Moving to vancouver - need neighboorhood perspective- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    57

    Moving to vancouver - need neighboorhood perspective

    Hey Folks and potential neighbors. I'm a Canadian living in the SFBay area for the last few decades and am returning this year to take a giant pay-cut and spend way more time riding amazing trails. I do non-giantcorp IT work(1/2 the pay, actual live/work balance once you get the resume built), so I'll find employment at a living wage as an apartment renter. I'll be selling a house in the SFBay area we bought in 2001, so I'll have a significant down payment to buy with. I'm looking to not be stressed at all about my mortgage and live humbly an have it paid off by 60. It's just my wife and myself and my wife owns nothing but books and hiking boots and some backpacking gear. I'll either be working full time for a company or contracts, most likely in downtown although there are some employers elsewhere. Coming from the SFBay area we are also accustomed to seeing lots of different cultures throughout the area, hearing different languages and working and hanging out with people with different life experiences than we have, so cultural diversity is important. Here are the options I'm looking at and would be grateful to hear some perspective on:

    Living in North Van:
    Visited - loved it
    I can afford a 2 bedroom townhouse/condo at about 1k sq feet with minimal views (or a slight upgrade to get additional storage/outdoor space/ views and add 5 years to the mortgage).

    Cons:
    Expensive!!
    Not very culturally diverse, but proximal enough
    Tons of Rain..so much rain

    Pros:
    Very close to Fromme and Seymour!!!!!!!
    Live near SeaBus and not commute by car into the city
    Closer drive to ride Squamish and Whistler and the Sunshine Coast

    Living in Burnaby:
    Visited - Nice green suburban spot - not just California style strip mall city.
    I can afford a 2 bedroom townhouse/condo at about 1250sq+ sq feet with some views and good storage

    Cons:
    Not very close to any advanced trails
    Still expensive, but better.

    Pros:
    ~30 minutes to North Van (but not right after work)
    ~30minutes to Eagle or Burke (but not right after work?)
    Close to good enough XC after work riding
    culturally diverse
    Reasonable public transport commute to downtown van area

    Living in Port moody/Coquitlam:
    Have not visited. If it looks like Burnaby that is great, would like to know more.
    I can afford a 2/3 bedroom townhouse at about 1200-1400sq feet with a garage/workshop (I do woodworking sometimes).

    Cons:
    Public transport to downtown unreasonably long (~80minutes), would have to park and ride. More car.

    Pros:
    Very close to Eagle and Burke!!!!!!!!!
    Lots of great riding to the east
    Culturally diverse

    I know I donít want to have to cross another bridge (weekday bridges for northvan only) to get to either mountains or work during the work week and Iíll have to pay more for that privilege. Iím interested in gathering more information and learning about any tips on daily riding and neighborhoods. I really donít know anything about Coquitlam (or living anywhere around Vancouver for that matter) but Iím really into the proximity in Coquitlam to Eagle and Burke and getting more bang for the buck on the real-estate. I also have a truck I plan to travel around in and sleep in, so lots of road trips to go ride trails on the weekends and holidays, if that makes any difference.

    Thanks for reading all this and any advice and good jokes you might provide!

  2. #2
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,514
    I think you've underestimated the amount of rain in North Vancouver, I was passed by salmon while driving in a rainstorm in January. We had 400mm of rain measured near the North Vancouver waterfront in January, 4th wettest January on record, where typical January rainfall is 240mm. It would have been 100mm more further up the mountainside or in Lynn Valley. Compared to Vancouver airport which had 250mm of rain compared to an average of 150mm.

    The languages you commonly hear in North Vancouver while shopping are English, French, Persian, Chinese, Japanese, a bit of Spanish, and Korean. You can find foods from most of those cultures, plus Thai and Vietnamese. But the visible culture is definitely less exotic. More MECrosexual (MEC being like REI).

    And these days the bridge traffic is abysmal, if you work downtown you'd likely come to rely on the Seabus so you never have to take a car on a bridge if you can avoid it.

    But once you're here you can't imagine living anywhere else in the Metro Vancouver area.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    57
    I have power tools and an air compressor and was planning on using them infrequently in my condo. Maybe set up sawhorses on the patio or my parking spot for a few hours on the weekend. Maybe 3-4 times a year. I was told if I try to do this in North Van my strata neighbors are going to sh*t bricks and complain and they will fine me...for serious?!?

  4. #4
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,514
    Pretty much any condo in the urban areas have such high costs of ownership and high strata fees that they will likely lose/loose their poo when people choose the wrong colour of curtains or the wrong shape of planter, let alone generate smells, sawdust or smoke.
    Last edited by rockyuphill; 02-16-2018 at 07:16 AM.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill View Post
    Pretty much any condo in the urban areas have such high costs of ownership and high strata fees that they will likely loose their poo when people choose the wrong colour of curtains or the wrong shape of planter, let alone generate smells, sawdust or smoke.
    Rockyuphill, thanks for all the info and the salmon joke! Yea, I guess I shouldn't really be surprised by that...narrows it down by a good bit for me. It's either a townhouse with a garage only, which pretty well prices me out of NorthVan, or a significant domestic lifestyle change. I guess the idea is I'll be outside or tired from doing stuff outside so....and I'm sure I could find someplace to set up shop once in a while with my own tools.

  6. #6
    ups and downs
    Reputation: rockyuphill's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    15,514
    Like a lot of urban environments where a home workshop is not possible, there are a variety of rental woodworking shops or some you can join as a club.

    https://millergoodwood.wordpress.com/

    Vancouver Community Laboratory |

    https://blog.abluestar.com/woodworking-in-vancouver
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: noose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    552
    I work and ride in the Bay area often. I'm not sure if you considered Fraser Valley but I can tell you it's amazing! There are five awesome trail systems within 30 min from me in Abbotsford and one is a 5 min bike ride from my door. It's quieter here if you don't have to commute to Van. Every service you can imagine and your right in the mountains!

    Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk
    2015 Giant Trance 3
    X-Fusion Sweep RL2 160mm fork
    Straitline Defacto pedals
    Renthal Fatbar with TV 40mm stem
    Ergon Grips

  8. #8
    rad to the power of sick
    Reputation: superlightracer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,968
    I would take a good look at East Vancouver.

    I initially lived in North Van when I moved here 2.5 years ago. The trail access is great, but there is nothing else going on there. Like Rocky said...very "MECrosexual" (my new favorite word by the way) I found evenings to be pretty boring. No vibrant arts or culture scene, and even the restaurants are a little more conservative compared to other areas.

    East Van still has a very DIY hippie/hipster feel. My gf and I chose this neighbourhood because it is so culturally rich. Lots of transients, world travellers, old school hippies, burners, artists, creatives etc.. And to top it off the craft beer scene is excellent. (i have literally 10 breweries within walking distance) You're also only a few km from downtown! There are lots of community events and so many awesome restaurants and bars. Your money would probably go a little further here as well albeit for an older house.

    If you wanted a garage with shop potential it's your best shot short of moving to the burbs. I live at Hastings and Nanaimo and ride out to Seymour and Fromme all the time (Riding up mountain highway sucks, but at least you hit the trails warmed up). Even if you do decide to drive out to the North Shore, you're only on the highway for a few minutes.

    Like I said I've only been here for a couple years but I am extremely happy with this neighbourhood and would definitely buy if I didn't work in the bike industry and live in the most expensive city in Canada
    Some great sets for the trainer:
    https://www.mixcloud.com/djfeelgood/

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    835
    The GF lived in East Van up until this past summer. I was always impressed with how many NSR-4s were hanging off the back of vehicles there. More impressed that they were still there in the next AM.

    East Van ProTip: Lock your shit up. If living in strata don't store your bikes in the bike storage.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    35
    Have a look at Squamish. I know it looks far but really the commute to downtown Vancouver is 45 to 60 minutes (mostly against traffic, way better commute than from the Valley), the real estate is still somewhat affordable and hands down the best mountain biking trails in the region, plus you're close to Whistler

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    47
    Living in Port moody/Coquitlam:
    Have not visited. If it looks like Burnaby that is great, would like to know more.
    I can afford a 2/3 bedroom townhouse at about 1200-1400sq feet with a garage/workshop (I do woodworking sometimes).

    Cons:
    Public transport to downtown unreasonably long (~80minutes), would have to park and ride. More car.

    Pros:
    Very close to Eagle and Burke!!!!!!!!!
    Lots of great riding to the east
    Culturally diverse.

    ** Don't come here, we're full and the trails suck.
    Nothing good here.

  12. #12
    roots, rocks, rhythm
    Reputation: Dawgprimo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    701
    Bring lots and lots of money!
    Plan to get frustrated looking for rent (Less then 1% availability) and the prices.......crazy!

    Move into a Sprinter van and then you are always mobile and the trails are never to far from the vans front door.......

    You may laugh but it is the truth..........unfortunately
    97' Brodie Expresso
    00' Turner RFX
    08' Turner RFX
    13' Surly Troll
    15' Surly ICT

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    835
    What do you do for work?

  14. #14
    banned
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    553
    East Van ProTip: Lock your shit up. If living in strata don't store your bikes in the bike storage.
    Lay down a couple of meters of this in your living room...

    Name:  3a4ee6db2a917d5380a145c595d03869--anchor-chain-anchors.jpg
Views: 109
Size:  11.8 KB

    and lock your bikes to it with something like...

    Moving to vancouver - need neighboorhood perspective-5051912-bk000.jpg

  15. #15
    Kilted Cyclist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    358
    Quote Originally Posted by nouseforaname View Post
    Living in Port moody/Coquitlam:
    Have not visited. If it looks like Burnaby that is great, would like to know more.
    I can afford a 2/3 bedroom townhouse at about 1200-1400sq feet with a garage/workshop (I do woodworking sometimes).

    Cons:
    Public transport to downtown unreasonably long (~80minutes), would have to park and ride. More car.

    Pros:
    Very close to Eagle and Burke!!!!!!!!!
    Lots of great riding to the east
    Culturally diverse.

    ** Don't come here, we're full and the trails suck.
    I live in Port Moody and it is not a great place at all.

    1) too many trails near my home. (Burnaby mountain, Eagle mountain, and Burke Montain) I can't concerntrate when I am at work (I work from home)

    2) too many craft breweries here... I mean 4 of them on 2 blocks??

    3) Too Transit friendly. the train station is so close to my home..like 5 minutes walk.

    4) Far from Downtown. like 50 minutes...

    5)Roadies.. Roadies every where!!!

    6) gravel Trails!! my gawd!

    7) We even have a lake that you can swim in the summer. We are Canadians.. we don't swim, we skate!
    Norco Threshold Single Speed
    Trek X-Calibur 7
    Bianchi San Jose with riser bar
    Trek Madone
    Kona Dew
    Tomac Taos

Similar Threads

  1. Moving to North of Vancouver, bike advice please ?..
    By earlanderson in forum Western Canada
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 06-22-2016, 07:24 PM
  2. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 08-07-2015, 01:07 PM
  3. Moving to Vancouver
    By Jmult in forum Washington
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-12-2014, 04:38 PM
  4. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-02-2013, 04:26 PM
  5. Moving to Vancouver
    By first man in forum Western Canada
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-30-2011, 02:08 PM

Members who have read this thread: 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.