$200 to ride Whistler for one day...yikes!- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    $200 to ride Whistler for one day...yikes!

    I was making a bike reservation online at Summit Sport and when all said and done for the rental, gear and lift ticket it came out to $208 (CDN).

    I really want to ride Whistler but that seems ridiculous. Is Whistler really the cat's meow? I was also looking at Silver Star and Kicking Horse.

    I am in Colorado and friends here who have gone rave about Whistler and tell me I need to go no matter what.

    Give me some warm and fuzzies about dropping two bills
    Yield to downhill

  2. #2
    West Coast FTW!
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    every rental place in town charges $100 per day for a DH bike rental, so you're stuck a little there, you can save some dough if you have you own safety gear, but just imagine though, this palce has 3400 feet of vert, every type of trail you can think off from super gnar tech to smooth flow singletrack to ladder bridges and berms, progressive learning areas with ladders and skinnies to get your practice on, a sick dual slalom course, a sweet Giant Slalom, the Boneyard, the sweet village where you can dine or party as much as you can afford. That one day will get you wanting to move here.....

  3. #3
    slaving away in paradise
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    Quote Originally Posted by PuraVida
    Is Whistler really the cat's meow?
    Yes

    I used to:
    -Tear apart my bike
    -Pack my bike into a package small enough for the airlines
    -Pack my suitcases so both were under the 50lb max (I usually had to rearrange at check-in)
    -Buy a ticket (from Kauai was $$$)
    -Pay the inter-island and trans-ocean fee (~$100 each way)
    -Rent a van from Vancouver to Whistler to get my bike and crap to WBP
    -Rent a place (usually two of us so we got a condo (~$100 night)
    -Eating out almost every day/afternoon/night (things ain't cheap up there)
    -Reverse the process to get home

    Now that I moved to BC:
    -Wake up at 4am
    -Put bike in truck
    -Drive 1 hr to ferry
    -Pay $70 for ferry (each way)
    -Sit on ferry for 1.5 hrs
    -Drive 45 min from Horseshoe bay to WBP
    -Ride, ride, ride, get home on last ferry
    Fill tank in truck (~$60)

    Either way, it's worth it. When are you going? If it's during Crankworx, there's pluses and
    minuses.

    On the plus side:
    -There's reps from almost every major bike company there
    -All the pros are there and watching them ride is pretty awesome
    -The event has ~20,000 people there and there's lots of parties to go to

    On the minus side:
    -There's ~20,000 people there
    -Lift lines can be over 1/2 hr (I waited 55 minutes on one run)
    -The trails are beat to hell (brake ruts that can swallow a small child)
    -With the trails so crowded you loose the feeling of being in mother nature

    You can get away from the majority of the minuses if you ride the top (Garbonzo zone), but
    bring you A game. There's lots of real fun trails, but it's much harder than 95% of the bottom
    of the hill.

    Go, and even if you don't get a fuzzy feeling when you drop the $$, you will after your first
    run.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by PuraVida
    I was making a bike reservation online at Summit Sport and when all said and done for the rental, gear and lift ticket it came out to $208 (CDN).

    I really want to ride Whistler but that seems ridiculous. Is Whistler really the cat's meow? I was also looking at Silver Star and Kicking Horse.

    I am in Colorado and friends here who have gone rave about Whistler and tell me I need to go no matter what.

    Give me some warm and fuzzies about dropping two bills
    It is Canadian dollars, oh and did you add 7% PST and 5% GST too....

    Course you could wait until the Canadian dollar rises, they figure parity before the end of the year.

  5. #5
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    I think I am over it. Gotta hit it at least once right. And after I kiss the money goodbye it's all about fun...no worries.

    I will be riding there on Monday so hoping the crowds won't be that crazy yet.
    Yield to downhill

  6. #6
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    Good choice you've made. One day in the park is an experience you will vividly remember for the rest of your life. Take it easy to begin with so you don't get hurt right off the bat.

  7. #7
    slaving away in paradise
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eerie
    Good choice you've made. One day in the park is an experience you will vividly remember for the rest of your life. Take it easy to begin with so you don't get hurt right off the bat.

    ^Take this to heart...no matter how good you think you are, start with some easier runs.

    I do fear you will be sad you only have one day though.
    Have a great time, Mondays are slow.

  8. #8
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    It's well worth it. It's expensive, but you'll have access to more trails and riding than in your wildest dreams.

    Note on the garbanzo zone. People try to tell everyone to stay off the trails up there and that it's so much harder than the lower mountain. While I do agree that it's tougher than SOME of the lower mountain, if you can ride blacks on the lower mountain you can ride blacks on the upper mountain. I race cross country in the midwest, so I'm no DH guru, but had a MUCH better time on the upper mountain than lower. Seemed like there were far less 'EXTREME!!!' hipsters who act like they own the trail, and there were FAR less people up there in general. It felt like I could concentrate on riding and the amazing terrain instead of worrying about some kid with no pads or common sense barreling down at me. I've found the highest concentration of these types of riders were on the lower mountain, mainly riding dirt merchant and a-line... both great trails, but full of morons and overcrowded

    The only thing I hated about whistler was the aforementioned riders with all the attitude. Most were cool, but there were a number of wanna be pro downhillers that thought they owned the place and felt the right to buzz anyone that got in their way. The lack of respect for other riders was the main problem. I don't care if you're the fastest or slowest guy/gal, is it that hard to respect other riders?

  9. #9
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    The only thing I hated about whistler was the aforementioned riders with all the attitude

    In these "neck of the woods" we like to call it bra-attitude

  10. #10
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    I once paid $200 to go bungy jumping in New Zealand, for about 7 seconds of falling... everytime I think about how amazing it was, the money doesn't matter. Although different, I'm sure if you enjoy biking that much, you'll feel the same.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiflow_21
    It's well worth it. It's expensive, but you'll have access to more trails and riding than in your wildest dreams.

    Note on the garbanzo zone. People try to tell everyone to stay off the trails up there and that it's so much harder than the lower mountain. While I do agree that it's tougher than SOME of the lower mountain, if you can ride blacks on the lower mountain you can ride blacks on the upper mountain. I race cross country in the midwest, so I'm no DH guru, but had a MUCH better time on the upper mountain than lower. Seemed like there were far less 'EXTREME!!!' hipsters who act like they own the trail, and there were FAR less people up there in general. It felt like I could concentrate on riding and the amazing terrain instead of worrying about some kid with no pads or common sense barreling down at me. I've found the highest concentration of these types of riders were on the lower mountain, mainly riding dirt merchant and a-line... both great trails, but full of morons and overcrowded

    The only thing I hated about whistler was the aforementioned riders with all the attitude. Most were cool, but there were a number of wanna be pro downhillers that thought they owned the place and felt the right to buzz anyone that got in their way. The lack of respect for other riders was the main problem. I don't care if you're the fastest or slowest guy/gal, is it that hard to respect other riders?
    Yep, Whistler attitude is BAD. I ride here now and I am missing great fun riders from Colorado. Now I ride with "pros" with no pads and bleeding hands (especialy disgusting if they sit on lift right next to you). WBP is cool , but people here NOT. Please smile everybody, you are not going to be next DH kings, this is sport and fun that should make you happy !!

  12. #12
    slaving away in paradise
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    Quote Originally Posted by robicycle
    Yep, Whistler attitude is BAD. I ride here now and I am missing great fun riders from Colorado. Now I ride with "pros" with no pads and bleeding hands (especialy disgusting if they sit on lift right next to you). WBP is cool , but people here NOT. Please smile everybody, you are not going to be next DH kings, this is sport and fun that should make you happy !!

    I've never had any issues w/ battitude. So what people ride w/o pads, so what some where
    pajamas while riding, and so what if some of them aren't smiling like they're funny in the head?

    I've had lots of great experiences w/ whislter locals, and tourists alike. There are dickwads
    just like there are dickwads in every town. Besides, half the population is from Australian anyhow.

    I'll be here next week, I'll be one of the majority with body armor on, mismatch out fit and
    a bike that's better than I am. I usually don't smile too much as I'm getting old and riding
    like that takes a lot out of me so I'm usually just chillin enjoying the sights.

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