running on some vintage tires and 1 3/8 rubber that really absorbs the bumps.

    We swapped rides on the way home and he was as thrilled as I always am when I ride the Superbe and when we hit the bike highway it gave me the opportunity to switch the Critter into high gear.

    So I'm doing 40 kmh and accelerating and my nephew pulls up alongside me on the Superbe (the kid has good legs from riding his monster FS) and it made me realize that the Critter is geared just a little higher than I thought as I was pedalling at a much lower rpm than he was. I brought the Critter up to 55 kmh (which left the boys sucking dust) and after this the nephew decided he really wanted a Critter.

    I should let him ride the SGP and then his conversion to the dark side will be complete...

    My sons are already converts to this whole vintage road bike / cruiser thing and whereas some parents migt worry about their kids taking the car, mine just want to ride the old bikes in the garage.
    I ride with 65'er...he's a mountain goat....But then again, we need to throw him in the mud and pack his pockets with lead shot before a scale will read him. - Psycho Mike

    -Environmental stickers don't mean shite when they are stuck to CARS!-

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