Where do you draw the line between light and porkie?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Where do you draw the line between light and porkie?

    I'm kind of new in the mountain bike seen and I'm much more familiar with road and tri bikes. I'm wondering where the line is drawn. I'm not talking weight weenie specials here, just light or not so light. On a road bike these days I'd say it's at 18 lbs. Tri/TT bikes; 20lbs. Where do you draw the line on mountain bikes? Full suspension? Hardtail?

  2. #2
    himom!
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    Hardtails:

    <18 lbs = crazy light
    <20 lbs = very light
    <22 lbs = light
    <24 lbs = OK
    >24 lbs = eh

    Shift 2-3 lbs up for full-suspension.

  3. #3
    Weight Weenie Shop Owner
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sweeney
    I'm kind of new in the mountain bike seen and I'm much more familiar with road and tri bikes. I'm wondering where the line is drawn. I'm not talking weight weenie specials here, just light or not so light. On a road bike these days I'd say it's at 18 lbs. Tri/TT bikes; 20lbs. Where do you draw the line on mountain bikes? Full suspension? Hardtail?
    HT: 20.5lbs is the over-under IMO
    FS: 22.5lbs
    Road: 16.5lbs

    It's just to easy nowadays to get a bike pretty light without sacrificing durability. Road bikes are even easier. Many road bikes on the LBS can easily weight under 16lbs with pedals, stock!
    DIRT BOY
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by DIRT BOY
    FS: 22.5lbs
    FS is a very broad category. If you are talking about FS XC race bikes then 22.5lbs is properly light. Some of the compromises made in achieving that weight will limit the uses to which the bike can be put, which is perhaps a bit different to road bikes. I'm thinking in particular that weight weenie tyre choices tend to be as useful as the proverbial chocolate teapot in many real world trail situations.

    If you were speccing a top drawer 5in travel trail bike, 25lbs is achievable just by speccing expensive kit on one of the better frames but without any weight "tuning". There are some headline stealing top end bikes that claim 24lbs (often weighed without pedals) but the last lunge to hit 24lbs is typically achieved with tyre choice and going to smaller brake disc setups. If you start tuning you can work down from there. The facts of tuning are that there is no change you make which is not a compromise in some way.

    My comments should probably be read in the context that I ride a large frame size and weigh in close to 200lbs, so my weight/strength expectations are slightly different to those of a smaller rider.

  5. #5
    the train keeps rollin
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    It's easy. You save at -1g for every $1. Crrap like ti rotor bolts, where you drop $25 to save -6g is for mentally challenged.
    beaver hunt

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by petercarm
    FS is a very broad category. If you are talking about FS XC race bikes then 22.5lbs is properly light
    . Yes I am. When you are talking about bikes here, It usually means XC. Race is not need as some here like me don't race (anymore.)But yes, your general XC bike with 3-4.5" of travel.

    Quote Originally Posted by petercarm
    Some of the compromises made in achieving that weight will limit the uses to which the bike can be put, which is perhaps a bit different to road bikes. I'm thinking in particular that weight weenie tyre choices tend to be as useful as the proverbial chocolate teapot in many real world trail situations.
    I agree to a certain degree. Like those Maxxis Flyweights, Crow and FF? Sure some riders and trails these types of tires will function very well. On most MTB terrain, these tires will NOT have enough traction to handle conditions. On my local trails these tires are about as useless as using slick road tires. I have tried and painfully found out they can not handle local conditions. Maybe, maybe on the rear for a race only and even then, I would prefer a bit more traction with a small weight penalty.
    DIRT BOY
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  7. #7
    Weight Weenie Shop Owner
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowdrifter
    Crap like ti rotor bolts, where you drop $25 to save -6g is for mentally challenged.
    Or for those who truly want to save every gram with no costs in mind. For the avg guy? No. For true weight weenies? Sure.

    That's the real line here. WW with practically and Real WW.

    It all depends on your budget and what your are trying to achieve. A Real WW knows that it always not a performance advantage with these upgrades, but just plain weight status. For me it's more of the "Hobby" aspect of getting a bike really down in weight. But there are areas that I choose to keep more weight. Like my heavy'ish UST wheels. Granted this was 3 yrs ago and we finally have a viable option with ZTR wheels and soon Fulcrum and Carbon wheels. Once I ride the trails more, I will bet some lighter wheels. This will give me a 18lb HT w/disc brakes that is more than durable. Then again, those lighter wheels will not make me that much faster.
    DIRT BOY
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  8. #8
    Is that Bill rated?
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    Your bike is porkie, anything lighter is light.

    It is the only justification that you need. Don't try to tie a specific number to the sickness.
    Well, it was a good try.

  9. #9
    ups and downs
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    Can a bike become anorexic? Sometimes weight loss can get get out of hand. Thank goodness a bike couldn't be bullemic!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowdrifter
    It's easy. You save at -1g for every $1. Crrap like ti rotor bolts, where you drop $25 to save -6g is for mentally challenged.
    There is another reason for Ti sometimes.......................
    My stem (sweat on them) and bar bolts tend to rust with steel.

    I'm going for Ti brake mounting bolts too. For whatever reason 2 of my 8 were rusty on the heads. It maybe because I consider a mud puddle as a "fun obstacle" where others bunny hop it. Or, it could have been the time I went OTB and my bike went into the creek. Or, it could have been the times where I thought the creek crossing was about 1 ft deep and it turned out to be 2 1/2 ft deep.

    No Ti rotor bolts here. Ti is an absolute pain in the a** to drill out if you break on in the hub. That is even if you can drill it out. I dork around with my rotors and brakes enough that rust isnt an issue there.

    So, are my Ti purchases worth it just of the weight? No, but it's just an added bonus for rust resistance.
    Lead by my Lefty............... right down the trail, no brakes.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill
    Thank goodness a bike couldn't be bullemic!
    Guess that is when you get thrown over the bars.

  12. #12
    More than somewhat.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ziscwg
    There is another reason for Ti sometimes.......................
    My stem (sweat on them) and bar bolts tend to rust with steel.

    I'm going for Ti brake mounting bolts too. For whatever reason 2 of my 8 were rusty on the heads. It maybe because I consider a mud puddle as a "fun obstacle" where others bunny hop it. Or, it could have been the time I went OTB and my bike went into the creek. Or, it could have been the times where I thought the creek crossing was about 1 ft deep and it turned out to be 2 1/2 ft deep.

    No Ti rotor bolts here. Ti is an absolute pain in the a** to drill out if you break on in the hub. That is even if you can drill it out. I dork around with my rotors and brakes enough that rust isnt an issue there.
    Did you just disagree with yourself?

    Oh - almost all non-carbon stems are made from aluminum. I don't know where you can find steel stems anymore aside from smaller companies that specialize in the hippy stuff.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cypress
    Did you just disagree with yourself?

    Oh - almost all non-carbon stems are made from aluminum. I don't know where you can find steel stems anymore aside from smaller companies that specialize in the hippy stuff.
    Stem bolts?

  14. #14
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    Ohhhh gotcha. I read it as the stem in general.

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