whats the effect of heavy shoes?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    whats the effect of heavy shoes?

    Everybody talks about light wheelsets components and bikes. But i dont see any discussions. About light shoes. do heavy shoes affect like if they were heavier pedals?

  2. #2
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    Everything on your bike whether attached directly or through you effects the bike and the ride in one way or another. To be quite honest with you unless you are racing where your increments of measurement are smaller than a second, the difference in weight on your shoes isn't going to make a difference. Most of the difference is going to be mental.
    2012 Intense M9
    2012 Pivot Mach 5.7 Carbon
    2008 Look 595
    2007 Custom Litespeed Sewanee

  3. #3
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    Shoe-In

    The benefits of lower rotational weight is indisputable but there are far more important issues in shoes.

    1. Do they fit?
    2. Do the uppers and lowers work with your feet and their issues?
    3. Is the sole "comfortably" stiff/efficient?
    4. Can you you use shims, insoles or wedges to fine tune your fit and function?
    5. Are the closures decent enough to work without going crap on you? (ie cheap Velcro, weak buckles)

    If all of those are a yes and the shoes are not a million dollars then the benefits of lighter weight should be considered, but only after all the other questions end in yes answers.

  4. #4
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    Oddly enough I have just experimented with this, I picked up a pair of Lake MX170 that were 200gms a pair lighter than my usual mud stompin' MX165. The primary reason was to reduce the weight I was carrying on a plane for a bike vacation. The weight difference while on the bike is subtle, but you sure do notice as soon as you're off the bike in hike a bike sections or even just walking around pre/post ride. 100gms a foot lighter feels pretty nice.

    The bigger issue for me was the light shoes had a minimized rubber tread and they didn't use Vibram rubber like the MX165's so they were a bit greasy. They had a spiffy Boa lace system that was fast and easy to use, and the smooth top surface gathered up less mud. But now that I'm back home and not flying, I find the heavier shoes offer superior grip on wet roots and rocks, so the 200gm weight penalty is worth the reduced landing on my butt while walking.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Supercleeb View Post
    The benefits of lower rotational weight is indisputable but there are far more important issues in shoes.
    Some great points have been made thus far but rotational weight is a bit misleading with regard to shoes/pedals. By rotational weight we are referring to inertia. Inertia is a function of the mass of the object and its velocity (p=mv). The linear velocity of your feet attached to your crank will be a function of the angular velocity and the radius (length of your crank arm) or v=wr (w in this case is a lower case omega or angular velocity). Assuming the angular velocity is constant, the linear velocity will be as well. If that is true then the only variable is the mass.

    What I am getting at is that the change is so small that I would suggest that there the rotating weight of your shoes on your feet would be very negligible. Another thing is that they are attached to your feet and it is more difficult to analyze than say a wheel and tire.
    2012 Intense M9
    2012 Pivot Mach 5.7 Carbon
    2008 Look 595
    2007 Custom Litespeed Sewanee

  6. #6
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    Changing my whole groupset from Sram X0 9 spd to the new heavy Deore 2012 10 spd but keeping the old rotors, wheels, and tires resulted in the exact same time to finish the same exact trail under the same exact condition. I was going nonstop both times without any traffic at the trail. Bottomline, even a 1kg penalty including a much heavier crank is far less important than having proper gear ratios (24-42 rocks!). So heavier shoes won't affect performance that much. Granted if the path involves multiple very steep climbs things could be different.

    My advise to starving college riders, buy heavy cheap gs + frame and spend all the budget on superlight tubeless tires and the lightest wheels possible.
    Titux X Carbon 2010 race 9.93kg
    Titux X 2009 "Deore 2012" training 11.55kg

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