token scandium bb twisted end off- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    token scandium bb twisted end off

    so much for my super light weight BB. it lasted about 10 super hard cyclocross rides. today I twisted the exposed driveside spindle right off. this thing is just too light.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by dang
    so much for my super light weight BB. it lasted about 10 super hard cyclocross rides. today I twisted the exposed driveside spindle right off. this thing is just too light.
    which one did you use?

    the 125g double bearing version (which is supposed to be used on roadbikes only) or the triple bearing MTB version?

  3. #3
    A little of everything
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    Just don't use those aluminium axel types, I'm also talking form experience. They are to weak for mtb. You can get a Token titanium that weigh 146g and is much stronger.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anders
    Just don't use those aluminium axel types, I'm also talking form experience. They are to weak for mtb. You can get a Token titanium that weigh 146g and is much stronger.
    sorry Anders,
    that's not true. the light scandium BBs have 14mm bolts, thus 14mm hollowed axle. the triple bearing MTB versions have 12mm bolts so there is 1mm more "meat" at the axle which is safe. FRM also uses Aluminium axles with 12mm bolts. below is an image of such a 14mm scandium axle and a 12mm FRM axle. there is a noticeable difference....

    for road applications there is no problem with the light BBs. for MTB i'd suggest the triple bearing versions anyway as no ISIS seems to last because of the tiny bearings.
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  5. #5
    A little of everything
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    What I wanted to point out was, that you can get a titanium version, that is 14g lighter, though only with 2 bearings. I rode mine without problems for a couple of months before I sold it with my Powerarms.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anders
    What I wanted to point out was, that you can get a titanium version, that is 14g lighter, though only with 2 bearings. I rode mine without problems for a couple of months before I sold it with my Powerarms.
    i have many guys using the ultralight BBs since months without any problems either.
    the Titanium axeled BBs are ca. 20g heavier at the same size. i'd say if you want the most durable AND light the triple-bearing scandium BBs are the way to go.
    pictured below the 68/113mm version
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by dang
    so much for my super light weight BB. it lasted about 10 super hard cyclocross rides. today I twisted the exposed driveside spindle right off. this thing is just too light.
    Got any pictures of the broken BB? I've heard that bearings can die (on any brand ISIS for that matter) but not heard much on shearing off the spindles.

    I've got one of the Token Ti BB in my MTB, I'm using the 108mmx68mm (road double ring) version to work with my 2x9 setup. Weight is 157g (w/o bolts) on my scales.

    I agree three bearings has to be better than two but the problem was with twisting off the spindle not a bearing issue right?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laika
    Got any pictures of the broken BB? I've heard that bearings can die (on any brand ISIS for that matter) but not heard much on shearing off the spindles.

    I've got one of the Token Ti BB in my MTB, I'm using the 108mmx68mm (road double ring) version to work with my 2x9 setup. Weight is 157g (w/o bolts) on my scales.

    I agree three bearings has to be better than two but the problem was with twisting off the spindle not a bearing issue right?
    correct - but those guys were using the thin walled 125g roadie scandium BBs.

    so the weight is actually 30g higher with the Titanium axle compared to the scandium axle. therefore i'd say it's better to use the triple-bearing scandium BBs which will definitely last longer at the same weight.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by nino
    so the weight is actually 30g higher with the Titanium axle compared to the scandium axle. therefore i'd say it's better to use the triple-bearing scandium BBs which will definitely last longer at the same weight.
    I can't comment on durability as mine hasn't seen enough km's yet. I did notice the version I'm using (TK873CT - M15 bolts) Token quotes as having the X-Long bearing on the drive side.
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  10. #10
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    the box says Token and looks just like the one in the picture. it was an 108 mm on my cyclocross bike. I stood up to sprint and I twisted the driveside splined spindle end right off. this has nothing, nothing, to do with bearings. I ripped the end right off.

    I took pictures but they're too large or something. I don't know what I'm doing.

  11. #11
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    Does it look like this...

    <img src="http://www.fototime.com/ftweb/bin/ft.dll/standard?pictid={7A9A1778-EB3F-49B7-8FDE-FB81E313CAE7}">

    2.5 seasons. 3 bearing swaps.

    Now I'm no rocket scientest by any means..but this is just a factor of alum and its resistance to fatigue in a given situation. I remember back in my smallblock chevy racing days, that alum rods had a given life span of so many hours at so many rpms. Then they started snap'n if not swapped out in time. Alum fatigues and then gets brittle.

    I've already got'n a new replacement from Stan. No questions asked. Didn't even come from him.

    Sounds familiar. I stood up to excelerate out of a dip and "snap" it goes.

    Edit: Ops. I just remembered you guys are talking about Scandium. hehe. See: rocket sci. above. Same fatigue/brittle issues tho, sorta like Mag has.
    Last edited by Duckman; 09-26-2005 at 02:47 PM.

  12. #12
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    HEY, looks like mine! but mine looks brand new. like out of the box new. unfortunately I bought mine through EBAY for $65.

  13. #13
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    That thing snapped right at the end of the crank bolt. I thought these B/B were supplied with longer bolts to fix this issue? Seems to me it would help.

    Shey

  14. #14
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    Another broken FRM...

    I posted this last year. No abuse here, just lots of miles & ~3 bearing sets. Stan was great with replacement parts at no charge even though I purchased from elsewhere (Stan is the US FRM distributor now). I have 2 others that are fine but neither has as many miles as the broken one did. I do believe the broken one had a slight machining error (transition was too deep & sharp) where it broke although I bet they all break in the same spot eventually. This is simply not a good place for aluminum.
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  15. #15
    I love Pisgah
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    Mines the old version from back in mid 03.

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