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  1. #1
    dmo
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    Worth it dropping a dropper?

    I run a dropper on my Yeti SB95C but find it don't actually use it much. My bike weighs 27lb which I think is decent for xc trail bike use but I was thinking of going to a rigid post like Thomson masterpiece or niner rdo carbon to save some weight. If i coukd trim a pound off the bike it might feel a bit more lively. Right now its more of a monster truck kind of feel which isnt bad. Anyone used to use a dropper but then got rid of it? Did you miss not having it?

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  2. #2
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    Only you can say if not having a dropper is worth it. Some people will strongly argue that you can never go back. If you don't use it much now, no harm in throwing a rigid seatpost on there. If you have the original one, throw it back on or try to borrow one from a friend.

    IMO, seatpost weight usually doesn't mean too much unless you're already feather weight and you race. It's non rotational weight, and dropping less than a pound under your butt is no better than going to the bathroom before a ride. It's more of a comfort and efficiency issue. Are you more comfortable on an alloy or carbon seatpost?
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  3. #3
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    I agree with watts888 that the weight wont make much of a difference, so as a test just ride a few times but don't utilize it. if it would have been more enjoyable to keep it, then keep it. my all mountain bike has one, my fat bike didn't for a year and it drove me crazy. now both my bikes have it, I'm in the "never go back" camp.

  4. #4
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    I have two bikes. One with a dropper and one without. My XC bike has no dropper...but at the same time...the trails I use it with aren't super technical or steep. The trail bike has the dropper and I use it on much more difficult terrain. There is no way I'd take the dropper off to save a couple pounds.

  5. #5
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    My 19 pound race bike doesn't have a dropper, and I wouldn't want the weight in a race.

    My 26 pound trail bike has a dropper, and the weight is justified for how the bike is ridden.

  6. #6
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    After 55 years of riding, my new bike has a dropper... Since it's a 27.5-plus, the BB height is more than on my old rigid steelie, and I find it handy at the ripe old age of near-old-phartdom to be able to lower the seat before dismounting. Other than that, the thing is a distraction. I discovered the hard way that you should set its max height BEFORE playing with it on the bike... Luckily, I have had all the children I want.

    Bottom line, if you don't use it, then take it off. If you do - then keep it.
    "We have met the enemy, and he is us" - Pogo

  7. #7
    Life Is Short
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    If it feels heavy get the carbon seat post. I was a mountain biking noob in 1997. There were no such thing as a dropper. I still don't use a dropper, I just roll my fat ass back and take the ride downhill. This dropper thing is out of control.
    Cheap people buy things twice

  8. #8
    Anytime. Anywhere.
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    If you are considering this then maybe it's the wrong bike for your trails. IMO it doesn't make any sense to handicap a bike like this with a fixed post. The Yeti is a pretty capable bike, Pinkbike even enjoyed it on the Shore. I mtb'd with a fixed post for nearly 20 years, and have had droppers for 10. It took a lot of practice for me, it wasn't instinctive at first, but now it's seamless.
    I got some bad ideas in my head.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatcat View Post
    If it feels heavy get the carbon seat post. I was a mountain biking noob in 1997. There were no such thing as a dropper. I still don't use a dropper, I just roll my fat ass back and take the ride downhill. This dropper thing is out of control.
    You've got it all wrong. This dropper thing is about bringing control. Perhaps you're still running rim brakes too, just like in 1997?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatcat View Post
    If it feels heavy get the carbon seat post. I was a mountain biking noob in 1997. There were no such thing as a dropper. I still don't use a dropper, I just roll my fat ass back and take the ride downhill. This dropper thing is out of control.
    If you do not normally ride aggressively or rarely have to drop behind the saddle then I can see your point but even still...as soon as you get behind the saddle due to terrain steepness, your not at an optimal position and unweighting your front tire. The dropper allows you to drop your weight while still being centered over your pedals "light hands, heavy feet" without the seat forcing you back. As for aggressive turns, without a dropper and having the seat at proper pedaling height..its the same thing, your too high and unable to lean the bike more than yourself to execute the most efficient and proper technique to shred a turn. In the end, again, if your more XC and dont shred, jump, rip much then a dropper will not be missed. The "dropper thing" is definitely NOT out of control and actually is just the opposite and puts you more in control.
    2015 Pivot Mach 4. XX1, Guide ultimate, NOX wheels, Next SL, KS LEV integra dropper. 24.63lbs

  11. #11
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    I think the comment was more about the idea that nowadays it is impossible to ride trails without a dropper

    I am a wheels on the ground type rider and a dropper didn't change my life. I'm I was a more gnarly bro hucking stuff left, right and centre then I can see the appeal. For me a dropper wasn't about riding faster or having more control, it was about being able to hit entirely different lines that aren't a smart move with the saddle up. If you are able to ride what you want to ride with the saddle up then I wouldn't persoanlly expect any benefit from a dropper. I'd much rather have the simpler, more reliable option of a nice light rigid post instead. That said, swapping to a rigid post will not make the bike feel any more "lively" as the OP asks. Tyres and suspension set up would be my first ports of call

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RS VR6 View Post
    I have two bikes. One with a dropper and one without. My XC bike has no dropper...but at the same time...the trails I use it with aren't super technical or steep. The trail bike has the dropper and I use it on much more difficult terrain. There is no way I'd take the dropper off to save a couple pounds.
    This is where I am at. My rigid SS, and XC FS bikes both have rigid posts. My endure / trail bike has a dropper and wouldn't use anything else.

    Right tool for the right job :-).

  13. #13
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    The one thing that I recently realized is the importance of the dropper post for the new school geometry. I just demoed two really nice 140/130 mm trail bikes with steepish STA. The bikes climbed fantastic and using the dropper allows you to keep your weight back on the DH. Best of both worlds.

  14. #14
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    An SB95c still feels like the kind of bike I'd want a dropper for. That's about as relevant as my experience with that is, but it's a very capable well-rounded bike, for which I'd assume a dropper is very nice. If it was a much lighter race whippet, then I'd be conflicted, but then again I run a 125mm dropper on my XC-oriented carbon hardtail.

    Quote Originally Posted by DeeZee View Post
    The one thing that I recently realized is the importance of the dropper post for the new school geometry. I just demoed two really nice 140/130 mm trail bikes with steepish STA. The bikes climbed fantastic and using the dropper allows you to keep your weight back on the DH. Best of both worlds.

    Yes. This. The modern long/slack-front-center geometry is predicated on having good enough fork performance to really use the front when descending, and the ability to move the seat out of the way for steep/chunky sections. Seated climbing is then in an optimized position without the compromise of having it out of the way for gnarly stuff.

  15. #15
    Turns right to go left
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    Quote Originally Posted by fatcat View Post
    If it feels heavy get the carbon seat post. I was a mountain biking noob in 1997. There were no such thing as a dropper. I still don't use a dropper, I just roll my fat ass back and take the ride downhill. This dropper thing is out of control.
    I was the same way for years. Then I put a dropper on my bike. All I can say is the dropper lives up to all of the hype.

  16. #16
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    It depends on both the geometry of the bike and the person riding it (and the terrain you ride) whether you need a dropper. If you can keep the seat high enough for good pedaling and still get your body/weight where you need it without getting hung up on the seat, you don't really need the dropper. If you can't, then the dropper helps you.

  17. #17
    Always in the wrong gear
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    I had one on my FS bike (enduro, def not WW) and I swore I'd give up rear suspension before I gave up a dropper.
    Then I bought a single speed for 'giggles' and went minor-league with the weight weenie obsession. I rode it with a straight carbon post for a few weeks while I shopped for a dropper. I bought a Reverb and it lasted like one ride before I pulled it off.
    It wasn't the weight per-se, it was more stubborn fixation on SS 'purity' and only having brake lines on the bars. I haven't had a dropper in a long time, but my bike is still light (20-ish with a carbon rigid fork) and I've been thinking recently I'm kinda over the 'purity' bull$hit, and would love to have the utility of getting the seat real low in a hurry.

    Both Kurt from A.S.S, and Dicky from Bad Idea Racing/TeamDicky both are huge fans of a dropper, even on a rigid SS bike. They've both made blog posts discussing how they use and love them, pointing out that some XC pros are using them.

    OP: I'd keep the dropper, unless you just don't use it and it's weight that doesn't currently have a function. Your bike is a great candidate for an 'all-around-er' that can handle terrain than makes a dropper shine.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by ARandomBiker View Post
    It wasn't the weight per-se, it was more stubborn fixation on SS 'purity' and only having brake lines on the bars. I haven't had a dropper in a long time, but my bike is still light (20-ish with a carbon rigid fork) and I've been thinking recently I'm kinda over the 'purity' bull$hit, and would love to have the utility of getting the seat real low in a hurry.
    Worth considering the under-seat lever type? Not many that are light, but still the svelte silhouette combined with the functionality of getting it lower and out of the way as needed.

  19. #19
    Always in the wrong gear
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    I hadn't really considered the under-seat lever post. Interesting.

    Honestly, though taking one hand off to reach for the lever sounds like it would lead to either a crash, or non-use because it's a hassle. I could be wrong though.

    I'm getting used to no dropper pretty well. since the bike is set up SS, I'm pretty much standing everywhere it matters, sitting only for easy spinning/recovery. I learned that fixing the post about 1" lower than optimal allows me to get behind it without much danger of getting stuck, and is still high enough to pedal fairly well.

    cool idea though. thanks!

  20. #20
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    i was just thinking similarly a couple of days ago while riding to totally get rid of the dropper. reason is not because of weight reduction but because i ride standing up most of the time even on my way from home to the trails. given this, i find myself always wanting to have the seat out of the way (dropped) so i can easily move around. and even in a dropped position i still wanted to have it lower (125mm reverb external).
    Canfield Yelli Screamy

  21. #21
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    Same here.


    My 23lbs carbon HT has carbon seat post and will not be getting a dropper. my 29lbs 5" SC Solo has a dropper and I love it. I ride the bikes differently.
    Joe
    '18 Specialized Epic 29", Vassago Verhauen SS 29", '13 Santa Cruz Solo 27.5", XC, AM, blah blah blah.. I just ride.

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